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  1. Today
  2. ( 1 ) WITH OR WITHOUT YOU - I think it is a brilliant song, it is a song you can listen to over and over. It has that special sound where the guitars stand out. Absolutely love that song. ( 2 ) For me it is very close out of MYSTERIOUS WAYS and WHERE THE STREETS HAVE NO NAME. But it would be? WHERE THE STREETS HAVE NO NAME. - Great song and there's nothing like singing on the roof top of a building. Up U2 down the cops I say. U2 taking over I say. Great song and great video clip. ( 3 ) MYSTERIOUS WAYS - A brilliant song. I love the song so much especially because bono gets his fans on stage with him for a dance. I think that is what a lot more singers should do. ( 4 ) BEAUTIFUL DAY - love the song, it is a song you just can't help getting into it. Yes it's a beautiful day. That's what I love. But there is a lot more songs I love to. Love you U2.
  3. In no particular order: Sunday Bloody Sunday Bad Until The End Of The World Mysterious Ways A Sort Of Homecoming Where The Streets Have No Name One Out Of Control Beautiful Day Even Better Than The Real Thing and like a lot of you these are the ones I'm feeling today 😂 and the ones that came to mind first. The first five don't change much but the other five might be different tomorrow. I love just about every U2 song!
  4. So I received a lot of support last week for #internationaldayofu2, including several great ideas to help get the day up and running. One of those ideas was to create a FB Event page for the Day (Thank you Virginie) - so here it is below (not sure how this link will work outside of Facebook but I try :D). If it doesn't link - just search in FB for International Day of U2 in Events. https://www.facebook.com/events/2357967637762396/?acontext={"ref"%3A"4"%2C"feed_story_type"%3A"308"%2C"action_history"%3A"null"} (I've set the date in Edmonton time, but for all the hours that it is September 25 somewhere in the world...) Please join and/or share the link as you wish! I also added a page to my blog https://insearchofrockgods.com/idou2-events/ to list any known planned events for the day (or around the day)- I already have 2 - the U241 Celebration at The Church in Dublin, and Rattle and Hum at the Metro Theatre in Edmonton - both planned before I sent out the first post - so happy coincidences! Also - if you want to translate any of this post or the FB event page or blog pages into other languages, please do and send to me - I will add to all these pages. It is an International Day after all!!
  5. Yesterday
  6. Esperando Octubre.....:rolleyes:

  7. From the album Mysterious Ways

  8. From the album Mysterious Ways

  9. It can't be "close to face" - it has to be face value. Can't make a profit from selling them - the only added value could be the ticketing system charges, but nothing more. Ticket prices are not negotiable... Please amend your ticket offer and add all the info related to the ticket: seat/section or GA, printed price, etc. Thanks...
  10. 40345 - Reading Festival next weekend! Gotta love Apple Music - created a playlist of all the bands I want to see, put it on shuffle, and it followed Plug in Baby by Muse with One Armed Scissor by At the Drive In
  11. 40, 344 - Post-football counting - and both local teams won today!
  12. Hello, Can't make the show from PA so I'm looking for as close to face as possible.By this I mean I am willing to sell the tix for slightly less than face value and fees.I am not trying to make a profit i would like to see them get used by a fan that will appreciate the show as I did in Philly. I am looking for $150 for the pair. These are hard tix and are in hand G.A. Floor Thanks, Todd
  13. 40 343 Been to BBQ today... was sunny but windy!
  14. Uncredible... You can try to call them tomorrow. And please be careful as there are lots of reports about false tickets being sold
  15. 40, 342 - Afternoon counting. I spent this morning trying to find a new backpack for my writing stuff, but I can't find a suitable one anywhere so far
  16. Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 5886 TECHNOLOGY How WeFarm is helping farmers in Kenya & Uganda share vital information over SMS July 20 2016 | By: SAMANTHA URBAN When you plant a summer garden, you likely source tips from your local garden center, friends with green thumbs, and of course, Google. But what if farming was your livelihood—making it imperative to have the information needed to succeed—and you didn’t have internet access? That’s the situation a huge swath of the world’s smallholder farmers find themselves in—and it’s why WeFarm has stepped in to help. WeFarm is a peer-to-peer service that helps these farmers share information with each other via SMS. So they don’t need the internet—they don’t even need to leave their farm! The service is completely free and it allows farmers to ask questions and receive crowd-sourced answers from other farmers around the world! We interviewed WeFarm CEO and co-founder Kenny Ewan on the origins of WeFarm and where it’s headed next: Photo credit: WeFarm So how did the idea for WeFarm come about? The seeds for me were the many years I spent working in international development abroad. I spent seven years in Latin America based out of Peru, where I worked for an international NGO. While I was there I directed projects across Latin America and designed projects with indigenous communities. A lot of the communities were forming agricultural-based communities and I saw people creating innovative grassroots solutions for common challenges—but you go a couple of miles down the road and people have the same challenges but hadn’t heard of the same ideas or solutions. I started to think of ways of harnessing that. Then, six years ago, I moved back to the UK and took a job with a new NGO based in London but working across 13 African and Latin America countries. I put my ideas together with a co-founder of the NGO, Claire, and together we designed the first version of WeFarm. I guess originally we saw it as an online platform but then very quickly we built in the idea of having people use it without any access to the internet. That was a key component of granting access to the populations that we wanted to. Photo credit: WeFarm You’ve described WeFarm before as the internet for people with no internet. As the idea of universal internet access gains traction will the ideas of WeFarm change as more people gain access to the internet? Obviously—we’re firstly looking at this in a very crowd-sourced, peer-to-peer, bottom-up way. I think the idea of access to information as a key driver in lifting people out of poverty has been around for a long time, but unfortunately, everyone comes at that from a top-down perspective—this kind of “people just need to be told what to do” idea. There are existing SMS platforms out there, so there are other services that have that starting point. What we wanted to do was tap into people’s existing knowledge: These populations have generations worth of experience to share and we can do something that isn’t as paternalistic as some development and international projects. I think those core concepts translate whether it is on the internet or not. WeFarm is completely online, although 96 percent of our users only use it through SMS and offline. We’re already ready for people transitioning to the internet – our long-term plan is when people get their first smartphone and can access internet, we graduate them to a place they already trust. WeFarm will be a place with content that’s already been developed from their point of view. Photo credit: WeFarm You mentioned the crowd-sourced data and generations of knowledge. Could you expand more on that? Was that an idea in WeFarm’s foundation from the very start? That was certainly one of the core fundamentals that really cut right from the start with WeFarm. The idea was to take the knowledge and ideas and innovations that people were generating on the farm or in life and give them a platform to share with people next door in their village. To give you a quick example, I remember in rural Kenya I asked a group of farmers who were selling at a bank center to share things they thought of on a farm that might be innovative or different. This guy brought over a chicken feeder that he designed that he had made out of old buckets—containers he had on the farm. Basically, he said he had a problem at feeding time, where the bigger chicks were trampling the smaller chicks and there was a high mortality rate. So he designed this whole feeder to separate out the feed and he reduced his mortality rate by around 50 percent, which is awesome! I thought thousands of people could be having that problem, but his idea might not travel beyond potentially a couple of neighbors. The whole concept of WeFarm was to take knowledge like this from the ground and be able to share it worldwide. Photo credit: WeFarm Earlier this year, ONE campaigned on the idea that investments in nutrition programs can strengthen economies. What is WeFarm’s role in that? We see our role in that area as strengthening supply chains from the bottom up in two key ways: One is providing information and knowledge to farmers to improve their farms; to battle disease and plant new crops; and be more effective on the farm. Ultimately, that benefits the entire supply chain right up to the multinationals buying these products. The second thing WeFarm does is to analyze and aggregate the millions of interactions that are happening in the system to be able to provide potentially game-changing information on this whole piece. Obviously, there is a huge part of the world’s population that isn’t using the internet and we don’t have any of that live analytics or data. WeFarm is looking at all the interactions to track disease as it spreads across countries, to be able to isolate drought, or track any kind of trends. That can ultimately help the businesses of these farmers—and the NGO’s and governments that are working with them—to have a much better understanding of what is actually happening, what people’s challenges are, and ultimately to help the world’s supply chain be more robust. Photo credit: WeFarm What countries are you in now and where will WeFarm go next? Currently, we are live in Kenya, which was our first country. More recently, we launched in Uganda and Peru. I think India is our next big target market for fairly obvious reasons: There are 110 million small farmers in India and many with very low internet access. We are also looking at Tanzania and a couple of other countries, but we don’t want to spread ourselves too thin too quickly. What’s in the future for WeFarm? We are hoping to be able to close our seed investment round very soon. That investment piece is key for us. We’ve had a very successful first year with more than 70,000 farmers using it now and our retention and usage metrics are through the roof, but we want to take this all to the next level. We want to have a million farmers using it in the next 12 months. We want to potentially launch in a couple of new countries, and really make it a successful venture on a kind of global scale. It’s really helping to improve farmers lives. Join the fight against extreme poverty Name Email Post/zip code Country United States Canada Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR SAMANTHA URBAN July 20 2016 TOPICS FOOD AND NUTRITIONTECHNOLOGY Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines Related Articles This tablet is transforming Zambian classrooms in a powerful way Female leaders take steps to end the gender digital divide How a female scientist collective is empowering girls in Sierra Leone NairoBits: Empowering young women to succeed in Africa’s Silicon Savannah opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window PRESS CAMPUS SHOP JOBS PRIVACY CONTACT
  17. Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 1735 HEALTH Kenya’s Dr. Faith Osier dreams of curing malaria August 2 2016 | By: GUEST BLOGGER By Katie G. Nelson Growing up in Nairobi, Kenya, Dr. Faith Osier often dreamed of curing the world of deadly diseases like malaria, an illness spread by mosquitos that kills more than an estimated 438,000 people every year. Dr. Faith Osier Several decades later, Osier, now 43, is at the forefront of the fight against malaria, spearheading the development of a vaccine that she believes could someday wipe out the disease. The swaying palm trees and pristine beaches of Kenya’s coastal town of Kilifi is a beach-lover’s paradise. But away from the white-sand beaches and crystal clear water waits a serious and often deadly parasite—one that caused more than 10 percent of all Kilifi residents to fall ill last year. But Osier believes that number could someday go down to zero. A nurse and patient at Kilifi County Hospital, where Dr. Osier works. (Photo credit: Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) Wellcome Trust) Osier has worked out of Kilifi for the last 12 years, partnering with the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) Wellcome Trust and the Kilifi County Hospital to develop a vaccine for malaria, which is endemic in most parts of Kenya’s coast. Osier first became intrigued by the idea of a vaccine—or more specifically, the ability to develop resistance to malaria—after working in the pediatric ward of the Kilifi County Hospital. “Malaria is a very big problem, especially for Africa,” says Osier. “What we see in people who live in Africa is that it’s children under the age of 5 who get frequently ill—severely ill—and can die. But in the same areas, the adults seem to be resistant,” she adds. “They don’t seem to become ill or die.” At Kilifi County Hospital’s vaccination ward, baby Sleiman Hamisi has his weight taken. (Photo credit: Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) Wellcome Trust) Aiming to better understand how adults acquire a resistance to malaria, Osier began studying how the body responds to the infection at different stages. Focusing on the role of antibodies— proteins created by the immune system to neutralize harmful substances, like infections—Osier dug into the complexities surrounding the ability to thwart malaria. “We study people who are being exposed to malaria,” she says. “We look at their blood and their antibody responses and how they are responding. We know that antibodies are very important… and we believe that antibodies hold the key.” While the molecular intricacies of proteins, antibodies and antigens might seem like the researcher’s biggest obstacle. But Osier’s role as a female researcher in a male-dominated profession often presents an equally steep challenge, she says. Osier said there have been many points in her career when she felt inhibited simply because she was a woman. “[As a female] you’re conditioned to believe that [hard skills] are not for you,” she says. “It takes some help to shake that off and to say ‘Look! There’s someone who can do it! If they can, then so can I.’” “I let my work speak for me,” she says. But while her climb toward success has provided unique challenges, Osier is quick to add that being a female scientist also has its strengths. “I bring a lot more compassion to my management and leadership skills and believe that I bring out the best in my team members because of this; in return, they give back more than 100 percent,” she says. “That has been key to both my progress and theirs.” A nurse administers a vaccine at Kilifi County Hospital. (Photo credit: Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) Wellcome Trust) But it’s not only her colleagues who recognize Osier’s work ethic and compassion-based leadership. In 2014, Osier won the Royal Society Pfizer Prize award, one of the most prestigious prizes in African science. Calling it her “biggest achievement,” Osier says the award “gave me a real sense of satisfaction that with hard work, determination, and vision, it was possible to achieve great things.” While hard work and dedication remain the foundation to Osier’s career, the researcher is also quick to credit the role of mentors in her success. “Mentors are really important. You can’t dream of something you can’t see,” she said. That’s why it’s so important to expose young girls to “hard skills” like medicine and research, she said “It’s exposure. It’s making research more visible and specifically targeting women,” she said. “In schools, in public meetings, village meetings… just letting girls see that they can be more than what the community is telling them.” It’s that same urge to rise above obstacles that will help Osier achieve her ultimate goal: developing a highly effective malaria vaccine that is available, free of charge, to the poorest communities in rural Africa. “I want women in our African villages to have the opportunity to take their children for vaccination against malaria and be able to move on with malaria behind them,” she says. But how long will the world wait for a malaria vaccine? “I’m confident that it will happen in my lifetime,” Osier said. SIGN THE PETITION: Support the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria. Join the fight against extreme poverty Name Email Post/zip code Country United States Canada Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR GUEST BLOGGER August 2 2016 TOPICS HEALTH Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines Related Articles 5 awe-inspiring humanitarians you should know about Ebola’s furthest-reaching legacy: How to get kids back in school Two sides to every story: What the latest data on HIV/AIDS tells us How this amazing school quickly improved girls’ attendance opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window PRESS CAMPUS SHOP JOBS PRIVACY CONTACT
  18. Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 272 HIV/AIDS How a Côte d’Ivoire health club is helping people living with chronic diseases February 17 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER This story by Angeline Anoble and Oumar Touré was originally published on Jhpiego. Learn more about Jhpiego, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University, here. Kone Kassim had a persistent cough and was losing weight. Although the 57-year-old farmer was skeptical of the benefits of modern medicine, he took the advice of a family member and visited the Tiémélékro Urban Health Center in Tiémélékro, Côte d’Ivoire, where he was diagnosed with pulmonary TB. A few weeks later, he tested positive for HIV. Kassim was despondent. “I was convinced that those jealous of my farming success had cast a spell on me,” he said, referring to his rice and coffee crops. A community health worker trained to support people living with chronic diseases visited Kassim at his home. During her visits, she encouraged him to adhere to his TB and HIV treatments, and she educated him on the importance of good hygiene practices that he and his family should adopt. A new approach to supporting people living with chronic diseases has helped farmer Kassim Kone manage his HIV/TB. (Photo credit: Oumar Toure/Jhpiego) After two months on TB treatment, Kassim was retested at the health center, in line with national guidelines. The test was negative: he couldn’t spread TB to anyone. The community health worker encouraged Kassim to join a health club—a monthly meeting of patients living with chronic conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, HIV and TB. “After my participation in the health club meetings, I really understood this disease and its implications,” Kassim told us during a visit to the health center. One of the first things he learned was that patients living with diabetes and hypertension had to pay for their medications. “I realized that we, people living with HIV, were better off because our drugs are provided for free,” said Kassim. “This type of meeting, where everyone is mixed, makes me feel comfortable in the village. No one will say that people with AIDS are meeting.” Kassim is among the more than 500 people living with a chronic disease—the majority of whom have HIV—who have benefited from the health service integration initiative supported by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention through the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. The project’s aim is to develop, conduct and evaluate an integrated model for the management of chronic diseases, including HIV. Implemented by Jhpiego in cooperation with the government of Côte d’Ivoire, the chronic care model and accompanying health club strategy offer people living with HIV, TB, hypertension or diabetes access to quality health services along with a safe space to meet and discuss their common health issues. The program is held in 44 sites in two health regions in Côte d’Ivoire. Kassim’s knowledge and understanding of chronic diseases grew through education sessions held by the community health worker with support from a nurse. Adopting a positive lifestyle, Kassim, a proud member of a health club, has resumed his agricultural activities. Angeline Anoble is an HIV technical assistant, and Oumar Touré serves as Technical Advisor, HIV and Reproductive Health, in Jhpiego’s Côte d’Ivoire office. Senior Program Officer Gahan Furlane also contributed to this article. Join the fight against extreme poverty Name Email Post/zip code Country United States Canada Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR GUEST BLOGGER February 17 2017 TOPICS HEALTHHIV/AIDS Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines Related Articles Two sides to every story: What the latest data on HIV/AIDS tells us Leave room for dessert! It’s time to EAT (RED) SAVE LIVES How my daughter taught me to dream Interview: Bono and Bill Gates discuss pandemics, politics, and more opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window PRESS CAMPUS SHOP JOBS PRIVACY CONTACT
  19. Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 522 AID AND DEVELOPMENT How does foreign aid affect U.S. security? Just ask these military officials. June 13 2017 | By: SAMANTHA URBAN This week, two retired military officers added their voices to the chorus of generals, politicians, faith leaders, and businesses urging against President Trump’s proposed cuts to the budgets of the State Department and USAID. Admiral (Ret.) Michael Mullen, left, and General (Ret.) James Jones. (Photo credit: Public domain/Wikimedia Commons) In an op-ed in Politico, Admiral (Ret.) Michael Mullen (Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff from 2007 to 2011) and General (Ret.) James Jones (commandant of the Marine Corps and served as Supreme Allied Commander-Europe from 2003 to 2006) argue that development aid is critical to America’s national security. It’s true: If the goal is to increase our national security, cutting our foreign assistance budget is one of the last things we should do. As Defense Secretary Jim Mattis once said, “If you don’t fund the State Department fully, then I need to buy more ammunition.” Strategic development assistance is in the United States’ clear national interest. Also in the op-ed, Mullen and Jones also argue that President Trump’s proposed budget cuts to aid could put our armed forces at risk: Cutting the budgets of State and USAID by a third would be shortsighted and devastating to programs that are saving lives, building capacity, protecting Americans, and advancing America’s interests around the world. We have to stop this in its tracks. Congress has the final say on spending decisions, but they need to know that their constituents—that’s YOU—want to stop these cuts. Sign the petition today. Stop President Trump’s proposed cuts to foreign aid Dear Congress, Please oppose President Trump’s proposed cuts - nearly ⅓ - to life-saving programs in the International Affairs Budget. STOP THESE CUTS Name Email Post/zip code Country United States Canada Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe When you submit your details, you accept ONE’s privacy policy and will receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time. Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR SAMANTHA URBAN June 13 2017 TOPICS AID AND DEVELOPMENT Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines Related Articles 5 awe-inspiring humanitarians you should know about How electricity access makes a big impact in the fight against poverty Jonathan took YOUR name to his representative! “This is his life’s work”: Dems and Reps agree at Mark Green’s nomination hearing opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window PRESS CAMPUS SHOP JOBS PRIVACY CONTACT
  20. Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 8354 Doctors with boats: How a Kenyan woman is keeping her people healthy October 18 2016 | By: GLOBAL CITIZEN This story by Luca Powell originally appeared on Global Citizen. In 2010, after completing two degrees in the United States, Umra Omar returned to her homeland. And really, you couldn’t blame her: the coastal region of Kenya, where she was born, is pristine and beautiful. At its hub is Lamu, a 14th-century town of Swahili-heritage that looks out onto the Indian Ocean, its coastline peppered with the rocking white boats of fisherman and tourists. Omar said she was compelled to come back because it was her town of origin, but also because she felt the desire to give back. She had pursued a bachelor’s in neuroscience and psychology before completing her master’s degree in social justice in intercultural relations. “I was so fortunate, to be given the scholarships and the opportunity I’ve had, being a woman, being from Kenya. You know, when you’ve been given the world, you have to give the world back,” she told Global Citizen in a phone interview. In Lamu, that meant addressing the unique challenge of the region — the difficult geography of its coastal, archipelago landscape that is both the regions joy and its pain. Its islands are untouchable hideaways, but where it concerns the indigenous communities and villages that inhabit them, they can be an expensive nightmare in terms of access. A boat trip from Lamu to one of its surrounding islands doesn’t run cheap. In fact, it can cost as much as $300, or a week of salary. The price tag effectively restricts inhabitants of the region from realistic access to healthcare and other essentials. It’s here that Omar’s efforts started. Driven by a vision of bringing medical access on the road, she began coordinating mobile healthcare visitations throughout the region. First, by motorbike, then by boat, and even by plane, Omar organized bi-monthly trips to bring doctors and nurses to the villages in Lamu’s orbit. The region is a broad geographical space that, Omar says, the government understandably doesn’t have the capacity to comprehensively treat. “[Lamu] is up in the northern coast, it’s an archipelago and it’s hard to reach. You have to take the bus through Mombasa, which makes it two days of travel to come out here,” she said. “We also have the indigenous communities that live very sparsely from one another,” Omar said. These are traditionally hunter-gatherer communities that now live spread out in between large tracts of land. Then you add the component of the sea and it becomes much more costly.” But geography isn’t the only complication to the mission. The area around Lamu, which is close to the Somalian border, has been pockmarked by conflict between the Kenyan military and Al-Shabaab, a militant group. Originating in 2006 as a guerilla response to then-U.S. backed warlords in Somalia, the group has since grown in the eastern African region. Al-Shabaab’s expansion across Somalia’s southern border into Kenya has been extensive. The group, which is an Al Qaeda affiliate and has also been courted by the Islamic State, is active in Kenya. Since 2010, they’ve claimed responsibility for a number of notable attacks, including the 2010 Kampala bombing and the Garissa University massacre in 2014. It was that same year Omar founded Safari Doctors, which has made it a focus to get health services to the Aweer and Bajuni groups that have suffered from the conflict. “Communities are very much caught in between a rock and a hard place,” says Omar, adding that it is also an ethnic problem, because Al-Shabaab militants are harder to distinguish from civilians than their military counterparts in uniform. “The militants can be more targeted than the military, which makes it very complex.” Twice each month her team and her, a nurse, administrative coordinator, visiting medic, and boat crew leave for the villages. These outreaches can take up to four days at a time, depending upon the amount of funding they can raise beforehand. Their biggest priority? Immunizations, which are the key component to preventative health care. Maternal care, too, is a sorely needed reality, she adds, half-jokingly noting that she should know, being currently 7 months pregnant now and with a bouncing toddler in her arms. She is married and enjoys what she calls a “village of a family,” but recognizes as well the demand for family planning and education where it isn’t available. Beyond that, Safari Doctors does what it can to facilitate the treatments of diseases like cholera, which is prevalent in areas without clean water. For the cases Safari Doctors can’t treat in the field, Omar’s team gently coaxes their patients to make the trip to Lamu District Hospital. “We’re at the baby stage,” says Omar. “Down the road we want to build educational groups, a volunteer exchange, and clinics.” Her longer-term strategy is to build the infrastructure and capacity to provide more in-depth care, testing for things such as diabetes and hypertension. Ideally, she’d like to cover at least 10 villages over a weeklong outreach. In that scenario, Safari Doctors could treat up to 1,000 patients. Currently, her project is funded by a variety of NGOs, such as the Anthony Robbins Foundation and Doctors of the World. Omar is interested in redesigning a more sustainable economic model for Safari Doctors. Her plan is to use a premium, privatized model to back-fund the public project, giving the initiative stability and longevity. She calls this, “flipping the game.” But what she is also flipping is the conventional definition of the safari. A Swahili word meaning “to journey,” Omar says she’s owning the word for what it means, rather than the now-conventional association with animal viewing. To that end, she opens up her trips — safaris — to donors who want to see Lamu’s beautiful islands and engage with real people. “They go out into communities, they do projects and help fund the villages, they know that their money is going toward something worthwhile.” Join ONE today to help fight poverty and preventable disease. 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  21. Good! So you'll be able to remember it to celebrate. 🎈 Happy Birthday ,early.🎂
  22. 40 341 Late start without a "strict' schedule. Work this evening..so.. better get moving before I feel the crunch🎼🐦🍅🌈 🎶listening to the Lumineers : )
  23. Today is the United Nations World Humanitarian Day and our #HumanitarianHeroes are voluntary CEO and Founder Adi Roche and CCI patron and Board member Ali Hewson. Adi and Ali have collaborated on a number of joint projects. In 1993, the pair researched, produced and presented the critically acclaimed Black Wind, White Land – the first documentary of its kind in the West that exposed to an international audience the plight of the victims of the Chernobyl accident which had been previously clouded in secrecy and deception by the Soviet Union. Ali became a patron of CCI the following year and since then she has participated in several aid missions to Chernobyl-affected areas. She has organised and travelled to Belarus with overland aid convoys and has driven ambulances with Adi which were filled with medical supplies delivering humanitarian aid up to the value of €100 million. Together, Ali and Adi brokered an adoption agreement with Belarusian authorities on behalf of the Irish government to ensure that the children of Chernobyl could be adopted in Ireland. The agreement paved the way for the hundreds of Irish children to be adopted into Ireland from Belarus. Ali and Adi are both godmothers to children adopted into Ireland from Belarus who grew up in Ireland and are now both studying at Irish universities. As part of their work on hospice care, the pair jointly developed, built and equipped the first baby hospice in the entire region. This facility is the first of its kind in the region and plans are in place to role out this model across Belarus. In their most recent collaboration, Adi and Ali pioneered the first Independent Living Facility in Belarus. This facility allows young adults to experience a taste of freedom and will eventually help them to integrate into the community. Both Ali and Adi are champions of human rights and believe that institutional care is a human rights violation. Because they believe it is a basic human right to have a family and a place to call home, to ensure that children are no longer dehumanised by living in bleak, custodial state orphanages and institution-based care they have developed programmes that advocate for the rights of children. Their collaborative work aims to eventually shut down orphanages and state-run institutions in stricken regions and together they have achieved phenomenal success in relation to the redrafting of legislation by Belarusian authorities.
  24. Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 5709 EDUCATION 7 barriers to girls’ education you need to know about 5 March 2017 6:02PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO The evidence that educating girls creates healthier, wealthier, fairer, and more stable communities is overwhelming—so why isn’t every girl getting a quality education? The barriers, particularly for girls in the poorest countries, are wide-ranging and complex but these are some of the most challenging: Cost The cost of supplies can limit girls access to education. Even in areas where school fees are non-existent, there’s still a price to pay. Students are often required to buy uniforms, transportation, and supplies, like textbooks, pens, and notebooks, not to mention the indirect costs such as loss of potential income from missed labour opportunities or contributions around the home. Violence and Security In some regions, parents don’t allow their daughters to attend school, but it isn’t necessarily because they don’t want them to be educated. Sometimes parents keep their children home because the commute to and from school is unsafe and the risk of attacks on girls’ schools is a serious concern. Conflict and Emergency Situations Women gather to collect aid at the Dar es Salaam refugee camp in Chad, close to the border to Niger. (Photo credit: Ashley Hamer) In conflict-affected countries, education is not always accessible. As a result, girls in these countries are almost 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than girls living in countries not affected by conflict. Teaching and School Climate Boys participating in a school science experiment. The perpetuation of traditional gender norms can result in girls being excluded from learning important subjects like science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Teaching must be inclusive and enable girls to learn the same lessons as their male counterparts. Access to Resources A girl learning how to code at Ghana Code Club. (Photo source: Facebook.) Where resources don’t address girls’ needs, it can limit their learning. Providing a wide range of resources that do address girls’ needs—such as textbooks, teaching guides, and the internet—all help ensure girls are both in school and learning. Cultural Norms and Expectations Constance Amusugut faced obstacles to thriving at school after she had a child at 15. Household duties, the care of family members, early marriage, and early childbirth are all factors that contribute to girls missing out on an education. In cultures where these expectations are the norm, girls’ education may be lower on a family’s list of priorities. Poor Infrastructure Overcrowded classrooms and rundown schools provide students with a less-than-quality learning environment. Schools that don’t provide students with access to separate toilets, washing areas, and sanitary products can discourage girls who are menstruating from attending classes. To learn more about what can be done to fight for girls’ education, read our new report ‘Poverty is Sexist: Why educating every girl is good for everyone‘. Every girl counts. 130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one. JOIN THE COUNT Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR ROBYN DETORO 5 March 2017 6:02PM UTC TOPICS AID AND DEVELOPMENTEDUCATIONFOOD AND NUTRITIONGIRLS AND WOMENHEALTHHIV/AIDSPOLICY Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines Related Articles If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be? African Union Chairperson supports ONE’s call for investment in girls’ education This brilliant NGO is helping mums fight poverty in Sierra Leone The brilliant way these Nigerian schools are helping students overcome illiteracy opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window MEDIA JOBS UNSUBSCRIBE PRIVACY CONTACT SITEMAP LIKE US ON FACEBOOK
  25. 40 340 These "terrorists" use fear to fuel prejudice. Spreading hate, lies,is also a destructive force. That is a waste of life. It's so 😢 of these attacks on peoples everyday life. It takes practice to not give into fear. I like to keep an open mind. Dialogue is a tool for communication. It can feel uncomfortable, but necessary in real change, not just a band-aid. Peace sometimes is more about restraint, than a feeling of contentment.
  26. We’re like a family" Sinead O’Halloran, cello (2011) In October 2017 our audition panel will travel around the country, hearing the best young musicians in Ireland. Musicians can apply online via the 'Apply' link below. Candidates must download and prepare the audition excerpts which are available below. 2017 audition dates are as follows: Friday October 13 (evening): Belfast | Saturday October 14: Dublin | Sunday October 15: Dublin | Friday October 20 (evening): Cork | Saturday October 21: Cork | Sunday October 22: Galway Leadership auditions will take place on the evening of Sunday October 15th in Dublin. Exact locations will be emailed to you in the last week of September, when audition times are allocated. Applicants must have reached their 12th birthday by 1st September 2017 and must not have reached their 19th birthday by 1st August 2018. If you are a first-time applicant, you can sign up to participate in a free audition training workshop. Just tick the relevent box during your application. Closing date for applications is 15/09/17. NYOI audition excerpts 2017 Apply
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