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  2. u2rone

    U2 Winding Down???

    Hope u r wrong!!
  3. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

  4. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

  5. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    ONE.org uses cookies to give you the best experience. Learn more. CLOSE Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 1 CULTURE GIVEAWAY: We’re celebrating 100 years of Nelson Mandela 17 July 2018 5:30PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO TAKE ACTION Every year on the 18th of July, we honour Nelson Mandela by highlighting his incredible life and legacy. This year is no exception and we’re going all out to celebrate what would have been his 100th birthday! To make this centenary occasion extra special, we’ve partnered with the Nelson Mandela Foundation to create a limited edition t-shirt and we’re giving *100* of them away to YOU! Head on over to our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram pages to enter for your chance to win and if you’re not on social media, you can enter via Email! Limit one prize per person. Eligible participants must be at least 13 years of age or older and must answer how Nelson Mandela has inspired them and tag 3 friends in their comment on ONE’s competition post. The first contest window officially begins at midnight GMT on Tuesday, July 17, ending at 11:59 pm GMT on Monday July 23rd. By entering this contest, you are giving ONE permission to share your comment and/or response to ONE’s Facebook/Twitter/Instagram post on social media and on ONE.org. Winners will be selected at the sole and absolute discretion of ONE. Winners will be notified by direct message. You must respond to the message in order to receive the prize. Prizes cannot be exchanged for cash and are not transferable. No purchase or sale necessary to enter. Void where prohibited by law. This promotion is in no way sponsored by or associated with third parties such as Facebook, Inc. or Twitter, Inc. Sponsor information: The ONE Campaign, 1299 Pennsylvania Ave., NW, Suite 400, Washington, DC 20004 Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR ROBYN DETORO 17 July 2018 5:30PM UTC TOPICS CULTUREMEMBERS IN ACTION Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines Related Articles 5 statements from Mandela that we should all be inspired by Download these exclusive Nelson Mandela wallpapers! 5 Obama-recommended books you should read this summer Meet the cool illustrators behind our gender equality campaign opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window MEDIA JOBS UNSUBSCRIBE PRIVACY CONTACT SITEMAP navigateup
  6. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Skip to content Go to ONE.org home 1 Download these inspiring Nelson Mandela Day wallpapers July 19 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty Join It’s the centenary celebration of Nelson Mandela and to honour all the incredible ways he changed the world we’ve created a set of free downloadable backgrounds for your phone! Over his lifetime, Mandela defended equality for all with courage and persistence, leading to the end of apartheid. Since then, activists worldwide have turned to him for inspiration and followed in his footsteps to be part of the next great generation. Have you been inspired by his timeless words of wisdom? Then wear your support on your screen with these Nelson Mandela Day phone wallpapers! Download Background 1 Download Background 2 Download Background 3 Join the fight against extreme poverty Name Email Post/Zip code Country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By signing you agree to ONE’s privacy policy, including to the transfer of your information to ONE’s servers in the United States. Do you want to stay informed about how you can help fight against extreme poverty? Sign up to receive emails from ONE and join millions of people around the world taking action to end extreme poverty and preventable disease. We’ll only ever ask for your voice, not your money. You can unsubscribe at any time. Yes, sign me up No, I'm already signed up or I don't want to be kept informed in future Share SHARE ON FACEBOOK SAVE FOR LATER SHARE ON TWITTER AUTHOR SADOF ALEXANDER July 19 2018 TOPICS Join the Conversation Comment Guidelines opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window opens in a new window PRESS CAMPUS SHOP JOBS PRIVACY CONTACT
  7. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    BBC News HomeHome UKUK WorldWorld BusinessBusiness PoliticsPolitics TechTech ScienceScience More 'I was a child carer - it made me who I am today' 20 July 2018 Stories Share this with Email Share this with Facebook Share this with Twitter Share this with Whatsapp From the age of 12, writer Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett helped look after her severely autistic brother. Like hundreds of thousands of other young carers, she took on major responsibilities early - but says it made her the person she is today. Being a young carer makes you different from your friends. This is one of the first things that you learn. You visit their houses after school and notice how different their lives are from yours. Their houses seem tidy, quiet and peaceful. Mine was the opposite. My younger brother is severely autistic. He was diagnosed when he was four, but we knew there were issues before then. Even as a baby, he wouldn't stay still when you tried to hold him - my mum, Anna, said he was like an octopus wriggling in her arms. As a toddler, he was hyperactive. He tore through our house, leaving chaos in his wake. He would climb furniture and banisters, empty cereal packets and cartons of orange juice on the floor, scribble on the walls. He didn't sleep. He didn't talk. We knew our lives would be changed by his autism, but we didn't realise by how much. I am six years older than my brother, and cared for him along with my mum until I left home in North Wales at 18 (my parents separated when I was 12). It's been estimated that 700,000 children and young people across the UK, some as young as five years old, are caring for family members. But the true number is likely to be much higher, as many are hidden from view. I know what an isolating and difficult experience it can be - growing up, I had no idea there were so many other children out there in similar positions, caring for ill and disabled relatives. When you are a carer, it can be hard to relate to your friends, with their "normal" lives. You have responsibilities. You have to grow up very quickly. You can't muck about and be so carefree. I certainly didn't misbehave - I felt that my mum, who did the lion's share of the caring, had enough to deal with, without me being naughty as well. My brother barely slept and she was exhausted most of the time from getting up more than four times a night. I would care for him while she snatched an hour of sleep and, as I got older, for much longer stretches so that she could go to work or spend the evening with her then partner. I did have moments where I felt quite separate from my classmates, who were still having their dinner cooked for them when I was preparing meals from scratch. On the other hand, being able to cook stood me in good stead in the long run, as did many other skills and traits I learned from being a carer - responsibility, compassion, empathy, selflessness, multi-tasking, patience and generosity. A sense of humour was a must, especially when it came to toilet trouble. Mum and I cleared up enough poo for a lifetime (this may be why, at 31, I am still not sure how I feel about having children). It taught me basic plumbing - give me some string and a coat-hanger and I can fix a broken toilet - but also how to laugh when you're up the proverbial creek. You had to, because otherwise you would cry. Then again, we did lots of that too. We had two floods and a fire, and endless weird and embarrassing moments. People loved my brother - he was a very cute child with a huge goofy smile and big blue eyes, but his behaviour was - how can I put it? - unpredictable. Sometimes when we were out and about he would take his clothes off and run around while we chased after him, waving his trousers desperately like a flag. He was always falling into lakes and rivers, or reaching into people's bags of chips and plucking them out. He had no sense of fear so you had to be hyper-alert. He once ran into a field with a bull, which was terrifying. Thankfully we got him out in time. He also had tantrums in public and people would stare and make comments. I always confronted them when this happened - being a young carer made me quite feisty. I had a keen sense of injustice from a young age and that has translated into my journalism, particularly when it comes to the hardship and discrimination that disabled people often face. Schoolwork was difficult as sleep was disrupted, and the house was really noisy all the time. I learned how to concentrate even if all around me was total chaos. I developed a love of reading and tore through several library books a week. In a way, being a carer is what made me a writer. When things were difficult, I needed a way to escape, and reading provided that, but it also made me interested in people. You learn so much about humanity when you are looking after someone vulnerable and you need empathy, a vital skill when it comes to creating your own characters. Teachers didn't always understand. I'm not surprised that Carers Trust Wales have found that many children who are carers are not known to local authorities . Adults often don't think to ask, or when you try to explain why your homework is late, or indeed why you are, they will just say that you are making excuses. I'll never forget the horrible reaction of an after-school drama teacher who refused to accept that I had missed a rehearsal because I had to look after my brother. Nevertheless, for every nasty person there were many more kind ones. I had a couple of close friends who lived nearby - Hannah and Kate - who have always been there, and would keep me company when I was on my own with my brother at home because mum had to work or pick up a prescription. (Hannah is now a mental health nurse and says her experience looking after my brother helped inspire her to pursue that career.) As I grew older, I opened up to more friends about my home situation. They were all really supportive, treating my situation as though it were no different from anyone else's. Sometimes people act as though they are uncomfortable around my brother because of his strange seeming mannerisms and noises, but they never did. They helped me realise that there is no such thing as a normal family. My mum trusted me, and in many ways that worked out quite well - as long as I made sure my brother was OK, I could have people over and she could benefit from finally having a bit of a social life. Often friends would help put him to bed, and I remember being particularly touched to find my friend Sam reading him a bedtime story. Leaving home was hard. By that time, my brother was in a special school, staying overnight during the week and coming home at the weekends. Yet I still felt like I was abandoning my mum, who was finding it increasingly difficult to cope. My brother had grown very big and strong and she couldn't control him any more. He had also developed epilepsy, which needed careful management and supervision, and his obsessive-compulsive disorder meant that taking him outside was more and more difficult. She became very isolated. I missed them both terribly, because although things had been hard at times, we were a family. I cried for two weeks, and I think the sadness and the exhaustion are with me even now. Although I have a good job and a happy life, there are some days where I still feel very low. When my brother was nearly 15, things became so difficult for my mum that he went into school full-time. He is now 25 and lives in a care home. He is very happy there - his carers are brilliant, and I see him as much as I can for walks on the beach and trips out for lunch. I am grateful for how lucky we are - not everyone receives such good government support. If the help hadn't been there, I might never have left home. I certainly wouldn't have gone to university or have established a career as a writer. Whenever I meet young carers, I want to give them a hug and tell them that I know what they are going through. They should be given more support - both practical and respite care. I certainly would have benefited from some counselling. No child's education should suffer because they are looking after a family member, they should be encouraged by adults, and given the help they need. Sometimes I am asked if I wish my brother had been "normal". It's a strange question, because it's essentially asking me if I wish he were a different person. Obviously, I wish that he did not have to suffer, which he does as a result of his epilepsy and anxiety. But I love my brother for who he is, and looking after him has been the defining experience of my life. Caring has made me strong as well as sensitive. It has made me a kinder person and given me the motivation to fight for social justice. But most of all I feel lucky to have felt such profound, unconditional love for my little brother. That has been a gift. Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett is the author of The Tyranny of Lost Things. Follow her on Twitter @rhiannonlucyc. All photos supplied by Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett and family. A selection of your comments: I was a child carer for my severely autistic brother who is 18 months younger than myself. I never really thought that I was until I read this article but it really spoke to me (especially the random sprinting and the poo!). I love my brother and there is no question he made me a better person but he has had a huge impact on my family. Jessica Sutcliffe, London Wow. Wow. Wow. Rhiannon's words here could almost be my own - word for word. The big difference is that I was a boy and it was my sister and as a male you do not have the close emotional support Rhiannon received from her friends. My friends were great but not in any way could they understand how I had to care for my younger sister - in every way. We also grew up in a very closed family in a rural area which did not help. While I wish I had someone to help direct me then, I have done OK. I am now the guardian for my sister. As we live in a rural area she unfortunately now lives 3.5 to four hours by car from home but like Rhiannon with her brother, I am very, very grateful that she now receives the care she deserves and it allows my other sister and I to lead "normal" lives. Anon Reading Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett's story was unnerving because she was writing about my childhood. My brother is severely autistic, six years younger than me and my parents separated when I was nine years old. Before reading her story, I had not thought of myself as a "carer" though. I had thought of that title as being my mum's. I felt a responsibility towards my mum and felt terrible to be abandoning her (and him). My brother is now in full-time care, visiting my mum some weekends. We are very lucky in so many ways, but I wonder if people realise that it is not just the physical exercise of caring for your loved one, but the mental and emotional burden. Is he happy, is he safe? Are the staff at his home treating him well and being kind to him? Rachel Cook, London Caring from a young age absolutely shaped who I am now! It's difficult, but looking around I am constantly reminded how lucky I am, in many ways I'm stronger than my peers and it's helped me become successful. You can't resent an experience that builds you, helps you become who you are and be happy as you are. Good luck to anyone who is experiencing this now, it does get better, honestly, also you're not alone! Cara Hunter, Bedworth This reflection resonates so much with my own situation. I have a younger brother who has ASD and severe learning disability (SLD). I now work as a Behavioural Specialist with children who have SLD and severe challenging behaviour. I feel my experiences give me a greater understanding and sense of empathy with the families I work with. My experiences with my brother and the people I have met through him have very strongly influenced my life - and for the better! Mandy Griffin, Antrim I was a young carer for my mum who has bipolar disorder. Growing up was quick, I was cooking, washing, cleaning, ironing, managing medication and providing constant support emotional and practical from age eight. All whilst also my helping look after my younger brother of three years. Making sure he and I got to school, dressed appropriately and fed. School was a challenge, I'd often have done a shift before getting there, exhausted. Homework time was difficult, finding time for anything for me was impossible. My family were my saving grace - grannies, aunties, uncles, cousins. They helped out with mum and looked after us when mum was too unwell to be at home with us. We survived it. It made us a close family. Not only that, it's shaped my future for the better. I was lucky enough at the age of 16 to have been linked in with my local young carers organisation. It gave me the chance to be a young person, to meet other young carers to know I wasn't alone and to go places and do things I never got the chance to growing up. Marc Howard, Motherwell I have four beautiful daughters. My third daughter has Rett syndrome which is a severe, neurological condition effecting all aspects of her life. I was absolutely devastated when I found out that my daughters are classed as young carers. It terrifies me. I want them to have a normal life. I realise that their life won't be normal but I'm desperate for it to be happy. Although my daughters are still very young, I do think that already they show a lot more love and kindness and empathy than other children that age. Our journey as a family really scares me - all we have to face in the future dealing with the difficulties Rett syndrome brings. However, I want to protect all of my daughters as much as possible. I want them to be happy and feel loved, feel secure and cared for. Eva Hodgson, Tynemouth I think it is so incredibly important to raise awareness of young carers for it is often assumed that every young person has it easily. I was a young carer for many years growing up and if people (both in schools and elsewhere) had a broader understanding of what it may be like as a carer, I think that it would benefit both the carer and the wider community. James, Gosport Join the conversation - find us on Facebook , Instagram , YouTube andTwitter . Copyright © 2018 BBC. The BBC is not responsible for the content of external sites.
  8. padawanbeck84

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    43, 905 - More counting now that I'm back home. The comic store guy is away at a convention so no comics for me today
  9. I would be interested to know if there has been any follow up to Guy Osearys response to the fan letter last year? In his response he said would like to 'set up a mechanism so that every so often we can convene around a band-related subject'.
  10. Malahide

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    43904 Counting on National Day.
  11. caz63

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    43 903 morning all and happy Saturday.
  12. padawanbeck84

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    43, 902 - Cool morning counting
  13. paoladegliesposti

    u2 song of the day

    https://youtu.be/zNE25uQyS1U
  14. I like your new cover photo - very nice! :Zoo_Idea:

    1. mich40

      mich40

      Thank you! I was doodling the other day and made it. 

    2. mich40

      mich40

      It is a brilliantly true lyric. 

  15. dmway

    U2 dreams

    I love how the dream world puts together settings that couldn't possibly be sequential in real life (e.g., auditorium and mall in immediate succession). I'd love to know what extra meaning Ali had to relate - that would be cool to know!
  16. dmway

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Well, I was going to add a few more photos from the Beck show last night, but even the smallest ones are "too big" - oh well, maybe we'll get a greater posting allotment someday. But, back on topic, my next show is tomorrow, and it's all day tomorrow. I like music from before the 80s revolution as well, and tomorrow the first band I ever saw live is having their 50th anniversary celebration - the band simply known as Yes. The band started the same year as Led Zeppelin and Jethro Tull, among many others. Their UK celebration was in London a few months ago, but their US celebration is in Philadelphia! Philly has supported this band since their very first tour here in the early 70s (they even have an official "Yes Day" by proclamation of the mayor and the city council - I was at that ceremony in City Hall back in 2004). They are playing tonight, but I am seeing them tomorrow night live after their anniversary celebration earlier in the day (I didn't want to see three shows on three consecutive nights - I knew Beck would put on a show that would ecstatically exhaust me, so I needed a recuperation day). I didn't see them live until the 80s myself, but their older music is my first love. A lot of the band's alumni from back then are even coming for the celebration, and two are even playing again with the current version of the band on a few songs! A full day of lovely music!
  17. Yesterday
  18. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Por Daniele Selby y Erica Sanchez 6 DE JULIO DE 2018 + 0 13 MEDIO AMBIENTE El Mar Báltico ahora tiene una zona muerta del tamaño de Irlanda A pesar de 10 años de esfuerzos, los niveles de oxígeno en el Báltico son los peores en 1.500 años. Por qué los Global Citizens deberían preocuparse La actividad humana y el calentamiento global provocado por el hombre están amenazando la vida marina en el Mar Báltico, obstaculizando el progreso en el logro de los Objetivos Globales, incluida la protección de la vida bajo el agua y la lucha contra el cambio climático. Puedes unirte a nosotros aquí tomando medidas para ayudar a proteger nuestros océanos y combatir el cambio climático. Los humanos literalmente están matando el planeta. Los científicos dicen que los niveles de oxígeno en el Mar Báltico son los más bajos registrados en los últimos 1.500 años y creen que estas " zonas muertas " encontradas, han sido causadas por los residuos agrícolas y urbanos. A pesar de que los países de la costa báltica han hecho los mejores esfuerzos para ayudar al mar a recuperarse en los últimos 10 años, la "zona muerta" en el Mar Báltico ahora cubre un área de alrededor de 70,000 kilómetros cuadrados, aproximadamente del tamaño de Irlanda, según informó The Guardian . El nitrógeno y el fósforo expulsado de las zonas agrícolas, los nutrientes químicos esenciales para las plantas, se abren camino en los cuerpos de agua donde causan un rápido crecimiento de algas. Las algas eventualmente mueren, se hunden y se descomponen. A medida que las algas se descomponen, consumen oxígeno en el agua, sofocando a otras criaturas marinas o incitándolas a huir del área, lo que genera "zonas muertas". Los bajos niveles de oxígeno en el agua también afectan a las poblaciones de peces, y por lo tanto a los medios de subsistencia de los pescadores, y pueden promover, además, el crecimiento de bacterias tóxicas. Esta no es la primera vez que los niveles de oxígeno en el Báltico han bajado.En su estudio recientemente publicado, el equipo de investigación finlandés y alemán descubrió que la vida marina en el mar Báltico ha ido desapareciendo en los últimos 100 años, pero que el estrés actual sobre el mar "no tiene precedentes" . La actividad agrícola y las aguas residuales no son las únicas formas en que los humanos están dañando el mar. Los científicos le dijeron a The Guardianque el calentamiento global, en gran medida impulsado por humanos , "probablemente retrasa el proceso de recuperación, porque el oxígeno se disuelve menos fácilmente en agua caliente". Ver imagen en Twitter Información y privacidad de Twitter Ads Aunque los gobiernos de la región báltica ya están trabajando en un plan de recuperación, Sami Jokinen y Tom Jilbert, coautores del estudio, dicen que los humanos tienen un papel que desempeñar en la curación del mar. "Una de las principales cosas que hacer en el futuro puede ser reducir la proporción de carne en la dieta", dijeron. "La agricultura ganadera genera una mayor pérdida de nutrientes por kilogramo de alimentos producidos" y esos nutrientes pueden llegar al agua donde alteran el ecosistema. TEMASEnvironmentClimate ChangeGlobal WarmingMarine LifeDead ZoneBaltic Seamar balticomedio ambiente COMENTARIOS
  19. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    CITIZENSHIP 12 Photos of Celebration and Struggle From Around the World This Week These powerful images capture everything from World Cup celebrations to devastating wildfires. Why Global Citizens Should Care These powerful images from around the world range from celebrations of the late Nelson Mandela, who dedicated his life to fighting for equality, to the impact of extreme weather events, worsened by climate change, on some of the world's most vulnerable populations. You can join us here to take action on these issues and more. This week has been one of celebration in many places around the world. Across South Africa and the globe, people honored the late Nelson Mandela, who would have turned 100 on July 18. In his highest-profile speech since leaving office in January 2017, Barack Obama remembered the legendary anti-apartheid leader and urged the crowd to follow in his footsteps and continue the fight for equality everywhere. Take Action: Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty Take Action: Sign Now 2 points United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe France, too, had reason to celebrate this week after winning its first FIFA World Cup in 20 years. And in Thailand, people rejoiced for a very different reason, as the trapped young boys and their coach were returned to saftey after spending two weeks trapped by floods in a cave. Yet, while scenes of joy were scene throughout much of the world this week, people in both the Philippines and Bangladesh are struggling to stay safe and dry as the rainy season carries on. And the ongoing conflict in Syria — now in its seventh year of civil war — continues to displace people from their homes. These are this week's most powerful photos of celebration, struggle, and everyday life. Embed from Getty Images 1. Mandela Day: Members of the Maharishi Institute Choir perform at the global Walk Together initiative event by Nelson Mandela's group The Elders to celebrate Nelson Mandela's 100th Anniversary at Constitution Hill in Johannesburg on July 18. South Africa celebrated 100 years since Nelson Mandela's birth, which is marked annually around the world as Mandela Day, and the Nelson Mandela Foundation called for people to "take action and inspire change" in his name on the centenary year. Image: Noah Berger/AP 2. California Wildfires: A plane battling the Ferguson Fire passes the setting sun in unincorporated Mariposa County in California, near Yosemite National Park on July 15. As of this morning, the wildfire has burned 22,892 acres of Mariposa County and is only 7% contained. Rising average temperatures have led to forests in California drying out, increasing the risk of fires. There are more than 100 million dead trees in California alone, which creates a tinderbox for fires to spark and grow from. Embed from Getty Images 3. Syrian Conflict: Evacuated Syrian boys from the area of Fuaa and Kafraya in the Idlib province look out of a broken bus window as it passes the al-Eis crossing south of Aleppo during the evacuation of several thousand residents from the two pro-regime towns in northern Syria on July 19. Image: Anupam Nath/AP 4. World Cup: Indian children at a school hostel watch on laptops the World Cup soccer final match between France and Croatia on the outskirts of Gauhati, India, on July 15. Image: Thibault Camus/AP 5. France World Cup Victory: The Arc de Triomphe is illuminated with the colors of the French national flag and by fireworks set off by French soccer fans celebrating France's World Cup victory over Croatia, in Paris, France, July 15. France won the final 4-2. The inscription in French reads: Proud to be blue. After the victory, Kylian Mbappé, a 19-year-old powerhouse who scored four goals this tournament, announced that he will donate all of his earnings from the tournament to kids with disabilities. The athlete, who was born in Paris, is the son of immigrants – yet another reminder of how migration and diversity can make a country great. Image: Themba Hadebe/AP 6. Nelson Mandela Centenary: Former US President Barack Obama delivers his speech at the 16th Annual Nelson Mandela Lecture at the Wanderers Stadium in Johannesburg, South Africa, on July 17. In his highest-profile speech since leaving office, Obama urged people around the world to respect human rights and other values under threat in an address marking the 100th anniversary of anti-apartheid leader Nelson Mandela's birth. Embed from Getty Images 7. Summer Weather: A child plays in the waterfall at Yards Park amid warm summer temperatures in Washington, DC, on July 19. Embed from Getty Images 8. Rohingya Refugees: A Rohingya refugee girl makes her way as rain falls at Jamtoli refugee camp in Ukhia on July 20. Image: Chiang Rai Public Relations Department/AP 9. Thailand Cave Rescue: In this July 18 photo provided by Chiang Rai Public Relations Department, members of the rescued soccer team show their skills before a press conference regarding their experience being trapped in the cave in Chiang Rai, northern Thailand. One of the boys, Adun Sam-On, a 14-year-old top student and star athlete who speaks four languages, was able to take a leadership role inside of the cave by translating for British divers. Staff at his school say it is not the first time the boy has had to overcome significant challenges, having escaped ethnic conflict in Myanmar to live alone as a refugee without a home or family in Thailand. Embed from Getty Images 10. France Agriculture: An aerial view shows haystacks in a field in Saint-Philbert-sur-Risle, northern France, on July 19. Embed from Getty Images 11. Flooding in the Philippines: A woman looks out of her home at floodwaters as the Marikina river swelled after continuous rain caused by Tropical Storm Inday (Ampil) in Manila on July 20. Embed from Getty Images 12. Protests in Peru: Demonstrators take part in a march against corruption in Lima on July 19. Outraged Peruvians marched on Thursday all over the country to protest against corruption, following the scandal of audios of judges negotiating sentences that already caused the resignation of the president of the Supreme Court and the Minister of Justice. TOPICSEnvironmentWorld CupNelson MandelaCitizenshipPhotographyWeek in PhotosWeek in Pictures COMMENTS
  20. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    CITIZENSHIP Giant Balloons Are Bringing Internet Access to Rural Kenya Google’s sister company Loon is behind the initiative. Why Global Citizens Should Care The internet isn't just selfies and Snapchat, it’s about education access, health care, training, business development, the sharing of new ideas, and spreading technologies that have the power to alleviate suffering the world over. That’s why initiatives like this are so important, and why universal, affordable internet access is part of the UN’s Global Goals. You can join us by taking action in support of the goals here . A network of enormous balloons will be bringing internet access to some of Kenya’s most inaccessible regions from as early as next year. Google’s sister company Loon — owned by Google parent company Alphabet Inc. — is behind the initiative, partnering with Telkom Kenya to deliver 4G coverage to the country’s rural areas. “Loon’s mission is to connect people everywhere by inventing and integrating audacious technologies,” said Alastair Westgarth, the chief executive of Loon, marking its first commercial deal in Africa. Take action: Tell Leaders How Important Education in Emergencies Is Take Action: Sign Petition 1 point United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe The fleet of balloons — each reportedly about the size of a tennis court — will dangle antennae, and these will relay internet signals transmitted from the ground. Loon has assured that the fleet will be floating far out of range of air traffic, storms, and wildlife, at a height of around 20 kilometers (60,000 feet or 12.4 miles) above sea level. Each balloon can reportedly provide coverage to an area of about 5,000 square kilometers. US telecom operators first used the technology behind the balloons in the wake of a hurricane in Puerto Rico last year, according to Reuters , to provide internet to around 250,000 people. Read more: Women Worldwide Are Being Left Behind as Technology Advances The balloons will be powered by a solar panel, made from polyethylene, and will be filled with helium. They’ll also designed to float above the country for months at a time without having to land. View image on Twitter Twitter Ads info and privacy While Kenya’s major cities and towns already have internet, rural areas are much harder to reach. But having internet access could be life-changing for those reached by the balloons’ connection. As of 2016, more than 4 billion people in the world — mostly in developing countries — didn’t have access to the internet. And yet, advantages of an internet connection include far more than social media (which also has a lot of advantages in itself, such as sharing new ideas and providing a platform for voicing and combatting injustice). The internet helps people access financial services, as well as health and education facilities; it provides a greater platform for the development of small businesses or startups; and helps people communicate with family and friends, among many other things. Read more: Canada Will Soon Provide Low-Income Families With $10-Per-Month Internet It also opens up a whole world of opportunity for apps to make people’s lives easier and safer — health workers have been able to track patients with Ebola to reduce the spread of the virus, for example. Nurses and health professionals can be trained more easily and more cheaply, and farmers aremore easily able to manage their supply chains. In fact, universal, affordable internet access is part of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, and the ONE Campaign, and NGO, has a wholecampaign dedicated to ensuring everyone can access the internet — particularly women and girls. But the sheer size of Kenya’s rural areas has so far made internet access almost impossible, with fiber cables and mobile masts unable to cope with the large distances involved. Read more: New Tech Will Change the World, But Not Without Risks, UN Report Says Experts have, however, raised some concerns about the balloon initiative leading to a monopoly on communications in rural areas that could leave people vulnerable to price hikes or changes in business strategy. “Once these networks are in place, and dependency has reached a critical level, users are at the mercy of changes in business strategy, pricing, terms and conditions, and so on,” Ken Banks, an expert in African connectivity and head of social impact at Yoti, told the BBC . “This would perhaps be less of a problem if there’s more than one provider — you can simply switch networks — but if Loon and Telkom have monopolies in these areas, that could be a ticking time bomb.” TOPICSEducationKenyaGoogleSocial MediaBalloonsinternet accessuniversal internet access COMMENTS
  21. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Yesterday we hosted the first of our Familly Support Days for children and families on our Community Care and Hospice Programme! 🎈🎉 This programme helps treat and deliver therapeutic services to terminally and chronically ill children across Belarus. These special days gives the children and families the opportunity to meet each other, develop a support network, exchange ideas and enjoy some time out from their everyday lives. CCI’s multi-disciplinary teams conduct home-based services specifically designed for each family and are assigned a palliative care team including therapists, a nurse, a psychologist and a social worker. The team makes home visits to supervise the child’s care, provides medication and supplies at no cost to the families and evaluates the social and emotional needs of all family members. The programme helps almost 50 families between Minsk and Gomel in Belarus. To learn more about our Programmes, visit www.chernobyl-international.com
  22. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Odd Socks Day for Anti-Bullying Week What is it? Most importantly, Odd Socks Day is designed to be fun! It’s an opportunity for children to express themselves and appreciate individuality and uniqueness! There is no pressure on the children to wear the latest fashion or for parents to buy expensive costumes. All they have to do to take part is wear odd socks to school, it couldn’t be simpler! Odd Socks day will take place on the first day of Anti Bullying Week, Monday 12th November 2018 to help raise awareness for Anti-Bullying Week. We would like to invite participating children to make a £1 donation - or any donation you think appropriate - to support the Anti-Bullying Alliance to continue coordinating Anti-Bullying Week. You do not have to raise money to take part - the most important thing is the message of Odd Socks Day - and any money raised for us is a bonus! Here is last year's pack for schools which gives you lesson plans and ideas to help bring your Odd Socks Day to life. We'll be launching a new school pack with a new song in September 2018. Andy Day is undoubtedly one of the most popular children’s personalities in the UK and widely known for his antics tackling dinosaurs, investigating baby animals and being on safari. At Glastonbury 2017, Andy launched his brand new rock 'n' roll band for kids, 'Andy and the Odd Socks'. Aimed at primary school children of all ages, Andy and the Odd Socks are all hugely individual and entertaining characters whose message to children is simple: be proud of who you are and be accepting of one another, in the words of one of the best known Odd Socks songs, be 'Unique'. We are delighted that Andy is a patron of the Anti-Bullying Alliance. Unique by Andy and the Odd Socks This song encompasses why we do Odd Socks Day and helps to celebrate what makes us all unique. How can you donate to the Anti-Bullying Alliance? We are a small team and are always so very grateful for any fundraising that you do for us to help us keep running Anti-Bullying Week each year in England. If you raise money for us through your Odd Socks Day or anytime in Anti-Bullying Week you can give it to us in the following ways: You can donate directly to us via our Virgin Money Giving page. Or send us a cheque should be made payable to the ‘Anti-Bullying Alliance’ and posting it to Anti-Bullying Alliance, National Children's Bureau, WeWork London Fields, 115 Mare Street, London E8 4RU. Please make sure you include your name and your address as we like to acknowledge all funds raised wherever possible. Visit Andy and the Odd Socks page Follow Andy and the Odd Socks on Twitter Attachments Odd Socks Day for Anti-Bullying Week 2017 - School Pack
  23. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    A unique opportunity here for young aspiring musicians in Mayo to learn from The Deans, currently in the midst of their Irish tour. The band are set to lead a workshop in The Core Mayo next Tuesday, July 24th on songwriting, the inner workings of the modern music industry, the practicalities of music technology, nuances of performance and developing stagecraft.
  24. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Every two minutes a teenager is infected with HIV. Yet it is preventable. Find out how you can help #endAIDS: red.org
  25. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Medication is a key piece of winning the fight to #endAIDS, but it’s not the only piece. Learn more about our impact. https://www.red.org/impact/
  26. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    9.1k Doctors with boats: How a Kenyan woman is keeping her people healthy October 18 2016 | By: GLOBAL CITIZEN JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin This story by Luca Powell originally appeared on Global Citizen. In 2010, after completing two degrees in the United States, Umra Omar returned to her homeland. And really, you couldn’t blame her: the coastal region of Kenya, where she was born, is pristine and beautiful. At its hub is Lamu, a 14th-century town of Swahili-heritage that looks out onto the Indian Ocean, its coastline peppered with the rocking white boats of fisherman and tourists. Omar said she was compelled to come back because it was her town of origin, but also because she felt the desire to give back. She had pursued a bachelor’s in neuroscience and psychology before completing her master’s degree in social justice in intercultural relations. “I was so fortunate, to be given the scholarships and the opportunity I’ve had, being a woman, being from Kenya. You know, when you’ve been given the world, you have to give the world back,” she told Global Citizen in a phone interview. In Lamu, that meant addressing the unique challenge of the region — the difficult geography of its coastal, archipelago landscape that is both the regions joy and its pain. Its islands are untouchable hideaways, but where it concerns the indigenous communities and villages that inhabit them, they can be an expensive nightmare in terms of access. A boat trip from Lamu to one of its surrounding islands doesn’t run cheap. In fact, it can cost as much as $300, or a week of salary. The price tag effectively restricts inhabitants of the region from realistic access to healthcare and other essentials. It’s here that Omar’s efforts started. Driven by a vision of bringing medical access on the road, she began coordinating mobile healthcare visitations throughout the region. First, by motorbike, then by boat, and even by plane, Omar organized bi-monthly trips to bring doctors and nurses to the villages in Lamu’s orbit. The region is a broad geographical space that, Omar says, the government understandably doesn’t have the capacity to comprehensively treat. “[Lamu] is up in the northern coast, it’s an archipelago and it’s hard to reach. You have to take the bus through Mombasa, which makes it two days of travel to come out here,” she said. “We also have the indigenous communities that live very sparsely from one another,” Omar said. These are traditionally hunter-gatherer communities that now live spread out in between large tracts of land. Then you add the component of the sea and it becomes much more costly.” But geography isn’t the only complication to the mission. The area around Lamu, which is close to the Somalian border, has been pockmarked by conflict between the Kenyan military and Al-Shabaab, a militant group. Originating in 2006 as a guerilla response to then-U.S. backed warlords in Somalia, the group has since grown in the eastern African region. Al-Shabaab’s expansion across Somalia’s southern border into Kenya has been extensive. The group, which is an Al Qaeda affiliate and has also been courted by the Islamic State, is active in Kenya. Since 2010, they’ve claimed responsibility for a number of notable attacks, including the 2010 Kampala bombing and the Garissa University massacre in 2014. It was that same year Omar founded Safari Doctors, which has made it a focus to get health services to the Aweer and Bajuni groups that have suffered from the conflict. “Communities are very much caught in between a rock and a hard place,” says Omar, adding that it is also an ethnic problem, because Al-Shabaab militants are harder to distinguish from civilians than their military counterparts in uniform. “The militants can be more targeted than the military, which makes it very complex.” Twice each month her team and her, a nurse, administrative coordinator, visiting medic, and boat crew leave for the villages. These outreaches can take up to four days at a time, depending upon the amount of funding they can raise beforehand. Their biggest priority? Immunizations, which are the key component to preventative health care. Maternal care, too, is a sorely needed reality, she adds, half-jokingly noting that she should know, being currently 7 months pregnant now and with a bouncing toddler in her arms. She is married and enjoys what she calls a “village of a family,” but recognizes as well the demand for family planning and education where it isn’t available. Beyond that, Safari Doctors does what it can to facilitate the treatments of diseases like cholera, which is prevalent in areas without clean water. For the cases Safari Doctors can’t treat in the field, Omar’s team gently coaxes their patients to make the trip to Lamu District Hospital. “We’re at the baby stage,” says Omar. “Down the road we want to build educational groups, a volunteer exchange, and clinics.” Her longer-term strategy is to build the infrastructure and capacity to provide more in-depth care, testing for things such as diabetes and hypertension. Ideally, she’d like to cover at least 10 villages over a weeklong outreach. In that scenario, Safari Doctors could treat up to 1,000 patients. Currently, her project is funded by a variety of NGOs, such as the Anthony Robbins Foundation and Doctors of the World. Omar is interested in redesigning a more sustainable economic model for Safari Doctors. Her plan is to use a premium, privatized model to back-fund the public project, giving the initiative stability and longevity. She calls this, “flipping the game.” But what she is also flipping is the conventional definition of the safari. A Swahili word meaning “to journey,” Omar says she’s owning the word for what it means, rather than the now-conventional association with animal viewing. To that end, she opens up her trips — safaris — to donors who want to see Lamu’s beautiful islands and engage with real people. “They go out into communities, they do projects and help fund the villages, they know that their money is going toward something worthwhile.” Join ONE today to help fight poverty and preventable disease.
  27. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    60 HEALTH A stronger future is now in the cards for Nigerians 13 July 2018 12:10PM UTC | By: INNOCENT EDACHE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin We launched Make Naija Stronger in Nigeria because it is one of the worst places in the world to be an infant, child or mother — one in eight of all children who die in the world under the age of five are Nigerian and 25% of the total number of deaths of children under five in Nigeria are newborns. We asked ourselves, how can 100 million Nigerians be empowered to transform their families’ health? By securing full funding of the National Health Act. Full funding would deliver adequate, affordable health services for all Nigerians by providing basic health services, expand and upgrade primary health facilities, develop health human capital (especially at the primary health care level), provide essential drugs and begin the process of providing universal coverage. ONE members march on the streets of Abuja calling on the government to #MakeNaijaStronger. Since we launched the campaign in 2016, over 220,000 people signed our online petition to President Buhari demanding action to revive the healthcare system. Hundreds of people attended street rallies, thousands watched and shared our videos and members even marched to the gates of the National Assembly in February 2018 to demand action from Nigeria’s leaders. ONE Champions in action. Our vibrant young ONE Champion activists, spread our campaign message to the nation’s grassroots, engaging citizens and lobbying state and local government officials. ONE also worked with numerous civil society and NGO partners to lobby and pressure the Federal Government. In 2017, over 30 of these partners signed an open letter to President Buhari demanding a quantum leap in health funding. ONE also worked hand-in-hand with these partners on over 130 advocacy meetings and public events carried out between February 2017 and May 2018. In June, we celebrated with our partners a momentous success in the #MakeNaijaStronger campaign. After two years of active campaigning, President Muhammadu Buhari signed the 2018 budget with N55.1 billion representing 1% of CRF for basic healthcare provision fund. Through this campaign, we realised: citizens have an effective, powerful voice — when they believe in an issue and pressure government to act, things happen. The most important part of this campaign has been the participation of incredibly passionate Nigerian citizens and influencers — like Waje, Ali Nuhu, Desmond Elliot, Falz, Basketmouth, Toolz, Yemi Alade and Kate Henshaw — who recognised that policy change was needed to address the country’s health sector. So, what comes next? There is lots of work to do in order to turn these funds into healthy lives. We must apply the same vigilance, passion, inventiveness and doggedness to the important task of holding the Nigerian government accountable for the effective and transparent use of these funds and for the proper application of our national health policies. Only then can we expect to see lives positively transformed and saved. Join ONE now to start using the power of your voice to build a stronger world together.
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