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edgeforpeace

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HE PUBLISHED THE NAMES OF AFGANS WHO WERE HELPING US STOP THE TERRORISTS AND NOW THOSE PEOPLES LIVES ARE IN DANGER

 

THIS IS REPREHENSIBLE

 

THIS IS NOT RESPONSIBLE JOURNALISM

 

IF YOU SUPPLIED THE FBI WITH THE NAMES AND LOCATION OF CRIMINALS IN THE MAFIA

 

YOU WOULD BE PUT INTO THE WITNESS PROTECTION PROGRAM TO TRY AND KEEP YOU FROM BEING MURDERED.

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Smile....little pieces of sh_ite.

email_wplogo_175x32.gif

 

 

Posted at 9:44 AM ET, 01/27/2011

Police: Five Anonymous hacking group members arrested in Britain

By Hayley Tsukayama

Police in the United Kingdom have arrested five men in connection with the Anonymous hacking group, largely credited for denial of service attacks carried out in support of WikiLeaks and its editor Julian Assange.

London's Metropolitan Police Service issued a statement saying that it had arrested five males, ranging in age from 15-26, in connection with "in relation to recent and ongoing 'distributed denial of service' attacks (DDoS) by an online group calling themselves 'Anonymous.'" Of those arrested, two are under the age of 18 and three are teenagers.

Anonymous is the group of "hacktivists" that has taken credit for attacks against companies such as Amazon and PayPal in support of Assange and WikiLeaks after the Web site leaked thousands of U.S. State Department cables.

The release said all five men were being held in police custody and that the arrests are part of an ongoing investigation, "being carried out in conjunction with international law enforcement agencies in Europe and the U.S."

Dutch authorities have already arrested a 16-year-old male in connection with Anonymous, who reportedly admitted being involved in attacks against credit card companies.

By Hayley Tsukayama  | January 27, 2011; 9:44 AM ET 

mummy, did you read this---its the hacking sia is referring to....this was done recently, and the men charged are not julian..

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MARK 4:22

 

22For there is nothing hidden which shall not be made manifest; nor does any secret thing take place, but that it should come to light.

 

the scritpture verse that you have quoted, this has to do with the gospel being made known.

 

and has utterly nothing to do

 

with reckless journalism that endangers peoples lives.

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Even though this guy is revolting, it is hard to not gape at the depths of his breakage.  There are certainly worse people in the world (tyrants, dictators, mass murderers), but they are not typically turned into heroes like this Assange has been by some misguided souls.

Here is an excerpt from an article in today's Washington Post.  Assange is the guy who, if he found out, would out you as being in witness protection for having testified against a murderous drug and human trafficking  mobster (to use Spicey's example).  Good guy, that Assange...a real stand-up sort of fellow.

"...  Guardian journalists David Leigh and Luke Harding recount an exchange with Assange in July at a Moroccan restaurant in London. When pressed by journalists to redact the names of informants mentioned in Afghan war documents then about to be released by WikiLeaks, Assange initially refused.

"Well, they're informants," he said, according to the journalists' account_74615. "So, if they get killed, they've got it coming to them. They deserve it."

 

Although Assange later agreed to redactions, the incident gave the journalists pause.

 

"Silence fell around the table," Leigh said in an interview. "We were astonished that Julian could be so callous but also so naive. Not redacting those names didn't begin to grapple with the complexities of life inAfghanistan. He didn't seem to get that."

 

But Assange, who has signed a book deal of his own, remains unbowed. "You are in a very beneficial position if you can be martyred without dying," he told BBC 4."

 

((full article at:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/04/AR2011020405201_2.html?sid=ST2011020407315))

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Even though this guy is revolting, it is hard to not gape at the depths of his breakage.  There are certainly worse people in the world (tyrants, dictators, mass murderers), but they are not typically turned into heroes like this Assange has been by some misguided souls.

Here is an excerpt from an article in today's Washington Post.  Assange is the guy who, if he found out, would out you as being in witness protection for having testified against a murderous drug and human trafficking  mobster (to use Spicey's example).  Good guy, that Assange...a real stand-up sort of fellow.

"...  Guardian journalists David Leigh and Luke Harding recount an exchange with Assange in July at a Moroccan restaurant in London. When pressed by journalists to redact the names of informants mentioned in Afghan war documents then about to be released by WikiLeaks, Assange initially refused.

"Well, they're informants," he said, according to the journalists' account_74615. "So, if they get killed, they've got it coming to them. They deserve it."

 

Although Assange later agreed to redactions, the incident gave the journalists pause.

 

"Silence fell around the table," Leigh said in an interview. "We were astonished that Julian could be so callous but also so naive. Not redacting those names didn't begin to grapple with the complexities of life inAfghanistan. He didn't seem to get that."

 

But Assange, who has signed a book deal of his own, remains unbowed. "You are in a very beneficial position if you can be martyred without dying," he told BBC 4."

 

((full article at:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/04/AR2011020405201_2.html?sid=ST2011020407315))

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Even though this guy is revolting, it is hard to not gape at the depths of his breakage.  There are certainly worse people in the world (tyrants, dictators, mass murderers), but they are not typically turned into heroes like this Assange has been by some misguided souls.

Here is an excerpt from an article in today's Washington Post.  Assange is the guy who, if he found out, would out you as being in witness protection for having testified against a murderous drug and human trafficking  mobster (to use Spicey's example).  Good guy, that Assange...a real stand-up sort of fellow.

"...  Guardian journalists David Leigh and Luke Harding recount an exchange with Assange in July at a Moroccan restaurant in London. When pressed by journalists to redact the names of informants mentioned in Afghan war documents then about to be released by WikiLeaks, Assange initially refused.

"Well, they're informants," he said, according to the journalists' account_74615. "So, if they get killed, they've got it coming to them. They deserve it."

 

Although Assange later agreed to redactions, the incident gave the journalists pause.

 

"Silence fell around the table," Leigh said in an interview. "We were astonished that Julian could be so callous but also so naive. Not redacting those names didn't begin to grapple with the complexities of life inAfghanistan. He didn't seem to get that."

 

But Assange, who has signed a book deal of his own, remains unbowed. "You are in a very beneficial position if you can be martyred without dying," he told BBC 4."

 

((full article at:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/02/04/AR2011020405201_2.html?sid=ST2011020407315))

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Judge says WikiLeaks' Assange can be extradited

By CASSANDRA VINOGRAD, Associated Press â€“ 1 hr 3 mins ago

LONDON – Julian Assange can be extradited to Sweden in a sex crimes inquiry, a British judge ruled Thursday, rejecting claims by the WikiLeaks founder that he would not face a fair trial there. Assange'slawyer said he would appeal.

Judge Howard Riddle said the allegations of rape and sexual molestation by two women against Assange meet the definition of extraditable offenses and said the Swedish warrant had been properly issued and was valid.

Assange, 39, a key figure in the release of tens of thousands of secret U.S. government and military documents, has been out on bail during the extradition fight. He has seven days to appeal the ruling in British courts.

After hearing three days of testimony this month, Riddle concluded "there is simply no reason to believe there has been a mistake" about the European Arrest Warrant issued by Swedish authorities.

In his ruling, the judge dismantled the defense case against extradition point by point. He rejected the claim that comments made against Assange by Swedish prosecutors and politicians would pervert the course of justice.

Assange's lawyers also said that Sweden's custom of hearing rape cases behind closed doors meant he would not get a fair trial, but Riddle said the practice was common in Sweden.

Assange's lawyers have questioned Sweden's judicial process and expressed concern their client risks being handed over to the United States, which is investigating whether Assange and WikiLeaks have violated U.S. laws by distributing secret government documents.

WikiLeaks has released tens of thousands of U.S. military documents on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and on U.S. diplomatic efforts worldwide, deeply angering U.S. officials.

The judge said it was wrong for the defense to raise the question of a possible extradition to the U.S. or the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, given the absence of any evidence that Assange risks torture or execution.

The Swedish case stems from charges of sexual misconduct made against Assange by two women after he visited Sweden last August. Lawyers for Sweden have argued that authorities made repeated attempts to interview Assange while he was in Scandinavia, to no avail.

In Sweden, Claes Borgstrom, the lawyer representing the two women, said the decision had been expected.

"It's just too bad that it took so long," Borgstrom said. "(Assange) will probably appeal this decision for some reason that is hard to understand. He claims that he hasn't committed a crime so he should just come here and sort it out. I expect that he will be on Swedish soil before the summer."

Bjorn Hurtig, Assange's Swedish lawyer, told The Associated Press that he was already preparing to represent his client.

"If he comes to Sweden I think he has great chances of being freed," Hurtig said. "And I'll be waiting for him, ready to fight for him tooth and nail."

The hearing Thursday attracted Assange's usual coterie of high-profile supporters, including Bianca Jagger and Jemima Goldsmith.

About a dozen WikiLeaks and Assange supporters in ski hats and parkas gathered outside the court hours before the hearing, hanging banners and signs saying "Free Julian Assange and Bradley Manning," the U.S. Army private suspected of leaking the documents to WikiLeaks.

Vaughan Smith, the founder of the Frontline Club who has been hosting Assange at his country estate, said the ruling was "disappointing."

Smith said Assange remains welcome at his house.

"He's good company," Smith said.

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Judge says WikiLeaks' Assange can be extradited

By CASSANDRA VINOGRAD, Associated Press â€“ 1 hr 3 mins ago

LONDON – Julian Assange can be extradited to Sweden in a sex crimes inquiry, a British judge ruled Thursday, rejecting claims by the WikiLeaks founder that he would not face a fair trial there. Assange'slawyer said he would appeal.

Judge Howard Riddle said the allegations of rape and sexual molestation by two women against Assange meet the definition of extraditable offenses and said the Swedish warrant had been properly issued and was valid.

Assange, 39, a key figure in the release of tens of thousands of secret U.S. government and military documents, has been out on bail during the extradition fight. He has seven days to appeal the ruling in British courts.

After hearing three days of testimony this month, Riddle concluded "there is simply no reason to believe there has been a mistake" about the European Arrest Warrant issued by Swedish authorities.

In his ruling, the judge dismantled the defense case against extradition point by point. He rejected the claim that comments made against Assange by Swedish prosecutors and politicians would pervert the course of justice.

Assange's lawyers also said that Sweden's custom of hearing rape cases behind closed doors meant he would not get a fair trial, but Riddle said the practice was common in Sweden.

Assange's lawyers have questioned Sweden's judicial process and expressed concern their client risks being handed over to the United States, which is investigating whether Assange and WikiLeaks have violated U.S. laws by distributing secret government documents.

WikiLeaks has released tens of thousands of U.S. military documents on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and on U.S. diplomatic efforts worldwide, deeply angering U.S. officials.

The judge said it was wrong for the defense to raise the question of a possible extradition to the U.S. or the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, given the absence of any evidence that Assange risks torture or execution.

The Swedish case stems from charges of sexual misconduct made against Assange by two women after he visited Sweden last August. Lawyers for Sweden have argued that authorities made repeated attempts to interview Assange while he was in Scandinavia, to no avail.

In Sweden, Claes Borgstrom, the lawyer representing the two women, said the decision had been expected.

"It's just too bad that it took so long," Borgstrom said. "(Assange) will probably appeal this decision for some reason that is hard to understand. He claims that he hasn't committed a crime so he should just come here and sort it out. I expect that he will be on Swedish soil before the summer."

Bjorn Hurtig, Assange's Swedish lawyer, told The Associated Press that he was already preparing to represent his client.

"If he comes to Sweden I think he has great chances of being freed," Hurtig said. "And I'll be waiting for him, ready to fight for him tooth and nail."

The hearing Thursday attracted Assange's usual coterie of high-profile supporters, including Bianca Jagger and Jemima Goldsmith.

About a dozen WikiLeaks and Assange supporters in ski hats and parkas gathered outside the court hours before the hearing, hanging banners and signs saying "Free Julian Assange and Bradley Manning," the U.S. Army private suspected of leaking the documents to WikiLeaks.

Vaughan Smith, the founder of the Frontline Club who has been hosting Assange at his country estate, said the ruling was "disappointing."

Smith said Assange remains welcome at his house.

"He's good company," Smith said.

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Judge says WikiLeaks' Assange can be extradited

By CASSANDRA VINOGRAD, Associated Press â€“ 1 hr 3 mins ago

LONDON – Julian Assange can be extradited to Sweden in a sex crimes inquiry, a British judge ruled Thursday, rejecting claims by the WikiLeaks founder that he would not face a fair trial there. Assange'slawyer said he would appeal.

Judge Howard Riddle said the allegations of rape and sexual molestation by two women against Assange meet the definition of extraditable offenses and said the Swedish warrant had been properly issued and was valid.

Assange, 39, a key figure in the release of tens of thousands of secret U.S. government and military documents, has been out on bail during the extradition fight. He has seven days to appeal the ruling in British courts.

After hearing three days of testimony this month, Riddle concluded "there is simply no reason to believe there has been a mistake" about the European Arrest Warrant issued by Swedish authorities.

In his ruling, the judge dismantled the defense case against extradition point by point. He rejected the claim that comments made against Assange by Swedish prosecutors and politicians would pervert the course of justice.

Assange's lawyers also said that Sweden's custom of hearing rape cases behind closed doors meant he would not get a fair trial, but Riddle said the practice was common in Sweden.

Assange's lawyers have questioned Sweden's judicial process and expressed concern their client risks being handed over to the United States, which is investigating whether Assange and WikiLeaks have violated U.S. laws by distributing secret government documents.

WikiLeaks has released tens of thousands of U.S. military documents on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and on U.S. diplomatic efforts worldwide, deeply angering U.S. officials.

The judge said it was wrong for the defense to raise the question of a possible extradition to the U.S. or the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, given the absence of any evidence that Assange risks torture or execution.

The Swedish case stems from charges of sexual misconduct made against Assange by two women after he visited Sweden last August. Lawyers for Sweden have argued that authorities made repeated attempts to interview Assange while he was in Scandinavia, to no avail.

In Sweden, Claes Borgstrom, the lawyer representing the two women, said the decision had been expected.

"It's just too bad that it took so long," Borgstrom said. "(Assange) will probably appeal this decision for some reason that is hard to understand. He claims that he hasn't committed a crime so he should just come here and sort it out. I expect that he will be on Swedish soil before the summer."

Bjorn Hurtig, Assange's Swedish lawyer, told The Associated Press that he was already preparing to represent his client.

"If he comes to Sweden I think he has great chances of being freed," Hurtig said. "And I'll be waiting for him, ready to fight for him tooth and nail."

The hearing Thursday attracted Assange's usual coterie of high-profile supporters, including Bianca Jagger and Jemima Goldsmith.

About a dozen WikiLeaks and Assange supporters in ski hats and parkas gathered outside the court hours before the hearing, hanging banners and signs saying "Free Julian Assange and Bradley Manning," the U.S. Army private suspected of leaking the documents to WikiLeaks.

Vaughan Smith, the founder of the Frontline Club who has been hosting Assange at his country estate, said the ruling was "disappointing."

Smith said Assange remains welcome at his house.

"He's good company," Smith said.

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Judge says WikiLeaks' Assange can be extradited

By CASSANDRA VINOGRAD, Associated Press â€“ 1 hr 3 mins ago

LONDON – Julian Assange can be extradited to Sweden in a sex crimes inquiry, a British judge ruled Thursday, rejecting claims by the WikiLeaks founder that he would not face a fair trial there. Assange'slawyer said he would appeal.

Judge Howard Riddle said the allegations of rape and sexual molestation by two women against Assange meet the definition of extraditable offenses and said the Swedish warrant had been properly issued and was valid.

Assange, 39, a key figure in the release of tens of thousands of secret U.S. government and military documents, has been out on bail during the extradition fight. He has seven days to appeal the ruling in British courts.

After hearing three days of testimony this month, Riddle concluded "there is simply no reason to believe there has been a mistake" about the European Arrest Warrant issued by Swedish authorities.

In his ruling, the judge dismantled the defense case against extradition point by point. He rejected the claim that comments made against Assange by Swedish prosecutors and politicians would pervert the course of justice.

Assange's lawyers also said that Sweden's custom of hearing rape cases behind closed doors meant he would not get a fair trial, but Riddle said the practice was common in Sweden.

Assange's lawyers have questioned Sweden's judicial process and expressed concern their client risks being handed over to the United States, which is investigating whether Assange and WikiLeaks have violated U.S. laws by distributing secret government documents.

WikiLeaks has released tens of thousands of U.S. military documents on the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and on U.S. diplomatic efforts worldwide, deeply angering U.S. officials.

The judge said it was wrong for the defense to raise the question of a possible extradition to the U.S. or the U.S. prison in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, given the absence of any evidence that Assange risks torture or execution.

The Swedish case stems from charges of sexual misconduct made against Assange by two women after he visited Sweden last August. Lawyers for Sweden have argued that authorities made repeated attempts to interview Assange while he was in Scandinavia, to no avail.

In Sweden, Claes Borgstrom, the lawyer representing the two women, said the decision had been expected.

"It's just too bad that it took so long," Borgstrom said. "(Assange) will probably appeal this decision for some reason that is hard to understand. He claims that he hasn't committed a crime so he should just come here and sort it out. I expect that he will be on Swedish soil before the summer."

Bjorn Hurtig, Assange's Swedish lawyer, told The Associated Press that he was already preparing to represent his client.

"If he comes to Sweden I think he has great chances of being freed," Hurtig said. "And I'll be waiting for him, ready to fight for him tooth and nail."

The hearing Thursday attracted Assange's usual coterie of high-profile supporters, including Bianca Jagger and Jemima Goldsmith.

About a dozen WikiLeaks and Assange supporters in ski hats and parkas gathered outside the court hours before the hearing, hanging banners and signs saying "Free Julian Assange and Bradley Manning," the U.S. Army private suspected of leaking the documents to WikiLeaks.

Vaughan Smith, the founder of the Frontline Club who has been hosting Assange at his country estate, said the ruling was "disappointing."

Smith said Assange remains welcome at his house.

"He's good company," Smith said.

    •  

     

The right thing has been done.

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About a dozen WikiLeaks and Assange supporters in ski hats and parkas gathered outside the court hours before the hearing, hanging banners and signs saying "Free 
 and Bradley Manning," the U.S. Army private suspected of leaking the documents to WikiLeaks.

Why were they in ski hats and parkas.  Trying to hide their identities, what are they afraid of ?  Or was it really cold.

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Al Jazeera has reported that an additional 22 charges have been brought against Bradly Manning, the solider who released the government classified cables to wikileaks. One of those charges is "Aiding the enemy," which can carry the death penalty if proven, although prosecution is reported to have said it would pursue a life-sentence instead. The punishment must be grave, but I would personally not support the death penalty for Manning.

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Al Jazeera has reported that an additional 22 charges have been brought against Bradly Manning, the solider who released the government classified cables to wikileaks. One of those charges is "Aiding the enemy," which can carry the death penalty if proven, although prosecution is reported to have said it would pursue a life-sentence instead. The punishment must be grave, but I would personally not support the death penalty for Manning.

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Al Jazeera has reported that an additional 22 charges have been brought against Bradly Manning, the solider who released the government classified cables to wikileaks. One of those charges is "Aiding the enemy," which can carry the death penalty if proven, although prosecution is reported to have said it would pursue a life-sentence instead. The punishment must be grave, but I would personally not support the death penalty for Manning.

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