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edgeforpeace

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I love that song "Dirty Day". Bono is a man of Grace. Any decision he makes, I support. I wish I was there to listen to him personally sing this song. I am always wishing I could be with him where he is at. I am hungry for his energy, for Bono to see, feel and be with him, enjoy his existence, his presence. A Man who is Positive Energies; Bono is Sacred, too sacred for us all, we should all protect him for ourselves,  and quite frankly when it comes to Assange, I prefer a silent Prince. Neutral Prince. Thats a government thing. Bono has too of a great labour that needs to be done, and he does it gracefully and he is clean, not spiritually corrupted. I don't want his name mentioned with anything having to do with this man, Assange. Anyone who values the truth, will be Neutral on this man. Okay, he has threatened to leak more, but I think, this Assange man has done what no other man has done, everyone will have to do their jobs, not like 9/11 where we were hours away from the problem, in other words, too confortable, not ready. Now, even China will have to be on their toes. Bono sings this song so beautiful, I listen to it, and I love him even more. I don't want his name mentioned on anything having to do with Assange or what the consequences of what he did is, we can't drag Bono into it, we need him, as what he is, a light to many. Bono a light to many, is better if he stands "still on this" and not say anything. I like him inside just the way he is, perfect for us all. Bono is the greatest man for us all, and I don't want anything or anyone touching his inside or trying to drag it out of him. The name "a Light To Many" is the reason behind my feelings on this. We can speculate, guess what he thinks, but is better if we don't disturb the Giant that he is. A man like "Bono" comes only once in a million years, and I just want to enjoy him even if its like this, thru the miles and the walls set up by this world filled with vanity. If people only knew just how special he is, they would be protecting him like Ghandi, or Moses. Bono is our only light today, a true servant, who has been given God's grace.

Realmawake

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In the pursuit of transparency, Assange lost his clarity.

His former partner has broken away from him to launch a new whistle-blower site, which he alleges will be less political and more responsible--adhering to the stated goals of the original organization without the corruption of reason and sleaze of spirit creeping in.  Let us see if he can be successful.

Assange is now trying to distance himself from the hackers, after several days of refusing to "oppose or condone" their actions.  I guess being ambiguous about criminals was complicating his cause further.  Idiot.

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In the pursuit of transparency, Assange lost his clarity.

His former partner has broken away from him to launch a new whistle-blower site, which he alleges will be less political and more responsible--adhering to the stated goals of the original organization without the corruption of reason and sleaze of spirit creeping in.  Let us see if he can be successful.

Assange is now trying to distance himself from the hackers, after several days of refusing to "oppose or condone" their actions.  I guess being ambiguous about criminals was complicating his cause further.  Idiot.

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In the pursuit of transparency, Assange lost his clarity.

His former partner has broken away from him to launch a new whistle-blower site, which he alleges will be less political and more responsible--adhering to the stated goals of the original organization without the corruption of reason and sleaze of spirit creeping in.  Let us see if he can be successful.

Assange is now trying to distance himself from the hackers, after several days of refusing to "oppose or condone" their actions.  I guess being ambiguous about criminals was complicating his cause further.  Idiot.

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Its not a support for him. Its the whole thing gives clarity, the truth comes out. That is important for us all. But, I don't think it is proper to do what he did without consulting the parties first, or at least speaking to them first. Sometimes, I think that the government knows where Osama is, and when I do, I also think about when former President Bush was in the white house, he allowed the families to board a plane and head back to Saudi Arabia. I think that was evil. I don't like that. They should have stayed, and taken responsibility for what their family member did here. I think they do nothing to stop their member from doing what he does, not even advice him or use their influence to stop him. So, I think they are in acceptance of what he does, so they are as he is.

Realmawake

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The bin Laden family severed ties with Osama many years before 9/11.

This is like saying you should be held responsible for a murder committed by a brother who has been estranged and separate from the family for a decade or more.  That would be silly, no?

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The bin Laden family severed ties with Osama many years before 9/11.

This is like saying you should be held responsible for a murder committed by a brother who has been estranged and separate from the family for a decade or more.  That would be silly, no?

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The bin Laden family severed ties with Osama many years before 9/11.

This is like saying you should be held responsible for a murder committed by a brother who has been estranged and separate from the family for a decade or more.  That would be silly, no?

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The bin Laden family severed ties with Osama many years before 9/11.
This is like saying you should be held responsible for a murder committed by a brother who has been estranged and separate from the family for a decade or more.  That would be silly, no?

 

Totally agree with you on this. You are so very eloquent and such a great writer. Very well said.

 

Illogical and absurd arguments need to be ironed out, piece by piece, to reveal the truth about what they are really saying. If it were not for your clarity, on these issues security, so much on this board could get confusing and convoluted.

 

You have a great mind, which I admire.

 

I think it entirely possible for you to pass the LSAT.

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I'm all for transparency in government. But when you start releasing lists of sensitive sites and interfering with our diplomatic corps' ability to do it's job, you've crossed the line. There are certain things that are kept confidential for a reason. As long as there is a LEGITIMATE national security reason for things to be kept confidential, I'm OK with that.

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Hi, Spicy.

 

I just wish tothank you for the very nice words you offered to me earlier in the thread. I am sorry I have been away from the site and had not read them beforenow. This last week has kept me deeply buried in all of the final work neededto get my start-up and website off the ground in the New Year.  What a lotof work it is!  But fun :-)

 

I am not sure ifI have a "great mind,†but I do try very hard to find and maintainclarity.  This is especially difficult when so many are doing so much tomuddy the waters so utterly.

 

This past week, Ihave gone to listen to all sorts of people here in DC talk about the impact ofwiki leaks on their work--I have heard from members of the State Department,the military and intelligence circles, lawmakers on the Hill, and protestvoices such as Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers during theVietnam War and has come out in support of Assange.

 

With theexception of Ellsberg, the overwhelming sentiment that I am hearing and sensingis one of terrible loss and regret--not because the wiki leaks have exposedterrible wrong-doings on the part of the US government.  In fact, theyhave done quite the opposite.  Our diplomats appear in the cables to bevery smart, dedicated and passionate individuals who truly do believe in humanrights and democracy and are operating without cynicism--perhaps with even abit too much naïveté.  There is no great blob on the face of America as theresult of Assange’s shit-slinging.

 

But, leaders inother countries are not faring as well, and there has been great fall-out forsome of them among their own populations.  And, the ability to conductdiplomacy has been forever changed.  And, rather than resulting in MORE transparency,Assange is forcing the government to become less transparent and lesseffective.

 

For example: Washingtonis notoriously slow and constantly lagging behind nearly every trend of note. This is because government systems are huge sluggish bureaucratic beaststhat cannot react quickly.  Now governments around the world may have tolimit how they communicate across their global networks by relying less ondigital technologies.  How does anyone expect any government to keep pacewith threats and opportunities if it is forced to communicate by fax machineand courier in order to maintain confidentiality?

 

And, all of thework that went into improving transparency and increasing information sharingacross the US government after 9/11, will  be rolled back somewhat out ofnecessity-- meaning, there will be less information sharing between agencies andless efficiency in government action.  I will remind everyone that all ofthe evidence pointing to 9/11 was in the system, but nobody was sharing thatinformation between agencies, so the plot slipped past unnoticed.  

 

And, lessgovernment activity will be committed to print at all now—out of necessity—which means we will not have a full  historical record of our decision-making.  Does thissound like a good idea to anyone?

 

 

American individualswere the least damaged by this leak.  However, individuals from othernations suffered much more.  And some of those from more lawless areas ofthe world may come looking for Assange and his followers themselves.  Theterrible irony here is that if any of them "catch" him, histhoughtless supporters will undoubtedly blame the US and think we are responsible.  In fact, Assange will be lucky if he ends up protected within the safetyof an American jail.

 

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Hi, Spicy.

 

I just wish tothank you for the very nice words you offered to me earlier in the thread. I am sorry I have been away from the site and had not read them beforenow. This last week has kept me deeply buried in all of the final work neededto get my start-up and website off the ground in the New Year.  What a lotof work it is!  But fun :-)

 

I am not sure ifI have a "great mind,†but I do try very hard to find and maintainclarity.  This is especially difficult when so many are doing so much tomuddy the waters so utterly.

 

This past week, Ihave gone to listen to all sorts of people here in DC talk about the impact ofwiki leaks on their work--I have heard from members of the State Department,the military and intelligence circles, lawmakers on the Hill, and protestvoices such as Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers during theVietnam War and has come out in support of Assange.

 

With theexception of Ellsberg, the overwhelming sentiment that I am hearing and sensingis one of terrible loss and regret--not because the wiki leaks have exposedterrible wrong-doings on the part of the US government.  In fact, theyhave done quite the opposite.  Our diplomats appear in the cables to bevery smart, dedicated and passionate individuals who truly do believe in humanrights and democracy and are operating without cynicism--perhaps with even abit too much naïveté.  There is no great blob on the face of America as theresult of Assange’s shit-slinging.

 

But, leaders inother countries are not faring as well, and there has been great fall-out forsome of them among their own populations.  And, the ability to conductdiplomacy has been forever changed.  And, rather than resulting in MORE transparency,Assange is forcing the government to become less transparent and lesseffective.

 

For example: Washingtonis notoriously slow and constantly lagging behind nearly every trend of note. This is because government systems are huge sluggish bureaucratic beaststhat cannot react quickly.  Now governments around the world may have tolimit how they communicate across their global networks by relying less ondigital technologies.  How does anyone expect any government to keep pacewith threats and opportunities if it is forced to communicate by fax machineand courier in order to maintain confidentiality?

 

And, all of thework that went into improving transparency and increasing information sharingacross the US government after 9/11, will  be rolled back somewhat out ofnecessity-- meaning, there will be less information sharing between agencies andless efficiency in government action.  I will remind everyone that all ofthe evidence pointing to 9/11 was in the system, but nobody was sharing thatinformation between agencies, so the plot slipped past unnoticed.  

 

And, lessgovernment activity will be committed to print at all now—out of necessity—which means we will not have a full  historical record of our decision-making.  Does thissound like a good idea to anyone?

 

 

American individualswere the least damaged by this leak.  However, individuals from othernations suffered much more.  And some of those from more lawless areas ofthe world may come looking for Assange and his followers themselves.  Theterrible irony here is that if any of them "catch" him, histhoughtless supporters will undoubtedly blame the US and think we are responsible.  In fact, Assange will be lucky if he ends up protected within the safetyof an American jail.

 

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Hi, Spicy.

 

I just wish tothank you for the very nice words you offered to me earlier in the thread. I am sorry I have been away from the site and had not read them beforenow. This last week has kept me deeply buried in all of the final work neededto get my start-up and website off the ground in the New Year.  What a lotof work it is!  But fun :-)

 

I am not sure ifI have a "great mind,†but I do try very hard to find and maintainclarity.  This is especially difficult when so many are doing so much tomuddy the waters so utterly.

 

This past week, Ihave gone to listen to all sorts of people here in DC talk about the impact ofwiki leaks on their work--I have heard from members of the State Department,the military and intelligence circles, lawmakers on the Hill, and protestvoices such as Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers during theVietnam War and has come out in support of Assange.

 

With theexception of Ellsberg, the overwhelming sentiment that I am hearing and sensingis one of terrible loss and regret--not because the wiki leaks have exposedterrible wrong-doings on the part of the US government.  In fact, theyhave done quite the opposite.  Our diplomats appear in the cables to bevery smart, dedicated and passionate individuals who truly do believe in humanrights and democracy and are operating without cynicism--perhaps with even abit too much naïveté.  There is no great blob on the face of America as theresult of Assange’s shit-slinging.

 

But, leaders inother countries are not faring as well, and there has been great fall-out forsome of them among their own populations.  And, the ability to conductdiplomacy has been forever changed.  And, rather than resulting in MORE transparency,Assange is forcing the government to become less transparent and lesseffective.

 

For example: Washingtonis notoriously slow and constantly lagging behind nearly every trend of note. This is because government systems are huge sluggish bureaucratic beaststhat cannot react quickly.  Now governments around the world may have tolimit how they communicate across their global networks by relying less ondigital technologies.  How does anyone expect any government to keep pacewith threats and opportunities if it is forced to communicate by fax machineand courier in order to maintain confidentiality?

 

And, all of thework that went into improving transparency and increasing information sharingacross the US government after 9/11, will  be rolled back somewhat out ofnecessity-- meaning, there will be less information sharing between agencies andless efficiency in government action.  I will remind everyone that all ofthe evidence pointing to 9/11 was in the system, but nobody was sharing thatinformation between agencies, so the plot slipped past unnoticed.  

 

And, lessgovernment activity will be committed to print at all now—out of necessity—which means we will not have a full  historical record of our decision-making.  Does thissound like a good idea to anyone?

 

 

American individualswere the least damaged by this leak.  However, individuals from othernations suffered much more.  And some of those from more lawless areas ofthe world may come looking for Assange and his followers themselves.  Theterrible irony here is that if any of them "catch" him, histhoughtless supporters will undoubtedly blame the US and think we are responsible.  In fact, Assange will be lucky if he ends up protected within the safetyof an American jail.

 

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Avaaz.org petition WikiLeaks: Stop the crackdown http://www.avaaz.org/en/w...ion/?cl=858334606&v=7769

 

Law experts say WikiLeaks in the clear (ABC)

http://www.abc.net.au/wor...ontent/2010/s3086781.htm

 

WikiLeaks are a bunch of terrorists, says leading U.S. congressman (Mail Online)

http://www.dailymail.co.u...gressman-Peter-King.html

 

Cyber guerrillas can help US (Financial Times)

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0...ab49a.html#axzz17QvQ4Ht5

 

Amazon drops WikiLeaks under political pressure (Yahoo)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/a...twikileakscongressamazon

 

"WikiLeaks avenged by hacktivists" (PC World):

http://www.pcworld.com/bu...nged_by_hacktivists.html

 

US Gov shows true control over Internet with WikiLeaks containment (Tippett.org)

http://www.tippett.org/20...h-wikileaks-containment/

 

US embassy cables culprit should be executed, says Mike Huckabee (The Guardian)

http://www.guardian.co.uk...s-executed-mike-huckabee

 

WikiLeaks ditched by MasterCard, Visa. Who's next? (The Christian Science Monitor)

http://www.csmonitor.com/...terCard-Visa.-Who-s-next

 

Assange's Interpol Warrant Is for Having Sex Without a Condom (The Slatest)

http://slatest.slate.com/id/2276690/

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The loud-mouthed fanatics among some of the US political personalities who are calling for Assange's assassination, are way off base and need to shut-up. They are doing just as much damage with this sort of radical rhetoric. I hate spotlight-grabbing fanatical hype freaks. And they exist on all sides. Blech.

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The loud-mouthed fanatics among some of the US political personalities who are calling for Assange's assassination, are way off base and need to shut-up. They are doing just as much damage with this sort of radical rhetoric. I hate spotlight-grabbing fanatical hype freaks. And they exist on all sides. Blech.

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The loud-mouthed fanatics among some of the US political personalities who are calling for Assange's assassination, are way off base and need to shut-up. They are doing just as much damage with this sort of radical rhetoric. I hate spotlight-grabbing fanatical hype freaks. And they exist on all sides. Blech.

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[quote name='surrenders wrote:


Panth']It's no worse than the news media outlying all the plans and locations of military and the plans in the event of attacks on global news where anyone can watch it.

 

 

At least Assange is being honest about doing that. He's a real life Bond villian.

 

Give me a F***ing break!  Do your homework!

This is the kind of post I won't respond to.

 

Well 'cept for this.

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have you thought how people are hacking into these places so easly? I mean surely the USA millatery should have total virus firewall security!

 

Also this has been going on since 2006 it's only now the USA are actually doing something??

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WikiLeaks

 

and i quote

 

Founding

 

The wikileaks.org domain name was registered on 4 October 2006.[5] The website was unveiled, and published its first document in December 2006.[32][33] The site claims to have been "founded by Chinese dissidents, journalists, mathematicians and start-up company technologists, from the US, Taiwan, Europe, Australia and South Africa".[4]

 

The creators of WikiLeaks have not been formally identified.[34] It has been represented in public since January 2007 by Julian Assange and others. Assange describes himself as a member of WikiLeaks' advisory board.[35] News reports in The Australian have called Assange the "founder of WikiLeaks".[36] According to Wired magazine, a volunteer said that Assange described himself in a private conversation as "the heart and soul of this organisation, its founder, philosopher, spokesperson, original coder, organiser, financier, and all the rest".[37] As of June 2009[update], the site had over 1,200 registered volunteers[4] and listed an advisory board comprising Assange, Phillip Adams, Wang Dan, C. J. Hinke, Ben Laurie, Tashi Namgyal Khamsitsang, Xiao Qiang, Chico Whitaker and Wang Youcai.[38] Despite appearing on the list Khamsitsang said that while he received an e-mail from WikiLeaks, he had never agreed to be an advisor.[39] Adams said he'd also never met Assange or been asked for any advice and suggested that other members of the board hadn't either.[38]

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Cybersecurity is an incredibly complex equation, and new holes open up as soon old ones are plugged.  The pentagon and white house get probed hundreds if not thousands of times a day; US companies have lost billions upon billions in intellectual property.  The security systems will continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, and artificial intelligence ought to make it possible for them to automatically counter-attack.  But this will take time.   There is likely to also be a revamp of the whole intelligence classification system in the US as a result of this, which is appropriate.

But, again, these cables are only classified as "secret," which is the lowest classification possible, and one which hundreds of thousands of people hold. Nothing super critical to the U.S. carries just a "secret" classification.   Like I have said before, nothing in these cable is all that compromising for the US, and just about everything is common knowledge to anyone who bothers to keep up with news and foreign affairs.  The damage is in the diminished environment of confidentiality that diplomacy depends on.  And the critical facilities list probably should have been classified higher than it was.

The wikileaks folks have done terrible damage, but not in the way they intended or to whom they intended.  They truly are idiots as well as malevolent anarchists.

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Cybersecurity is an incredibly complex equation, and new holes open up as soon old ones are plugged.  The pentagon and white house get probed hundreds if not thousands of times a day; US companies have lost billions upon billions in intellectual property.  The security systems will continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, and artificial intelligence ought to make it possible for them to automatically counter-attack.  But this will take time.   There is likely to also be a revamp of the whole intelligence classification system in the US as a result of this, which is appropriate.

But, again, these cables are only classified as "secret," which is the lowest classification possible, and one which hundreds of thousands of people hold. Nothing super critical to the U.S. carries just a "secret" classification.   Like I have said before, nothing in these cable is all that compromising for the US, and just about everything is common knowledge to anyone who bothers to keep up with news and foreign affairs.  The damage is in the diminished environment of confidentiality that diplomacy depends on.  And the critical facilities list probably should have been classified higher than it was.

The wikileaks folks have done terrible damage, but not in the way they intended or to whom they intended.  They truly are idiots as well as malevolent anarchists.

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Cybersecurity is an incredibly complex equation, and new holes open up as soon old ones are plugged.  The pentagon and white house get probed hundreds if not thousands of times a day; US companies have lost billions upon billions in intellectual property.  The security systems will continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, and artificial intelligence ought to make it possible for them to automatically counter-attack.  But this will take time.   There is likely to also be a revamp of the whole intelligence classification system in the US as a result of this, which is appropriate.

But, again, these cables are only classified as "secret," which is the lowest classification possible, and one which hundreds of thousands of people hold. Nothing super critical to the U.S. carries just a "secret" classification.   Like I have said before, nothing in these cable is all that compromising for the US, and just about everything is common knowledge to anyone who bothers to keep up with news and foreign affairs.  The damage is in the diminished environment of confidentiality that diplomacy depends on.  And the critical facilities list probably should have been classified higher than it was.

The wikileaks folks have done terrible damage, but not in the way they intended or to whom they intended.  They truly are idiots as well as malevolent anarchists.

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But, to be clear--wikileaks is not the result of hacking. It is the result of a low level military member who downloaded classified cables and gave the info to wikileaks. He is in prison for espionage now. Where he will stay.

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