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Civic Duty shoes benefits New Orleans nonprofit

By Alison Fensterstock

 

 

“Walk the walk†is the slogan of Civic Duty, a sneaker company with a socially responsible bent whose latest design has a New Orleans-based mission.

 

9829271-large.jpg

(Civic Duty shoes to benefit Common Ground)

 

Starting this year, Civic Duty plans to pick a nonprofit to be the annual beneficiary of sales of a specially designed shoe. The inaugural winner is Common Ground, the New Orleans recovery organization that organizes volunteers for a variety of community-based efforts.

 

The uppers of Civic Duty’s Keds-like sneakers are constructed out of Tyvek, a material that’ll be familiar to any local who had to gut and rebuild a house. Tyvek is the lightweight, durable water-resistant material used to seal buildings.

 

Common Ground will receive 100 percent of the proceeds from sales of the 2011 “Shoe For A Cause,†the design of which also might remind New Orleanians of a happier milestone in our city’s history. The $54 shoes are black and gold, with a subtle fleur-de-lis embossed just below the laces.

 

source: nola

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Music Rising 

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Support Haiti, help Haiti

 

 

Civic Duty shoes benefits New Orleans nonprofit

By Alison Fensterstock

 

 

“Walk the walk†is the slogan of Civic Duty, a sneaker company with a socially responsible bent whose latest design has a New Orleans-based mission.

 

9829271-large.jpg

(Civic Duty shoes to benefit Common Ground)

 

Starting this year, Civic Duty plans to pick a nonprofit to be the annual beneficiary of sales of a specially designed shoe. The inaugural winner is Common Ground, the New Orleans recovery organization that organizes volunteers for a variety of community-based efforts.

 

The uppers of Civic Duty’s Keds-like sneakers are constructed out of Tyvek, a material that’ll be familiar to any local who had to gut and rebuild a house. Tyvek is the lightweight, durable water-resistant material used to seal buildings.

 

Common Ground will receive 100 percent of the proceeds from sales of the 2011 “Shoe For A Cause,†the design of which also might remind New Orleanians of a happier milestone in our city’s history. The $54 shoes are black and gold, with a subtle fleur-de-lis embossed just below the laces.

 

source: nola

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Music Rising 

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Support Haiti, help Haiti

 

 

Civic Duty shoes benefits New Orleans nonprofit

By Alison Fensterstock

 

 

“Walk the walk†is the slogan of Civic Duty, a sneaker company with a socially responsible bent whose latest design has a New Orleans-based mission.

 

9829271-large.jpg

(Civic Duty shoes to benefit Common Ground)

 

Starting this year, Civic Duty plans to pick a nonprofit to be the annual beneficiary of sales of a specially designed shoe. The inaugural winner is Common Ground, the New Orleans recovery organization that organizes volunteers for a variety of community-based efforts.

 

The uppers of Civic Duty’s Keds-like sneakers are constructed out of Tyvek, a material that’ll be familiar to any local who had to gut and rebuild a house. Tyvek is the lightweight, durable water-resistant material used to seal buildings.

 

Common Ground will receive 100 percent of the proceeds from sales of the 2011 “Shoe For A Cause,†the design of which also might remind New Orleanians of a happier milestone in our city’s history. The $54 shoes are black and gold, with a subtle fleur-de-lis embossed just below the laces.

 

source: nola

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Music Rising 

follow Music Rising:twitter

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Support Haiti, help Haiti

 

 

Civic Duty shoes benefits New Orleans nonprofit

By Alison Fensterstock

 

 

“Walk the walk†is the slogan of Civic Duty, a sneaker company with a socially responsible bent whose latest design has a New Orleans-based mission.

 

9829271-large.jpg

(Civic Duty shoes to benefit Common Ground)

 

Starting this year, Civic Duty plans to pick a nonprofit to be the annual beneficiary of sales of a specially designed shoe. The inaugural winner is Common Ground, the New Orleans recovery organization that organizes volunteers for a variety of community-based efforts.

 

The uppers of Civic Duty’s Keds-like sneakers are constructed out of Tyvek, a material that’ll be familiar to any local who had to gut and rebuild a house. Tyvek is the lightweight, durable water-resistant material used to seal buildings.

 

Common Ground will receive 100 percent of the proceeds from sales of the 2011 “Shoe For A Cause,†the design of which also might remind New Orleanians of a happier milestone in our city’s history. The $54 shoes are black and gold, with a subtle fleur-de-lis embossed just below the laces.

 

source: nola

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Harry Connick Jr. to host TV show celebrating Louisiana music, history  - 

NEW ORLEANS - Grammy-winning jazz singer Harry Connick Jr. will host and perform in a television show that pays tribute to the music of Louisiana and the industries that have shaped its culture and history.

The one-hour show, a Louisiana Public Broadcasting special set to air in December, will be available to PBS affiliates nationwide next year. It will include performances of "You Are My Sunshine" by many of Louisiana's most famous musicians — among them Tim McGraw, Irma Thomas, Zachary Richard, Better Than Ezra, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Guy. The production will cross many Louisiana musical genres such as Cajun, zydeco, jazz, blues, gospel and rock.

"This is the fun part, assembling a bunch of Louisiana musicians," Connick said Friday. "There's not a lot of states that can pull from that many genres. If you think about it, it's amazing."

The as yet untitled show will mix music, interviews and video snapshots of Louisiana's economic drivers like tourism and oil and gas.

Connick, a New Orleans native, and Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne unveiled the project Friday at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter.

BP PLC is paying for the TV production and its promotion with $1 million in funds. After its massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, BP gave tourism officials in Louisiana $30 million to help the state win tourists back. Funding for this new TV production comes on top of that money, said Jacques Berry, a spokesman for the lieutenant governor.

Dardenne called the show a celebration of the state's rich musical history on the heels of the Louisiana bicentennial. He said music and food are vital to the state's culture and tourism — one of four industries that will be featured in the TV show for shaping Louisiana's economy and history. The other industries to be highlighted are agriculture, oil and gas, and the Mississippi River and its port system.

For the show, Connick and roughly a dozen other musicians will perform "You Are My Sunshine" — one of two state songs most notably associated with former Gov. Jimmie Davis.

Dardenne said Connick was the "obvious and logical choice" to host the show.

"He's not only one of America's most recognized and loved crooners of this era, he has such a close connection to New Orleans and a love for his native city," he said.

The show is one of two LPB projects Connick is hosting. The Grammy-winning singer and actor is narrating a bicentennial documentary called "Louisiana: 200 Years of Statehood," which is set to air at 7 p.m. CDT Aug. 13 on LPB. It is scheduled to air on a sister station, WLAE-TV32 in New Orleans, at 9 p.m. CDT Aug. 14.

The one-hour documentary will look at some of the most significant events in the state's history, including floods, hurricanes and the Civil War. The state's cuisine, music and political figures such as former Govs. Huey and Earl Long and Edwin Edwards will also be included.

The LPB projects are an extension of Connick's ongoing efforts to revive his hometown after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Connick and his longtime friend, jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis, founded the Musicians' Village after the storm. The pair launched the rebuilding effort in the Upper 9th Ward with the help of Habitat for Humanity.

Musicians' Village includes more than 70 new homes for displaced musicians and 10 duplexes for seniors. They also established a music centre at the site.

Last month, Connick and Marsalis were recognized for their work to help New Orleans as recipients of the 2012 Jefferson Awards, a national prize for public service that was co-founded 40 years ago by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

___

Associated Press writer Cain Burdeau contributed material to this report. yahoo

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Harry Connick Jr. to host TV show celebrating Louisiana music, history  - 

NEW ORLEANS - Grammy-winning jazz singer Harry Connick Jr. will host and perform in a television show that pays tribute to the music of Louisiana and the industries that have shaped its culture and history.

The one-hour show, a Louisiana Public Broadcasting special set to air in December, will be available to PBS affiliates nationwide next year. It will include performances of "You Are My Sunshine" by many of Louisiana's most famous musicians — among them Tim McGraw, Irma Thomas, Zachary Richard, Better Than Ezra, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Guy. The production will cross many Louisiana musical genres such as Cajun, zydeco, jazz, blues, gospel and rock.

"This is the fun part, assembling a bunch of Louisiana musicians," Connick said Friday. "There's not a lot of states that can pull from that many genres. If you think about it, it's amazing."

The as yet untitled show will mix music, interviews and video snapshots of Louisiana's economic drivers like tourism and oil and gas.

Connick, a New Orleans native, and Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne unveiled the project Friday at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter.

BP PLC is paying for the TV production and its promotion with $1 million in funds. After its massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, BP gave tourism officials in Louisiana $30 million to help the state win tourists back. Funding for this new TV production comes on top of that money, said Jacques Berry, a spokesman for the lieutenant governor.

Dardenne called the show a celebration of the state's rich musical history on the heels of the Louisiana bicentennial. He said music and food are vital to the state's culture and tourism — one of four industries that will be featured in the TV show for shaping Louisiana's economy and history. The other industries to be highlighted are agriculture, oil and gas, and the Mississippi River and its port system.

For the show, Connick and roughly a dozen other musicians will perform "You Are My Sunshine" — one of two state songs most notably associated with former Gov. Jimmie Davis.

Dardenne said Connick was the "obvious and logical choice" to host the show.

"He's not only one of America's most recognized and loved crooners of this era, he has such a close connection to New Orleans and a love for his native city," he said.

The show is one of two LPB projects Connick is hosting. The Grammy-winning singer and actor is narrating a bicentennial documentary called "Louisiana: 200 Years of Statehood," which is set to air at 7 p.m. CDT Aug. 13 on LPB. It is scheduled to air on a sister station, WLAE-TV32 in New Orleans, at 9 p.m. CDT Aug. 14.

The one-hour documentary will look at some of the most significant events in the state's history, including floods, hurricanes and the Civil War. The state's cuisine, music and political figures such as former Govs. Huey and Earl Long and Edwin Edwards will also be included.

The LPB projects are an extension of Connick's ongoing efforts to revive his hometown after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Connick and his longtime friend, jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis, founded the Musicians' Village after the storm. The pair launched the rebuilding effort in the Upper 9th Ward with the help of Habitat for Humanity.

Musicians' Village includes more than 70 new homes for displaced musicians and 10 duplexes for seniors. They also established a music centre at the site.

Last month, Connick and Marsalis were recognized for their work to help New Orleans as recipients of the 2012 Jefferson Awards, a national prize for public service that was co-founded 40 years ago by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

___

Associated Press writer Cain Burdeau contributed material to this report. yahoo

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Music Rising 
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Harry Connick Jr. to host TV show celebrating Louisiana music, history  - 

NEW ORLEANS - Grammy-winning jazz singer Harry Connick Jr. will host and perform in a television show that pays tribute to the music of Louisiana and the industries that have shaped its culture and history.

The one-hour show, a Louisiana Public Broadcasting special set to air in December, will be available to PBS affiliates nationwide next year. It will include performances of "You Are My Sunshine" by many of Louisiana's most famous musicians — among them Tim McGraw, Irma Thomas, Zachary Richard, Better Than Ezra, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Guy. The production will cross many Louisiana musical genres such as Cajun, zydeco, jazz, blues, gospel and rock.

"This is the fun part, assembling a bunch of Louisiana musicians," Connick said Friday. "There's not a lot of states that can pull from that many genres. If you think about it, it's amazing."

The as yet untitled show will mix music, interviews and video snapshots of Louisiana's economic drivers like tourism and oil and gas.

Connick, a New Orleans native, and Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne unveiled the project Friday at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter.

BP PLC is paying for the TV production and its promotion with $1 million in funds. After its massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, BP gave tourism officials in Louisiana $30 million to help the state win tourists back. Funding for this new TV production comes on top of that money, said Jacques Berry, a spokesman for the lieutenant governor.

Dardenne called the show a celebration of the state's rich musical history on the heels of the Louisiana bicentennial. He said music and food are vital to the state's culture and tourism — one of four industries that will be featured in the TV show for shaping Louisiana's economy and history. The other industries to be highlighted are agriculture, oil and gas, and the Mississippi River and its port system.

For the show, Connick and roughly a dozen other musicians will perform "You Are My Sunshine" — one of two state songs most notably associated with former Gov. Jimmie Davis.

Dardenne said Connick was the "obvious and logical choice" to host the show.

"He's not only one of America's most recognized and loved crooners of this era, he has such a close connection to New Orleans and a love for his native city," he said.

The show is one of two LPB projects Connick is hosting. The Grammy-winning singer and actor is narrating a bicentennial documentary called "Louisiana: 200 Years of Statehood," which is set to air at 7 p.m. CDT Aug. 13 on LPB. It is scheduled to air on a sister station, WLAE-TV32 in New Orleans, at 9 p.m. CDT Aug. 14.

The one-hour documentary will look at some of the most significant events in the state's history, including floods, hurricanes and the Civil War. The state's cuisine, music and political figures such as former Govs. Huey and Earl Long and Edwin Edwards will also be included.

The LPB projects are an extension of Connick's ongoing efforts to revive his hometown after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Connick and his longtime friend, jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis, founded the Musicians' Village after the storm. The pair launched the rebuilding effort in the Upper 9th Ward with the help of Habitat for Humanity.

Musicians' Village includes more than 70 new homes for displaced musicians and 10 duplexes for seniors. They also established a music centre at the site.

Last month, Connick and Marsalis were recognized for their work to help New Orleans as recipients of the 2012 Jefferson Awards, a national prize for public service that was co-founded 40 years ago by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

___

Associated Press writer Cain Burdeau contributed material to this report. yahoo

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Music Rising 
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Harry Connick Jr. to host TV show celebrating Louisiana music, history  - 

NEW ORLEANS - Grammy-winning jazz singer Harry Connick Jr. will host and perform in a television show that pays tribute to the music of Louisiana and the industries that have shaped its culture and history.

The one-hour show, a Louisiana Public Broadcasting special set to air in December, will be available to PBS affiliates nationwide next year. It will include performances of "You Are My Sunshine" by many of Louisiana's most famous musicians — among them Tim McGraw, Irma Thomas, Zachary Richard, Better Than Ezra, Jerry Lee Lewis and Buddy Guy. The production will cross many Louisiana musical genres such as Cajun, zydeco, jazz, blues, gospel and rock.

"This is the fun part, assembling a bunch of Louisiana musicians," Connick said Friday. "There's not a lot of states that can pull from that many genres. If you think about it, it's amazing."

The as yet untitled show will mix music, interviews and video snapshots of Louisiana's economic drivers like tourism and oil and gas.

Connick, a New Orleans native, and Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne unveiled the project Friday at the Old U.S. Mint in the French Quarter.

BP PLC is paying for the TV production and its promotion with $1 million in funds. After its massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, BP gave tourism officials in Louisiana $30 million to help the state win tourists back. Funding for this new TV production comes on top of that money, said Jacques Berry, a spokesman for the lieutenant governor.

Dardenne called the show a celebration of the state's rich musical history on the heels of the Louisiana bicentennial. He said music and food are vital to the state's culture and tourism — one of four industries that will be featured in the TV show for shaping Louisiana's economy and history. The other industries to be highlighted are agriculture, oil and gas, and the Mississippi River and its port system.

For the show, Connick and roughly a dozen other musicians will perform "You Are My Sunshine" — one of two state songs most notably associated with former Gov. Jimmie Davis.

Dardenne said Connick was the "obvious and logical choice" to host the show.

"He's not only one of America's most recognized and loved crooners of this era, he has such a close connection to New Orleans and a love for his native city," he said.

The show is one of two LPB projects Connick is hosting. The Grammy-winning singer and actor is narrating a bicentennial documentary called "Louisiana: 200 Years of Statehood," which is set to air at 7 p.m. CDT Aug. 13 on LPB. It is scheduled to air on a sister station, WLAE-TV32 in New Orleans, at 9 p.m. CDT Aug. 14.

The one-hour documentary will look at some of the most significant events in the state's history, including floods, hurricanes and the Civil War. The state's cuisine, music and political figures such as former Govs. Huey and Earl Long and Edwin Edwards will also be included.

The LPB projects are an extension of Connick's ongoing efforts to revive his hometown after Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Connick and his longtime friend, jazz saxophonist Branford Marsalis, founded the Musicians' Village after the storm. The pair launched the rebuilding effort in the Upper 9th Ward with the help of Habitat for Humanity.

Musicians' Village includes more than 70 new homes for displaced musicians and 10 duplexes for seniors. They also established a music centre at the site.

Last month, Connick and Marsalis were recognized for their work to help New Orleans as recipients of the 2012 Jefferson Awards, a national prize for public service that was co-founded 40 years ago by former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis.

___

Associated Press writer Cain Burdeau contributed material to this report. yahoo

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Millions spent on upkeep of empty Katrina lots

 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than 3,000 lots flooded by Hurricane Katrina and bought with federal money in an emergency bailout sit idle across this city — a multimillion-dollar drain on federal, state and city coffers that lends itself to no easy solution.

An Associated Press examination of the properties sold to the government by homeowners abandoning New Orleans after the catastrophic 2005 flood has found that about $86 million has been spent on 5,100 abandoned parcels. And there's no end in sight to maintenance costs for perhaps most of the 3,100 properties that remain unsold.

This portfolio of urban wasteland and blight represents part of the storm's difficult legacy that persists nearly seven years later.

And with federal funding for maintenance running out, there's concern the lots could fall into deeper neglect when this cash-strapped city is forced to pay for upkeep and that they could contribute to New Orleans's staggering blight. At last count the city found an estimated 43,000 blighted properties, according to a city-sponsored analysis of U.S. Postal Service data.

"Right now nobody on those 3,000-plus properties is contributing. It's costing the city and state government to maintain them. Police got to go out there, run kids out of there, drug-users," said Errol Williams, the tax assessor in New Orleans. "That's a cost to the city. If they sell one, it comes back on the tax rolls, I'm happy."

Until now, the properties have been managed by the Louisiana Land Trust, an agency set up using federal funds.

Jeff Thompson, a land-use lawyer on former Mayor Ray Nagin's rebuilding team, said the city needs to be creative. "Maybe they should make them into ponds to store water. Make them into parks or community gardens," he said.

Donald Vallee, a longtime New Orleans developer, complained that city officials had not acted fast enough.

"How many years does it take them to do something?" said Vallee, who also sits on the Louisiana Land Trust board.

He advocated selling the lots at auction. Sitting on the properties, he said, was a "pure waste of money."

Every month, LLT spends about $88 to cut the grass at each location. Other expenses range from insurance to pest control.

Since 2007, when the first homes were bought, $34 million has been spent on maintenance, $4.5 million on security and $9.1 million on overhead costs in New Orleans, according to LLT. In addition, some $38 million has been spent on demolishing 3,607 homes beyond repair and tearing up 1,256 slabs.

Visits by a reporter to neighborhoods hit the hardest by the flood found these orphaned lots are contributing to blight and the checkerboard-like rebuilding still dragging on in parts of the city.

The tour of 45 government-owned properties was focused on the Lower 9th Ward and other neighborhoods where these abandoned lots are concentrated. Overall, many unsold properties are in low-lying neighborhoods that suffered blight and poverty even before Katrina.

But they weren't confined to rundown neighborhoods. On South Galvez Street in Broadmoor, an abandoned house was the only sign of Katrina left on the block.

Jim Provensal, a musician living next door, said he wanted to buy it, but the city agency in charge of selling or developing the properties, the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, wanted $130,000.

"That's too much money!" Provensal said. "They don't care. They know if they sell the property they won't have a job."

And so, the boarded-up house sits, paint peeling.

In the Lower 9th Ward, 739 homeowners sold to the state. About 570 of those properties remain unsold and entire blocks sit undeveloped.

"The city ain't done a thing," a frustrated Carolyn J. Claiborne said on a recent day, scanning empty lots on her Lower 9th Ward street. She complained of snakes and vermin.

The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority has said it's sitting on many properties at the request of neighborhood groups to avoid flooding the market and hurting home prices.

The agency says it's drafting plans to dispose of the properties and that it has about 750 prospective buyers. It plans to hold onto many of the other properties for the foreseeable future, NORA said.

Nicole Heyman, a New Orleans-based expert on vacant and blighted property with the nonprofit Center for Community Progress, said holding onto the property is the right choice. She is advising the city on its plans.

When a city sells cheaply they end up "just putting properties in the hands of investors who drive the properties' values down," she said. Buyers often sit on vacant properties hoping for a market turnaround, and when that doesn't happen the properties end back up in the hands of a city, she said.

This summer the city has begun taking ownership of the 3,100 properties as federal funding runs out. Soon the city is expected to be in charge of cutting the grass and maintaining them.

Stacy Head, a City Council member-at-large, said the city doesn't have the resources.

"The LLT has actually done a good job of maintaining most of these properties," Head said. "So, when they're turned over to the city, our blight problems that we have not been able to manage are going to get that much worse."

Jeff Hebert, the head of NORA, said on Monday that the city will spend less on grass cutting, comparing LLT's efforts to maintaining a golf course.

"You're not going to get 18-feet-high grass on these LLT properties but it's not going to look like a putting green. We have budget realities we have to deal with," he said.

Hebert said NORA expects to pay contractors about $20 per house on grass cutting and to spend about $3 million a year overall to maintain the properties.

Head, who oversees housing issues for the City Council, expected about 1,500 to go unsold because of a lack of demand.

Many, including Head, want to see vacant lots turned into urban green spaces. NORA said it was open to working with neighborhoods, schools and the city's recreation department to turn empty lots into something useful — maybe tree nurseries, dog parks, urban farms or outdoor laboratories for biologists.

The Center for Community Progress's Heyman said that unlike other cities with an abundance of vacant property New Orleans has a strong real estate market, plenty of federal rebuilding money and lots of economic development taking place.

Based on that, she figured many can be sold at market prices. Selling the good pieces could pay for maintaining the less desirable properties, she said.

Hebert agreed and said the LLT properties are ripe for large-scale redevelopment. "Whereas other people see them as problems and issues we seem them as opportunities," he said.

Raynetta Hammler, an Avon saleswoman who lives in the St. Roch neighborhood, would love to see development on two government-owned lots across the street. Hammler suggested building a playground there.

"We have a lot of kids who currently play ball in the street," she said.

She complained that four stolen or abandoned cars had been set on fire in the lots over the previous year.

"Right now, it's an eyesore," she said. "It's not serving any purpose."

 

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Millions spent on upkeep of empty Katrina lots

 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than 3,000 lots flooded by Hurricane Katrina and bought with federal money in an emergency bailout sit idle across this city — a multimillion-dollar drain on federal, state and city coffers that lends itself to no easy solution.

An Associated Press examination of the properties sold to the government by homeowners abandoning New Orleans after the catastrophic 2005 flood has found that about $86 million has been spent on 5,100 abandoned parcels. And there's no end in sight to maintenance costs for perhaps most of the 3,100 properties that remain unsold.

This portfolio of urban wasteland and blight represents part of the storm's difficult legacy that persists nearly seven years later.

And with federal funding for maintenance running out, there's concern the lots could fall into deeper neglect when this cash-strapped city is forced to pay for upkeep and that they could contribute to New Orleans's staggering blight. At last count the city found an estimated 43,000 blighted properties, according to a city-sponsored analysis of U.S. Postal Service data.

"Right now nobody on those 3,000-plus properties is contributing. It's costing the city and state government to maintain them. Police got to go out there, run kids out of there, drug-users," said Errol Williams, the tax assessor in New Orleans. "That's a cost to the city. If they sell one, it comes back on the tax rolls, I'm happy."

Until now, the properties have been managed by the Louisiana Land Trust, an agency set up using federal funds.

Jeff Thompson, a land-use lawyer on former Mayor Ray Nagin's rebuilding team, said the city needs to be creative. "Maybe they should make them into ponds to store water. Make them into parks or community gardens," he said.

Donald Vallee, a longtime New Orleans developer, complained that city officials had not acted fast enough.

"How many years does it take them to do something?" said Vallee, who also sits on the Louisiana Land Trust board.

He advocated selling the lots at auction. Sitting on the properties, he said, was a "pure waste of money."

Every month, LLT spends about $88 to cut the grass at each location. Other expenses range from insurance to pest control.

Since 2007, when the first homes were bought, $34 million has been spent on maintenance, $4.5 million on security and $9.1 million on overhead costs in New Orleans, according to LLT. In addition, some $38 million has been spent on demolishing 3,607 homes beyond repair and tearing up 1,256 slabs.

Visits by a reporter to neighborhoods hit the hardest by the flood found these orphaned lots are contributing to blight and the checkerboard-like rebuilding still dragging on in parts of the city.

The tour of 45 government-owned properties was focused on the Lower 9th Ward and other neighborhoods where these abandoned lots are concentrated. Overall, many unsold properties are in low-lying neighborhoods that suffered blight and poverty even before Katrina.

But they weren't confined to rundown neighborhoods. On South Galvez Street in Broadmoor, an abandoned house was the only sign of Katrina left on the block.

Jim Provensal, a musician living next door, said he wanted to buy it, but the city agency in charge of selling or developing the properties, the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, wanted $130,000.

"That's too much money!" Provensal said. "They don't care. They know if they sell the property they won't have a job."

And so, the boarded-up house sits, paint peeling.

In the Lower 9th Ward, 739 homeowners sold to the state. About 570 of those properties remain unsold and entire blocks sit undeveloped.

"The city ain't done a thing," a frustrated Carolyn J. Claiborne said on a recent day, scanning empty lots on her Lower 9th Ward street. She complained of snakes and vermin.

The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority has said it's sitting on many properties at the request of neighborhood groups to avoid flooding the market and hurting home prices.

The agency says it's drafting plans to dispose of the properties and that it has about 750 prospective buyers. It plans to hold onto many of the other properties for the foreseeable future, NORA said.

Nicole Heyman, a New Orleans-based expert on vacant and blighted property with the nonprofit Center for Community Progress, said holding onto the property is the right choice. She is advising the city on its plans.

When a city sells cheaply they end up "just putting properties in the hands of investors who drive the properties' values down," she said. Buyers often sit on vacant properties hoping for a market turnaround, and when that doesn't happen the properties end back up in the hands of a city, she said.

This summer the city has begun taking ownership of the 3,100 properties as federal funding runs out. Soon the city is expected to be in charge of cutting the grass and maintaining them.

Stacy Head, a City Council member-at-large, said the city doesn't have the resources.

"The LLT has actually done a good job of maintaining most of these properties," Head said. "So, when they're turned over to the city, our blight problems that we have not been able to manage are going to get that much worse."

Jeff Hebert, the head of NORA, said on Monday that the city will spend less on grass cutting, comparing LLT's efforts to maintaining a golf course.

"You're not going to get 18-feet-high grass on these LLT properties but it's not going to look like a putting green. We have budget realities we have to deal with," he said.

Hebert said NORA expects to pay contractors about $20 per house on grass cutting and to spend about $3 million a year overall to maintain the properties.

Head, who oversees housing issues for the City Council, expected about 1,500 to go unsold because of a lack of demand.

Many, including Head, want to see vacant lots turned into urban green spaces. NORA said it was open to working with neighborhoods, schools and the city's recreation department to turn empty lots into something useful — maybe tree nurseries, dog parks, urban farms or outdoor laboratories for biologists.

The Center for Community Progress's Heyman said that unlike other cities with an abundance of vacant property New Orleans has a strong real estate market, plenty of federal rebuilding money and lots of economic development taking place.

Based on that, she figured many can be sold at market prices. Selling the good pieces could pay for maintaining the less desirable properties, she said.

Hebert agreed and said the LLT properties are ripe for large-scale redevelopment. "Whereas other people see them as problems and issues we seem them as opportunities," he said.

Raynetta Hammler, an Avon saleswoman who lives in the St. Roch neighborhood, would love to see development on two government-owned lots across the street. Hammler suggested building a playground there.

"We have a lot of kids who currently play ball in the street," she said.

She complained that four stolen or abandoned cars had been set on fire in the lots over the previous year.

"Right now, it's an eyesore," she said. "It's not serving any purpose."

 

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Millions spent on upkeep of empty Katrina lots

 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than 3,000 lots flooded by Hurricane Katrina and bought with federal money in an emergency bailout sit idle across this city — a multimillion-dollar drain on federal, state and city coffers that lends itself to no easy solution.

An Associated Press examination of the properties sold to the government by homeowners abandoning New Orleans after the catastrophic 2005 flood has found that about $86 million has been spent on 5,100 abandoned parcels. And there's no end in sight to maintenance costs for perhaps most of the 3,100 properties that remain unsold.

This portfolio of urban wasteland and blight represents part of the storm's difficult legacy that persists nearly seven years later.

And with federal funding for maintenance running out, there's concern the lots could fall into deeper neglect when this cash-strapped city is forced to pay for upkeep and that they could contribute to New Orleans's staggering blight. At last count the city found an estimated 43,000 blighted properties, according to a city-sponsored analysis of U.S. Postal Service data.

"Right now nobody on those 3,000-plus properties is contributing. It's costing the city and state government to maintain them. Police got to go out there, run kids out of there, drug-users," said Errol Williams, the tax assessor in New Orleans. "That's a cost to the city. If they sell one, it comes back on the tax rolls, I'm happy."

Until now, the properties have been managed by the Louisiana Land Trust, an agency set up using federal funds.

Jeff Thompson, a land-use lawyer on former Mayor Ray Nagin's rebuilding team, said the city needs to be creative. "Maybe they should make them into ponds to store water. Make them into parks or community gardens," he said.

Donald Vallee, a longtime New Orleans developer, complained that city officials had not acted fast enough.

"How many years does it take them to do something?" said Vallee, who also sits on the Louisiana Land Trust board.

He advocated selling the lots at auction. Sitting on the properties, he said, was a "pure waste of money."

Every month, LLT spends about $88 to cut the grass at each location. Other expenses range from insurance to pest control.

Since 2007, when the first homes were bought, $34 million has been spent on maintenance, $4.5 million on security and $9.1 million on overhead costs in New Orleans, according to LLT. In addition, some $38 million has been spent on demolishing 3,607 homes beyond repair and tearing up 1,256 slabs.

Visits by a reporter to neighborhoods hit the hardest by the flood found these orphaned lots are contributing to blight and the checkerboard-like rebuilding still dragging on in parts of the city.

The tour of 45 government-owned properties was focused on the Lower 9th Ward and other neighborhoods where these abandoned lots are concentrated. Overall, many unsold properties are in low-lying neighborhoods that suffered blight and poverty even before Katrina.

But they weren't confined to rundown neighborhoods. On South Galvez Street in Broadmoor, an abandoned house was the only sign of Katrina left on the block.

Jim Provensal, a musician living next door, said he wanted to buy it, but the city agency in charge of selling or developing the properties, the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, wanted $130,000.

"That's too much money!" Provensal said. "They don't care. They know if they sell the property they won't have a job."

And so, the boarded-up house sits, paint peeling.

In the Lower 9th Ward, 739 homeowners sold to the state. About 570 of those properties remain unsold and entire blocks sit undeveloped.

"The city ain't done a thing," a frustrated Carolyn J. Claiborne said on a recent day, scanning empty lots on her Lower 9th Ward street. She complained of snakes and vermin.

The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority has said it's sitting on many properties at the request of neighborhood groups to avoid flooding the market and hurting home prices.

The agency says it's drafting plans to dispose of the properties and that it has about 750 prospective buyers. It plans to hold onto many of the other properties for the foreseeable future, NORA said.

Nicole Heyman, a New Orleans-based expert on vacant and blighted property with the nonprofit Center for Community Progress, said holding onto the property is the right choice. She is advising the city on its plans.

When a city sells cheaply they end up "just putting properties in the hands of investors who drive the properties' values down," she said. Buyers often sit on vacant properties hoping for a market turnaround, and when that doesn't happen the properties end back up in the hands of a city, she said.

This summer the city has begun taking ownership of the 3,100 properties as federal funding runs out. Soon the city is expected to be in charge of cutting the grass and maintaining them.

Stacy Head, a City Council member-at-large, said the city doesn't have the resources.

"The LLT has actually done a good job of maintaining most of these properties," Head said. "So, when they're turned over to the city, our blight problems that we have not been able to manage are going to get that much worse."

Jeff Hebert, the head of NORA, said on Monday that the city will spend less on grass cutting, comparing LLT's efforts to maintaining a golf course.

"You're not going to get 18-feet-high grass on these LLT properties but it's not going to look like a putting green. We have budget realities we have to deal with," he said.

Hebert said NORA expects to pay contractors about $20 per house on grass cutting and to spend about $3 million a year overall to maintain the properties.

Head, who oversees housing issues for the City Council, expected about 1,500 to go unsold because of a lack of demand.

Many, including Head, want to see vacant lots turned into urban green spaces. NORA said it was open to working with neighborhoods, schools and the city's recreation department to turn empty lots into something useful — maybe tree nurseries, dog parks, urban farms or outdoor laboratories for biologists.

The Center for Community Progress's Heyman said that unlike other cities with an abundance of vacant property New Orleans has a strong real estate market, plenty of federal rebuilding money and lots of economic development taking place.

Based on that, she figured many can be sold at market prices. Selling the good pieces could pay for maintaining the less desirable properties, she said.

Hebert agreed and said the LLT properties are ripe for large-scale redevelopment. "Whereas other people see them as problems and issues we seem them as opportunities," he said.

Raynetta Hammler, an Avon saleswoman who lives in the St. Roch neighborhood, would love to see development on two government-owned lots across the street. Hammler suggested building a playground there.

"We have a lot of kids who currently play ball in the street," she said.

She complained that four stolen or abandoned cars had been set on fire in the lots over the previous year.

"Right now, it's an eyesore," she said. "It's not serving any purpose."

 

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Millions spent on upkeep of empty Katrina lots

 

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — More than 3,000 lots flooded by Hurricane Katrina and bought with federal money in an emergency bailout sit idle across this city — a multimillion-dollar drain on federal, state and city coffers that lends itself to no easy solution.

An Associated Press examination of the properties sold to the government by homeowners abandoning New Orleans after the catastrophic 2005 flood has found that about $86 million has been spent on 5,100 abandoned parcels. And there's no end in sight to maintenance costs for perhaps most of the 3,100 properties that remain unsold.

This portfolio of urban wasteland and blight represents part of the storm's difficult legacy that persists nearly seven years later.

And with federal funding for maintenance running out, there's concern the lots could fall into deeper neglect when this cash-strapped city is forced to pay for upkeep and that they could contribute to New Orleans's staggering blight. At last count the city found an estimated 43,000 blighted properties, according to a city-sponsored analysis of U.S. Postal Service data.

"Right now nobody on those 3,000-plus properties is contributing. It's costing the city and state government to maintain them. Police got to go out there, run kids out of there, drug-users," said Errol Williams, the tax assessor in New Orleans. "That's a cost to the city. If they sell one, it comes back on the tax rolls, I'm happy."

Until now, the properties have been managed by the Louisiana Land Trust, an agency set up using federal funds.

Jeff Thompson, a land-use lawyer on former Mayor Ray Nagin's rebuilding team, said the city needs to be creative. "Maybe they should make them into ponds to store water. Make them into parks or community gardens," he said.

Donald Vallee, a longtime New Orleans developer, complained that city officials had not acted fast enough.

"How many years does it take them to do something?" said Vallee, who also sits on the Louisiana Land Trust board.

He advocated selling the lots at auction. Sitting on the properties, he said, was a "pure waste of money."

Every month, LLT spends about $88 to cut the grass at each location. Other expenses range from insurance to pest control.

Since 2007, when the first homes were bought, $34 million has been spent on maintenance, $4.5 million on security and $9.1 million on overhead costs in New Orleans, according to LLT. In addition, some $38 million has been spent on demolishing 3,607 homes beyond repair and tearing up 1,256 slabs.

Visits by a reporter to neighborhoods hit the hardest by the flood found these orphaned lots are contributing to blight and the checkerboard-like rebuilding still dragging on in parts of the city.

The tour of 45 government-owned properties was focused on the Lower 9th Ward and other neighborhoods where these abandoned lots are concentrated. Overall, many unsold properties are in low-lying neighborhoods that suffered blight and poverty even before Katrina.

But they weren't confined to rundown neighborhoods. On South Galvez Street in Broadmoor, an abandoned house was the only sign of Katrina left on the block.

Jim Provensal, a musician living next door, said he wanted to buy it, but the city agency in charge of selling or developing the properties, the New Orleans Redevelopment Authority, wanted $130,000.

"That's too much money!" Provensal said. "They don't care. They know if they sell the property they won't have a job."

And so, the boarded-up house sits, paint peeling.

In the Lower 9th Ward, 739 homeowners sold to the state. About 570 of those properties remain unsold and entire blocks sit undeveloped.

"The city ain't done a thing," a frustrated Carolyn J. Claiborne said on a recent day, scanning empty lots on her Lower 9th Ward street. She complained of snakes and vermin.

The New Orleans Redevelopment Authority has said it's sitting on many properties at the request of neighborhood groups to avoid flooding the market and hurting home prices.

The agency says it's drafting plans to dispose of the properties and that it has about 750 prospective buyers. It plans to hold onto many of the other properties for the foreseeable future, NORA said.

Nicole Heyman, a New Orleans-based expert on vacant and blighted property with the nonprofit Center for Community Progress, said holding onto the property is the right choice. She is advising the city on its plans.

When a city sells cheaply they end up "just putting properties in the hands of investors who drive the properties' values down," she said. Buyers often sit on vacant properties hoping for a market turnaround, and when that doesn't happen the properties end back up in the hands of a city, she said.

This summer the city has begun taking ownership of the 3,100 properties as federal funding runs out. Soon the city is expected to be in charge of cutting the grass and maintaining them.

Stacy Head, a City Council member-at-large, said the city doesn't have the resources.

"The LLT has actually done a good job of maintaining most of these properties," Head said. "So, when they're turned over to the city, our blight problems that we have not been able to manage are going to get that much worse."

Jeff Hebert, the head of NORA, said on Monday that the city will spend less on grass cutting, comparing LLT's efforts to maintaining a golf course.

"You're not going to get 18-feet-high grass on these LLT properties but it's not going to look like a putting green. We have budget realities we have to deal with," he said.

Hebert said NORA expects to pay contractors about $20 per house on grass cutting and to spend about $3 million a year overall to maintain the properties.

Head, who oversees housing issues for the City Council, expected about 1,500 to go unsold because of a lack of demand.

Many, including Head, want to see vacant lots turned into urban green spaces. NORA said it was open to working with neighborhoods, schools and the city's recreation department to turn empty lots into something useful — maybe tree nurseries, dog parks, urban farms or outdoor laboratories for biologists.

The Center for Community Progress's Heyman said that unlike other cities with an abundance of vacant property New Orleans has a strong real estate market, plenty of federal rebuilding money and lots of economic development taking place.

Based on that, she figured many can be sold at market prices. Selling the good pieces could pay for maintaining the less desirable properties, she said.

Hebert agreed and said the LLT properties are ripe for large-scale redevelopment. "Whereas other people see them as problems and issues we seem them as opportunities," he said.

Raynetta Hammler, an Avon saleswoman who lives in the St. Roch neighborhood, would love to see development on two government-owned lots across the street. Hammler suggested building a playground there.

"We have a lot of kids who currently play ball in the street," she said.

She complained that four stolen or abandoned cars had been set on fire in the lots over the previous year.

"Right now, it's an eyesore," she said. "It's not serving any purpose."

 

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Innovative Job Training Continues in New Orleans with EPA Grant Support

 

New Orleans, Louisiana (PRWEB) July 17, 2012 On June 21, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded a second funding term to Limitless Vistas (LVI), a job training non-profit. The EPA Job Training Grant, worth $200,000 over two years, was also awarded to LVI in 2010. The grant was part of $3 million in federal funds awarded throughout the country to businesses and non-profits who are driving growth in the green jobs sector.

 

 

LVI was founded in 2006 by Patrick Barnes, P.G., to add a philanthropic partner to Barnes Ferland & Associates (BFA), the environmental consultation firm he co-founded in 1994. The non-profit provides environmental jobs training for disconnected and at-risk youth. Since its founding, LVI has trained over 270 students aged 17-24 in the New Orleans area.

 

In the summer of 2010, LVI partnered with the Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans and Veolia Water to provide classroom and hands-on job training for at-risk youth in the water and wastewater treatment industries. As Barnes explains, once “the population that stood to benefit most from this kind of training was identified, the natural next move was to find partners willing to open up their operations and help train these young adults. This collaboration and the internship that’s grown out of it have turned a crisis into an opportunity.†The summer internship program that began with 10 students has grown, and is now providing paid training to 10 additional students, according to LVI Executive Director Matilda Tennessee.

 

At the June 21 announcement of the grant’s extension, New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board Executive Director Marcia St. Martin thanked LVI and Veolia Water for pooling their resources and experience to help at-risk youth. “This partnership in the training of water and wastewater operations through Limitless Vistas can help to address the critical need for succession planning as our workforce ages,†St. Martin said. “It also can prepare our young people to become vital participants in the water and wastewater industry.â€

 

During the four-week program, interns learn the various stages of the wastewater treatment process, how to use a treatment plant's SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system to control operations, and how to analyze plant processes at aeration basins, clarifiers, and belt presses. They are also taught how to properly collect influent and effluent samples, and to measure and interpret water quality parameters such as pH, temperature, turbidity and conductance. Graduates from the internship earn technical certifications and scholarships, and qualify to apply for entry-level positions as they become available.

 

“The internship has proven to be an effective way to reach out and educate young people who don't usually consider the water and wastewater industry as a possible career path,†Kevin Servat said. Servat is Senior Project Manager for Veolia Water in New Orleans.

 

Concerning future plans for additional job training programs, Tennessee is optimistic. “The EPA is very eager to incorporate coastal restoration job skills into these kinds of grants, so LVI and its partner BFA will be reaching out to the state of Louisiana and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority to see about the possibility of projects under their jurisdiction,†she said. “Training in those skills would be extremely beneficial for the students we work with, and vital for Louisiana, as well.â€

 

Patrick A. Barnes, P.G.

Limitless Vistas, Inc.

407-896-8608

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Innovative Job Training Continues in New Orleans with EPA Grant Support

 

New Orleans, Louisiana (PRWEB) July 17, 2012 On June 21, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded a second funding term to Limitless Vistas (LVI), a job training non-profit. The EPA Job Training Grant, worth $200,000 over two years, was also awarded to LVI in 2010. The grant was part of $3 million in federal funds awarded throughout the country to businesses and non-profits who are driving growth in the green jobs sector.

 

 

LVI was founded in 2006 by Patrick Barnes, P.G., to add a philanthropic partner to Barnes Ferland & Associates (BFA), the environmental consultation firm he co-founded in 1994. The non-profit provides environmental jobs training for disconnected and at-risk youth. Since its founding, LVI has trained over 270 students aged 17-24 in the New Orleans area.

 

In the summer of 2010, LVI partnered with the Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans and Veolia Water to provide classroom and hands-on job training for at-risk youth in the water and wastewater treatment industries. As Barnes explains, once “the population that stood to benefit most from this kind of training was identified, the natural next move was to find partners willing to open up their operations and help train these young adults. This collaboration and the internship that’s grown out of it have turned a crisis into an opportunity.†The summer internship program that began with 10 students has grown, and is now providing paid training to 10 additional students, according to LVI Executive Director Matilda Tennessee.

 

At the June 21 announcement of the grant’s extension, New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board Executive Director Marcia St. Martin thanked LVI and Veolia Water for pooling their resources and experience to help at-risk youth. “This partnership in the training of water and wastewater operations through Limitless Vistas can help to address the critical need for succession planning as our workforce ages,†St. Martin said. “It also can prepare our young people to become vital participants in the water and wastewater industry.â€

 

During the four-week program, interns learn the various stages of the wastewater treatment process, how to use a treatment plant's SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system to control operations, and how to analyze plant processes at aeration basins, clarifiers, and belt presses. They are also taught how to properly collect influent and effluent samples, and to measure and interpret water quality parameters such as pH, temperature, turbidity and conductance. Graduates from the internship earn technical certifications and scholarships, and qualify to apply for entry-level positions as they become available.

 

“The internship has proven to be an effective way to reach out and educate young people who don't usually consider the water and wastewater industry as a possible career path,†Kevin Servat said. Servat is Senior Project Manager for Veolia Water in New Orleans.

 

Concerning future plans for additional job training programs, Tennessee is optimistic. “The EPA is very eager to incorporate coastal restoration job skills into these kinds of grants, so LVI and its partner BFA will be reaching out to the state of Louisiana and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority to see about the possibility of projects under their jurisdiction,†she said. “Training in those skills would be extremely beneficial for the students we work with, and vital for Louisiana, as well.â€

 

Patrick A. Barnes, P.G.

Limitless Vistas, Inc.

407-896-8608

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Innovative Job Training Continues in New Orleans with EPA Grant Support

 

New Orleans, Louisiana (PRWEB) July 17, 2012 On June 21, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded a second funding term to Limitless Vistas (LVI), a job training non-profit. The EPA Job Training Grant, worth $200,000 over two years, was also awarded to LVI in 2010. The grant was part of $3 million in federal funds awarded throughout the country to businesses and non-profits who are driving growth in the green jobs sector.

 

 

LVI was founded in 2006 by Patrick Barnes, P.G., to add a philanthropic partner to Barnes Ferland & Associates (BFA), the environmental consultation firm he co-founded in 1994. The non-profit provides environmental jobs training for disconnected and at-risk youth. Since its founding, LVI has trained over 270 students aged 17-24 in the New Orleans area.

 

In the summer of 2010, LVI partnered with the Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans and Veolia Water to provide classroom and hands-on job training for at-risk youth in the water and wastewater treatment industries. As Barnes explains, once “the population that stood to benefit most from this kind of training was identified, the natural next move was to find partners willing to open up their operations and help train these young adults. This collaboration and the internship that’s grown out of it have turned a crisis into an opportunity.†The summer internship program that began with 10 students has grown, and is now providing paid training to 10 additional students, according to LVI Executive Director Matilda Tennessee.

 

At the June 21 announcement of the grant’s extension, New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board Executive Director Marcia St. Martin thanked LVI and Veolia Water for pooling their resources and experience to help at-risk youth. “This partnership in the training of water and wastewater operations through Limitless Vistas can help to address the critical need for succession planning as our workforce ages,†St. Martin said. “It also can prepare our young people to become vital participants in the water and wastewater industry.â€

 

During the four-week program, interns learn the various stages of the wastewater treatment process, how to use a treatment plant's SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system to control operations, and how to analyze plant processes at aeration basins, clarifiers, and belt presses. They are also taught how to properly collect influent and effluent samples, and to measure and interpret water quality parameters such as pH, temperature, turbidity and conductance. Graduates from the internship earn technical certifications and scholarships, and qualify to apply for entry-level positions as they become available.

 

“The internship has proven to be an effective way to reach out and educate young people who don't usually consider the water and wastewater industry as a possible career path,†Kevin Servat said. Servat is Senior Project Manager for Veolia Water in New Orleans.

 

Concerning future plans for additional job training programs, Tennessee is optimistic. “The EPA is very eager to incorporate coastal restoration job skills into these kinds of grants, so LVI and its partner BFA will be reaching out to the state of Louisiana and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority to see about the possibility of projects under their jurisdiction,†she said. “Training in those skills would be extremely beneficial for the students we work with, and vital for Louisiana, as well.â€

 

Patrick A. Barnes, P.G.

Limitless Vistas, Inc.

407-896-8608

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Innovative Job Training Continues in New Orleans with EPA Grant Support

 

New Orleans, Louisiana (PRWEB) July 17, 2012 On June 21, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded a second funding term to Limitless Vistas (LVI), a job training non-profit. The EPA Job Training Grant, worth $200,000 over two years, was also awarded to LVI in 2010. The grant was part of $3 million in federal funds awarded throughout the country to businesses and non-profits who are driving growth in the green jobs sector.

 

 

LVI was founded in 2006 by Patrick Barnes, P.G., to add a philanthropic partner to Barnes Ferland & Associates (BFA), the environmental consultation firm he co-founded in 1994. The non-profit provides environmental jobs training for disconnected and at-risk youth. Since its founding, LVI has trained over 270 students aged 17-24 in the New Orleans area.

 

In the summer of 2010, LVI partnered with the Sewerage and Water Board of New Orleans and Veolia Water to provide classroom and hands-on job training for at-risk youth in the water and wastewater treatment industries. As Barnes explains, once “the population that stood to benefit most from this kind of training was identified, the natural next move was to find partners willing to open up their operations and help train these young adults. This collaboration and the internship that’s grown out of it have turned a crisis into an opportunity.†The summer internship program that began with 10 students has grown, and is now providing paid training to 10 additional students, according to LVI Executive Director Matilda Tennessee.

 

At the June 21 announcement of the grant’s extension, New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board Executive Director Marcia St. Martin thanked LVI and Veolia Water for pooling their resources and experience to help at-risk youth. “This partnership in the training of water and wastewater operations through Limitless Vistas can help to address the critical need for succession planning as our workforce ages,†St. Martin said. “It also can prepare our young people to become vital participants in the water and wastewater industry.â€

 

During the four-week program, interns learn the various stages of the wastewater treatment process, how to use a treatment plant's SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system to control operations, and how to analyze plant processes at aeration basins, clarifiers, and belt presses. They are also taught how to properly collect influent and effluent samples, and to measure and interpret water quality parameters such as pH, temperature, turbidity and conductance. Graduates from the internship earn technical certifications and scholarships, and qualify to apply for entry-level positions as they become available.

 

“The internship has proven to be an effective way to reach out and educate young people who don't usually consider the water and wastewater industry as a possible career path,†Kevin Servat said. Servat is Senior Project Manager for Veolia Water in New Orleans.

 

Concerning future plans for additional job training programs, Tennessee is optimistic. “The EPA is very eager to incorporate coastal restoration job skills into these kinds of grants, so LVI and its partner BFA will be reaching out to the state of Louisiana and the Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority to see about the possibility of projects under their jurisdiction,†she said. “Training in those skills would be extremely beneficial for the students we work with, and vital for Louisiana, as well.â€

 

Patrick A. Barnes, P.G.

Limitless Vistas, Inc.

407-896-8608

Email Information

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New Orleans Host Industry Elite for 2012 Global Events Partners Executive Summit - July 18, 2012 -

 

Washington DC (PRWEB) July 18, 2012 Global Events Partners ( GEP), the leading partnership of Destination Management Companies (DMCs) worldwide, held its annual Executive Summit in New Orleans from June 28 to July 1. GEP co-hosted the event with BBC Destination Management, a Global Events Partner and welcomed more than 200 meeting professionals from more than 70 destinations worldwide.

 

 

The participants came from across the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia to discuss industry concerns, learn about new destinations, network, meet with prospective DMC partners, and enjoy the social and cultural offerings of New Orleans – including an 8 block private parade down Canal and Bourbon street for the final evening. This was the second summit to be held in New Orleans, the first was in 2005, just five weeks before Hurricane Katrina hit.

 

“We wanted to come back and see the rebuilding of the city,†said Chris White, chairman and CEO of GEP and Krisam Group, during the opening evening at the host property InterContinental New Orleans, A Krisam Group Member. In welcoming remarks to Summit attendees, Mitch Landrieu, mayor of New Orleans, described Hurricane Katrina as a wake-up call for the city and an opportunity not to put the city back the way it was but “to rebuild it to be the city we always wanted to become.â€

 

Topics among the business sessions were:

 

GEP Tech Talk

Presented by Kevin Brewer, Destination King and Dahlia El Gazzar, Dahlia+

This popular interactive session covered the latest in technologies useful to planners and shared survey results on what apps, social media tools, audio response systems and other new technologies are being used in meetings, and the pros and cons of each. Among apps discussed were tools for travel and hotel arrangements, screen-sharing, event planning calculators, digital filing cabinets, and community builders.

 

Hip Hot Spots - Long Haul, but Worth the Flight!

 

Updates on new venues, hotel openings, expansions and service offerings from 20 of GEP’s DMCs worldwide.

 

MICHAEL CERBELLI’S: THE HOT LIST™

 

By Michael Cerbelli, Partner & President, Go West Cerbelli

 

A fast moving session of brand new trends for the 2012 – 2013 season from the latest in entertainment, to amenity options, theme and décor ideas and branding suggestions

 

Innovative Communication – How to Harness Your Creativity!

 

Presented by David Fischette, Chief Executive Officer, Go West Creative.

 

In this energetic session, Fischette demonstrated some simple ways to unleash creativity to better communicate ideas in more exciting, effective and powerful ways.

 

DearWorld – an Evening to Remember

 

“As a seasoned Event Planner with 70 countries under my belt, I have seen a lot of ‘wows’ throughout my career. However, this past week I was reminded that sometimes the simplest moments captured in your own backyard can be some of the most powerful,†wrote Kim Hester, Senior Account Executive, JNR Incorporated, in a blog describing one experience from the Summit.

 

She was referring to DearWorld, the brainchild of Robert X. Fogarty, a New Orleans photographer. It started as a love note to New Orleans and has expanded throughout the world. As guests entered the room for dinner, they were given washable black ink markers and asked to write a short inspirational message on their skin, something they wanted to tell the world.

 

They were then photographed displaying their messages. Most wrote on their hands and arms, some on their backs, and some on their faces. Messages ranged from the touching to the cryptic to the humorous including “ I will watch your back,†on a back, of course; “Live each day;†“Be kind to animals;†and one telling where to return the guest if he was found under the weather.

 

At the reception the next night, to the surprise of the participants, all 200 plus photo portraits were shown on a wall at five-second intervals. Kim Hester again, “A truly extraordinary moment that I will never forget, and a reminder that incentive travel is not merely about going to fun places. It is about those shared experiences that touch our hearts collectively and bring our spirits together.â€

 

The Summit was also the stage for GEP’s announcement of the 2012 Partners of the Year, an annual award presented to an International and a US-based DMC that embody the standards of GEP, demonstrate exceptional customer service, and use creativity in the pursuit of excellence. For the first year, two winners were awarded in each area. The 2012 winners were:

 

Catherine Chaulet, senior vice president, Best of Boston

 

Marty MacKay, president, GEP Destination Management Washington

 

Denis Kalinic, managing director, Adria Events Ltd., Croatia

 

Stefan Herzl, president, Panorama Tours & Travel, Austria

 

Social highlights of the conference included:

 

 

[*]

 

Airboat Adventures

 

 

[*] Life in the Old South

 

National WW II Museum with 4D Movie Experience

 

Cookin New Orleans Style

 

 

[*] Reception & Dinner at The Mansion at Mardi Gras World

 

 

The next GEP Executive Summit will be held in Greece July 11-14, 2013, hosted by Horizon Travel, A Global Events Partner.

 

About Global Events Partners (GEP)

 

Global Events Partners provides national sales support for 65 of the top destination management companies (DMCs) in 92 locations worldwide. Since 1999, GEP has built its reputation on choosing DMC partners with extensive local knowledge and proven expertise in the design and execution of successful meetings and events.

 

GEP offers a unique "one-stop" solution for meeting planners through its sister companies Krisam Group (http://www.krisam.com) and PRG. Krisam Group’s dedicated professionals are authorized to provide national sales support for more than 250 distinctive hotels and resorts worldwide. PRG is a full-service production company.

 

Kathleen McDermott

Krisam Group

202-775-5800

Email Information

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New Orleans Host Industry Elite for 2012 Global Events Partners Executive Summit - July 18, 2012 -

 

Washington DC (PRWEB) July 18, 2012 Global Events Partners ( GEP), the leading partnership of Destination Management Companies (DMCs) worldwide, held its annual Executive Summit in New Orleans from June 28 to July 1. GEP co-hosted the event with BBC Destination Management, a Global Events Partner and welcomed more than 200 meeting professionals from more than 70 destinations worldwide.

 

 

The participants came from across the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia to discuss industry concerns, learn about new destinations, network, meet with prospective DMC partners, and enjoy the social and cultural offerings of New Orleans – including an 8 block private parade down Canal and Bourbon street for the final evening. This was the second summit to be held in New Orleans, the first was in 2005, just five weeks before Hurricane Katrina hit.

 

“We wanted to come back and see the rebuilding of the city,†said Chris White, chairman and CEO of GEP and Krisam Group, during the opening evening at the host property InterContinental New Orleans, A Krisam Group Member. In welcoming remarks to Summit attendees, Mitch Landrieu, mayor of New Orleans, described Hurricane Katrina as a wake-up call for the city and an opportunity not to put the city back the way it was but “to rebuild it to be the city we always wanted to become.â€

 

Topics among the business sessions were:

 

GEP Tech Talk

Presented by Kevin Brewer, Destination King and Dahlia El Gazzar, Dahlia+

This popular interactive session covered the latest in technologies useful to planners and shared survey results on what apps, social media tools, audio response systems and other new technologies are being used in meetings, and the pros and cons of each. Among apps discussed were tools for travel and hotel arrangements, screen-sharing, event planning calculators, digital filing cabinets, and community builders.

 

Hip Hot Spots - Long Haul, but Worth the Flight!

 

Updates on new venues, hotel openings, expansions and service offerings from 20 of GEP’s DMCs worldwide.

 

MICHAEL CERBELLI’S: THE HOT LIST™

 

By Michael Cerbelli, Partner & President, Go West Cerbelli

 

A fast moving session of brand new trends for the 2012 – 2013 season from the latest in entertainment, to amenity options, theme and décor ideas and branding suggestions

 

Innovative Communication – How to Harness Your Creativity!

 

Presented by David Fischette, Chief Executive Officer, Go West Creative.

 

In this energetic session, Fischette demonstrated some simple ways to unleash creativity to better communicate ideas in more exciting, effective and powerful ways.

 

DearWorld – an Evening to Remember

 

“As a seasoned Event Planner with 70 countries under my belt, I have seen a lot of ‘wows’ throughout my career. However, this past week I was reminded that sometimes the simplest moments captured in your own backyard can be some of the most powerful,†wrote Kim Hester, Senior Account Executive, JNR Incorporated, in a blog describing one experience from the Summit.

 

She was referring to DearWorld, the brainchild of Robert X. Fogarty, a New Orleans photographer. It started as a love note to New Orleans and has expanded throughout the world. As guests entered the room for dinner, they were given washable black ink markers and asked to write a short inspirational message on their skin, something they wanted to tell the world.

 

They were then photographed displaying their messages. Most wrote on their hands and arms, some on their backs, and some on their faces. Messages ranged from the touching to the cryptic to the humorous including “ I will watch your back,†on a back, of course; “Live each day;†“Be kind to animals;†and one telling where to return the guest if he was found under the weather.

 

At the reception the next night, to the surprise of the participants, all 200 plus photo portraits were shown on a wall at five-second intervals. Kim Hester again, “A truly extraordinary moment that I will never forget, and a reminder that incentive travel is not merely about going to fun places. It is about those shared experiences that touch our hearts collectively and bring our spirits together.â€

 

The Summit was also the stage for GEP’s announcement of the 2012 Partners of the Year, an annual award presented to an International and a US-based DMC that embody the standards of GEP, demonstrate exceptional customer service, and use creativity in the pursuit of excellence. For the first year, two winners were awarded in each area. The 2012 winners were:

 

Catherine Chaulet, senior vice president, Best of Boston

 

Marty MacKay, president, GEP Destination Management Washington

 

Denis Kalinic, managing director, Adria Events Ltd., Croatia

 

Stefan Herzl, president, Panorama Tours & Travel, Austria

 

Social highlights of the conference included:

 

 

[*]

 

Airboat Adventures

 

 

[*] Life in the Old South

 

National WW II Museum with 4D Movie Experience

 

Cookin New Orleans Style

 

 

[*] Reception & Dinner at The Mansion at Mardi Gras World

 

 

The next GEP Executive Summit will be held in Greece July 11-14, 2013, hosted by Horizon Travel, A Global Events Partner.

 

About Global Events Partners (GEP)

 

Global Events Partners provides national sales support for 65 of the top destination management companies (DMCs) in 92 locations worldwide. Since 1999, GEP has built its reputation on choosing DMC partners with extensive local knowledge and proven expertise in the design and execution of successful meetings and events.

 

GEP offers a unique "one-stop" solution for meeting planners through its sister companies Krisam Group (http://www.krisam.com) and PRG. Krisam Group’s dedicated professionals are authorized to provide national sales support for more than 250 distinctive hotels and resorts worldwide. PRG is a full-service production company.

 

Kathleen McDermott

Krisam Group

202-775-5800

Email Information

yahoo

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New Orleans Host Industry Elite for 2012 Global Events Partners Executive Summit - July 18, 2012 -

 

Washington DC (PRWEB) July 18, 2012 Global Events Partners ( GEP), the leading partnership of Destination Management Companies (DMCs) worldwide, held its annual Executive Summit in New Orleans from June 28 to July 1. GEP co-hosted the event with BBC Destination Management, a Global Events Partner and welcomed more than 200 meeting professionals from more than 70 destinations worldwide.

 

 

The participants came from across the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia to discuss industry concerns, learn about new destinations, network, meet with prospective DMC partners, and enjoy the social and cultural offerings of New Orleans – including an 8 block private parade down Canal and Bourbon street for the final evening. This was the second summit to be held in New Orleans, the first was in 2005, just five weeks before Hurricane Katrina hit.

 

“We wanted to come back and see the rebuilding of the city,†said Chris White, chairman and CEO of GEP and Krisam Group, during the opening evening at the host property InterContinental New Orleans, A Krisam Group Member. In welcoming remarks to Summit attendees, Mitch Landrieu, mayor of New Orleans, described Hurricane Katrina as a wake-up call for the city and an opportunity not to put the city back the way it was but “to rebuild it to be the city we always wanted to become.â€

 

Topics among the business sessions were:

 

GEP Tech Talk

Presented by Kevin Brewer, Destination King and Dahlia El Gazzar, Dahlia+

This popular interactive session covered the latest in technologies useful to planners and shared survey results on what apps, social media tools, audio response systems and other new technologies are being used in meetings, and the pros and cons of each. Among apps discussed were tools for travel and hotel arrangements, screen-sharing, event planning calculators, digital filing cabinets, and community builders.

 

Hip Hot Spots - Long Haul, but Worth the Flight!

 

Updates on new venues, hotel openings, expansions and service offerings from 20 of GEP’s DMCs worldwide.

 

MICHAEL CERBELLI’S: THE HOT LIST™

 

By Michael Cerbelli, Partner & President, Go West Cerbelli

 

A fast moving session of brand new trends for the 2012 – 2013 season from the latest in entertainment, to amenity options, theme and décor ideas and branding suggestions

 

Innovative Communication – How to Harness Your Creativity!

 

Presented by David Fischette, Chief Executive Officer, Go West Creative.

 

In this energetic session, Fischette demonstrated some simple ways to unleash creativity to better communicate ideas in more exciting, effective and powerful ways.

 

DearWorld – an Evening to Remember

 

“As a seasoned Event Planner with 70 countries under my belt, I have seen a lot of ‘wows’ throughout my career. However, this past week I was reminded that sometimes the simplest moments captured in your own backyard can be some of the most powerful,†wrote Kim Hester, Senior Account Executive, JNR Incorporated, in a blog describing one experience from the Summit.

 

She was referring to DearWorld, the brainchild of Robert X. Fogarty, a New Orleans photographer. It started as a love note to New Orleans and has expanded throughout the world. As guests entered the room for dinner, they were given washable black ink markers and asked to write a short inspirational message on their skin, something they wanted to tell the world.

 

They were then photographed displaying their messages. Most wrote on their hands and arms, some on their backs, and some on their faces. Messages ranged from the touching to the cryptic to the humorous including “ I will watch your back,†on a back, of course; “Live each day;†“Be kind to animals;†and one telling where to return the guest if he was found under the weather.

 

At the reception the next night, to the surprise of the participants, all 200 plus photo portraits were shown on a wall at five-second intervals. Kim Hester again, “A truly extraordinary moment that I will never forget, and a reminder that incentive travel is not merely about going to fun places. It is about those shared experiences that touch our hearts collectively and bring our spirits together.â€

 

The Summit was also the stage for GEP’s announcement of the 2012 Partners of the Year, an annual award presented to an International and a US-based DMC that embody the standards of GEP, demonstrate exceptional customer service, and use creativity in the pursuit of excellence. For the first year, two winners were awarded in each area. The 2012 winners were:

 

Catherine Chaulet, senior vice president, Best of Boston

 

Marty MacKay, president, GEP Destination Management Washington

 

Denis Kalinic, managing director, Adria Events Ltd., Croatia

 

Stefan Herzl, president, Panorama Tours & Travel, Austria

 

Social highlights of the conference included:

 

 

[*]

 

Airboat Adventures

 

 

[*] Life in the Old South

 

National WW II Museum with 4D Movie Experience

 

Cookin New Orleans Style

 

 

[*] Reception & Dinner at The Mansion at Mardi Gras World

 

 

The next GEP Executive Summit will be held in Greece July 11-14, 2013, hosted by Horizon Travel, A Global Events Partner.

 

About Global Events Partners (GEP)

 

Global Events Partners provides national sales support for 65 of the top destination management companies (DMCs) in 92 locations worldwide. Since 1999, GEP has built its reputation on choosing DMC partners with extensive local knowledge and proven expertise in the design and execution of successful meetings and events.

 

GEP offers a unique "one-stop" solution for meeting planners through its sister companies Krisam Group (http://www.krisam.com) and PRG. Krisam Group’s dedicated professionals are authorized to provide national sales support for more than 250 distinctive hotels and resorts worldwide. PRG is a full-service production company.

 

Kathleen McDermott

Krisam Group

202-775-5800

Email Information

yahoo

Share this post


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Share on other sites

 

Music Rising 

follow Music Rising:twitter

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New Orleans Host Industry Elite for 2012 Global Events Partners Executive Summit - July 18, 2012 -

 

Washington DC (PRWEB) July 18, 2012 Global Events Partners ( GEP), the leading partnership of Destination Management Companies (DMCs) worldwide, held its annual Executive Summit in New Orleans from June 28 to July 1. GEP co-hosted the event with BBC Destination Management, a Global Events Partner and welcomed more than 200 meeting professionals from more than 70 destinations worldwide.

 

 

The participants came from across the U.S., Canada, Europe and Asia to discuss industry concerns, learn about new destinations, network, meet with prospective DMC partners, and enjoy the social and cultural offerings of New Orleans – including an 8 block private parade down Canal and Bourbon street for the final evening. This was the second summit to be held in New Orleans, the first was in 2005, just five weeks before Hurricane Katrina hit.

 

“We wanted to come back and see the rebuilding of the city,†said Chris White, chairman and CEO of GEP and Krisam Group, during the opening evening at the host property InterContinental New Orleans, A Krisam Group Member. In welcoming remarks to Summit attendees, Mitch Landrieu, mayor of New Orleans, described Hurricane Katrina as a wake-up call for the city and an opportunity not to put the city back the way it was but “to rebuild it to be the city we always wanted to become.â€

 

Topics among the business sessions were:

 

GEP Tech Talk

Presented by Kevin Brewer, Destination King and Dahlia El Gazzar, Dahlia+

This popular interactive session covered the latest in technologies useful to planners and shared survey results on what apps, social media tools, audio response systems and other new technologies are being used in meetings, and the pros and cons of each. Among apps discussed were tools for travel and hotel arrangements, screen-sharing, event planning calculators, digital filing cabinets, and community builders.

 

Hip Hot Spots - Long Haul, but Worth the Flight!

 

Updates on new venues, hotel openings, expansions and service offerings from 20 of GEP’s DMCs worldwide.

 

MICHAEL CERBELLI’S: THE HOT LIST™

 

By Michael Cerbelli, Partner & President, Go West Cerbelli

 

A fast moving session of brand new trends for the 2012 – 2013 season from the latest in entertainment, to amenity options, theme and décor ideas and branding suggestions

 

Innovative Communication – How to Harness Your Creativity!

 

Presented by David Fischette, Chief Executive Officer, Go West Creative.

 

In this energetic session, Fischette demonstrated some simple ways to unleash creativity to better communicate ideas in more exciting, effective and powerful ways.

 

DearWorld – an Evening to Remember

 

“As a seasoned Event Planner with 70 countries under my belt, I have seen a lot of ‘wows’ throughout my career. However, this past week I was reminded that sometimes the simplest moments captured in your own backyard can be some of the most powerful,†wrote Kim Hester, Senior Account Executive, JNR Incorporated, in a blog describing one experience from the Summit.

 

She was referring to DearWorld, the brainchild of Robert X. Fogarty, a New Orleans photographer. It started as a love note to New Orleans and has expanded throughout the world. As guests entered the room for dinner, they were given washable black ink markers and asked to write a short inspirational message on their skin, something they wanted to tell the world.

 

They were then photographed displaying their messages. Most wrote on their hands and arms, some on their backs, and some on their faces. Messages ranged from the touching to the cryptic to the humorous including “ I will watch your back,†on a back, of course; “Live each day;†“Be kind to animals;†and one telling where to return the guest if he was found under the weather.

 

At the reception the next night, to the surprise of the participants, all 200 plus photo portraits were shown on a wall at five-second intervals. Kim Hester again, “A truly extraordinary moment that I will never forget, and a reminder that incentive travel is not merely about going to fun places. It is about those shared experiences that touch our hearts collectively and bring our spirits together.â€

 

The Summit was also the stage for GEP’s announcement of the 2012 Partners of the Year, an annual award presented to an International and a US-based DMC that embody the standards of GEP, demonstrate exceptional customer service, and use creativity in the pursuit of excellence. For the first year, two winners were awarded in each area. The 2012 winners were:

 

Catherine Chaulet, senior vice president, Best of Boston

 

Marty MacKay, president, GEP Destination Management Washington

 

Denis Kalinic, managing director, Adria Events Ltd., Croatia

 

Stefan Herzl, president, Panorama Tours & Travel, Austria

 

Social highlights of the conference included:

 

 

[*]

 

Airboat Adventures

 

 

[*] Life in the Old South

 

National WW II Museum with 4D Movie Experience

 

Cookin New Orleans Style

 

 

[*] Reception & Dinner at The Mansion at Mardi Gras World

 

 

The next GEP Executive Summit will be held in Greece July 11-14, 2013, hosted by Horizon Travel, A Global Events Partner.

 

About Global Events Partners (GEP)

 

Global Events Partners provides national sales support for 65 of the top destination management companies (DMCs) in 92 locations worldwide. Since 1999, GEP has built its reputation on choosing DMC partners with extensive local knowledge and proven expertise in the design and execution of successful meetings and events.

 

GEP offers a unique "one-stop" solution for meeting planners through its sister companies Krisam Group (http://www.krisam.com) and PRG. Krisam Group’s dedicated professionals are authorized to provide national sales support for more than 250 distinctive hotels and resorts worldwide. PRG is a full-service production company.

 

Kathleen McDermott

Krisam Group

202-775-5800

Email Information

yahoo

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Legendary New Orleans musician makes last stand - July 20, 2012

 

 

At famed New Orleans character and Treme Brass Band drummer “Uncle†Lionel Batiste’s wake Thursday afternoon, mourners had a hard time locating the casket.

The Times-Picayune reported Batiste’s corpse was not in a casket. Instead he was leaning against a fake street lamp inside the Charbonnet-Labat Funeral Home, dressed in his typical attire. He was wearing a sport coat, pocket square, bowler hat and sunglasses. Batiste’s bass drum was positioned to his side.

Storyville Stompers tuba player Woody Penouilh said Batiste “looks better today than when I saw him the Thursday before he died.â€

Batiste’s children and funeral home owner Louis Charbonnet decided to embalm the jazz legend standing up, because “he had to be an original,†according to his son Lionel Batiste Jr.

Charbonnet studied pictures of Batiste to determine his posture and stance. “You have to think outside the box. And so he’s outside the box. We didn’t want him to be confined to his casket,†said Charbonnet.

Batiste died July 8 of cancer at age 80. His commemoration continues Friday with a formal ceremony at the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, where Batiste is expected to be inside his casket.

In this video from weeks before Batiste died, the jazz drummer performs “Let Me Call You Sweetheart†at the 2012 Tennessee Williams Literary Festival.

 

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Legendary New Orleans musician makes last stand - July 20, 2012

 

 

At famed New Orleans character and Treme Brass Band drummer “Uncle†Lionel Batiste’s wake Thursday afternoon, mourners had a hard time locating the casket.

The Times-Picayune reported Batiste’s corpse was not in a casket. Instead he was leaning against a fake street lamp inside the Charbonnet-Labat Funeral Home, dressed in his typical attire. He was wearing a sport coat, pocket square, bowler hat and sunglasses. Batiste’s bass drum was positioned to his side.

Storyville Stompers tuba player Woody Penouilh said Batiste “looks better today than when I saw him the Thursday before he died.â€

Batiste’s children and funeral home owner Louis Charbonnet decided to embalm the jazz legend standing up, because “he had to be an original,†according to his son Lionel Batiste Jr.

Charbonnet studied pictures of Batiste to determine his posture and stance. “You have to think outside the box. And so he’s outside the box. We didn’t want him to be confined to his casket,†said Charbonnet.

Batiste died July 8 of cancer at age 80. His commemoration continues Friday with a formal ceremony at the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, where Batiste is expected to be inside his casket.

In this video from weeks before Batiste died, the jazz drummer performs “Let Me Call You Sweetheart†at the 2012 Tennessee Williams Literary Festival.

 

yahoo

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 Music Rising 

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Legendary New Orleans musician makes last stand - July 20, 2012

 

 

At famed New Orleans character and Treme Brass Band drummer “Uncle†Lionel Batiste’s wake Thursday afternoon, mourners had a hard time locating the casket.

The Times-Picayune reported Batiste’s corpse was not in a casket. Instead he was leaning against a fake street lamp inside the Charbonnet-Labat Funeral Home, dressed in his typical attire. He was wearing a sport coat, pocket square, bowler hat and sunglasses. Batiste’s bass drum was positioned to his side.

Storyville Stompers tuba player Woody Penouilh said Batiste “looks better today than when I saw him the Thursday before he died.â€

Batiste’s children and funeral home owner Louis Charbonnet decided to embalm the jazz legend standing up, because “he had to be an original,†according to his son Lionel Batiste Jr.

Charbonnet studied pictures of Batiste to determine his posture and stance. “You have to think outside the box. And so he’s outside the box. We didn’t want him to be confined to his casket,†said Charbonnet.

Batiste died July 8 of cancer at age 80. His commemoration continues Friday with a formal ceremony at the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, where Batiste is expected to be inside his casket.

In this video from weeks before Batiste died, the jazz drummer performs “Let Me Call You Sweetheart†at the 2012 Tennessee Williams Literary Festival.

 

yahoo

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 Music Rising 

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Legendary New Orleans musician makes last stand - July 20, 2012

 

 

At famed New Orleans character and Treme Brass Band drummer “Uncle†Lionel Batiste’s wake Thursday afternoon, mourners had a hard time locating the casket.

The Times-Picayune reported Batiste’s corpse was not in a casket. Instead he was leaning against a fake street lamp inside the Charbonnet-Labat Funeral Home, dressed in his typical attire. He was wearing a sport coat, pocket square, bowler hat and sunglasses. Batiste’s bass drum was positioned to his side.

Storyville Stompers tuba player Woody Penouilh said Batiste “looks better today than when I saw him the Thursday before he died.â€

Batiste’s children and funeral home owner Louis Charbonnet decided to embalm the jazz legend standing up, because “he had to be an original,†according to his son Lionel Batiste Jr.

Charbonnet studied pictures of Batiste to determine his posture and stance. “You have to think outside the box. And so he’s outside the box. We didn’t want him to be confined to his casket,†said Charbonnet.

Batiste died July 8 of cancer at age 80. His commemoration continues Friday with a formal ceremony at the Mahalia Jackson Theater for the Performing Arts, where Batiste is expected to be inside his casket.

In this video from weeks before Batiste died, the jazz drummer performs “Let Me Call You Sweetheart†at the 2012 Tennessee Williams Literary Festival.

 

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Fun & Affordable Things To-Do in New Orleans, LA

TripShock.com Introduces New & Exclusive Walking Tours, Steamboat Dinner Cruises & Guided Plantation Tours in New Orleans!

New Orleans, LA (PRWEB) July 20, 2012

TripShock.com announces discounted attractions and activities for one of the worlds most fascinating cities- New Orleans, Louisiana.

 

 

For those headed down to "NOLA" this summer to enjoy the Summer Festival Season, consider looking into a few of the fantastic discounts and exclusive tours offered online at TripShock.com

 

Popular examples of a few discounted attractions and tours offered on TripShock include,Guided Walking Tours for Ghost & Spirit Walks, Cocktail Tours, Discounted Zoo and Aquarium Admissions Tickets, Garden District Tours, Steamboat Lunch Cruises, Dinner and Jazz Nighttime Cruises, Old Historic Plantation Tours and so much more.

 

TripShock.com is now offering a Summer Spook-Tacular Special with an Online Promo Code for the New Orleans Ghost and Spirits Nighttime Walking Tour. For a limited time only, TripShock.com will take $5 Off all orders of $50+ or $10 Off orders of $100+. Don't pass up this fantastic summer savings and book online today.

 

About TripShock.com

 

TripShock! ® is the one and only online travel agency in the Northern Gulf Coast that enables travelers to book tours and activities directly. TripShock! offers trusted reviews from real travelers, photos, videos and other planning tools to help create the perfect Gulf Coast vacation. TripShock! attracts more than 500,000 visitors annually and partners with over 100 activity and lodging providers from Florida to Louisiana

 

Greg Fisher
TripShock.com
800-450-7139
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