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Vicksburg native's film to debut in New Orleans Sunday
By Manivanh Chanprasith
Published:
Saturday, April 4, 2009 4:54 PM CDT

doc49d65b318df5a769107750.jpg

On Sunday, a 1995 Vicksburg High School graduate will premier her debut documentary, "No Cross, No Crown," at the sixth annual New OrleansInternational Human Rights Film Festival.

A.M. ("Amy") Peters' film about post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans will be shown at 9 p.m. at the Zeitgeist Multi-Disciplinary ArtsCenter.

"Katrina exposed what outsiders don't see," said Peters. "I saw New Orleans before Katrina, and I saw the racism, the bad schools - andthen I saw the good parts, too."

Peters has a bachelor's degree in environmental biology from the University of Southern Mississippi. While in college, she was interested inenvironmental racism. Upon graduation, she went to work for ACORN - the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now - a community-based advocateorganization for low- and moderate-income families.

In "No Cross, No Crown," Peters includes local musicians' and artists' points-of-view of the aftermath of Katrina. The two-year project ofdocumenting the music and culture of New Orleans, post-Katrina, came after Peters began speaking with native musicians who were displaced to New York Cityafter the hurricane.

The documentary features music with origins in New Orleans including DJ Soul Sister, Kermit Ruffins, author Tom Piazza and Mardi Gras Indian Chief AlfredDoucette.

"I wanted people to feel and see all the different voices because New Orleans is a patchwork," said Peters.

In the documentary, Peters wanted to not only show the physical damage of Katrina, but wanted to also capture the damage to the spirit of the New Orleansculture.

"I did not want it to be angry, political or partisan," she said.

"No Cross, No Crown" is Peters' first feature film, but she has dabbled in animation and shorts. While growing up in Vicksburg, she enjoyedhearing local bands play.

"I think Vicksburg is the kind of town you want to grow up in," Peters said. "They accept a lot of people."

Peters is the daughter of John and Bonnie Peters of Vicksburg. She resides in Staten Island, N.Y.

She hopes the people of New Orleans like her work and aims to "take the film all the way. It says what I wanted to say. I got a lot of experience fromit."

Peters' next project is a sequel to her animated short film, "Jack Quack (The Path)."

Contact Manivanh Chanprasith at mchanprasith@vicksburgpost.com.
source: vicksburgpost

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Louisiana, a Test Case in Federal Aid
By ADAM NOSSITER
Published: April 4, 2009

05louisiana.inline.jpg
Gov. Bobby Jindal is an outspoken foe of federal aid, but his subordinates praise it as effective.


NEW ORLEANS - Years before Washington spent $787 billion on a national stimulus bill, it staged an unintended trial run in Louisiana, a huge injection of some$51 billion for which historians find few, if any, precedents in a single state.

The experiment is still playing out, but some indicators suggest that what occurred in Louisiana - dumping a large amount of reconstruction money into aconfined space in the three and a half years since Hurricane Katrina - has had a positive outcome. The state's unemployment rate of 5.7 percent in Februarywas considerably below the national average of 8.1 percent, and it was the only state to see a drop in unemployment from December to January. It was also theonly state with an increase in non-farm employment in February.

State economists specifically mention what one called "the ongoing building boom" from federal dollars as a main reason for the numbers. Largely aresult of the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina, construction projects have not dried up as they have elsewhere, and a few can even be seen in downtown NewOrleans.

Construction has "really hung in there and done very well," said Loren Scott, an emeritus professor of economics at Louisiana State University."In most states construction is way down, but in ours it has been up." The relatively low unemployment rate in Louisiana "tells you that thestimulus can have an effect," Mr. Scott said.

However, the state's Republican governor, Bobby Jindal, has positioned himself as a leading voice against the new stimulus bill, objecting to federalintervention in a state's economy. He has threatened to reject $98 million in stimulus money intended to help Louisiana's unemployed, echoing otherSouthern and Western governors who have turned such rejections into a conservative rallying cry.

But even as Mr. Jindal has criticized the stimulus bill, his own subordinates have continued to request money from Washington, notably in replacing CharityHospital, which for generations served the poor in downtown New Orleans. State health officials, disregarding restoration work at Charity done in the monthsimmediately after Hurricane Katrina, say they need a brand-new hospital and an additional $500 million; the Federal Emergency Management Agency has balked andis offering only $150 million.

Mr. Jindal amplified his anti-government-spending theme in a speech last month at the National Republican Congressional Committee dinner in Washington,saying Democrats believe that "the historic spending and expansion of government" is the way out of the economic crisis.

"They honestly believe that," he said. "Conversely, we honestly believe that they are completely wrong, and that their path will have direconsequences for not only this time, but also for the future of America."

In Louisiana, however, the consequences have hardly been dire - just the opposite, in fact. One of the governor's leading aides, the state'srecovery director, Paul Rainwater, praised the federal relief effort in Louisiana in recent remarks to Congress, the day after his boss scorned federal help onnational television in the Republican Party's response to President Obama's first address to Congress.

"No other state in the nation has been blessed with such generosity from Congress and the American people," Mr. Rainwater said.

Referring to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, a principal conduit for the aid that has flowed here, he said that "Louisiana is FEMA'sbiggest 'customer,' so to speak, and the state's Office of Facility Planning and Control is the largest single public-assistance applicant inAmerican history."

In the preceding 18 months, some $25 million a week had been given out in the public-assistance program, which helps local governments rebuild vitalfacilities, among other functions.

Over all, Mr. Rainwater said in an interview, $10 million a day was spent in the state in 2008, enough to draw contractors from around the country. In thelast two weeks alone, he said, the state helped open six new apartment complexes, five of them in New Orleans.

"You take 10 million a day you didn't have otherwise in your general fund, you can generate a lot of energy in your economy," he said.

Because of that history, the governor's anti-stimulus stance - as well as his threat to reject the stimulus package's supplemental unemployment aidas an unwarranted burden on business interests - has provoked some skepticism and incomprehension here.

"The feedback I get is, it's no longer an issue of big government vs. little," said State Senator Eric LaFleur, a Democrat who wants tooverride the governor's promised veto of the money. "If that money has been made available and we've paid for it, we should accept it. To doanything otherwise is purely political."

The torrent of money flowing here after Hurricane Katrina has gone for projects small and grand, from $63,000 to the St. Theodore Holy Family CatholicSchool in Lake Charles and $96,000 for the Louisiana School for the Deaf in Baton Rouge to $11 million to the public housing authority in New Orleans and $160million for the city's sewer and water board. Billions of dollars more have been paid out in federally subsidized flood insurance, levee reconstruction andlow-cost loans, including $7.9 billion for the Road Home program, which provided cash grants to people whose homes were damaged in the flooding.

The official list includes dozens upon dozens of projects, and the money is still being paid out - indeed, a constant lament of Louisiana officials is thatit does not come fast enough.

source: nytimes

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Louisiana, a Test Case in Federal Aid
By ADAM NOSSITER
Published: April 4, 2009

05louisiana.inline.jpg
Gov. Bobby Jindal is an outspoken foe of federal aid, but his subordinates praise it as effective.


NEW ORLEANS - Years before Washington spent $787 billion on a national stimulus bill, it staged an unintended trial run in Louisiana, a huge injection of some$51 billion for which historians find few, if any, precedents in a single state.

The experiment is still playing out, but some indicators suggest that what occurred in Louisiana - dumping a large amount of reconstruction money into aconfined space in the three and a half years since Hurricane Katrina - has had a positive outcome. The state's unemployment rate of 5.7 percent in Februarywas considerably below the national average of 8.1 percent, and it was the only state to see a drop in unemployment from December to January. It was also theonly state with an increase in non-farm employment in February.

State economists specifically mention what one called "the ongoing building boom" from federal dollars as a main reason for the numbers. Largely aresult of the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina, construction projects have not dried up as they have elsewhere, and a few can even be seen in downtown NewOrleans.

Construction has "really hung in there and done very well," said Loren Scott, an emeritus professor of economics at Louisiana State University."In most states construction is way down, but in ours it has been up." The relatively low unemployment rate in Louisiana "tells you that thestimulus can have an effect," Mr. Scott said.

However, the state's Republican governor, Bobby Jindal, has positioned himself as a leading voice against the new stimulus bill, objecting to federalintervention in a state's economy. He has threatened to reject $98 million in stimulus money intended to help Louisiana's unemployed, echoing otherSouthern and Western governors who have turned such rejections into a conservative rallying cry.

But even as Mr. Jindal has criticized the stimulus bill, his own subordinates have continued to request money from Washington, notably in replacing CharityHospital, which for generations served the poor in downtown New Orleans. State health officials, disregarding restoration work at Charity done in the monthsimmediately after Hurricane Katrina, say they need a brand-new hospital and an additional $500 million; the Federal Emergency Management Agency has balked andis offering only $150 million.

Mr. Jindal amplified his anti-government-spending theme in a speech last month at the National Republican Congressional Committee dinner in Washington,saying Democrats believe that "the historic spending and expansion of government" is the way out of the economic crisis.

"They honestly believe that," he said. "Conversely, we honestly believe that they are completely wrong, and that their path will have direconsequences for not only this time, but also for the future of America."

In Louisiana, however, the consequences have hardly been dire - just the opposite, in fact. One of the governor's leading aides, the state'srecovery director, Paul Rainwater, praised the federal relief effort in Louisiana in recent remarks to Congress, the day after his boss scorned federal help onnational television in the Republican Party's response to President Obama's first address to Congress.

"No other state in the nation has been blessed with such generosity from Congress and the American people," Mr. Rainwater said.

Referring to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, a principal conduit for the aid that has flowed here, he said that "Louisiana is FEMA'sbiggest 'customer,' so to speak, and the state's Office of Facility Planning and Control is the largest single public-assistance applicant inAmerican history."

In the preceding 18 months, some $25 million a week had been given out in the public-assistance program, which helps local governments rebuild vitalfacilities, among other functions.

Over all, Mr. Rainwater said in an interview, $10 million a day was spent in the state in 2008, enough to draw contractors from around the country. In thelast two weeks alone, he said, the state helped open six new apartment complexes, five of them in New Orleans.

"You take 10 million a day you didn't have otherwise in your general fund, you can generate a lot of energy in your economy," he said.

Because of that history, the governor's anti-stimulus stance - as well as his threat to reject the stimulus package's supplemental unemployment aidas an unwarranted burden on business interests - has provoked some skepticism and incomprehension here.

"The feedback I get is, it's no longer an issue of big government vs. little," said State Senator Eric LaFleur, a Democrat who wants tooverride the governor's promised veto of the money. "If that money has been made available and we've paid for it, we should accept it. To doanything otherwise is purely political."

The torrent of money flowing here after Hurricane Katrina has gone for projects small and grand, from $63,000 to the St. Theodore Holy Family CatholicSchool in Lake Charles and $96,000 for the Louisiana School for the Deaf in Baton Rouge to $11 million to the public housing authority in New Orleans and $160million for the city's sewer and water board. Billions of dollars more have been paid out in federally subsidized flood insurance, levee reconstruction andlow-cost loans, including $7.9 billion for the Road Home program, which provided cash grants to people whose homes were damaged in the flooding.

The official list includes dozens upon dozens of projects, and the money is still being paid out - indeed, a constant lament of Louisiana officials is thatit does not come fast enough.

source: nytimes

New Orleans' news here

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, Ilove your site!

_ZOE2037.jpg great great pics!

 

big hugs ((((((((((Nawlins))))))))))))

Reg

 

 

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Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, Ilove your site!

_ZOE2037.jpg great great pics!

 

big hugs ((((((((((Nawlins))))))))))))

Reg

 

 

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ReggieReginaONumb wrote:

Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him [Eddie Bo] go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif

thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, I love your site!

great great pics!

 

big hugs ((((((((((Nawlins))))))))))))

Reg

 

 

 

 

 

My favorite:

 

Guinness%26Leicas.jpg

It says it all!

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U2 star The Edge donates guitar to Stuart Adamson fundraiser

Daily Record, April 06, 2009

Joanne Curran


Rocker The Edge has pledged his support to a fundraiser in honour of late Big Country singer Stuart Adamson.

The U2 star has donated one of his prized guitars to a charity auction being held by Adamson's family.

It's in aid of the Children's Hospice Association Scotland and the youth set-up at Adamson's beloved Dunfermline Football Club.

And the gift from The Edge -- a longtime friend of fellow guitarist Adamson, who died in Hawaii in 2001, aged 43 -- will boost the fundraiser by £8000. HisGibson Epiphone guitar is expected to fetch at least that when it is auctioned on eBay.

Its sale will come after Saturday's main auction and tribute to Adamson, when murals of him, created by local schoolkids, will be unveiled atDunfermline's home ground.

Adamson, who achieved international fame with The Skids and Big Country, would have been 51 on Saturday.

Dunfermline, nicknamed the Pars, and their fans are also involved in the event. Adamson's musician daughter Kirsten, lead singer The Gillyflowers, got intouch with The Edge.

She said: "I couldn't believe it when the guitar turned up. It's pretty cool.

"The Edge has signed it and has used it for a few gigs. My dad really had a lot of respect for The Edge and U2, so this is just a fantastic tribute."The Edge had one condition, though -- that some money raised goes a charity he co-founded to help musicians struggling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

Adamson's son Callum added: "My dad would have been extremely honoured by this gesture. He was a working class man with a burning ambition to become asuccessful musician.

"His devotion to the Pars was, at times, as strong as the urge to make music." Dunfermline supporter Colin Gourlay said: "For some time,there's been a strong desire to permanently express the affection and respect we all have for Stuart.

"Many wish to honour his memory and articulate the high esteem in which Stuart's legacy is held among us." Adamson had been suffering personalproblems in the months before his suicide in a Honolulu hotel room.


© Scottish Daily Record, 2009.

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jeldahr wrote:

U2 star The Edge donates guitar to Stuart Adamson fundraiser

, April 06, 2009

Joanne Curran

 

Rocker The Edge has pledged his support to a fundraiser in honour of late Big Country singer Stuart Adamson.

 

The U2 star has donated one of his prized guitars to a charity auction being held by Adamson's family.

 

It's in aid of the Children's Hospice Association Scotland and the youth set-up at Adamson's beloved Dunfermline Football Club.

 

And the gift from The Edge -- a longtime friend of fellow guitarist Adamson, who died in Hawaii in 2001, aged 43 -- will boost the fundraiser by £8000. His Gibson Epiphone guitar is expected to fetch at least that when it is auctioned on eBay.

 

Its sale will come after Saturday's main auction and tribute to Adamson, when murals of him, created by local schoolkids, will be unveiled at Dunfermline's home ground.

 

Adamson, who achieved international fame with The Skids and Big Country, would have been 51 on Saturday.

 

Dunfermline, nicknamed the Pars, and their fans are also involved in the event. Adamson's musician daughter Kirsten, lead singer The Gillyflowers, got in touch with The Edge.

 

She said: "I couldn't believe it when the guitar turned up. It's pretty cool.

 

"The Edge has signed it and has used it for a few gigs. My dad really had a lot of respect for The Edge and U2, so this is just a fantastic tribute." The Edge had one condition, though -- that some money raised goes a charity he co-founded to help musicians struggling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

 

Adamson's son Callum added: "My dad would have been extremely honoured by this gesture. He was a working class man with a burning ambition to become a successful musician.

 

"His devotion to the Pars was, at times, as strong as the urge to make music." Dunfermline supporter Colin Gourlay said: "For some time, there's been a strong desire to permanently express the affection and respect we all have for Stuart.

 

"Many wish to honour his memory and articulate the high esteem in which Stuart's legacy is held among us." Adamson had been suffering personal problems in the months before his suicide in a Honolulu hotel room.

 

 

© Scottish Daily Record, 2009.

clap.gifgreat great. thanks to add!

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jeldahr wrote:

U2 star The Edge donates guitar to Stuart Adamson fundraiser

, April 06, 2009

Joanne Curran

 

Rocker The Edge has pledged his support to a fundraiser in honour of late Big Country singer Stuart Adamson.

 

The U2 star has donated one of his prized guitars to a charity auction being held by Adamson's family.

 

It's in aid of the Children's Hospice Association Scotland and the youth set-up at Adamson's beloved Dunfermline Football Club.

 

And the gift from The Edge -- a longtime friend of fellow guitarist Adamson, who died in Hawaii in 2001, aged 43 -- will boost the fundraiser by £8000. His Gibson Epiphone guitar is expected to fetch at least that when it is auctioned on eBay.

 

Its sale will come after Saturday's main auction and tribute to Adamson, when murals of him, created by local schoolkids, will be unveiled at Dunfermline's home ground.

 

Adamson, who achieved international fame with The Skids and Big Country, would have been 51 on Saturday.

 

Dunfermline, nicknamed the Pars, and their fans are also involved in the event. Adamson's musician daughter Kirsten, lead singer The Gillyflowers, got in touch with The Edge.

 

She said: "I couldn't believe it when the guitar turned up. It's pretty cool.

 

"The Edge has signed it and has used it for a few gigs. My dad really had a lot of respect for The Edge and U2, so this is just a fantastic tribute." The Edge had one condition, though -- that some money raised goes a charity he co-founded to help musicians struggling in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

 

Adamson's son Callum added: "My dad would have been extremely honoured by this gesture. He was a working class man with a burning ambition to become a successful musician.

 

"His devotion to the Pars was, at times, as strong as the urge to make music." Dunfermline supporter Colin Gourlay said: "For some time, there's been a strong desire to permanently express the affection and respect we all have for Stuart.

 

"Many wish to honour his memory and articulate the high esteem in which Stuart's legacy is held among us." Adamson had been suffering personal problems in the months before his suicide in a Honolulu hotel room.

 

 

© Scottish Daily Record, 2009.

clap.gifgreat great. thanks to add!

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MUSIC RISING site was born clap.gif

musicrisingguitarsite.jpg April 7, 2006 - "I can't imagine what it must be like towake up one morning and not have my guitar...' Great images, powerful words and cool clips as Edge launches a new website to promote Music Rising. 'From the Mississippi Delta to New Orleans, the Central Gulf has been the spawning ground of contemporarymusic from Blues to Jazz to Rock'n'Roll... But the music was silenced by the storms as whole lives were destroyed and people uprooted, leaving behindeverything...' The idea behind Music Rising is simple, explains Edge. 'Thousands of musicians have lost their instruments in New Orleans - Music Risingis attempting to put those instruments back in their hands.'

 

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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MUSIC RISING site was born clap.gif

musicrisingguitarsite.jpg April 7, 2006 - "I can't imagine what it must be like towake up one morning and not have my guitar...' Great images, powerful words and cool clips as Edge launches a new website to promote Music Rising. 'From the Mississippi Delta to New Orleans, the Central Gulf has been the spawning ground of contemporarymusic from Blues to Jazz to Rock'n'Roll... But the music was silenced by the storms as whole lives were destroyed and people uprooted, leaving behindeverything...' The idea behind Music Rising is simple, explains Edge. 'Thousands of musicians have lost their instruments in New Orleans - Music Risingis attempting to put those instruments back in their hands.'

 

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Auction hoping to hit right notes

 

WWWGUITARN.jpeg

Kenny's Music employees Rory Stewart and Drew Innis with the guitar.

 

A rare guitar donated by U2 guitarist The Edge is on show in a Dundee music shop ahead of its auction at the weekend.

The musician donated the signed instrument, which he has used live and in the studio, to the family of late Big Country singer Stuart Adamson.

Funds raised will go to musicians affected by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. thumbsup.gif

The Adamson family will unveil a mural of the Dunfermline musician and Pars' fan at East End Park on Saturday as part of a permanent tribute.

Mr Adamson died in Hawaii in 2001. He had previously declined a directorship with Dunfermline so he could remain in the terraces with other supporters.

Rory Stewart, guitar manager of Kenny's Music in Dundee's Castle Street where the guitar is being displayed, thinks it is sure to attract theattention of both U2 and Big Country fans.

He said, "The guitar will be auctioned on eBay at the weekend.

"The Edge has put in an opening bid of £8000 so it will raise at least that amount." clap.gif

Budding guitar heroes can look at the guitar, which still has the Edge's guitar strap and strings attached, but not touch it. Rory said anyone lookingto show off their skills on the rare item will be disappointed.

He added, " No one will be allowed to play it while it's in the shop - unless they have a spare £8000!"

 

source: eveningtelegraph

 

New Orleans' news

 

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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Visit and support Music Rising

 

Auction hoping to hit right notes

 

WWWGUITARN.jpeg

Kenny's Music employees Rory Stewart and Drew Innis with the guitar.

 

A rare guitar donated by U2 guitarist The Edge is on show in a Dundee music shop ahead of its auction at the weekend.

The musician donated the signed instrument, which he has used live and in the studio, to the family of late Big Country singer Stuart Adamson.

Funds raised will go to musicians affected by Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. thumbsup.gif

The Adamson family will unveil a mural of the Dunfermline musician and Pars' fan at East End Park on Saturday as part of a permanent tribute.

Mr Adamson died in Hawaii in 2001. He had previously declined a directorship with Dunfermline so he could remain in the terraces with other supporters.

Rory Stewart, guitar manager of Kenny's Music in Dundee's Castle Street where the guitar is being displayed, thinks it is sure to attract theattention of both U2 and Big Country fans.

He said, "The guitar will be auctioned on eBay at the weekend.

"The Edge has put in an opening bid of £8000 so it will raise at least that amount." clap.gif

Budding guitar heroes can look at the guitar, which still has the Edge's guitar strap and strings attached, but not touch it. Rory said anyone lookingto show off their skills on the rare item will be disappointed.

He added, " No one will be allowed to play it while it's in the shop - unless they have a spare £8000!"

 

source: eveningtelegraph

 

New Orleans' news

 

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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jeldahr wrote:

Nawlins wrote:

Don't forget about Fr Qtr Fest, just as good as Jazzfest IMHO. Less heat
:)

Absolutely true - I am usually working a booth for Fr Q Fest - but unfortunately have to be of of town that weekend. Everybody else, come down April 17 - 19 and ENJOY!!!

 

French Quarter Festivals

 

 

400 North Peters Street • Suite 205 New Orleans, LA 70130 • (504) 522-5730 • (800) 673-5725 • Fax (504) 522-5711 •

 

Here's last year's French Quarter Fest, huge turn out, larger than I've ever seen before! http://www.zoeicaimages.com/FrenchQuarterFest08/

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ReggieReginaONumb wrote:

Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif

thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, I love your site!

_ZOE2037.jpg

great great pics!

 

big hugs ((((((((((Nawlins))))))))))))

Reg

 

Thanks, Ok everyone, how do you post pics in the posts????

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jeldahr wrote:

ReggieReginaONumb wrote:

Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him [Eddie Bo] go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif

thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, I love your site!

great great pics!

 

big hugs ((((((((((Nawlins))))))))))))

Reg

 

 

 

 

 

My favorite:

 

Guinness%26Leicas.jpg

It says it all!

 

Thanks! that was the 2nd Irish trip in 2003. Lunch in Bunratty at the Creamery.

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Nawlins wrote:

ReggieReginaONumb wrote:

Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, I love your site!

thumbsup.gif

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Nawlins wrote:

ReggieReginaONumb wrote:

Nawlins wrote:

sad to see him go. i photographed a wedding last year that he played at since he knew the bride and groom. my wife used to walk with him to work when we first moved here 15 yrs ago and lived on esplanade ave.

thumbsup.gif thanks Nawlins for this info. Your job is great, I love your site!

thumbsup.gif

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Visit and support Music Rising

 

New Orleans to receive $30 million grant to protect port

04:35 PM CDT on Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Sofia Voulgarakis / Eyewitness News

NEW ORLEANS - New Orleans is going to get a slice of $970 million in FEMA emergency grant money.

 

Homeland security officials designated seven port areas nationwide as prone to terrorist threats, and the Port of New Orleans ranked among those at highestrisk.

Because of that the port will receive more than $30 million to prevent, detect, and respond to attacks involving explosive devices or weapons of massdestruction.

"Now every community has some level of risk, and so with these grants we want to help create a base level of protection against all hazards, whetheracts of man, or of nature," said Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

The Jefferson Parish Transit System also received almost $600 thousand to protect its bus program.

Napolitano expects the money to roll out over the summer.

source: wwltv

 

****

Aeromexico adding service to New Orleans

Wed Apr 8, 11:46 am ET

 

NEW ORLEANS - AeroMexico is returning international flight service to New Orleans for the first time since Hurricane Katrina.

Beginning July 6, the airline will offer one direct, nonstop flight, Monday through Saturday, to Mexico City that will continue on to San Pedro Sula,Honduras. AeroMexico will use 50-seat regional jets for the two-hour flight to Mexico City.

During a news conference Tuesday, Mayor Ray Nagin said the flight will be a boost to both tourism and business and provide for easier travel for regionalresidents who have family ties with Mexico and Honduras.

The flight was established following about a year of negotiations with AeroMexico. Company vice president Frank Galan said that to be successful, theflights will have to average about 33 passengers.

Galan said the airline and the city are currently talking about another direct flight that would provide service to Cancun, Mexico.

Nagin said the city had entered into a risk-share agreement with the airline that is based upon the number of passengers. The city could lose up to $250,000if the flight fails. Ochsner Health System also made a "financial contribution" to establish the flight, the mayor said.

About 4,000 international patients and physicians come to Ochsner annually, mostly from Honduras, Nicaragua and Venezuela, said Dr. Ana Hands, thesystem's director of international health services.

Prior to Hurricane Katrina, air service was available from Louis Armstrong New Orleans International to Honduras through TACA Airlines and to Toronto on AirCanada.

source: yahoo

 

New Orleans' news

 

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New Orleans to receive $30 million grant to protect port

04:35 PM CDT on Wednesday, April 8, 2009

Sofia Voulgarakis / Eyewitness News

NEW ORLEANS - New Orleans is going to get a slice of $970 million in FEMA emergency grant money.

 

Homeland security officials designated seven port areas nationwide as prone to terrorist threats, and the Port of New Orleans ranked among those at highestrisk.

Because of that the port will receive more than $30 million to prevent, detect, and respond to attacks involving explosive devices or weapons of massdestruction.

"Now every community has some level of risk, and so with these grants we want to help create a base level of protection against all hazards, whetheracts of man, or of nature," said Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano.

The Jefferson Parish Transit System also received almost $600 thousand to protect its bus program.

Napolitano expects the money to roll out over the summer.

source: wwltv

 

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Aeromexico adding service to New Orleans

Wed Apr 8, 11:46 am ET

 

NEW ORLEANS - AeroMexico is returning international flight service to New Orleans for the first time since Hurricane Katrina.

Beginning July 6, the airline will offer one direct, nonstop flight, Monday through Saturday, to Mexico City that will continue on to San Pedro Sula,Honduras. AeroMexico will use 50-seat regional jets for the two-hour flight to Mexico City.

During a news conference Tuesday, Mayor Ray Nagin said the flight will be a boost to both tourism and business and provide for easier travel for regionalresidents who have family ties with Mexico and Honduras.

The flight was established following about a year of negotiations with AeroMexico. Company vice president Frank Galan said that to be successful, theflights will have to average about 33 passengers.

Galan said the airline and the city are currently talking about another direct flight that would provide service to Cancun, Mexico.

Nagin said the city had entered into a risk-share agreement with the airline that is based upon the number of passengers. The city could lose up to $250,000if the flight fails. Ochsner Health System also made a "financial contribution" to establish the flight, the mayor said.

About 4,000 international patients and physicians come to Ochsner annually, mostly from Honduras, Nicaragua and Venezuela, said Dr. Ana Hands, thesystem's director of international health services.

Prior to Hurricane Katrina, air service was available from Louis Armstrong New Orleans International to Honduras through TACA Airlines and to Toronto on AirCanada.

source: yahoo

 

New Orleans' news

 

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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French Quarter Festivals

 

 

400 North Peters Street • Suite 205 New Orleans, LA 70130 • (504) 522-5730 • (800) 673-5725 • Fax (504) 522-5711 •

Nawlins wrote:

 

Here's last year's French Quarter Fest, huge turn out, larger than I've ever seen before!

Wow - really fantastic pictures!!! Last year was so much fun. I can't believe I won't be here this year - so go enjoy it for me and take lots moregreat photos, please!!

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That's great to hear about the Port of NO and the fact it would go to the Port, sometimes when NOLA has been given FEMA $$$, it seems to disappear due toour corrupt politicians(Ray Ray and others). Finally NOLA can make good on being called an "international airport" once again! " :)

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Nawlins wrote:

That's great to hear about the Port of NO and the fact it would go to the Port, sometimes when NOLA has been given FEMA $$$, it seems to disappear due to our corrupt politicians(Ray Ray and others). Finally NOLA can make good on being called an "international airport" once again! "
:)

thumbsup.gif and it's great hear from a NOLA citizen thesefacts ... big hugs ((((((((((NAWLINS))))))))))

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Nawlins wrote:

That's great to hear about the Port of NO and the fact it would go to the Port, sometimes when NOLA has been given FEMA $$$, it seems to disappear due to our corrupt politicians(Ray Ray and others). Finally NOLA can make good on being called an "international airport" once again! "
:)

thumbsup.gif and it's great hear from a NOLA citizen thesefacts ... big hugs ((((((((((NAWLINS))))))))))

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Artists seek to paint houses on Industrial Canal floodwall

by Sheila Grissett, The Times-Picayune

Thursday April 09, 2009, 2:09 PM

 

large_floodwall.jpg

The floodwall along Jourdan Avenue would be covered in paintings of shotgun houses under a proposal that regional levee commissioners areconsidering.

A New Orleans public art group asked regional levee commissioners today to let 65 local artists paint shotgun houses on an Industrial Canal floodwall tohelp rejuvenate the Lower 9th Ward. Graffitti eradicator Fred Radtke is against theproposal.

The non-profit community group NoLA NoLA Rising told a committee meeting of the Sutheast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East that it wants paint 3,900 feet of floodwall visible from the neighborhood.

"This would be a controlled project. You'd get to approve the (art) in advance," said organization President Michael "Rex" Dinger."It's a wall that deserves a great deal of respect ... because of those who died."

The site is where the floodwall breached during Hurricane Katrina, destroying the surrounding neighborhood.

Radtke warned the authority's operations committee that granting the arts request would open Pandora's box.

"You cannot control this project ... in this city," he said, alleging that the amount of graffitti has tripled at other local mural sites in thepast several years. "It's out of control here because the city's out of control. There's no quality of life here."

Committee members voted to ask the Army Corps of Engineers whether it has a policy on painting federal floodwalls.

. . . . . . .

Sheila Grissett can be reached at sgrissett@timespicayune.com or 504.717.7700.

source: nola

 

New Orleans' news

 

Edge's blog by Regina O'Numb

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