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To tell my tale of my unforgettable gig, I need to go back a bit. I’ve been a fan of U2 since I was about 11. Safe to say, I grew up with them nearly always being in my life. I grew up and lived much of my adult life in an area where U2 is not known to travel to so it took me a while to get to my first U2 concert. When I finally did, it was so completely worth it. I actually made it to see them a few times in the 360 tour and loved it. Flash forward to 2009. U2 are opening the 360 tour in Barcelona. I get a complete wild hair and decide now is the time for me to see them. I had been a paid member of Zootopia for a good few years by then in anticipation of being able to finally attend one of their concerts. In 2009 I finally made it. It was so completely worth the wait. It was such a surreal moment and it was appropriate that it was in Barcelona, Spain – the capital of surrealism. 

 

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I went on this adventure solo. I had a blast. I was texting back and forth with Mich40 and keeping her in the loop while I was there. It was great fun. I actually have a video of the first time I actually heard U2 and Bono sing (although I had just missed recording Bono) and it was really them, not a radio, CD, or etc. I was in the parking lot of Camp Nou stadium listening to them practice and sitting in the café across from the stadium. I’m actually glad this was my first time hearing them live, just me in the parking lot of Camp Nou. I was a grinning fool.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Usjo8UKanHs

 

I went back a few more times to hear them practice leading up to the show. I remember on one occasion in the evening you could hear them around for miles. There were people in the streets with their chairs out listening to them, some dancing even. It was great. I did try and hang out with the bunch that were waiting around to meet the band but they always came out super late from what I understand. So I didn’t get to meet them, but enjoyed my time hanging out and chatting with a few fans there.

 

I didn’t make it to the very first concert but did the second night. 

 

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I thoroughly enjoyed myself singing and dancing around. It was a fantastic concert and night. Also, I got to hear Electrical Storm which was awesome and I think the only time they played that live. I walked away with some great memories, a new addiction for attending concerts, and the best keepsake of all – a U2 video shot on the night I was there.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OT6KngHmrbg&index=12&list=PLE66CAF778BD0C3A6

 

This is also worth posting. Another fan who attended made it. I love it and watch it all the time. It nicely rounds up what the atmosphere was like, the sights of Barcelona, and the concert from a fan perspective.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU3HwRJt3NY&list=PLE66CAF778BD0C3A6&index=3

 

If you ever get the chance to see a U2 opener, go for it. I had a blast and the atmosphere as you near the concert date is amazing. I swear U2 fans from around the world completely invaded Barcelona. It was great.

 

Thanks U2 for everything!!

 

#unforgettablegig 

Edited by Shannon387

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Hey U2 fans this is my concert story!
 

Hey do you want 2 tickets for the Amsterdam Arena? Asked my best friend back in 2005. I was 15/16 years old and never been to a Arena or to a big city like Amsterdam before. Only some small festivals in my local village. I felt my heart beating. ME? going to Amsterdam? To the Arena?

Wow this could be amazing! I started to fantasize about special effects, lights and how big it is. So I said to my friend: Yes that would be suuuuper cooool!!!

 
Ofcourse Im a girl, and the first thing I did when I got home was going to my closet to look for some awesome shirts. Hmmm what to wear… The Police, U2, The Stones…
 
A couple of days later we were sitting in her parents car on our way to Amsterdam! Yes! But then with all the happiness in the world, I started to realize I didn’t no who was performing! So I asked who is going to play tonight? "De Toppers" she answered. My parents got the tickets for free with some grocery commercial. 
 
I got goosebumps…. and not the good kind. Like you eat something you really don’t like goosebumps. For the people that don’t know "De Toppers” to me its a mix between the Amsterdam Gay Pride and German Schlagers but with typical dutch songs… Just not that cool…
 
That concert was took the longest two and a half hours of my life.
This is it then… my very first experience in a Arena and they sing Schlager…
I have never felt more embarrassed than that day…
 
Jenn

 

#unforgettablegig

Edited by jenmusic

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The most unforgettable concert memory I have is when I used to sail with my brother in law.  Annually there was a race where we would sail from Newport to Ensenada.  Problem was U2 was starting their Popmart tour and opening venue was in Las Vegas on 4/25/1997, and we had purchased tickets months before realizing it was the same weekend as this race.  I couldn't not go to the U2 concert and I also couldn't let me brother in law down and not sail.  So I had to do both.  The sailing race started on 4/23 and takes about a day and a half.  I arrive with little sleep early in the morning around 5am Friday morning, jump in my car and drove from Ensenada to Sam Boyd stadium in Las Vegas to catch the opening night concert for Popmart tour.  Don't remember how we did in the race, but will always remember the concert and the craziness that went into getting there. 

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Hello, my U2 family!  In August of 1993, I was the winner of a U2 radio contest!! I won a trip from Philly to Dublin to see the last night of the Zooropa Tour! It was a completely amazing experience and I still cannot believe it happened - 21 years later!  I flew to Dublin with my new husband - we will be married 22 years this month and we still go to as many U2 shows as we can - three kids later!   I wrote a letter to Propaganda to tell them about my experience. In my letter I wrote that at that moment, we felt like were at the coolest place on the planet (true!) and my letter was printed!  Fast forward to 2011 - Edge signed my Propaganda and I got to tell him my story.  His response:  "Wow!".  He was so nice and really listened to my story. He was impressed!  Here are some pics - my letter from WMMR Radio in Philly, pics of the Bonavox Hearing Aid Shop, the Principle Management door bell, our tickets, the Zoo money my husband caught, and a pic of Edge from 2011 and his autograph. My letter was called "Wonderful".  And it was!   #unforgettablegig

Cheers,

Mari

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November 2005, U2 in Montreal. My tickets scanned Vertigo and I end up first row just in front of The Edge in the pit. It was my first U2 gig but not my last! I had tickets for their second night two days later and then, Adam signed this picture.!

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The year was 1983... U2 was scheduled to perform at Red Rocks, in my backyard, so to speak. The June day dawned cold and rainy. And I had an 8th grade math final that morning. Needless to say, I was not at the now-famous Red Rocks in the rain show... 

Fast forward to March 17, 1985. I had a ticket to the U2 show at McNichols Arena in Denver. Behind the stage. Not a great seat, by all means. I didn't care one bit! The music was loud, and U2 played all of my favorites. I sang and danced, and had a great time. After the show, my friends and I were hanging around in the parking lot, not ready to go home, and not wanting to sit in endless traffic in the parking lot. Well, hanging around the tour bus area was a great idea - I saw a figure clad in black, and just knew that it was Bono. I ran toward him, tripped on the curb, and nearly knocked Bono to the ground. He was so nice, and we chatted a little bit. I can still recall that he smelled like cigarettes and leather jacket... I asked him to sign my ticket, but could not locate a pen. He took my ticket, placed it in my hands, and held them tightly.. and said "I'm sorry, I really have to go now". Now that's a great memory of my first U2 show! 

The 1987 Joshua Tree tour rocked my world - that was one of my favorites. 

In 1992, my best friend and I wanted to see the ZooTV tour, which wasn't scheduled to stop in Denver until later in the year. So, we packed up the car and drove 800 miles to Phoenix with hopes that we would be able to score tickets to the show there. We perhaps over paid for the tickets, but we were in, and had a great time. We did see U2 later that year in Denver, and ended up meeting the Edge and Larry outside of their hotel. Those were the days! 

I've seen U2 11 times total, and have loved each show - they keep getting better! My favorite moment from the latest tour was "Moment of Surrender", when Bono asked everyone to turn on their phones... 

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Although I have a continuing love affair with U2, one extra special gig I have been to was Jeff Buckley at the Palais Theatre, St Kilda, Melbourne, in 1995. Jeff's voice and his band's singing guitars had been haunting my dreams for many months and the opportunity to see him in such an intimate venue was an exciting event. The Palais Theatre is an art deco venue on the foreshore of St Kilda. It seats only a couple of 1000 people, I was seated in the front row of the circle which means I looked down on Jeff Buckley, while he complained about the awkardness of his hairstyle, and strummed his guitar lovingly. His voice soared through the room, and we all hung off every note that he sang and played.  His version of Hallelujah, now so popularly done by other artists, is the best after Lou Reed.  The gig at the time was perfect, and some years later in 1997 when Jeff died in the Mississippi, I felt sadness at such a loss of talent and purity of style, and forever grateful that I had been able to spend that evening with him.

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It was October, 2005.
It was my first airplane trip;
It was the first time I traveled to another country;
It was the first time I met Bono;
It was my first U2 Concert;
It was the first time I had a dream to come true!
It was a moment I'll never forget!!
Lucky me, lucky and beautiful Boston!
 

Boston memories

#unforgettableGig

 

Boston memories

#unforgettableBoston

 

 

Andrea Macedo

Recife - Brasil

Edited by *ladywiththespinninghead*

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Without a moment’s hesitation, he reached out and touched the boot. I didn’t have the guts, but Jack? He was adventurous, daring, definitely the cool kid. We stood in the front row of the Luther College gymnasium as Mike Peters and the boys from The Alarm ripped through the finale--the title track off their new album “The Eye of the Hurricane.”

I was content to admire the spikey hair, stylish vests and fat-body guitars. Jack needed a more tangible connection. Like the desperate mother extending a hand for just a faint brush of Jesus’ healing cloak, Jack’s fingertip brush with that black leather boot atop the monitor was a miracle. Peters acknowledged the touch with a smile from above, and I knew that rock ‘n’ roll was Gospel set to a backbeat, the players the preachers, the crowds the converts starving for the Word.

 

Greg Adams

 

(Me, left, Jack, right)

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2011 was the best year of my life .... U2 360 went to the grandest and blistering concert my life .... I could hardly believe it was close to my biggest idols, BONO, THE EDGE, ADAM AND LARRY. was ... a dream .... I wanted to show that these days in Brazil never ran out ... Besides going to the show, I could go to the hotel where BONO and tHE EDGE were staying ... after long hours of waiting they appeared in front of the hotel and started signing autographs people who were there ... I could not believe I was face to face with my idol ... got autographs BONO and EDGE, the EDGE I tattooed on my arm , will be a memory for all my life .... can not wait for the next tour and get to see my idols again ... I always dreamed of my whole life to meet them and this happened .... they are all I imagined and dreamed .. wonderful and amazing people

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January 1991 and I'm off to see The Ramones at Festival Hall in Brisbane. Problem is my foot is in a cast and I'm on crutches after breaking my ankle playing rugby. Worse still I plan (or I should day my GF's plans) are to sit down during the concert because of my mobility issues! Two songs into the Ramones gig and I can't sit still and tell my GF that I can't sit with her and that I'm headed for the floor. I get up and head down to the security dude at the floor gate who instead of ordering me back to my seat just smiles and lets me through. I make my way through the crowd to a spot where I'm happy and all the while theres people slapping me on the back and cheering me on. I can vividly recall raising my crutches in triumph and doing my best to oscillate wildly whilst the strangers around me smiled and occasionally grabbed the crutches off me. One time I went down and was helped back up by what seemed to be a hundred hands. What an awesome night, somehow almost better than normal because I was slightly disabled on the night. RIP Ramones, I saw them about half a dozen times, once even in London where they were supported by the Anti Nowhere League. I have included the poster from the night and my ticket stub along with a poster that I had bought 14 months previous when I saw them at the same venue in 1989 (maybe soon, I have to work out how to shrink the photo sizes). Gabba Gabba Hey! Now my son who is only 7 is a Ramones fanatic, I recently had to re-sync his iPod and he came back to me half an hour later to tell me I had forgotten to add The Ramones.

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OK. Here goes!

 

See the whole thing here.

 

I'd grown up around music, but it was of the classical variety. My dad was a concert violinist and couldn’t help me much in the early ‘90s when it came to “modern” music. My first album was Achtung Baby. I got the right to choose one by selling magazines during my middle school fundraiser. I didn’t get enough points for the police siren, so CD it was. I didn’t know U2 in 1993. I didn’t know anyone. I made my selection based on album cover. It was AB, the Crash Test Dummies or Petty. A girl told me to go with U2, and, well, you listen to girls.

1997 rolled around. I was a U2 fan by then, but still a concert virgin. Not just U2. Any band. Pop had been released, and then I heard about Popmart. Not only that, but that it was coming to tiny Eugene, Ore. Thank good for Autzen Stadium; the only suitable stadium in all of Oregon to host a concert large enough. I went by myself. None of my friends had the kind of money for a ticket like that. $60. The whole town got a free concert, of course. And in the days afterward everyone knew U2 would never come back to Eugene. I sat in the back, among people who were mostly twice my age. I had no idea what to expect. I was blown away, of course. Every concert I’ve seen since, and I’ve seen many, I’ve compared to that one. I didn’t know what emotions people were supposed to feel at a concert. I didn’t know whether they were supposed to sit down or stand, or what they were supposed to do with their hands. Even the concept of lighters didn’t make sense yet (I was areally late bloomer). And then, during “Please,” I stood, and I put my arms up, and I think I cried. That was my memory, at least. Bono was singing lyrics, but I understood that he was talking to me directly, when he said to “get up; please.”
 
The following week I wrote about my experience for a class project. It was a proto-review; the first of thousands of times I would write about music. You can still read it, here. It’s … not my best work, unless you want to know which buses I took to the stadium, or how U2 came out of a lemon, or how the entire experience overwhelmed me forever. 

At that point, I hadn’t yet seen U2 60-plus times. I had yet to camp in front of arenas and stadiums across this country and others. I had yet to meet some of my closest friends, start an illegal campfire in a parking lot, run a “list” or write numbers on people’s wrists. I had yet to become a journalist to write about the work and lives of musicians (as I do now), I had yet to get married, turn my wife into a U2 fan and drag her around the world, I had yet to have  two of my own kids to take to a concert. I hadn’t yet interviewed the band one-on-one (actually, I’m still waiting for that. Can you put in a good word? I promise I’d be interesting and I would challenge them for insights). 

But, really, everything I am now dates to the moment I got that album, Achtung Baby, and that first concert. May 6, 1997.
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Edited by Romi

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Picture it...1984..just turned 17.. first concert ever..Worcester Centrum MA..hot stagnant air with the smell of the occassional pot smoke..lights go down and the TVs on stage start up..it's The Clash walking into the Centrum..this started a night of pure excitement I've never experienced before..at one point the stage was taken over by well over 50 fans..the band keeps playing..controlled chaos..song ends and the stage clears..a mutual respect between fans and artist I havent seen since U2 shows..everytime I hear a Clash song I'm taken back to that unforgettable night.

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My father took me to Bruce Springsteen play at the Amway Arena in Orlando, FL.  It was a graduation present from my mother and him, but most of all, it was a rite of passage. Bruce had no opener that night, just 4 hours of sweat, screams, and rock & roll. My father knew the usher in our section who invited us to sneak into the "VIP" section of the station where the fans willing to drop major cash so that the Boss could hear them shout out "Spirit in the Night!" or "Tenth Avenue Freeze Out."

 

I never really thanked my father enough for that night. Perhaps I simply did not understand the significance of it at the time. Growing up as the second son, I often felt as a shadow to my older brother. We had the same teachers, played on the same football team, I got his hand-me-down clothes. Springsteen's rasp was one thing that I uniquely held. It was a love my father and I shared. Whether it was intended or not, with each bead of sweat dripping off of Bruce's elbow was a symbol, an anointing, a blessing from my father.   

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Dream out loud #unforgettablegig

U2 in Dublin, August 27, 1993

 

This is not about my very first concert (Journey, 1986), nor my very first U2 concert (Atlanta, 1992).  It is about my fourth U2 concert, a show that forever left a mark on my life.

 

It was late July, 1993.  My best friend had called me to tell me that she and her dad had heard a commercial during the weekly broadcast of The American Top 40 announcing that there was a contest going on to go see U2 in Dublin in August.  She didn't catch all the details, so it was my mission the next week to see if I could hear it.  I did and I got the details.  All you had to do was call this 1-800 number and register.  I called and got through, gave my info and was officially registered (the only requirement was that you had to be home to take the call the day that they were announcing the winners).  I called my best friend to give her the number and have her register. She registered and we made a promise to each other that if one of us won, we would take the other.  So both of us arranged to have that day off and spent most of the day talking on the phone (we both had call waiting) and waited.  Around 3 that afternoon, she had an incoming call and she put me on hold for what felt like an eternity.  It was probably only about 20 minutes, but when she returned, it would change my life forever.  WE WERE GOING TO DUBLIN TO SEE U2! The next few days were a whirlwind.  We had to get passports (which we were supposed to have already) expedited and make work arrangements and get ready to make our journey across the Atlantic Ocean.  I was so excited and nervous because I was a small town girl that had barely been anywhere, much less on an airplane to another country.

 

15277717549_7a0af7418a_n.jpgscan0003 by mich40u2, on Flickr

 

15441501116_f7ccb9c88a_n.jpgscan0002 by mich40u2, on Flickr

 

Fast-forward to August 25.  We departed on our journey and arrived in Dublin on August 26th.  We were greeted by the Music Awareness Group that was doing the contest, given our itinerary, our spending money and met up with the other 6 sets of winners of the contest.  While we were chatting with the other winners, we realized how much this trip and this concert was meant to be for us.  We were all talking about how we had registered and the question came up, "How many times did you call?" We found out that the other winners had all called between 20-80 times a piece and registered that many times.  When they asked my friend and me, I'm not sure who was shocked more, us or them.  I had called one time.  She had called one time.  One time.  Unbelievable!

 

August 27, 1993.  The day of the show.  We had a pre-show party at the hotel and then walked down to the RDS where U2 were playing.  The streets were a party and I felt like I was in the best dream ever.  Inside the stadium was buzzing with energy.  Our seats were to the side on Edge's side and we watched as the sea of people on the field waved back and forth like waves in the ocean.  I had never seen anything like it in my 22 years.  The opening bands came and went and then U2 hit the stage.  It was the first time I had seen them in almost a year and to see them in their hometown was absolutely amazing and almost unreal to me.  I was still convinced that I must be dreaming.  The show was the updated ZooTV show with the added Zooropa songs and each and every song was a part of the soundtrack of my unforgettable moment.  I danced and sang to every song, and cried several times during the show because I was so happy to be there.  At every show, Bono would call someone on his telephone from the stage and that night he called home.  He was told by his little girl that he couldn't come home until he took his devil horns (from his Macphisto persona) off.  He did take them off and the night couldn't have been more beautiful.

 

15277898000_d55a7b58e5_n.jpgscan0004 by mich40u2, on Flickr

 

15277969648_2335542162_n.jpgscan0006 by mich40u2, on Flickr

 

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To this day, I cannot believe that I got to see my favorite band in their hometown with my best friend. We still go to every show together and have seen them 18 times together and looking forward to adding to that.  Not only that, but I went to Dublin to see U2 but came home, having fallen in love with a city and a country.  I have now been back 5 times since then.

 

When I read the album notes to Songs of Innocence for 'The Miracle" and "California," I couldn't help but think that Bono and the rest of the band "get it."  Those songs describe how I felt going to Dublin and seeing them there.  I liked U2 when I first saw the "Gloria" video in 1983, but having that experience left such a deep mark on me that they have been the soundtrack of my life since then.  I've had several amazing moments at their shows since then, but that night in Dublin still stands out in my mind like it was yesterday.

Edited by mich40
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Best gig of my life was 360 Pittsburgh. Not only was it my 3rd 360 gig and my 4th U2 show ever, I had recently learned I was expecting my 2nd baby. (I had my firstborn only 4 weeks after my very first U2 show, Vertigo Pittsburgh).

 

And if the news of my pregnancy wasn't enough, I met Bono and Edge that day when they greeted fans outside of Heinz Field. And when I told Bono my good news, he reached through the barricade and rubbed my barely-there baby bump. That moment was a highlight for me as a mom, a wife, and a U2 fan. Thanks, B. I can't wait to bring my little girl to a show someday. (Her big brother was at 360 E. Lansing)

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Better than a picture...I have video. PBS filmed Tears For Fears at First Avenue in Minneapolis and I can be found at the 1:51 mark singing my heart out.

 

 

Drove six hours to the show. Ran into Roland Orzabal by chance in the parking lot before the show. Got backstage passes. Had dinner with the opening act and got into the show early for front row access. Went to the Tears For Fears after show party. Drove home in a blizzard that extended the return trip to about nine hours. My roommate dropped me off at work for a 12 hour shift as we pulled into town and coffee plus adrenaline from the previous night kept me upright for the rest of the day.

 

Band was great. Experience will never be forgotten. Almost 20 years have passed and I still remember it vividly...and thanks to YouTube, it survives on video as well.

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post-290081-0-83507900-1412648787_thumb.jpgOne of my favorite U2 concert memories was from Palace of Auburn Hills, Michigan on Vertigo Tour 10/25/05.  My friend & I ended up with an extra paid of GA tickets that we weren't able to sell before entering the arena, or more accurately we couldn't find a fan in need instead of touts looking to mark them up.  It was time to enter the venue and get our own GA wristbands and we still had the extra tix.  As I was watching the opening act, I glanced up at the nosebleed section behind the stage and thought - that has got to be a lousy view from that section, I bet some nice fan up there deserves to be on the floor, so off we went to literally the last row of the worst section in the arena.  I spotted a young couple and asked if they needed better seats.  They didn't understand, and by that I mean that they literally didn't understand English, as well as not understanding that I was really offering them tickets at no cost.  We muddled through some broken English as we walked down to the floor of the arena together.  Turns out they were from Spain, in the US on their honeymoon and decided at last minute to fly from NYC to Detroit to see U2 (seriously, why else would anyone go to Detroit on their honeymoon) but sadly they got ripped off with those nosebleed seats and so they were delighted to find themselves on the floor.  But wait, there's more…just then I spotted a laminated tour crew member who was assisting a fan in a wheelchair.  I told him that this couple was from Spain, on their honeymoon, and before I could finish explaining, he gave all of us pit wristbands.  So in less than 30 minutes they went from literally the worse seats in the arena to being 10 feet away from the band in the heart.  Gas/Dinner/GA tickets $150, the look of disbelief on their face and tears of joy #priceless  Pretty sure it was an #UnforgettableGig for them.  

Edited by MaryC

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I was listing to U2 for almost 12 years but it was until 1992 that i have the luck to attend the concerts, was on San Diego and I remember Bono shut down the band to play "Who's gone ride you wild horses" by Himself then after 3 months i saw the band in Mexico city play their magic and the attendance play along with the lighters.... Priceless, i have been an U2 fan since then

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Hey!

One of my first concerts I was able to visit, was in my age of 16. There I used to be a hugh Fan of Bryan Adams. It was on a Festival in Germany and I got a vip Ticket to stand near the stage. Friday, it was the biggest Moment of my life to that time. Mr Adams drove by and was almost gone to his dressing room when he heared me shouting. He stoped, came to me and to me to the dressing room and gave me the time to talk a while. Also you let me took some pictures and he signed my records. This Moment I still remember if it was yesterday. It was awesome und unforgettable.

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City in My Head..... UTOPIA... Heaven in my body.... UTOPIA....

 

Those words changed my life in the most profound way.  It was the fall of 1975 in a small state forest in southern Iowa, where I was living with my sister after being expelled from school in Cincinnati for being a foolish young hooligan.  My newfound friends had invited me along, and I was more than happy to leave the farm and explore the beauty of the Hawkeye state.  Doing what most teenagers did in the 1970's, we had plenty of 'party' supplies and music on 8-track, leaving our vinyl at home with our "quad" stereos. 

 

Lying in the back of a 1950's pickup truck with my Iowa farmboy friends, watching stars dance and glide through the sky, the most beautiful sound I had ever heard suddenly filled every sinue of my being.  It was the first few chords of a song I would later discover is entitled, "Todd Rundgren's Utopia."  Immediately upon hearing those notes, I literally saw fireworks, felt explosions from head to toe, and had a total out of body experience. It wasn't holy, it was divine, nothing less than sharing a pure consciousness experience with the true cosmic source of all love and music. 

 

From that moment forward my life would follow the Utopian path.  My friend loaned me his vinyl version, where I explored every note on the entire album, and learned about Freedom Fighters, and living in the light of eternal mind in the Ikon, and the joy of being lock step in with the Freak Parade, but more than anything else, I learned the meaning of Utopia. From there, I quickly gobbled up the remaining TR catalog, and upon returning to Cincy with a new outlook and attitude, got my act together in school and graduated with honors, all the while sharing my love of all things utopian and gathering a nice group of utopian friends.

 

My friends and I enjoyed waiting in line for the live shows, especially after experiencing the Who and Led Zeppelin fiascos we barely survived at Riverfron Coliseum. There was no pushing and shoving, nobody being trampled or squished, no beer bottles being smashed all over.  Just people sharing coffee and hot chocolate and talking about the nature of existence and started a little activist group that would meet and do some fine consciousness exploration.  I met my husband and most of my lifelong friends at these shows, and now actually work for Todd making backstage passes and tour laminates.

 

On a U2 note, in the spring of 1983, we witnessed U2 (and that crazy Bono kid climbing the flag pole at Keenan stadium!!!) for the first time, when they opened for Todd Rundgren in Chapel Hill, NC.  I had pics from that show, but they were lost to a flood in my basement.  However, I do recall that was a fun show.... we somehow were invited to party with Grandmaster Flash and hang on their tour bus and backstage. Not sure if we even met anyone from U2 (so sad, but it would be another 10 years before Zooropa would give me another karmic moment, similar to TR's Utopia).  We found it incredibly amusing that as soon as U2 left the stage, the entire audience cleared out, so we were able to be front row (almost a private show) for Todd. 

 

Backstage after a Todd show, he encouraged my friends and I to become concert promoters, which we did for a few years. My two girlfriends and I who ran the business were affectionately dubbed, "The Ohio Players" by band members in Grateful Dead, Todd's Band, and a few others.  We were also known for the girls who kicked out NIN out of a hotel party in Cleveland, because they were drinking from our robo-bar!   Anyway, that is my story, and my life in a nutshell. 

 

Everything in my life can be measured as a soundtrack, and I do not see that changing any time in the near future. 

 

The attached pic is that of my son, TR and I with my Ohio Utopian license plate. 

 

Peace

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In the mid-80's a high school buddy named Dave Young, who was older than I, insisted we see THE JOSHUA TREE concert in LA, even though neither of us could afford tickets.  Just a couple of broke teenagers.  I didn't have a license yet, but Dave drove a cool white Camero with black interior, and we hoped to get lucky with scalpers, even if the seats were crap.  So we drove to the Coliseum, parked and started to hustle for tix.  Basically, no price was too low.  But even the scalpers were expensive.  And I remember that sinking feeling as it dawned on me that we were not going to see this epic show.  The Pixies opened for them, as I recall, and I could hear Bjork singing "Today is your birthday-ay-ay ..."  The show had begun.  The crowd went bananas.  So Dave and I resigned ourselves to sit outside and listen to the entire concert on the curb.  It sounded like everyone was having such a blast inside!  The concert must've been amazing!  I bought a t-shirt in the parking lot, which I later cut off the sleeves and wore proudly.  The drive home was somber.  We didn't get to see U2, but we heard them.  And that's what music is all about anyway, right -- listening.

 

Dave died, sadly, in a car accident before I even finished high school.  I kept that Joshua Tree t-shirt for a very long time ... until it was thread-bare.  Only wish i had a pic ...

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It's October, 1989 and Transvision Vamp are playing at The Barrowlands in Glasgow, Scotland.

 

 

 

As a teenager, my parents have decided it's too far (40 miles), too late at night blah blah blah but my best mate Foxy has already bought the tickets and nothing's going to stop us. So late afternoon we catch the bus through to Glasgow and make our way to the gig.

 

 

As expected, the crowd is predominantly a heaving, sweating mass of testosterone filled, lager fuelled teen lads who’s interest in the lead singer far outweighs their interest in the music– and she knows it; prowling across the stage, pouting and posing in a very, very short, silver sequined dress.

 

 

After the gig, however, we soon discover that there are no buses at that time of night to get us home. We find a phone box and I sheepishly call home to ask my Dad to come and pick us up.

 

 

Needless to say I got the hiding of my life when I got home but it was worth it to be in the front row and see Wendy James in that dress.

 

No pics from the night but none required!

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