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The Action Thread Part Two

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They say pictures are worth a thousand words, and this certainly rings true when it comes to this recent photo of Angelina, who is clearly thriving in the care of the Sugrue family in Tralee 2764.png❤️

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CULTURE

10 facts you need to know about Nelson Mandela

11 July 2018 11:57AM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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It’s hard to keep track of all the incredible things about Nelson Mandela and his accomplishments. We’re clearly inspired by his actions and wisdom, and there’s still even more to know about him! You may remember these 7 facts about Nelson Mandela, and there are a few more to add to the list!

1. His birth name was Rolihlahla Mandela. His primary school teacher gave him the name Nelson.

2. He began his long road to a college degree at the University College of Fort Hare in 1931. He was expelled for participating in a protest against the university’s policies.

3. After leaving the University College of Fort Hare, the King of his village threatened to arrange marriages for him and his cousin, Justice. They both ran away to Johannesburg to avoid the marriages.

4. He, along with fellow ANC member Oliver Tambo, established South Africa’s first black law practice in 1952. His practice primarily worked in challenging apartheid laws, including South Africa’s “pass laws,” which required non-white citizens to carry documents authorizing their presence in “restricted” areas.

5. In order to leave the country (which he was banned from doing), he used the name David Motsamayi to get out of South Africa in secret.

6. His activism continued while in prison, both inside its walls and out. He was a mentor to other prisoners and taught them about nonviolent resistance. He also sent notes to the outside world and was a consistent symbol for the anti-apartheid movement.

7. He loved sports and even used them as part of his activism. He believed that sport “has the power to change the world…it has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people in a way that little else does. It speaks to youth in a language they understand. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair. It is more powerful than government in breaking down racial barriers.”

8. He was released from prison in 1990 by President Frederik Willem de Klerk. The two now share a Nobel Peace Prize.

9. He voted for the first time in his life in 1994 – at 76 years old!

10. Mandela Day is July 18th, with this year being the centenary of Nelson Mandela’s birth in 1918. This year, you can celebrate by taking #ActionAgainstPoverty with the Nelson Mandela Foundation!

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It’s true, education *can* change the world! Need proof? → If every girl in sub-Saharan Africa completed a primary education, maternal mortality could fall by a dramatic 70%.

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It's been 100 years since the birth of Nelson Mandela! We’re celebrating by giving away *100* exclusive #MandelaDay t-shirts! 1f455.png? 

To enter: Fill in the blank telling us why Nelson Mandela has inspired you to #BeTheLegacy and tag 3 friends! 2728.png 26a1.png

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My Creative Career – Rosaleen Molloy, Music Generation

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  5. My Creative Career – Rosaleen Molloy, Music Generation

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What is your current role and how long have you been working in it?

I am the National Director of Music Generation and commenced in the role in January 2010.

How did you get to where you are today and what influenced your decision to work in your chosen field?

My background spans the worlds of music performance, music education, arts/cultural management, strategic policy and research. I grew up with music and always wanted to pursue it as a career, and from an early age was very drawn to the world of music education.

After completing my music degree in UCC, I initially trained and taught as a secondary school teacher for a while but was always more drawn to the world of music performance in education and in particular the realm of conducting. Thereafter, I worked as a freelance performing musician and music educator, directing various ensembles, conducting youth orchestras, adult/youth/children’s choirs and generally developing my portfolio of practice. I also began to study with the Choral Music Experience Institute for Choral Teacher Education in the States, because I really wanted to specialise in that area. During that time I was also appointed Project Director of a pioneering arts-in-education research initiative and from there I initiated a countywide choral music education programme in County Wexford which was very innovative for its time.

Following that I was appointed Arts Officer to Wexford County Council in 2002 and subsequently took up my current position in 2010.

What do you love/enjoy most about your job?

I love what Music Generation stands for and believe in the values that it is built upon. As a movement of change it has a very clear purpose – to transform the lives of children and young people by giving them access to high quality music tuition in their local area. Every dimension of the organisation’s work is concerned with achieving that outcome.

What are the most challenging parts of your job?

Every element of it can be challenging as it’s a multi-faceted senior leadership role. Aspects include strategic planning, policy development, the nurturing of strategic partnerships with multiple stakeholders, cultivating and leading learning networks, research, building and empowering teams, financial management and advocacy.

Each component has its own challenges but that, along with its diversity, is what keeps me motivated and interested in the role.

How do you relax?

I enjoy cooking, cycling, gardening, spending time with family and friends and playing music when time allows. I also love going to concerts and engaging with live music. I especially like going to performances by children and young people involved in Music Generation as I find them truly inspiring.

What skills and personality traits do you think are essential to a job like yours?

Passion, resilience, motivation, determination, ambition, entrepreneurial ability and openness to learning. You also need to be able to translate vision into realisation and action and be adaptable.

What’s your advice to anyone who wants to pursue a career in the same field?

Because the needs in music education in Ireland are so great, and what Music Generation is trying to do is so significant, I think that you absolutely need to love and believe in the purpose of music in the lives of children and young people and how it changes lives.

You need to believe in the vision that roots the organisation. You’ve got to be resilient, determined, hard-working, have the capacity to envision what’s possible for children and young people in music and be really willing and open to learning.

There was no route map or clear career path to arriving at the role that I have now. The pathway evolved and that’s probably reflective of how the arts and cultural landscape has evolved in Ireland over the past 25 years. For me it was a combination of creating opportunities in response to my own ambitions and what I wanted to achieve in a strategic way, as well as responding to exciting opportunities as they arose.

I think it’s important to be versatile and to be equally adept in the ‘business’ and ‘practice’ dimensions of the organisation.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever been given?

Down through the years, I’ve been given really inspirational nuggets of advice from lots of people who have had a significant influence on me at different stages of my life. One of the most influential mentors that I ever worked with is Dr. Doreen Rao who’s globally renowned for her work in choral music education leadership. She said to me one time, “you never know who the teacher is and in music education children and young people are our best teachers”.  How right she is!

Another great educational leader also once said to me that so much of leadership is about listening – that’s been a key piece of advice that has stood me in good stead.

What has been the best moment of your career so far?

I think the moments that continue to sustain and excite me in the various roles I’ve had are simply those where I’ve been so inspired by live music-making, particularly that interaction between children/young people and musicians. When you experience that, either in live performance or in a moment of teaching and learning, that for me has always been the best moment which continues to excite and energise me about the work that I do and that I believe in.

What are your career aspirations?

As I’ve been working professionally for about 25 years now, in looking ahead to the next 25 years my aspiration would be to continue working with fantastic teams and pursuing movements of change which ultimately impact positively people’s lives.

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The second event in our 2018 Run Series - 350 of you tied your laces and clocked up the kilometers for Mencap! Thanks again to all who came, find yourself and tag yourself!

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8 WAYS NELSON MANDELA CHANGED THE WORLD

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Today marks Nelson Mandela’s 100th birthday, and we’re joining people around the world who are celebrating the life, achievements, and legacy of the former South African leader. Mandela’s impact on his people, his country, and the world as a whole has been far too vast to measure, though it has also been too important to leave untried. Here are eight ways Nelson Mandela used his life to change the world forever.

 

1. FROM THE BEGINNING, MANDELA KNEW THAT A SINGLE PERSON COULD BE A CATALYST FOR CHANGE. HE WASN’T AFRAID TO BE THAT CATALYST.

THERE IS NO PASSION TO BE FOUND PLAYING SMALL - IN SETTLING FOR A LIFE THAT IS LESS THAN THE ONE YOU ARE CAPABLE OF LIVING.

Mandela was born in 1918 in a small village in the Transkei, then a British territory in what is now South Africa. He would go on to lead a nation, change lives, and inspire countless people along the way. While he was only one man, Mandela shaped a better world through his own initiative.

Mandela formed and joined many organizations and alliances during his lifetime and continues to be a symbol of the power that one individual has to make a difference. Almost every personal and professional road he traveled—whether that road meant establishing the first black law firm in South Africa, forming the African National Congress Youth League, or refusing a pardon due to continued injustice—was a brave and powerful example of the long journey to freedom.

As Mandela put it, “There is no passion to be found playing small - in settling for a life that is less than the one you are capable of living.”

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2. HE REFUSED TO GIVE UP ON HIS CAUSE AND HIS COUNTRY.

Fewer images in history are more powerful than that of Nelson Mandela, fist raised in a dignified grey suit, walking after his release from 27 years of imprisonment. Mandela was only 44 years old when he was given a life sentence by the apartheid regime for his leadership of the African National Congress, an organization outlawed by the government for its anti-apartheid actions and positions.

Mandela was first arrested on treason charges just four years after starting South Africa’s first black law firm and working with others calling for a nonracial state in the country. He would later be acquitted of these charges, only to be arrested yet again in 1962 for his work as a leader within the African National Congress.

3. MANDELA SET AN EXAMPLE OF DEDICATION, COURAGE, AND SACRIFICE FOR ALL.

YOUR FREEDOM AND MINE CANNOT BE SEPARATED.

During his trial, Mandela refused to defend himself in order to not legitimize the charges levied against him.

In 1985, the government offered to release Mandela under the conditions that he would not engage in political activities once free. Nelson refused. "I cannot and will not give any undertaking at a time when I and you, the people, are not free," he said. "Your freedom and mine cannot be separated."

4. HE KNEW THAT HIS STRUGGLE WAS HIS PEOPLE’S, AS HIS PEOPLE’S STRUGGLE WAS HIS. BUT MANDELA OPENED THAT STRUGGLE AND HIS MESSAGE OF JUSTICE TO THE WORLD.

In the mid-1980s, the world slowly awakened to the suffering of South Africans under apartheid rule. And while Mandela suffered behind bars, his message had never been louder. As anti-apartheid rallies grew, so did awareness of Mandela’s struggle for freedom for black South Africans. His message was so powerful that a protest song named “Free Nelson Mandela,” written and performed by the ska band The Special AKA after attending such a rally, became a top ten hit in the UK, and a legendary anthem worldwide.

Mandela’s message was one of peace, justice and freedom, an inclusive campaign that all people could support. He set the precedent for messaging and rallying for future activists to come.

5. HE SET UP A FOUNDATION IN ORDER TO SECURE THAT HIS WORK FOR JUSTICE AND PEACE COULD CONTINUE.

Founded in 1999, the Nelson Mandela Foundation is the legacy that Mandela has left behind. The organization focuses on what was central to Mandela’s work: justice, dialogue, and social cohesion. Just as Mandela did so successfully in South Africa, the foundation “aims to use the history, experience, values, vision and leadership of its Founder to provide a non-partisan platform for public discourse on important social issues, and in doing so, to contribute to policy decision-making.” The foundation hopes that by providing people and politics with the relevant tools, the public can have informed discussions that lead to justice and freedom for all.

6. MANDELA DELIVERED A GROUNDBREAKING SPEECH FOR THE FIGHT AGAINST HIV/AIDS AT A CRUCIAL TIME FOR SOUTH AFRICANS.

In 2000, a quarter of South African citizens between the ages of 15- and 45-years old tested positive for HIV/AIDS. In a time and place with four million infected people and incalculable stigma, Nelson Mandela called for bold new measures to be taken in the fight against AIDS.

While he regretted not doing enough while he was in office, Nelson Mandela single-handedly set a new agenda for the future fight against HIV/AIDS with a groundbreaking speech in 2000 at an International AIDS conference in Durban.

Combined with his public meeting with the revolutionary South African HIV/AIDS activist Zackie Achmat in 2002 and his relentless engagement with the fight through the later years of his life, Nelson Mandela was a devoted advocate for HIV+ South Africans all the way up until his death in 2013.

7. HE UNDERSTOOD THAT WHILE IT IS IMPORTANT TO FORGIVE, HISTORY MUST NEVER FORGET ITS TROUBLED PAST.

Nelson Mandela sought remembrance, rather than revenge, in response to injustices under Apartheid rule. He understood that the key to moving forward as a nation was understanding and learning from its troubled past. That’s why one of Mandela’s first actions as president of South Africa was to set up a Committee for Truth and Reconciliation, a governmental agency dedicated to investigating crimes committed under apartheid from 1960 to 1994.

The program is a beacon for human rights volition investigators everywhere, and stands as a shining example as a guide for healing from past atrocities and unifying divided peoples.

8. MANDELA CHANNELED HIS CHILDHOOD LESSONS OF UBUNTU, AND GAVE THOSE VALUES TO THE WORLD.

HE NOT ONLY EMBODIED UBUNTU, HE TAUGHT MILLIONS TO FIND THAT TRUTH WITHIN THEMSELVES.
— BARACK OBAMA

At his core, this was Nelson Mandela’s mission, and its story goes back all the way to his days as a child in that small African village. Ubuntu is the Xhosa idea that there is a oneness to all people. An impenetrable tie that binds us all to one another. A principle stating that conflict amongst people is temporary, only a brief diversion from the natural order of our true nature as human beings: togetherness. Mandela took this belief to heart, and with it shaped the world around him, believing that strength will overcome strife and refusing to be cynical.

As Barack Obama said during Mandela’s eulogy:

“Ubuntu, a word that captures Mandela’s greatest gift: His recognition that we are all bound together in ways that are invisible to the eye; that there is a oneness to humanity; that we achieve ourselves by sharing ourselves with others, and caring for those around us. . . . He not only embodied Ubuntu, he taught millions to find that truth within themselves.”

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Did you know young women are twice as likely to become infected with HIV than young men?

Rise Clubs in South Africa provide much needed safe spaces for women and girls to share and discuss difficult issues, and build resilience among peers. Find out more about how (RED) empowers women & girls here:https://bit.ly/2zGne9G

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HEALTH

Comedian 'Humiliated' by UK Train Staff After She Was Forced to Leave Disability Space

A staff member stopped the train and threatened to call the police.

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Disability is stigmatised all over the world. In the poorest countries, it can trap people in extreme poverty with fewer employment prospects and insufficient health care — and stories like this prove that wealthy societies still have so much work to do to support people with disabilities of all forms. Take action now to end extreme poverty for all.

Tanyalee Davis had just performed at Plymouth Comedy Club, and the next day boarded a Great Western Railway (GWR) train to London Paddington.

The 47-year-old Canadian was driving her mobility scooter — she has a form of dwarfism called diastrophic dysplasia — and immediately a staff member on the platform said that she might have to move if a wheelchair user boarded the train.

“I was like, here we go again,” Davis said in a YouTube video, recalling the day that left her “personally and publicly humiliated” on July 15.

Take Action: Urge Leaders to Step Up for Women’s Rights and Health

Take Action: Email Now

 
 
 
 
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In partnership with: SheDecides

Within an hour, trouble stirred.

A young mother arrived on the train with her baby just before it pulled into a station in Taunton, England. She was carrying her child, and wanted somewhere to put her pram. After “kicking up a fit” with staff, she grew frustrated that Davis was parked in the spot reserved as a disability space.

The guard asked Davis to fold the scooter up and move on.

 

In footage recorded by her husband Kevin Bolden on his phone, Davis can be seen attempting to maneuver the vehicle to give up her space to the pram.

“He basically said, fine, I’m calling the police, and this train will be stopped at Taunton,” Davis said. “Then he made an announcement over the tannoy that it was the woman in the mobility scooter that was causing problems, and we would be delayed indefinitely.”

Read More: Apple Just Proposed 13 New Emojis to Represent People With Disabilities

“It was humiliating and I cried for most of the journey home,” Davis said, adding she felt sick of having to deal with situations like this all of the time. “I don’t know what it is about this country, but they really make you feel disabled.”

Tanyalee Davis has previously performed on TV shows The Last Leg and Live At The Apollo — and has taken her comedy tour all over the world. She’s also a disability campaigner, and director of the anti-bullying charity Gr8 As U R.

 

The Guardian reports that the footage left GWR staff “collectively horrified”.

“We got it wrong, it made no sense,” said Dan Panes, who leads external communications at GWR. “A wheelchair space is a wheelchair space, it’s not for luggage or pushchairs.”

Read More: This Nightclub Is Exclusive in a Whole New Way: It’s Just for People With Learning Disabilities

An investigation will be launched into the incident, although it’s not confirmed if any action will be taken against the staff member.

There’s since been a wave of support for Davis across social media.

 

My friend @TanyaleeDavis uses a mobility scooter & today she was shamed by Great Western Railways - a pram boarded & when tanyalee refused to move, @GWRHelp threatened to call the police & chuck her + her partner off. This is not pushchairs vs wheelchairs. This is discrimination.

 
 
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Check out @BBCNorfolk cuz Im talking about my experience on @GWRHelp https://youtu.be/FpHm7gNf7DA 

 

@TanyaleeDavis I am so, so sorry you had to go through this experience. I am a wheelchair user, but I don’t use public transport very often, mainly because I don’t get out much. When I do, I fear an experience like this. Getting about should not be made more difficult than it is

 
 
 

@TanyaleeDavis Following you because I read the BBC article about your train journey and I want to support you and those who have similar experiences. Bang out of order. You’re brave and strong. Thanks for sharing. It’s important that you do.

 
 

On July 24, the UK’s Department for International Development will host the first ever Global Disability Summit in London with the International Disability Alliance and the Government of Kenya.

It aims to draw attention to what they describe is a “neglected area” of health and mobilise new commitments on disability. Global Citizen will report from the summit.

Penny Mordaunt, secretary of state for international development, announced the summit using British Sign Language (BSL) in parliament, making history as the first ever government minister to communicate using BSL from the frontbench.

 

Tanyalee Davis will embark on a tour called Actual Size from September — “for laughs, not tears,” she tweeted.

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

Belice elogiada por salvar su enorme arrecife de coral de la destrucción total

Es el segundo más grande del mundo después de la Gran Barrera de Coral de Australia.

La Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura (UNESCO) anunció el martes que la Barrera de Coral de Belice ya no figura en su lista de sitios del Patrimonio Mundial en peligro de extinción,según informó la BBC .

 

En 2009 las autoridades de Naciones Unidas habían alertado que estaba en peligro cuando el gobierno de Belice consideró permitir la exploración de petróleo en aguas adyacentes. Pero desde ese momento, el país centroamericano ha tomado medidas "visionarias" para preservarlo, dijo la UNESCO.

"El gobierno de Belice merece un gran crédito por asociarse con ONGs y tomar medidas concretas para salvaguardar este paisaje marino verdaderamente especial, un trabajo que continuará", dijo en un comunicado Nicole Auil Gómez, directora para la Conservación de la Fauna en Belice al HuffPost.

 

"Seguimos siendo optimistas de que las medidas de conservación inteligentes y eficaces, con un enfoque en los compromisos a largo plazo que conducen a resultados, pueden ayudar a salvar sitios en peligro de extinción del Patrimonio Mundial antes de que desaparezcan".

 

Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System just removed from List of #WorldHeritage in Danger Congratulations, #Belize ?? ! #WHC42

 
 

Este arrecife de coral de 190 millas de largo incluye destinos de fama mundial como el Gran Agujero Azul, y es el hogar de casi 1400 especies. Ha sido descrito como uno de los sitios marinos más biodiversos del planeta, según señaló el informe de HuffPost.

 

 

Entre ellos se incluyen una serie de especies amenazadas, como las tortugas marinas, los manatíes y el cocodrilo marino estadounidense, según informó la BBC.

 

Ahora el arrecife y sus habitantes se benefician bajo la protección de una histórica moratoria sobre la exploración petrolera en aguas beliceñas, aprobada en diciembre de 2017. La BBC señaló que Belice es uno de los pocos países del mundo con tal legislación.

 

Global Citizen realiza campañas para alcanzar los Objetivos Globales de las Naciones Unidas, que llaman a los países a promover la biodiversidad. Puedes tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí .

 

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HEALTH

Bill Gates Invests $30M for Affordable Early Alzheimer's Test

There’s currently no way to identify the disease in its early stage.


Why Global Citizens Should Care:
Alzheimer’s affects nearly 50 million people worldwide. Efforts to identify and treat this disease are key to achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3 on good health and well-being for all. Take actionhere.

Billionaire Bill Gates is doubling down on his commitment to Alzheimer’s research.

The Microsoft founder and philanthropist, along with Estée Lauder Companies Inc. chairman emeritus Leonard Lauder, announced this week that they would invest $30 million over three years toward the development of new tests for early Alzheimer’s detection, reports Reuters.

Take Action: It's Time to Deliver on the Promise of Universal Health Coverage

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
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“The process of getting diagnosed with Alzheimer’s today is less than ideal,” Gates wrote in a post to his personal blog, Gates Notes, explaining the current limitations of Alzheimer’s testing.

“It starts with a cognitive test. If you don’t perform well, your doctor needs to rule out all other possible causes for memory loss, like stroke or a nutritional deficiency. Then your doctor can order a spinal tap or PET scan to confirm you have Alzheimer’s. Although these tests are fairly accurate, the only way to diagnose the disease definitively is through an autopsy after death.”

 

 

I'm excited to share that my next investment in Alzheimer’s research is in a new fund from @TheADDF called Diagnostics Accelerator. I’m joining Leonard Lauder and other philanthropists in committing over $30M to develop a new way to diagnose Alzheimer’s. https://b-gat.es/2zWKPTJ 

 
 

 

But Gates believes that a better way to identify the disease in its early stages is possible, and so he’s decided to provide seed money for a Diagnostics Accelerator through the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation (ADDF), which was founded by Lauder.

“We need a better way of diagnosing Alzheimer's — like a simple blood test or eye exam — before we're able to slow the progression of the disease," Gates wrote in a statement, reports CNN. “Imagine a world where diagnosing Alzheimer’s disease is as simple as getting your blood tested during your annual physical.”

News of the Diagnostics Accelerator project follows an announcement by Gates in November that he would commit $100 million toward Alzheimer’s disease research, noted TIME. At that time, he also revealed that the disease has touched him personally, as members of his family, including his father, have suffered from it.

Read More: Bill Gates Just Pledged $100,000,000 to Research Dementia

The Alzheimer's Association says the disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in the US, according to the CNN report, killing more than breast and prostate cancer victims combined. Six million Americans are currently living with Alzheimer's and roughly 14 million individuals are expected to be affected by the brain disorder by 2050.

Those figures jump to nearly 50 million people worldwide and are expected to rise to more than 131 million by 2050, according to Alzheimer’s Disease International, reports Reuters.

All stand to benefit from an early diagnosis and potential new treatment therapies funded by Gates.

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EDUCATION

A Stranger Handed This Teacher $500 to Help Her Low-Income Students

A plane trip landed an elementary school teacher enough cash to make a difference.

Why Should Global Citizens Care
Across the US, schools face chronic budget shortages that affect the ability of students to learn. United Nations Global Goal 4 calls for universal access to education, and you can take action on this issue here.

When Kimber Bermudez boarded a Southwest Airlines flight to visit her parents on July 10, she never expected to leave that plane with $530 more in her wallet, according to Bermudez’s Facebook post. The generous gesture came directly out of a conversation she was having with the stranger sitting next to her.

She had told him about her profession as an elementary school teacher and how hard it is to teach in low-income neighborhoods. Her students often come to school hungry, or without school supplies and other essentials. Faculty members at her charter school, Carlos Fuentes Elementary in Chicago, regularly use their own money to help buy their students whatever they need.

Take Action: Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
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While Bermudez was talking about her difficulties, she didn’t realize the man next her worked at a company that donates to schools in need. He ended up taking down the school’s information.

Then, the man sitting behind her reached out and tapped her on the shoulder, according to Bermudez’s story on Facebook. When she turned around, he apologized for eavesdropping on their conversation and handed Bermudez five $100 bills. He said, “Do something amazing.”  

Tears began to streak down her cheeks. She thanked him and promised to buy her kids supplies with the money.

Once the plane landed, the man across the aisle from her said he “didn’t have much” and handed her $20. The man in front of her turned around and handed her $10.

Bermudez's story shows how generous strangers can be, but it also highlights the disparities found throughout the education system.

A lack of resources and poverty impact classrooms throughout the US. Across the country, 13 millions kids go to school hungry, according to The Denver Post. Poverty, meanwhile, affects the rate of human infant brain growth, which goes on to affects students’ performance in school, according to a recent study.

These inequalities often fall to teachers to address. In 2014, 94% of public school teachers used their own money to buy basic school supplies and food for students.  

Related StoriesFeb. 2, 2018Global Citizens and Rihanna Just Helped Secure $2.3BN For Education

Charter schools have become increasingly popular in the United States, but their growth often comes at the expense of public schools, which lose funds for every student that goes charter. Charter schools are partially publicly funded schools, often run by for-profit companies, and often take no advising from community groups like school boards. Consequently, charter schools sometimes run undemocratically, and without the students’ best interests in mind, according to critics.

In many states in the US, weak regulations have allowed a boom in charter schools that fail to adequately prepare students, according to The Nation. Oftentimes, these schools have high faculty turnover rates, high student attrition, and inconsistent curriculums, The Nation reports.

Meanwhile, public schools across the country are facing large budget deficits. Over the past year, teachers have been protesting stagnating wages and cuts to funding for higher education, early education, and much more.

Bermudez's story helps bring these stats closer to home. She posted the details on Facebook with the hope that it would “continue the chain reaction of people helping those in need, and especially the children in need.”

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ENVIRONMENT

Adidas Pledges to Use Only Recycled Plastics by 2024

The German company is the second-largest sportswear brand in the world.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Much of the world’s plastic makes its way into the ocean where it kills more than 100,000 marine mammals and 1 million seabirds every year. You can take action toward protecting life below water and achieving the Global Goals by supporting efforts to reduce single-use plastic here.

Adidas announced Monday that it will transition to exclusively using recycled plastics in all its clothing and shoes by 2024, the Financial Times reported. The sportswear company will stop using “virgin” plastic — newly manufactured plastic — and newly produced polyester, often used in moisture-wicking clothing.

Over the next few years, Adidas will phase plastic out of millions of items, ranging from shoes to shirts. The move is the latest of the sportswear company’s sustainability efforts.

Take Action: Call on Governments and Business Leaders to Say No to Single-Use Plastics

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
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Adidas has been experimenting with using recycled plastics in its products since 2012, when the company partnered with London designer Stella McCartney to create uniforms for the British Olympic Team. The uniforms were made from half a million recycled plastic bottles.

In November 2016, the sportswear company made waves with the release of its Parley line of sportswear and shoes made from recycled plastics collected near the Maldives. Since its launch, Adidas has sold 1 million pairs of Parley shoes and aims to sell 5 million by the end of 2018 and more than double that figure the following year, according to the Financial Times.

The company’s push to reduce its polyester production in addition to its plastic production is significant as “any polyester fabric presents a lot of problems in terms of aftercare,” Orsola de Castro, co-founder of Fashionrevolution.org, an NGO that campaigns for a sustainable fashion industry, told the the Financial Times. "[Polyester] sheds microfibres, which are the greatest cause of plastics pollution in the oceans.”

Read More: This Terrorist Group Just Banned Plastic Bags ... to Save Lives

Adidas will also ban the use of virgin plastics in its offices, retail outlets, warehouses, and distribution centers, according to CNN, which could save about 40 tons of plastic annually.

The BBC estimates that at the current rate of recycling, incineration, and landfill accumulation of plastics, 12 billion tons of plastic will be in landfills by 2050.

Adidas isn’t the only company that has amped up its push to go green recently. Several companies turned away from using plastic this year, some in response to an EU proposal to make all plastic packaging recyclable by 2030. The proposal reflects mounting pressure from consumers for companies to take responsibility for plastic production and the world’s plastic disposal problem.  

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CITIZENSHIP

7 Ways Nelson Mandela's Legacy Still Resonates Today

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world."

2018 is the Year of Mandela — the year the independence leader of South Africa would have turned 100 years old. But although Nelson Mandela died in 2013 at the age of 95, his entire life still stands as a testament to the power of the human spirit. 

Confronted by the challenges of apartheid, physical imprisonment, and doubt, Mandela nonetheless wielded his inimitable spirit to improve the lives of millions of his fellow countrymen and women, as an activist, scholar, leader, and, ultimately, one of the world’s greatest-ever humanitarians. 

Take Action:  Pledge to Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty

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This year, Global Citizen is joining other organizations, leaders, and citizens of the world to honor Mandela’s legacy. We're going to South Africa for Global Citizen Festival Mandela 100, in proud partnership with the Motsepe Foundation, to call on world leaders to commit to ending the various causes and consequences of extreme poverty.

Not only did Mandela liberate an entire country from the grips of the racist apartheid system, but he also continued the fight for the world’s most vulnerable people until the very end of his life.

Learn More About Global Citizen Festival Mandela 100

Here are seven ways Nelson Mandela fought for the same values that Global Citizens hold dearly, including women’s empowerment, access to quality education, and the fight against HIV/AIDS.

1. He ushered hundreds of women into the political sphere 

 

Though South Africa has work to do to eliminate violence against womenand to ensure that women earn the same amount of money as men, Mandela helped set the country on a path toward equality from the very beginning of his career as president. 

During his first State of the Nation Address in 1994, Mandela expressed his commitment to the "emancipation” of women and called for equality across systems in South Africa.

Read More:  17 Inspiring Quotes From Nelson Mandela

“It is vitally important that all structures of government, including the President himself, should understand this fully: that freedom cannot be achieved unless women have been emancipated from all forms of oppression,” Mandela said

“The objectives of the Reconstruction and Development Program will not have been realized unless we see in visible and practical terms that the condition of the women of our country has radically changed for the better,” he continued. “And that they have been empowered to intervene in all aspects of life as equals with any other member of society.”

The growing number of women serving in South Africa’s parliament continues to demonstrate the progress toward Mandela’s mission of gender equality.

When Mandela was elected president, women held just 2.7% of seats in South Africa’s parliament. But by 2013, less than two decades later, women made up 44% of the legislature.

2. He joined the fight against HIV/AIDS 

 

Mandela’s record in the fight to end HIV/AIDS was not perfect, as many experts have pointed out, but in the years after his presidency Mandela became an ardent campaigner for HIV/AIDS awareness. 

As president, Mandela and certain members of his administration were reticent to acknowledge the scope of the AIDS crisis, which came to affect nearly one in four 15- to 49-year-olds by 2000 — and Mandela’s hand-picked successor, Thabo Mbeki, was known to be an AIDS denialist

But in 2000, as the scope of the crisis became overwhelmingly evident, Mandela added his voice to the chorus of activists calling for recognition of the disease and action to prevent it. 

“Our country is facing a disaster of immeasurable proportions from HIV/AIDS,” Mandela said on World AIDS Day that year. "We are facing a silent and invisible enemy that is threatening the very fabric of our society.” 

In 2003, Mandela’s foundation launched the 46664 initiative — a concert series that brought AIDS to the forefront of the global conversation that was broadcast to 2 million viewers. The concert raised money for AIDS research and advocacy. Two years later, Mandela announced that his son had died of AIDS, which was said to have normalized the illness in the eyes of many. 

According to Michel Sidibe, head of the UN's Aids agency UNAIDS, Mandela’s campaigning “[laid] the foundations of the modern AIDS response and his influence helped save millions of lives and transformed health in Africa.” 

3. He brought education to rural students 

 

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world," Mandela famously said.

And for Mandela, bringing about real educational change started in the countryside. 

In 2007, Mandela founded the Nelson Mandela Institute for Rural Development and Education to train and send high-quality teachers to rural areas and equip schools with modern facilities. 

While the majority of South African students — black and white — now attend primary school, vast income inequality, as well as untrained teachers and improper facilities, has prevented rural students from making up the racial achievement gap that emerged during apartheid.  

Read More:  Nelson Mandela’s Former Protege Is South Africa’s New President — And Is Calling for ‘Year of Action

“Many [students in] far off rural areas in our country do not become confident readers and writers,” Mandela said at the time. “Indeed, they are denied the creativity that in turn denies the world the boldness of their ideas.”

The Institute for Rural Development and Education, located in the rural Eastern Cape region of the country, has as its mission the promotion of a more sustainable future for younger generations and for the planet. 

4. He fought for children 

 

“The true character of society is revealed in how it treats its children,” Mandela said in 1997.

And throughout his life, Mandela lived by those words as a steadfast champion for the rights of children. Today, the Nelson Mandela Children’s Fund carries on his legacy by pledging “to give voice and dignity to the African child by building a rights-based movement.”

During his tenure as president Mandela donated a third of his salary to create the organization, which he charged with ending extreme poverty and its symptoms, such as hunger, exploitation, and homelessness.

In 2009, Mandela received the World Children’s Prize Decade Child Rights Hero award in recognition of his commitment to the children of South Africa and the world. When he won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993, Mandela donated part of his prize money to support street children and other kids in need. 

 

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5. He promoted scientific and environmental education

 

Mandela so valued the power of science and research that he lent his name to three institutes of technology in Nigeria, Tanzania, and Burkina Faso.

Another institute in South Africa also bears his name. It’s a remarkable development in a country where black people were not even allowed to attend classes a generation ago.

During Apartheid, black South Africans were prevented from studying science and technology and barred from careers in the STEM field. But that changed when Mandela was elected president.

“South Africa's need for rapid expansion of its scientific and technological skills is immense,” he said at the opening of the Academy of Science of South Africa in 1996. “On your shoulders rest the challenge of giving science a face that inspires our youth to seek out science, engineering and technology.”

Read More:  After South African President Resigns, Country Looks to Future With Hope

But Mandela’s commitment to technological achievement did not come at the expense of the natural world. He was a staunch environmentalist and opposed the degradation of South Africa’s natural resources by former colonial powers and their allies inside Africa. 

Mandela also worked to ensure that all South Africans could have access to clean water — a mission that continues today.

“In [the] impoverishment of the natural environment, it is the absence of access to clean water that strikes most starkly,” he once said. “That our government has made significant progress in bringing potable water nearer to so many more people than was previously the case, I rate amongst the most important achievements of democracy in our country.”

6. He expanded voting rights to all South Africans

 

In Nelson Mandela’s first-ever televised interview as an anti-Apartheid activist, in 1961, the leader made one demand crystal clear. Asked by reporter Brian Widlake what black Africans wanted to achieve through their actions, Mandela’s response was unambiguous: 

"The Africans require, want the franchise, the basis of One Man One Vote — they want political independence," he said

In that interview, he went on to express that the fight to achieve voting rights for black South Africans should be independent of education levels or race. 

Mandela wouldn’t achieve the dream of a multiracial voting system until the collapse of Apartheid and his election as president in 1994. 

Nearly 9 in 10 South Africans voted in that election, but voter turnout has since declined, with 2014 registering under 60% participation.

7. He fought for peace and justice around the world

 

Mandela was the leading figure in the fight against South Africa’s racist apartheid system, but his activism didn’t stop at his home country’s borders. After retiring as president, Mandela worked to educate people about the HIV/AIDS crisis in Africa. He also helped broker peace in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Burundi.

Decades before the end of Apartheid, Mandela also served as an inspiration for civil rights movements around the world, including in the US.

“We who were involved in the civil rights movement back then were acutely aware of the parallels of the [African National Congress] struggle with our own struggles,” said civil rights leader Jesse Jackson in 2013. “So you see, we knew what was going on in South Africa, those bridges and links were always there, those parallels just as I saw in Nelson Mandela with our own Dr. King.”

When the World Cup came to South Africa in 2010, Mandela attended the closing ceremony as the guest of honor, and his appearance, despite his poor health, made one of world’s greatest events even more special. 

That’s because the hero who emerged from a tiny prison cell to help topple Apartheid, deliver rights to millions of oppressed South Africans, and heal a wounded nation had long before earned his status as an international icon of peace and justice.


Global Citizen is hosting Global Citizen Festival Mandela 100 in South Africa in Decemeber. You can learn more and take action at GlobalCitizen.org.za .

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The partners for the Global Citizen Festival Mandela 100 are our Presenting and Major Partner The Motsepe Foundation, with major partners, House of Mandela, Johnson & Johnson, Cisco, Nedbank, Vodacom, Big Concerts, BMGF Goalkeepers, Eldridge Industries, and Associate Partner, HP.

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16 DE JULIO DE 2018

 

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

Más de mil millones de personas están en riesgo de sufrir un golpe de calor a medida que la Tierra se calienta

India, China y Mozambique son algunos de los países que más necesitan refrigeración.

Por qué los Global Citizens deberían preocuparse
El cambio climático provocado por el hombre está causando que la tierra se caliente y, a su vez, que quienes viven en climas tropicales sin acceso a sistemas de enfriamiento adecuado tengan mayores riesgos de salud.

Las Objetivos Globales de Desarrollo de las Naciones Unidas hacen un llamamiento a todos los países para que protejan el medio ambiente y respeten el acuerdo climático de París. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre estos temas aquí.



Un nuevo estudio revela que más de mil millones de personas están en riesgo en el mundo por la falta de aire acondicionado y refrigeración, según informó Reuters .

 

Según datos publicados por el grupo sin fines de lucro Sustainable Energy for All, 1.100 millones de personas en Asia, África y América Latina, que viven principalmente en zonas rurales o barrios marginales, están amenazadas por la falta de aire acondicionado para mantener sus cuerpos frescos y la refrigeración adecuada para conservar alimentos y medicina.

 

Pero además un aumento en los servicios de la electricidad requerida para la utilización de refrigeradores, ventiladores y otros electrodomésticos solo contribuirá aún más al cambio climático provocado por el hombre en los próximos años, según el informe.

 

"El enfriamiento del cuerpo se vuelve cada vez más importante" con el cambio climático, dijo a Reuters Rachel Kyte, directora del grupo y representante especial del Secretario General de la ONU para Energía Sostenible para Todos. "Tenemos que proporcionar refrigeración de una manera súper eficiente".

 

Kyte declaró en su entrevista que las compañías deben enfocarse en trabajar con energías limpias y desarrollar aires acondicionados de bajo costo y alta eficiencia orientados a las clases medias en crecimiento en los países tropicales.

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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Las personas que viven en regiones remotas de los países tropicales a menudo carecen de electricidad, y las clínicas de salud tienen dificultades para almacenar vacunas o medicamentos que requieren refrigeración, señaló el estudio. Del mismo modo, en los barrios marginales de la ciudad, los residentes experimentan un suministro irregular de electricidad.

 

“Access to cooling is not a luxury. Access to cooling is now a fundamental issue of equity.” @rkyte365 discussing new ‘Chilling Prospects’ report launch to provide #CoolingforAll. Watch live on @UN Web TV now: http://webtv.un.org 

 
 

 

La falta de energía constante y refrigeración contribuyen a elevar los riesgos para la salud.

 

Se estima que alrededor de 38,000 muertes adicionales ocurrirán cada año en todo el mundo entre 2030 y 2050, debido al estrés térmico relacionado con el cambio climático, según indicó la Organización Mundial de la Salud.

 

Solo en Pakistán murieron más de 60 personas durante una severa ola de calor en mayo según el informe.

 

Además, el informe determinó que de los 52 países encuestados, los más amenazados son India, China, Mozambique, Sudán, Nigeria, Brasil, Pakistán, Indonesia y Bangladesh.

 

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MEMBERS IN ACTION

ONE Ambassador Aïcha: Young people have the ability to create change

22 May 2018 9:43AM UTC | By: ONE AMBASSADORS

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In countries around the world, ONE youth volunteers are taking action to make the world a better place for everyone! Aïcha, a ONE volunteer from Canada, was recently selected to attend a Youth Forum as part of the 2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London. Keep reading to learn more about how she got started as an activist and why it’s essential for youth to get involved!

1. How did you get involved with ONE?

I started volunteering for ONE in Montreal and Ottawa because their message and values deeply resonate with me. I wanted to share what they have taught me about advocacy, women’s rights, poverty and global change, and use my experience, social engagement background and general consciousness to teach others and help build more inclusive societies and a more equal world.

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2. What is the role of young people in politics?

I believe that the political scene is a place for everyone — young people have a very important role to play in that area. To me, the presence of young people in decision-making positions benefits all citizens in every society because, as young people, we have the capacity to bring up issues and talk about solutions that do not only affect the ones currently in power, but also the generations to come.

I believe that the perspectives, the creativity and the sense of initiative that young people can bring in politics has a great value! As part of the youth, it is my conviction that the path towards a better future starts when you get engaged, interact with the world around you, raise your voice, and promote key values for a better world.

3. What was the best part about attending the 2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM)?

The best part was meeting with inspiring youth from across the Commonwealth who had all gathered for a common goal: a better world. At CHOGM, I was able to engage in enriching discussions concerning the great challenges that we face today and help create a dialogue about poverty, inequality and women’s rights. Most importantly, we talked about our ideas and solutions for a better world. The best part was to be able to connect and engage with all those young leaders, represent Canada and increase my contribution to the world around me by expressing my ideas, concerns and solutions on issues affecting women and young girls. Through this unique experience, I felt as though politics, diplomacy and change are truly accessible to everyone.

4. What was the most important lesson you learned about at the Youth Forum that you’ll put into action in your advocacy work in Canada?

As young people, we all have the ability to use our ambition and our creativity to create change. I had the opportunity to meet inspiring youth that do incredible work in their communities and in their country. Beyond our socio-economic conditions, religious affiliations, cultural backgrounds or place of birth, we can all contribute to the world around us and to humanity by working on ensuring the world is a more inclusive and healthy place for all people and for the next generations — everyone can play an important part in the societies they live by being open-minded, critical and by sharing innovative ideas.

I plan to bring this experience back to my community by reminding young people of the importance of getting involved and engaged by educating ourselves about the world around us. My participation in the Youth Forum is an achievement I can be proud of and that I know will enable me to move forward in my community, be more aware, more enlightened and more inspired as a young change-maker of society.

Aïssatou, 18, is a Canadian student originally from West Africa. She is passionate about politics, diplomacy and human rights. She believes that it is essential to gain a better understanding of the world by engaging in those areas and by sharing her voice. She was selected to attend the Youth Forum at the 2018 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London, UK.

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