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The Action Thread Part Two

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MEMBERS IN ACTION

ONE on Tour: 3 of my favourite moments

11 December 2018 5:11PM UTC | By: BILLY HILL

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Billy ‚ÄĒ our UK Campaigns Manager ‚ÄĒ hit the road with U2 this fall to take the fight against extreme poverty across Europe! Read the full¬†#ONEonTour¬†series¬†here.

After an incredible 2.5 months on the U2 tour, I’ve packed up my cases, folded up the remaining ONE t-shirts, and put our enormous ONE banner (which, between you and me, is completely destroyed) away.

I’ve settled back into my life here in London and I wanted to share a few short highlights from a whirlwind few months:

1. Meeting Bono, ONE’s co-founder, in Berlin

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Germany ONE Staff with ONE’s co-founder, Bono.

It was great to meet our co-founder Bono at the beginning of the tour at our Berlin office. His commitments to activism and fighting extreme poverty have been a huge source of motivation to me throughout my time at ONE.

Before he met with Chancellor Merkel, he shared some of his thoughts on global politics and why our efforts were more important than ever. We even got a cheeky picture.

2. Hanging out with U2 fans

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ONE volunteers at the O2 in London.

I love music. I love Adele, Bon Iver, LCD Soundsystem and Gorillaz ‚Äď that‚Äôs my vibe! But, I‚Äôve never met any fans as committed as U2 fans ‚ÄĒ their support for ONE is astonishing. Many of them had ONE wristbands from previous tours, shared personal stories about why they cared about fighting extreme poverty and so many had become full fledged volunteers for ONE in their hometowns. It was really inspiring and made me feel hugely optimistic about the future of the movement.

3. Laughing with brilliant ONE volunteers

Here’s the truth (trust me). Every ONE volunteer who joined us on the tour was great! They were lovely, funny, and tried their best. From Copenhagen to Milan, I’ve never met such a wonderful group of people willing to give up their time to chat with strangers about global gender inequality and ask them to stand with us, which isn’t always an easy task at a concert.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

We had a blast in #Madrid yesterday on #U2EiTour - just look at my face. Laughing at t-shirts.

It‚Äôs our second night and we have 25 volunteers ready to roll ūüôĆ#ONEonTour

 
See Billy Hill¬†ūüôĆūüŹľ's other Tweets
 
 
 

 

I feel very lucky to have met so many wonderful people and I’m pleased to still be in touch with many of them.

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‚ÄúI‚Äôm grateful to be able to contribute to this important event. AIDS is treatable, yet it has caused devastation and the unnecessary deaths of over 35 million people. And, in a time when the world feels like there‚Äôs so much going wrong, vital medical advancements are giving way to a real opportunity for ending AIDS once and for all.‚Ä̬†Guillermo Kuitca

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"I immediately said yes to supporting the (RED) Auction…for a number of reasons, because I lost friends in the art world to this preventable and treatable disease but also because it’s still a crisis. Few people are aware that AIDS is the leading killer of young women globally. I hope we make a lot of money to help us put a nail in the coffin of AIDS." - Marilyn Minter

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5
CULTURE

The ultimate gift guide for every activist

December 13 2018 | By: BRETT JACOBSON

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Shopping for activists is never easy, but we’ve got you covered at the ONE Storewith stylish gifts that show what they stand for. This holiday season, we’ve pulled together some of our favorite items that the activists in your life are sure to love.  

For the activist with too much to carry

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Our Equality Tote is THE Poverty is Sexist gift for the on-the-go activist. Perfect for keeping spare leaflets, pens, policy facts, and campaigning materials handy, the Equality Tote can help turn a chance encounter with an elected official into a campaigning opportunity!   

For the activist who is always cold

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Our classic ONE Crewneck sweatshirt can keep any activist warm while showing their support for ending extreme poverty.

For the Poverty Is Sexist Supporter

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Our iconic None of Us Are Equal shirts are a must for any Poverty Is Sexist support. Versatile and bold, the tee is frequently sported by our staff, members, champions, and friends (like Phoebe Robinson, Chadwick Boseman, and Callum Worthy!) all around the world.

For the activist that runs on coffee

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A classic ONE Coffee Cup is the perfect gift for the coffee-loving activist in your life. This double-walled mug will keep their coffee warm all morning long. 

For the activist who makes a statement

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Dressed up or down, the Banana Leaf Clutch is a go-to accessory for an activist with style. Handmade in Uganda, it directly supports women artisans earning ethical and sustainable wages.

Bonus: SHOP (RED) SAVE LIVES

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If you still haven’t found the perfect gift for that special someone, (RED) has you covered. When you shop (RED) on Amazon.com/RED, a percentage of everything you spend goes to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. There’s hundreds of products to choose from, including Apple products, stocking stuffers, cookware, tasty treats, clothing, accessories, and so much more! 

No matter the occasion, find the perfect gift for everyone in your life ‚Äď or something special for yourself‚Äď in the¬†ONE store!

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GIRLS AND WOMEN

This chess champion is using her love of the game to empower girls everywhere

8 October 2018 10:10AM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

SIGN THE PETITION

An open letter to leaders

 
  

Chances are, you already know about Phiona Mutesi ‚Äď AKA the¬†Queen of Katwe! Phiona‚Äôs journey as a chess prodigy inspired the 2016 Disney movie, but her story didn‚Äôt stop when the credits rolled. To this day, she continues to be an inspiration for girls everywhere!

Phiona‚Äôs upbringing ‚ÄĒ like many kids in Katwe, Uganda ‚ÄĒ was far from easy. Her father passed away from complications with AIDS, and her sister passed shortly after from unknown causes. Her mother worked long hours to provide for her family, but there wasn‚Äôt enough left over to afford school fees. As a result, Phiona had to leave school when she was nine.

Despite the odds stacked against her, she found her calling. The same year she left school, Phiona joined a chess program run by the Sports Outreach Institute where she quickly gained recognition as a chess prodigy. By 2012, she was a three-time junior girls’ champion of Uganda!

As if that wasn’t impressive enough, her and Ivy Amoko earned Woman Candidate Master titles. This made them the first titled female chess players in Uganda. She’s also won multiple categories in Uganda’s National Junior Chess Championships.

Last year, Phiona began college at Northwest University in the United States and she’s already accomplished a lot in her freshman year! She competed on her school’s chess team in the Pan-American Intercollegiate Chess Championshipsand, even though it was the team’s first time competing, they swept the competition in the Top Small College Team category!

Phiona‚Äôs determined to¬†create opportunities for other girls¬†to thrive. In 2013, she was invited to the Women of the World Summit and awarded a grant for her work ‚ÄĒ which she used to promote girls‚Äô access to education and chess in Uganda. She also founded a girls-only chess clinic, where girls can learn how to play the game and hear about the importance of education!

Phiona’s success is proof that when girls are given access to the resources they need to thrive, they can achieve anything.

We’re fighting for a world where every girl has the opportunity to build the future she deserves. Join us by adding your name to our open letter right now.

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These mothers and babies are beating the odds in the DRC
2
AID AND DEVELOPMENT

These mothers and babies are beating the odds in the DRC

30 October 2018 3:34PM UTC | By: KATIE RYAN

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is among the top 5 most dangerous places to be born in the world: one in every fourteen children will die before reaching the age of one.

DRCHealth_social-1024x512.jpg

Glorie Sibamona is hoping that her newborn baby girl will beat those odds. And thanks to the innovative financing model of the Global Financing Facility (GFF), her chances are improving.

The GFF was set up in 2015 to increase funding to improve maternal and child health and end deaths caused by preventable diseases. It works by partnering with governments to identify and invest in high-impact but historically underfunded areas like newborn survival, adolescent health, nutrition, and in the systems needed to deliver large-scale health care.

In the DRC, the government spent just US$3 per person on health in 2015 ‚Äď only two other countries in sub-Saharan Africa spent less per person: the Central African Republic and Mozambique. The DRC lacks quality health services at affordable prices, leading to poor health and avoidable tragedies, such as infant deaths.

That’s where the GFF has stepped in, working with the national government to do three main things:
1. Increase government financing to fight maternal, newborn, and child deaths.
2. Ensure governments and donors are advancing key priorities together.
3. Fund health facilities that are having a positive impact on women and children’s health.

So what does this mean for moms like Glorie?

Since the GFF partnered with the government of the DRC in 2015, Glorie, now a mother of 3, has seen dramatic changes in the availability and affordability of services at her local health center. ‚ÄúWe are very happy because we didn‚Äôt have some services before ‚Äď but now we have lots of services and we‚Äôre more comfortable,‚ÄĚ Glorie said.

In the DRC, the GFF brought together all stakeholders to create a case for investment and establish the country’s priorities. The fourteen provinces with the worst health and socioeconomic indicators, including Glorie’s Kenge province, have received support from the GFF, which is proving to be successful in saving children’s and mothers lives.

Glorie’s own Kasombo Health Center now has the funds and capacity to prioritize reproductive, maternal, and child health services. Nurses hold prenatal clinics to educate women on healthy practices during pregnancy, when to come to the health facility to deliver, and how to plan their families.

On 6 November, leaders will gather in Norway to discuss raising an additional US$2 billion for the partnership for 2018-2023 (known as a Replenishment Conference). We must urge leaders to support the replenishment so that women and children, like Glorie and her newborn daughter, can gain access to quality health services.

Are you ready to join the fight against extreme poverty and preventable diseases? Become a ONE member today!

Glorie Sibamona’s story was provided by the Global Financing Facility with permission for use on ONE’s blog.

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GLOW, a Cork Christmas Celebration, is well underway. Young musicians from music education programmes across Cork City in partnership with Music Generation Cork City have been performing on the GLOW stage on Grand Parade this month. With only two weekends of musical festivities left, check out the lineup of young and professional musicians below.

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona

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People with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are, like everybody else, unique individuals! ✨ 
We want to ensure that people with PMLD are fully included in society.¬†ūüĎꬆūüϨ¬†ūüĎ≠¬†Find out more:¬†http://bit.ly/2wdCFjI

La imagen puede contener: 2 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas y exterior

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There’s only one thing that today’s #throwbackthursday could be dedicated to...the arrival of last years Rest and Recuperation Group into Dublin Airport!

With only 5 days to go until the arrival of this years group, we can barely hold in the excitement! These health-boosting stays have been proven to add up to 2 years to the life expectancy of the children and young adults, who are given a break from the radioactive environment in which they live.

Many of those who come to Ireland have been abandoned to institutions, and these breaks are their only opportunity for the care of a loving family.

Head over to our Instagram to see a selection of the beautiful moments captured at last year's arrivals¬†2764.png‚̧ԳŹ

#DUBChristmas

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GIRLS & WOMEN

10 Female Trailblazers Who Made History in 2018

From politics to finance to media, these women dominated 2018.


Why Global Citizens Should Care 
Women have historically been underrepresented in governments around the world, but that is starting to change and 2018 featured enormous progress.  You can join us in taking action on this issue here.

Women broke countless records around the world in 2018. More than 100 women won seats in the United States House of Representatives during the midterm elections, and globally, women have taken over prominent new roles for the first time, not just in politics, but also the media and the private sector.

While gender inequality remains prevalent in many governments, on TV, and in the corporate world, these 10 women have shown that it is possible to break glass ceilings and advance gender equality.

Take Action: Sign This Petition to #LeveltheLaw and empower girls and women around the world!

 

 

Act√ļa:¬†Pledge Now

 
 
 
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United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistan√Öland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaC√īte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCura√ßaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands¬† [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See¬† [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarR√©unionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint Barth√©lemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: CHIME FOR CHANGE

 

 

1. Mia Mottley

 

 

In secondary school, Mia Mottley told her teacher that one day she would become Barbados’ first female prime minister. This year, at 53, she’s achieved that goal, becoming the first woman to lead the country in the 52 years since Barbados became independent from Britain. 

Mottley is also only the fifth woman in the English-speaking Caribbean to be elected to a head of government position, according to HuffPost.

Read More: Barbados Just Elected Its First Female Prime Minister


2. Marvia Malik

 

Marvia Malik became the first openly transgender news anchor on primetime television in Pakistan this March.

The transgender community is underrepresented in media around the world and disproportionately faces discrimination, making it hard to find employment. In Pakistan, workplace discrimination has forced many transgender people to panhandle to make a living.

"I am a journalism degree holder, but I faced the same difficulties [as] the transgender people who simply beg or dance in the streets," she told Voice of America.

The Pakistani Senate has since passed a bill making it illegal to deny people employment opportunities because they are transgender. The bill also protects transgender people from assault and harassment. 

‚ÄúI also wish to see transgender people run for public office and an increase in government jobs,‚ÄĚ she told the¬†Express Tribune, an English-language newspaper in Pakistan.

Read More: Meet Pakistan's First Transgender News Anchor


3. Epsy Campbell Barr

epsy-campbell-barr-costa-rica-Casa-de-AmeŐĀrica-flickr.jpgImage:¬†Casa de Am√©rica/Flickr

Epsy Campbell Barr became the first black woman to serve as vice presidentin not only Costa Rica, but also throughout all of Latin America.

‚ÄúIt's a big responsibility,"¬†said¬†Barr, shortly before winning the election. ‚ÄúIt would not be the first only in Costa Rica, but in Latin America. And eventually, if the president leaves the country, the first woman of African descent to assume the presidency in the entire American continent.‚ÄĚ

Barr, who is of Jamaican descent, has spoken out against the gender wage gap, violence against women, prejudice against Afro-Costa Ricans, and racism more broadly.

For example, Campbell Barr criticized the mandatory children’s book Cocori, which depicted black stereotypes, and despite facing backlash and death threats, her efforts lead to the book being removed from the national school curriculum.

Campbell Barr co-founded Costa Rica’s Citizen’s Action Party. She alsoserved as the head of the Center for Women of African Descent, the Alliance of Leaders of African Descent in Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Black Parliament of the Americas.

Read More: Costa Rica Just Elected Latin America’s First Black Female Vice President


4. London Breed

London-Breed-San-Francisco-Mayor-Social.jpgLondon Breed waves before speaking to reporters outside of City Hall in San Francisco, June 13, 2018.
Image: Lorin Eleni Gill/AP

London Breed became San Francisco‚Äôs¬†first black female mayor earlier this year¬†‚ÄĒ the second female mayor in the city‚Äôs history. And of the 15 largest cities in the US, San Francisco is now the only one led by a woman, according to the¬†BBC.¬†

Breed aims to improve the education system and make transportation more accessible. In addition to this, she plans to make San Francisco more eco-friendly by decreasing waste and using more renewable energy sources.

She is also a proponent of affordable housing, having personally struggled with the issue of housing in the city. She grew up in San Francisco’s public housing, where the majority of the city’s black population still lives, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

In recent years, gentrification and the rise of the tech industry have caused the cost of living to rise, and many black families and businesses have been forced out of the city, the New York Times reports. In 2016, African Americans made up just 5% of San Francisco’s population, in comparison to about 14% in 1970, according to the Times. 

Read More: San Francisco Just Elected Its First Black Female Mayor


5. Claudia Sheinbaum

 

In the past year, at least 132 political candidates have been killed in Mexico. However, Claudia Sheinbaum didn’t back down in the face of threats, and, in July, she became the first woman to be elected as the mayor of Mexico City.

Sheinbaum is an environmental engineer with a PhD in physics, according to Agence France-Presse (AFP). She has previously served as an environmental secretary while working with her predecessor, Mayor Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

"Just because I might look like a skinny scientist doesn't mean I'm not going to crack down on crime here. I will," Sheinbaum said during her campaign.

In addition to crime, Sheinbaum is focusing on water and the environment. The city’s developments have nearly covered a former lakebed, and most of the city’s water supply is underneath it. 

She also wants to improve public transportation, allowing for more mobility access and a healthier environment. Pardo says that cars cause 70% of greenhouse gas emissions in the city, so she plans on enforcing stricter emission standards for vehicles as well.

Sheinbaum was one of 3,000 female candidates who ran in Mexico’s elections this year, which is a record-breaking number, NPR reports.

Read More: Mexico City Just Elected Its First Female Mayor


6. Stacey Cunningham

 

In May, Stacey Cunningham became the¬†New York Stock Exchange‚Äôs first female president¬†in the organization's 226-year history. While Wall Street has¬†traditionally been a ‚Äúboys‚Äô club,‚Ä̬†women like Cunningham are paving the way for greater gender equality in the financial industry.

‚ÄúI think it‚Äôs just really important to recognize that any time a woman pushes the boundaries and redefines the boundaries, she‚Äôs redefining them for everyone else that follows her,‚ÄĚ Cunningham told¬†TheStreet.

Read More: New York Stock Exchange Gets Its First Female President After 226 Years


7. Sahle-Work Zewde

Ethiopia-First-Female-President.jpgEthiopia's first female President Sahle-Work Zewde stands near book of the Constitution following the handover ceremony at the Parliament in Addis Ababa on Oct. 25, 2018.
Image: Minasse Wondimu Hailu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

After a unanimous vote, Sahle-Work Zewde became the first female president of Ethiopia. She is also currently the only female head of state in the entire continent of Africa. Prior to this role, Zewde served as a representative of the UN’s secretary-general and head of the UN office to the African Union. 

The prime minister functions as the acting head of Ethiopia’s government, so the role of president is largely ceremonial and holds symbolic value.

Zewde is using her platform to promote peace, advance gender equality, and to build a¬†‚Äúsociety that rejects the oppression of women.‚ÄĚ

In recent years, Ethiopia has made strides toward gender equality, and, under Zewde, introduced a cabinet that is 50% female.

Read More: Ethiopia Elects Its First Female President Ever


8. Rashida Tlaib and 9. Ilhan Omar

Rashida Tlaib-Michigan-Muslim-Congresswoman.jpgRashida Tlaib is photographed outside the Michigan Capitol Thursday, Nov. 6, 2008, in Lansing, Mich. Elected to the 12th District of the Michigan state House, Tlaib becomes the first Muslim woman ever to serve in the Michigan legislature.
Image: Al Goldis/AP

Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Ombar became the first Muslim women elected to Congress in the United States.

Tlaib, whose parents are Palestinian immigrants, will represent Michigan’s 13th congressional district and Omar will represent Minnesota’s 5th congressional district. Omar immigrated from Somalia as a refugee at age 12 and is now the first Somali-American member of Congress.

Read More: These 2 Politicians Just Became the First Muslim Women Elected to Congress

Both candidates support creating universal health care, establishing a $15 federal minimum wage, and providing assistance to student debtors. They also both advocate for accepting more refugees, ending the private prison industry, and ending mass incarceration.

 

Their election is not only helping to push back on gender stereotypes, but religious ones as well. Anti-Muslim hate crimes have been on the rise in the US, with 2018 featuring the third-highest reported number of attacks on Muslims ever recorded, trailing a surge in 2016 and another in 2001 after the 9/11 attacks, according to BuzzFeed News. 

‚ÄúI stand here before you tonight as your congresswoman-elect with many firsts behind my name,‚ÄĚ Omar¬†said¬†in her victory speech. ‚ÄúThe first woman of color to represent our state in Congress, the first woman to wear a hijab, the first refugee ever elected to Congress, and one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress.‚ÄĚ


10. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Alexandria-Ocasio-Cortez-New-York-Social.jpgThis 2018 photo provided by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Campaign shows candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in New York.
Image: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Campaign/AP

The 29-year-old Bronx Native became the¬†youngest woman ever elected to Congress¬†this year. She‚Äôs also the¬†first woman of color to represent the 14th district¬†this year ‚ÄĒ a major step for political representation for women but also for communities of color, who make up a large portion of the 14th district‚Äôs population.

‚ÄúWomen like me aren‚Äôt supposed to run for office,‚ÄĚ Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez¬†said¬†in a campaign video.¬†

Ocasio-Cortez unseated Joseph Crowley, who hasn’t been challenged in 14 years and is twice her age. Ocasio-Cortez has never held public office before.

Ocasio-Cortez advocates for universal health care and guaranteed federal jobs. She supports the Common Sense Housing Investment Act, which views housing as a human right. She is a proponent of sustainable energy, and wants the United States to switch to a carbon-free, renewable energy system by 2035.

‚ÄúI knew that it was long odds, and I knew that it was uphill, but I always knew it was possible,‚Ä̬†said¬†Ocasio-Cortez. ‚ÄúI‚Äôm an organizer in this community, and I knew living here and being here and seeing and organizing with families here, that it was possible.‚ÄĚ

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Indian Trafficking Survivors Just Sent Thousands of Postcards to Push for a New Law

Activists and survivors are urging lawmakers to pass already proposed legislation.

By Annie Banerji and Anuradha Nagaraj

NEW DELHI/CHENNAI, Dec 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) ‚ÄĒ From letters and postcard campaigns to meetings with lawmakers, modern slavery victims across India are pushing for the passage of a long-pending anti-trafficking bill amid fears it could be sidelined as general elections take center stage in parliament.

Survivors from 11 states have turned campaigners in the last few months by roping in their communities to write more than 110,000 postcards to Prime Minister Narendra Modi, urging him to ensure the bill is passed by parliament in the coming months.

The Trafficking of Persons Bill was passed by India's lower house of parliament in July and is expected to be tabled in the upper house in the ongoing session that ends on Jan. 8.

Take Action: #BeTheGeneration to end modern slavery and forced labour

Act√ļa:¬†Sign Petition

 
 
 
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En asociación con: International Labour Organization

Campaigners, survivors and lawmakers alike fear the proposed law will be stalled or even shelved if it is not passed soon as political attention turns to next year's general elections.

"It needs to pass this time so that victims finally get all the help and facilities to start a new life," a 29-year-old who was trafficked into prostitution when she was a teenager, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on condition of anonymity.

"It is high time traffickers pay for their crimes, they must be convicted and punished," the mother-of-one, who is part of the survivors' organization Vimukthi, said on the sidelines of a meeting in New Delhi between survivors and several lawmakers.

India is home to the largest number of slaves globally, with 8 million out of a global total of 40 million, according to the Global Slavery Index by Australia-based Walk Free Foundation.

Most of the 23,000 trafficking victims rescued in India in 2016 were women and girls, the latest government data shows.

Read More:¬†UN Reaches Anti-Slavery 'Milestone' ‚ÄĒ But Millions Are Still at Risk

The proposed law prioritises survivors' needs and prevents victims, such as those found in brothel raids, from being arrested and jailed like traffickers, who would face prison sentences ranging from 10 years to life under the legislation.

Activists and lawmakers say the bill unifies existing anti-trafficking laws and aims to make India a leader in the fight against such crimes in South Asia ‚ÄĒ one of the world's fastest-growing regions for forced labor, begging and forced marriage.

"It is sad to see how for the lust of money, people have shamed humanity. This must stop," said Akhilesh Prasad Singh, an upper house lawmaker from the main opposition Congress party.

"All parties ... should discuss this bill in this winter session and pass it with necessary provisions."

RESISTANCE

While the bill has been hailed by many campaigners, it has faced resistance from some sectors over fears that it could unfairly target consenting adults working in the sex industry.

Sex workers' organisations say the proposed law does not distinguish between victims of trafficking and women doing sex work out of choice, and could lead to the latter being held in rehabilitation shelters against their will.

Survivors and activists are demanding that the bill be debated in the current session to iron out any such differences, and pave the path for its passage before political attention starts to turn towards general elections which are due in 2019.

That is why unlike ever before, survivors ‚ÄĒ who often hesitate to share their stories fearing social stigma ‚ÄĒ¬†have teamed up and stepped up efforts to drum up support for the bill during one of the final parliament sessions before elections.

Read More: The UK Just Ramped Up the Fight Against 'Heinous' Enslavement of Children

While about 1,000 survivors have sent letters to state MPs, another 12,000 have signed or put their thumbprints on a petition ‚ÄĒ each accompanied with a personal story of entrapment, torture and despair ‚ÄĒ to press parties to green-light the bill.

"The bill aside, what this campaign has done is to mainstream human trafficking," said Uma Chatterjee, co-founder of non-profit Sanjog that works on gender equity and justice.

"The survivors have brought the issue out in the open," she said. "Suddenly, common people are stopping, listening and pledging their support. That is huge."

(Reporting by Annie Banerji @anniebanerji in New Delhi and Anuradha Nagaraj in Chennai; editing by Jason Fields and Kieran Guilbert. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters that covers humanitarian issues, conflicts, land and property rights, modern slavery and human trafficking, gender equality, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org to see more stories)

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12 DE DICIEMBRE DE 2018

 

 
 
CIUDADAN√ćA

La ONU alcanza un hito contra la esclavitud, pero millones a√ļn siguen en riesgo

Los migrantes son considerados particularmente vulnerables a la explotación.

 

 

LONDRES, 11 de diciembre (Fundación Thomson Reuters) - Los activistas contra la esclavitud elogiaron recientemente el pacto mundial de las Naciones Unidas sobre los migrantes como un hito potencial en la lucha contra la trata de personas, pero advirtieron que la falta de detalles dejará a millones de personas en riesgo.

 

Recientemente la gran mayoría de los miembros de la ONU firmaron un acuerdo destinado a mejorar la forma en que el mundo enfrenta la creciente migración, pero casi 30 se mantuvieron al margen de este pacto, en la reunión realizada en Marruecos debido a que estaban en desacuerdo sobre su contenido.

 

El acuerdo, que aborda temas como cuál será la forma de integrar a los migrantes y, en algunos casis, trabajar para que puedan regresar a sus casas, ha sido criticado por políticos europeos, en su mayoría de derecha, ya que quieren evitar que aumente la inmigración.

 

El texto fue apoyado por los grupos que trabajan para evitar la trata de personas, ya que establece los pasos que se deberían tomar para proteger a los migrantes de la explotación y el abuso, llenando un vacío en la cooperación internacional sobre el tema.

 

El acuerdo de la ONU compromete a los signatarios a garantizar que los trabajadores migrantes sean reclutados de manera justa y ética, y sugiere una serie de posibles acciones, entre ellas prohibir las tarifas de reclutamiento e impulsar los controles policiales.

Act√ļa:¬†Tuitea ahora

 
 
 
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En asociación con: CHIME FOR CHANGE


"Este es un hito notable", dijo Phil Bloomer, director ejecutivo del Centro de Recursos de Derechos Humanos y Negocios de Londres (BHRRC).

 

La situaci√≥n actual del comercio de esclavos afecta a aproximadamente 40 millones de personas en todo el mundo y recauda alrededor de $150 mil millones cada a√Īo en ganancias ilegales para los traficantes, seg√ļn datos de la ONU, que estableci√≥ un objetivo para 2030 para ponerle fin a este flagelo.

 

Los migrantes son considerados particularmente vulnerables, ya que a menudo deben someterse a grandes deudas para financiar sus viajes y no siempre tienen los documentos adecuados para trabajar al llegar a un nuevo país.

 

Muchos terminan trabajando largas horas por poco dinero en las grandes cadenas de suministro de compa√Īias multinacionales que producen desde alimentos hasta computadoras port√°tiles y ropa, explic√≥ Bloomer.

 

"Eso se ha permitido esencialmente debido a la falta de coordinaci√≥n entre los estados en torno al tema de la migraci√≥n que permiti√≥ que los traficantes ganen terreno‚ÄĚ, dijo a la Fundaci√≥n Thomson Reuters por tel√©fono.

 

"El hecho de que 164 naciones se hayan unido para comenzar a comprometerse colectivamente para reforzar la legislación para prevenir el tráfico de personas es fundamentalmente importante".

 

La escala del impacto potencial del acuerdo es enorme.

 

"Es hora de ponerle fin a la idea generalizada de que este grupo, conformado aproximadamente por 150 millones de personas, pueda ser tratado de manera rutinaria como seres humanos de una categor√≠a inferior‚ÄĚ, dijo la abogada y experta en esclavitud Anne Gallagher.

 

"Estos cambios no suceder√°n de la noche a la ma√Īana, pero se puede y se debe avanzar: por ejemplo, con la reducci√≥n de la vulnerabilidad de los trabajadores migrantes, que generalmente est√†n sometidos a la explotaci√≥n, extendi√©ndoles la protecci√≥n de leyes laborales locales‚ÄĚ.

 

El texto también llama a las naciones para que traten el tráfico de personas y la trata de personas de manera diferente y refuercen la cooperación internacional compartiendo información y brindando protección y asistencia a las víctimas de trata.

 

Los activistas han advertido que los países que le cierran las puertas a los migrantes y quienes los catalogan como criminales, solo los están empujando a las manos de los traficantes.

 

Sin embargo el texto presentado necesita establecer m√°s detalles seg√ļn explic√≥ Nicola Jones, investigador del Instituto de Desarrollo de Ultramar (ODI). Este grupo de expertos brit√°nicos dijeron que el acuerdo no estableci√≥ objetivos claros ni dio informaci√≥n precisa sobre su implementaci√≥n y financiamiento.

 

"Los detalles sobre la implementaci√≥n son bastante d√©biles", dijo. "Lo que falta es realmente alg√ļn tipo de exigibilidad. Tenemos que tener objetivos claros que deben ser monitoreados".

 

Por el momento, nada en el texto obliga a los países a hacer algo respecto de la trata de personas, informó.

 

Los 193 miembros de la ONU, excepto Estados Unidos, acordaron su redacción en julio, pero solo 164 lo ratificaron formalmente en la ceremonia en Marrakech.

 

Entre los críticos, el gobierno del presidente estadounidense, Donald Trump, dijo que el enfoque global del problema no es compatible con la soberanía estadounidense.

Austria, Chile y Brasil dijeron que se retirarían, afirmando que el pacto borra la línea entre la migración legal e ilegal, que la migración no es un derecho humano y que las naciones deben establecer sus propias políticas.

 

Australia dijo que no se registrará ya que el acuerdo compromete su dura política de inmigración.

 

"Es un acuerdo no vinculante, y muchos países no lo han firmado, lo que es decepcionante", dijo Jakub Sobik de Anti-Slavery International.

 

"A√ļn nos queda mucho trabajo por hacer de modo que los migrantes puedan ser protegidos de la explotaci√≥n y la discriminaci√≥n. Realmente no deber√≠a ser tan complicado".

Más información en: http://news.trust.org


Por Umberto Bacchi

Traducción Erica Sánchez

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HEALTH

Nobel Prize Winner Nadia Murad Is Building a Hospital for Survivors of Sexual Violence

Murad is a survivor of sexual violence at the hands of Islamic States militants herself.

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Sexual violence is used as a weapon of war around the world and puts women and girls at risk. Nadia Murad is a fierce champion for survivors and is working to put an end to wartime sexual violence. Join us in taking action here to support the human rights of women and girls.

Nadia Murad, the Yazidi human rights activist who won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, has announced that she will use her $1 million award to build a hospital for victims of sexual abuse in her hometown of Sinjar, Iraq, Reuters reports.

"With the money I got from the Nobel Peace Prize, I will build a hospital in Sinjar to treat ill people, mainly widows and women who were exposed to sexual abuses by Islamic State militants," she told a large crowd in Sinjar on Dec. 14, Reuters reports.

Take Action: Teach others about Universal Health Coverage

Act√ļa:¬†Share Video

 
 
 
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En asociación con: Johnson & Johnson

Fighting to end sexual violence is more than just a pet cause for Murad. Her work is fueled by her personal experiences and the challenges she has overcome.

Murad was kidnapped and held as a sex slave by Islamic State militants for three months in 2014, when she was only 19 years old. After escaping, she fled to Germany where she began calling for support for the¬†Yazidi community¬†‚ÄĒ a religious minority in northwest Iraq that has been displaced, persecuted, and killed by ISIS fighters.

Around 7,000 women and children were captured by ISIS in northwest Iraq in 2014, and many of them were raped and tortured.

As a human rights activist, Murad has made it her mission to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and to hold Islamic State militants responsible for their abuse of the Yazidi people. Earlier this year, Murad received the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Denis Mukwege, a Congolese doctor who specializes in treatment for survivors of rape in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where mass rape has also been used as a war tactic for decades.

Read More: Winter Vacation Puts British Schoolgirls at Risk of FGM

Wartime sexual violence is a global problem that puts women and girls living in areas of armed conflict at high risk of rape and sexual slavery.

Leadership from human rights activists like Murad will be essential in rebuilding communities and putting policy in place to protect survivors. The construction of a hospital in Sinjar, Iraq is an important step forward in this effort.

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SALUD

Esto es lo que necesitas saber sobre la nueva ley de vacunas argentina

Se acaba de sancionar la ley que garantiza su gratuidad y disponibilidad.

hyttalo-souza-1074680-unsplash.jpg__1264x568_q85_crop_subsampling-2.jpg
 Hyttalo Souza, Unsplash

Preocupada por la reaparición de enfermedades ya erradicadas Argentina decidió pasar a la acción con una ley de avanzada: la nueva ley 22.909 declara a la vacunación de interés nacional y entiende la inmunización como un bien social.

Dice la nueva ley: “La vacunación como de interés nacional, entendiéndose por tal a la investigación, vigilancia epidemiológica, toma de decisiones basadas en la evidencia, adquisición, almacenamiento, distribución y provisión de vacunas, asegurando la cadena de frío, como así también su producción".

De este modo se establece que las vacunas y su aplicación serán totalmente gratuitas, haciéndose cargo el estado de estos servicios en todas las etapas de la vida. Al pasar a ser obligatorias, estar vacunado será necesario y requerido para trámites como ingreso y egreso del ciclo lectivo escolar, tramitación o renovación del DNI, pasaporte, residencia, trámites médicos por trabajo, certificado prenupcial y licencia de conducir, así como para la tramitación de asignaciones familiares.


¬ŅPor qu√© habr√°, entonces, que vacunarse de ahora en m√°s? Es una obligaci√≥n que el Estado impone en beneficio de los ciudadanos y de la comunidad para prevenir el contagio de enfermedades graves, indica¬†la ley.

Su autor es, además de diputado por la Provincia de Tucumán, médico pediatra. Pablo Yedlin, preocupado por la reaparición de enfermedades ya erradicadas, decidió pasar a la acción.  

‚ÄúLa Argentina cuenta ahora con una herramienta fundamental para poder promover la prevenci√≥n de las enfermedades infecciosas a trav√©s de las vacunas. Sin dudas, esta ley permitir√° ampliar y mejorar la vacunaci√≥n como pol√≠tica p√ļblica para el control y la prevenci√≥n de las enfermedades inmunoprevenibles‚ÄĚ, le dijo Lautaro de Vedia, presidente de la SADI, Sociedad Argentina de Pediatr√≠a al¬†Diario PERFIL.

 

¡Argentina tiene #NuevaLeydeVacunas! Se acaba de aprobar en el @SenadoArgentina por amplísima mayoría.
ūüĎŹūüĎŹūüĎŹ

Estos son algunos de los cambios que introduce ūüĎáūüŹĽ:

 
 
 
 

Seg√ļn inform√≥ INFOBAE,¬†‚Äúno se va a impedir la tramitaci√≥n por no contar con el certificado de vacunas, sino que a los adultos se les va a pedir tengan aplicadas las de la hepatitis B y la doble bacteriana adultos. A los que nacieron despu√©s de 1965, se incluye la triple viral (sarampi√≥n, paperas y rub√©ola). Los que superen esa edad s√≠ deben darse la antigripal y las antineumoc√≥ccicas‚ÄĚ.

Se pueden acceder a más detalles sobre la nueva ley de vacunación aquí.

 

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