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The Action Thread Part Two

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We're thrilled to share the story of the development of the Music Generation South Dublin strings programme in St Ronan's National School, Deansrath.

Music Generation South Dublin is part of Music Generation, Ireland's national music education programme initiated by Music Network, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds, the Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships. Locally Music Generation South Dublin is led by South Dublin County Council with support from Dublin and Dun Laoghaire Education and Training Board and Dublin West Education Centre.

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Which human rights are the most important?
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POLICY

Which human rights are the most important?

22 September 2017 11:54AM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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This is a guest post by Frank Pichel, CEO of the Cadasta Foundation.

Which human rights are the most important? Ask this question in a developed economy and you will likely hear: the right to freedom of speech, religious freedom, or the right to freedom from discrimination and so on.

Rarely, if ever, will this list include land and property rights — even though this right is the foundation of the Western economic system and so critical that US founding father James Madison once said, “Government is instituted no less for the protection of the property than of the person.”

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Women make up half the agriculture workforce in sub-Saharan Africa but own just 2% of the land. (Photo Credit: Landesa)

Land and property rights often don’t make it into lists of top ten rights or even consciousness in developed economies not because they aren’t valued, but — in part — because they are usually so secure and secured so long ago that they are taken for granted (with the notable exceptions of indigenous groups).

Without secure property rights, you could leave for work in the morning and come home to find that someone had changed the lock on your home and moved in. Or someone could claim your vegetable garden just as you were preparing to harvest your sugar snap peas and lettuce.

For most people in Europe, North America, and some parts of Asia, this is so beyond the realm of possibility that we don’t give secure land and property rights much thought.

But ask any farmer, indigenous community, or resident in a shanty town in an emerging economy — where the World Bank maintains that the vast majority of property rights are undocumented and land governance systems are either non-existent or non-functional — what rights they need to climb out of poverty and you will hear a resounding: secure land and property rights.

Indeed, land rights — particularly the lack of secure land rights — continue to capture headlines across emerging economies. Just last week, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf told the African Green Revolution Forum that the continent would continue to be stalked by poverty, hunger, and famine until governments strengthened smallholder farmers land rights and finally gave them the security and opportunity they need to invest in their land and improve their harvests and their lives.

Research around the world supports this view of land rights as the foundation for development. Secure land rights have been found to increase productivity by as much as 50 percent, double the rate of high-school graduation, and increase conservation.

The impact is even more pronounced when women gain secure rights to land. Study after study shows that economically empowering women starts with land rights. In Tanzania, women with secure rights to land have three times more income. In Nepal, children whose mothers have secure rights to land are one-third less likely to be malnourished.

In India, where 40 percent of people believe wife beating to be sometimes justifiable, women who own land are 8 times less likely to experience domestic violence.

Despite this clear evidence, women’s rights to land and property continue to be undermined by discriminatory laws and practices in more than half the countries on the planet. This not only frustrates women’s ability to climb out of poverty but also leaves their children and community less resilient and poorer.

A new interactive survey is now helping to illustrate the gap between those who have secure property rights and those who do not. Take the 10 question survey developed by Habitat for Humanity’s Solid Ground Campaign and Cadasta Foundation and explore the gap between the haves and the have-nots with regard to land rights.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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PARTNERGIRLS & WOMEN

This Inspiring 23-Year-Old Isn't Waiting to Empower Young Women

"We don't have to wait to make change. We can make change right now."


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Gender inequality stops women from achieving financial independence. We need to empower women in the workplace to end poverty. You can join us and take action here

 

 

 

Global citizen Jadayah Spencer realized she wanted to give back to her community at a young age.

In high school, the native New Yorker took a “life-changing” educational trip to Tanzania throughthe nonprofit organization International Youth Leadership Institute (IYLI). The experience exposed her to opportunities she didn’t even know were possible, she says.

Now 23, Spencer works to improve access to opportunities that enhance the lives of youth, women, people of African descent, and Indigenous people worldwide as IYLI’s executive director. Recognized as one of 40 Under 40 Rising Stars in the NYC Nonprofit Sector by New York Nonprofit Media, Spencer’s impact has only just begun.

“Youth have to understand, we don’t have to wait to make change, we can make change right now,” she told Life and Money by Citi in a video launched ahead of International Women’s Day

Since 1990, IYLI has made it possible for more than 500 high school students like Spencer to travel and study in 17 countries. IYLI’s mission is to cultivate critical thinkers and leaders by educating high school students of color on history, culture, and geography, providing them with opportunities they don’t always get through the education system.

In almost all major American cities, most students of color attend public schools where a majority of the student body are deemed low-income and where a lack of funding and resources impacts the quality of education. 

Related StoriesAug. 7, 2018CitiCiti Progress Makers: Malala Fund

Spencer is devoted to supporting young black girls, who are twice as likely to attend under-resourced schools and disproportionately receive discipline that harms their academic achievement. Born and raised in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, she sits on Girls for Gender Equity's New York City Young Women’s Advisory Council, which addresses policy issues that directly affect young women of color in the city and helps them fight for institutional reform. 

The gender wage gap persists in New York City and is magnified by race. Asian, black, and Latina women earn 63, 55, and 46 cents to every dollar earned by a white man, respectively, making it difficult to succeed in the competitive workforce and achieve economic independence. 

Spencer can’t end forms of gender inequality like the pay gap alone. She’s determined to motivate others to follow in her footsteps every chance she gets. As the United Nations Department of Public Information NGO Youth Representative Program co-chair, she encourages young people to get involved with NGOs that work on issues they care about.

“It opens your mind to global issues,” she said of her position, “and reminds you how important it is to uplift the voices of people who might not be heard so readily.”

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16 DE ABRIL DE 2019

 

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

El último video sobre cambio climático de The Weather Channel te transportará a un aterrador 2100

Un momento que algunos niños vivirán para ver.

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
El cambio climático está alterando drásticamente los ecosistemas. Los países de todo el mundo lidian con desastres naturales que se ven empeorados por el cambio climático, y ahora el Weather Channel ofrece una mirada aterradora sobre el futuro del planeta. Puedes tomar medidas aquí para asegurar un futuro saludable para el planeta.


El nuevo video de The Weather Channel sobre el cambio climático se parece mucho a uno de juegos de aventura en 3D de Disneyland. Pero en lugar de volar sobre el río Na'vi de Avatar, la meteoróloga Jen Carfagno viaja al año 2100, en Charleston, Carolina del Sur, que se inunda permanentemente.

 

"La gente acude a nosotros para obtener pronósticos, especialmente si hay un gran evento climático extremo, pero todo esto se está modificando muy lentamente y de forma gradual por el cambio climático", dijo a The VergeMatthew Sitkowski, productor ejecutivo de clima de The Weather Channel.

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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"Mira a tu alrededor; Es el año 2100 y un planeta que se ha calentado para siempre ha cambiado las ciudades de Estados Unidos”, narra Carfagno en el video, que utiliza la tecnología de realidad inmersiva y mixta para crear efectos de sonido dramáticos y gráficos casi realistas.

 

La horrible descripción de Charleston apunta a un problema importante al que se enfrenta la zona.

 

Los estados a lo largo de la costa se ven afectados drásticamente por el calentamiento de los océanos, el aumento del nivel del mar y el aumento de las temperaturas globales. Un informe publicado por la Casa Blanca el año pasado advirtió que las inundaciones costeras podrían aumentar hasta un 1.500% y que las Carolinas podrían enfrentar olas de calor sin precedentes.

 

Otra ciudad de Estados Unidos que aparece en el video que enfrenta las graves consecuencias del cambio climático es Norfolk, Virginia, que ha sufrido nueve inundaciones importantes en la última década.

 

"Solo una brisa constante en la costa y la marea alta pueden llevar a carreteras y casas inundadas", dijo Carfagno sobre Norfolk, la ciudad que alberga numerosos astilleros navales del país.

 

 

Usando movimientos rápidos de cámara y sonidos envolventes de fondo, el video luego transporta al espectador al "Ártico, el área de calentamiento más rápido en la Tierra" y al glaciar Jakobshavn en Groenlandia.

 

Usando una tecnología similar a la de los videojuegos, el clip presenta sonidos intensificados de derrumbe de hielo, vientos acelerados y una rota que salpica agua.

 

Si bien el glaciar en sí ha ganado hielo durante el último año, la tendencia general muestra que Groenlandia perdió alrededor de 739 gigatoneladas de hielo, con el glaciar Jakobshavn y otros cuatro que representan aproximadamente el 30% de esas pérdidas.

 

El video termina con un mensaje poderoso, mientras Carfagno cambia a un tono más urgente.

 

"Los glaciares como este están desapareciendo en todo el mundo", dijo. "Está sucediendo ahora: las temperaturas están aumentando, el hielo se está derritiendo, los niveles del mar están aumentando y esto empeorará a lo largo de nuestra vida".

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Malaysia's Book Investigation Prompts Outrage Among Muslim Women's Rights Activists

This seems to follow the ongoing effort to regulate women's attires.

By Beh Lih Yi

KUALA LUMPUR, April 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — Malaysia's religious authorities on Wednesday said they were investigating a book about Muslim women who choose not to wear a hijab, prompting a backlash among women's rights groups.

The probe is the latest in a series of incidents that have led to women's rights activists accusing authorities of acting like "fashion police" by trying to control women's attire in the Muslim-majority nation.

It came after a government minister called for a probe into the launch of the book Unveiling Choice last weekend, which featured Muslim women who discussed why they had stopped wearing a headscarf.

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"It's just a sharing of experience, nothing more than that," said Maryam Lee, author of the book, which she hopes will show that the hijab can be "both liberating and oppressive."

"[Some] say this is something to promote 'de-hijabbing' — that's not true. It's a book about experience," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, referring to the removing of the headscarf.

Lee said officers from the Islamic affairs department in the central state of Selangor had obtained copies of the book from the publisher's office on Tuesday.

A spokeswoman from the department when contacted said it was "looking into the matter" but declined to give further details. Its director Haris Kasim did not respond to requests for comment.

Religious Affairs Minister Mujahid Yusof Rawa said in a statement that he viewed the matter seriously and called for a "fair" investigation.

It was unclear what offenses or laws the book was being investigated over.

Muslim women who do not wear the headscarf are a common sight in Malaysia, and include notable figures like the wife and daughter of Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad.

Read More: Yet Another Malaysian Teen Married Off to Man Nearly Three Times Her Age

Other prominent personalities such as former trade minister Rafidah Aziz and ex-central bank governor Zeti Akhtar Aziz also do not wear the hijab.

More than 60% of Malaysia's 32 million population are Muslims, but it is also home to a large number of ethnic and religious minorities who openly practice their religion.

"It's really disappointing," said Sumitra Visvanathan, executive director of the nonprofit Women's Aid Organisation.

"I would tell the government to butt out of our private lives and how we choose to dress is our business. There is no law in Malaysia that stipulates a woman should or should not wear the headscarf."

Last year, Mujahid said that the government was planning to introduce a dress code for Muslim women in the workplace, sparking a large public outcry.

(Reporting by Beh Lih Yi @behlihyi. Editing by Michael Taylor. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, property rights, and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org

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160
HEALTH

There’s a health care revolution in the DRC

4 March 2019 10:25AM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

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Vaccines don’t just stop us from getting sick, they keep us healthy too, which means we can take advantage of all the opportunities that life has to offer. For many of us, getting vaccinations is pretty easy – we just arrange an appointment at our local health centre. For others, it’s a lot harder.

Victor is a health worker in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) capital city. Delivering healthcare in communities affected by extreme poverty is hard enough, but without a working fridge to store and transport vaccines, it is even harder for Victor to vaccinate children who need it.

Health worker Victor, DRC.

Health worker Victor, DRC.

“We were only doing two or three vaccination sessions per month. We had to take the cooler back and forth to pick up the vaccines – a distance of four kilometres between here and the central office. The only mode of transport, the motorbike, cost CF2000 (US$ 1.25) for each journey. That cost us a lot.”

Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC.

Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC.

Keeping cool

Vaccines need to be kept at stable, low temperatures. If not, they stop working. So, cold-chain equipment such as fridges and cool boxes are essential to keep vaccines chilled. This hasn’t been an easy feat to achieve in the DRC – an equatorial country with a tropical climate. Until now, health centres have used petrol-fuelled fridges to keep vaccines cool, but they are unreliable, often breakdown and fuel is hard to get and transport.

What makes transportation even harder, is that the DRC is a big country – the size of Western Europe, much of which is covered by dense forest without good roads.

“The distances here are too large to supply some areas with vaccines,” said Didier Maundé, Head of Logistics for the DRC’s Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI). “Sometimes fuel was nowhere to be found either, or was too expensive. The cold-chain was at risk, and it was having a negative impact on vaccination.”

Despite some recent progress, the DRC still has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Every year nearly two million children miss out on a full course of vaccines, contributing to almost one in ten Congolese children not surviving to see their fifth birthday.

Now the good bit…

In October 2018, the Ministry of Health, working closely with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners, launched a plan to increase immunisation by 15% by 2020. If successful, an additional 220,000 children could be immunised.
Crucial to the success of the Ministry’s plan is improved cold-chain equipment. With more reliable equipment and better methods of transportation to cover the country’s huge distances, children in the DRC will be able to reap the benefits of life-saving vaccinations.

Almost 5,000 new solar-powered fridges have been delivered to the DRC and more are on the way!

Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year.

Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year.

Victor, who received his solar fridge last year, said “This has reduced the cost for us and increased the number of [vaccination] sessions. I think we are at ten sessions per month now. We are very happy to have this.”

Supersizing

Meanwhile, another quiet revolution is also taking place that will improve healthcare in DRC: the creation of Central Africa’s largest vaccine storage hub.

The hub (funded by Gavi) recently opened in Kinkole, just outside central Kinshasa. It can safely store more than 200 million vaccine doses and other medical supplies before they are distributed to health centres.

The state of the art facility is also equipped with all kinds of transportation, including 150 canoes and boats powered by outboard motors to help deliver vaccines around the country. For a nation that currently uses aeroplanes to deliver 80% of its vaccines to the provinces, the use of boats is expected to deliver massive long-term savings. Excitingly, two more major regional hubs are planned. “The impact is visible,” said Didier Maundé. “More and more vaccines are available in the field. The cold chain is now reliable, and long distances are less of a problem.”

A big thank you to Gavi for providing the story.

Gavi is a global Vaccine Alliance that brings together public and private organisations with a shared goal — to make vaccines more available, accessible and affordable to children who need them the most. Incredibly, Gavi has so far supported some of the world’s poorest countries to immunise 700 million children, averting 10 million future deaths that would be lost to vaccine-preventable diseases.

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GIRLS AND WOMEN

Now is the time to stand in solidarity with women everywhere

5 March 2019 9:00PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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108 years.

That’s how long ago the first International Women’s Day took place. On March 19, 1911, over a million people worldwide rallied for equal rights. They demanded that women have the right to work, receive vocational training, hold public office, and vote.

A lot has changed in 108 years, but we’ve still got a long way to go.

Across the globe, women are still legally prevented from having the same economic opportunities as men. In some places, women are barred from having a bank account, or can’t own the land that they farm. 1,000 young women are still infected with HIV every single day, and millions of girls are still out of school. These are some of the realities that make it harder for women to escape global poverty.

If we don’t speed things up, it will take 108 years more to achieve gender equality. That means inequality could likely outlive every single person who reads this. Every girl born this year may face inequality throughout her whole life. This is unacceptable.

This year cannot be a halfway point. If we want equality, we need to step up now and demand real progress for women everywhere.

Luckily, no one is fighting this fight alone.

We contacted 45 activists from across the African continent who are leading the charge fighting for gender equality. We asked them to share their vision for gender equality and what world leaders need to do to achieve it. Despite their different focuses and various fields of work, they all shared a common sentiment: we need to create a world where everyone has the same opportunities.

Their responses came together in a powerful open letter. They are urging world leaders to make real progress towards ending inequality. But, this letter isn’t just about the activists who wrote it and the leaders who are acting on it – it’s about you.

You, reading this right now, have the opportunity to stand with them. You have the chance to join a global movement and stand in solidarity, with the women who contributed to this letter, and with every woman.

None of us are equal until all of us are equal. No matter where you live or what gender you are, you have a voice in this fight. Now is the time for you to use it and make sure we leave no woman behind.

Sign this open letter to stand with women and girls everywhere:

 

ADD YOUR NAME

 

Dear World Leaders,

We are the women at the frontlines of the fight against gender inequality and global poverty.

Every day we see the determination and dignity of girls and women facing down the toughest challenges. We see real advances and the power of people to achieve change. We won’t surrender this fight, but we need you to play your part.

You promised to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls by 2030, but at the current rate of progress, this will take 108 years. This is unacceptable. We need genuine progress, not grand promises.

We want implementation and accountability at every level – from this year’s G7 Summit to the Global Fund Replenishment; from our African Union leaders to our community leaders. We will be looking for your actions not your words; for funding to follow promises; and policy to turn into practice. It’s both the right and the smart thing to do for everyone.

To accelerate progress men must demand change with us so that we rise united not divided. And women must have a seat at the decision-making table – because you can’t change what you don’t see.

We’re not looking for your sympathy, we’re demanding your action. Because none of us are equal until all of us are equal.

Yours,

 

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EDUCATION

Millions of Girls in Pakistan Aren’t Attending School

In a new report, Human Rights Watch says the country lacks facilities to educate them.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Education is a basic human right, but 130 million girls around the world currently can’t attend school. Human Rights Watch is urging the Pakistani government to help young girls receive an education in a new report. You can join us in taking action here.  

The Pakistani government isn’t providing children living in poverty with the facilities they need to learn, according to a new Human Rights Watch (HRW) report published Monday. 

Millions of girls are especially at risk, and HRW is calling on the government to step up for their futures, the Guardian reports.

Take Action: Urge the G20 to Prioritize Girls’ Education and Help Them to Face the Future

 

According to the report, titled Shall I Feed my Daughter or Educate Her?, more than one-third of Pakistani girls are not attending primary school, compared to 21% of boys. Only 13% of girls are still in school by the 9th grade.

As of 2018, 22.5 million children in the country are not in school, according to Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan’s party manifesto. But in Balochistan, Pakistan’s largest province, for example, the gender disparity is stark 81% of girls did not finish primary school in 2014, compared to 52% of boys, HRW reported. In 2013, UNICEF found literacy rates are 20% higher for boys than girls.

 

In #Pakistan, girls want an #education. They want to become lawyers, engineers, & a future of possibilities. But the government of #Pakistan has failed to ensure that more children can get a quality #education due, in part, to #corruption & lack of funding

 
 
 
 

“Many of the girls we interviewed are desperate to study, but instead are growing up without the education that would help them have options for their future,” HRW Women’s Rights Director Liesl Gerntholtz told the Guardian.

In Pakistan, young girls miss school partly because of the Sunni Islamic militant group the Taliban. The group claims educating women goes against Islam. In 2012, Nobel Peace Prize winner and activist Malala Yousafzai was shot by the Taliban after advocating for girls' education using a pen name, bringing global attention to the group’s violent threat on the nation’s young women.

But according to the report, Pakistan’s school system is primarily responsible for the country’s education barriers. The government hasn’t invested enough in schools, especially ones for girls, HRW says. Unaffordable school fees, corporal punishment, low-quality public and private schools, corruption, and lenient regulation also contribute to the country’s education crisis.

“The government recognizes that education reform is desperately needed and promises to make this a priority, especially for girls — a positive step,” Gerntholtz told the Guardian.

Read More: Malala Relaxes From the Stress of Freshman Year by Building a Girls’ School in Pakistan

For many young girls in Pakistan, receiving an education is their only hope for avoiding child marriage. It is estimated that 21% of girls in Pakistan are married before the age of 18, according to the organization Girls Not Brides. Child brides who stop attending school are more likely to experience an early pregnancy, malnourishment, domestic violence, and pregnancy complications.

While the Pakistani government has acknowledged its poor education system, the HRW says it’s not enough. The country doesn’t make an effort to enforce its law that requires all children between the ages of five and 16 receive an education, the organization argues. As a result, unregulated private schools open, leaving families living in poverty to send their children to the cheapest option, which isn’t always of the highest quality. 

“We hope that our findings will help the government to diagnose the problems and identify solutions that will give every Pakistani girl a bright future,” Gerntholtz said.

With 130 million girls around the world missing school because they live in poverty, lack resources, or are surrounded by violence and conflict, every effort counts. 

Supporting girls’ education strengthens economies, stabilizes communities, and protects the planet. What’s there to lose? 

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La imagen puede contener: cielo, texto y exterior

 

'More than one million children continue to live in contaminated zones'. 

As we approach the 33rd Anniversary of Chernobyl and the 3rd 'Naciones Unidas Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day' on 26 April, we must remember those who continue to live in Chernobyl's deadly shadow and pay the highest price.

#UNChernobylDay #IWillNotForgetYou

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Posted (edited)

La imagen puede contener: una o varias personas, personas de pie y exterior

Today is the day! 🚛🚑

A special humanitarian aid truck will leave Kilkenny today bound for vulnerable children and families in the Chernobyl affected regions of Belarus lead by volunteer extraordinaire, Jim Kavanagh of the Chernobyl Kilkenny Outreach Group.

The aid delivery has been collected and co-ordinated by our Kilkenny Outreach Group, with support from our Cork Outreach Group. They will be accompanied by our Dental Team, pioneered by the 2017 National Volunteers of the Year Mary and George Sugrue from Tralee chernobyl children Int outreach as well as Roscommon Rose 2018 - Eimear Reynolds...who is returning to volunteer less than 2 months after initial volunteering with CCI and Rose of Tralee International Festival!

The team will travel through nine European countries before arriving at its final destination in Belarus..

Safe journey to this incredible volunteer team and we look forward to seeing the impact of your incredible contributions once again! Thank you for everything!

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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197
CULTURE

You should add this Rwandan documentary to your watchlist

10 December 2018 10:43AM UTC | By: ONE

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

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Written by ONE Campus

Zaza Rising is a short documentary film narrated by Christine, an entrepreneur, teacher and mother who runs an all-female bakery in Zaza, Rwanda.

ZazaStill_02-768x423.pngIn the film, Christine speaks about the role gender plays in her community. It’s often assumed that girls aren’t capable of work, and Christine shares how her parents used to cry because they never bore a son. To challenge the stigma around gender, Christine worked hard to sell produce and earn an income that could support her through college to get a degree in economics.

After graduating she was still confronted by the ways that stigma and poverty affect the women in her community. So she decided to further challenge these myths about women and work by hiring ten HIV-positive single mothers from her community to run a bakery.

ZazaStill_01-768x423.pngTogether, the women bake bread in a safe-space cultivated by Christine that encourages the women to openly share with each other and also enables them to make economic achievements as a unit. She emphasizes that when you work together, you have a higher power.

Despite Christine’s efforts to be a role model and to offer her employees opportunities for growth, issues like the health of her employees threaten the success of her business. To date, the bakery has lost three of its employees to AIDS and paid for the funeral costs because the women’s families had rejected them due to their health status.

ZazaStill_05-768x423.pngMoments like these are still too common in many places around the world, which is why ONE’s work towards ending extreme poverty includes treating preventable diseases through actions such as ensuring that world leaders maintain their funding commitments to the Global Fund.

So what does Christine need to ensure the success of her business and the future of the women who run it? Her solution is education and we can’t agree more.

Lack of access to quality education, especially among girls, is preventing millions of people from escaping the cycle of extreme poverty. Christine’s bakery moves beyond selling bread — now, its goal is to raise enough funds for its seven employees to go through an intensive business education program.

Interested? Learn more about Christine, the bakery and her work here!

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

This World AIDS Day, we are turning our outrage into action and putting our leaders on notice: AIDS isn’t done. And neither are we. We’re committed to joining the global fight against AIDS and we’ll do what it takes to end the epidemic for good.

 

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WATER & SANITATION

6 Young Women Fighting for Water Access Around the World

“Empowering women is critical to solving the water crisis.”


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Women risk their lives on a daily basis to provide water for their communities. Access to clean water and sanitation for all must be achieved by 2030. You can join us and take action on this issue here

When a young girl or woman spends most of her day collecting water for her family or looking for a place to use the bathroom, she can’t fit much else into her schedule.

Women collectively spend 200 million hours per day finding and collecting water, which puts them at risk of sexual abuse, disease, and missing out on school.

“This time-consuming process leaves little time for education or income-generating activities, exacerbating existing issues of poverty and gender inequities,” Heidi Rickels, executive director of the organization Freshwater Project International, told Global Citizen. 

World Water Day is March 22, when everyday people and activists are coming together to leave no one behind in the effort to guarantee safe, clean water for all. Fetching water is one of the many chores that fall on women because of genderd norms and traditions. Marginalized communities, including people with disabilities, refugees, and women, are often discriminated against the most while trying to secure the basic necessity. Pregnant women without water access are especially vulnerable — they can suffer infections and pass them on to their children.

Take Action: How Much Do You Know About The World's Most Vital Resource?

“Empowering women is critical to solving the water crisis,” Rosemary Gudelj, senior adviser of public affairs at the nonprofit organization Water.org, told Global Citizen. 

Using social media or attending local advocacy events are just a couple of ways to educate each other on the world water crisis, a spokesperson at Water Mission, an organization implementing safe water solutions around the world, told Global Citizen. 

If you want more ideas for how to take action, here are six women working on the crisis who you should know.

1. Georgie Badiel 

Fashion model Georgie Badiel spent three hours fetching water as a young girl in Burkina Faso, where almost half the country lives without clean water, she told Forbes. When her sister became pregnant and still needed to wake up in the middle of night to get water, she was inspired to do something about it. 

Badiel launched the Georgie Badiel Foundation in 2015, which has made water accessible to over 100,000 people by building wells in local communities in Burkina Faso. The foundation also trains women to restore wells in their communities and educates students on menstrual hygiene management. In 2016, Badiel also co-wrote the educational children's book The Water Princes about her experience growing up without clean drinking water. 

“Right now my biggest dream is to provide access to clean water to every person in my country Burkina Faso. I created this social project Georgie Water that will give back to the cause,” Badiel told Forbes.

 

2. Stella Bowles

A school science project led Stella Bowles to test water samples from LaHave River in Nova Scotia, Canada, where she was always told she couldn’t swim, according to Green Matters. The 14-year-old found fecal matter and didn’t understand why straight pipes, which dump water from home toilets into waterways, were being used. Bowles posted her discovery on Facebook and put up signs near the river notifying her community. Her efforts garnered national attention and prompted the government to announce a $15.7 million in funding to clean up the river. 

“I hope it can show them that your age shouldn’t put a limit on what you can do,” Bowles told CBC. “Age is just a number.” 

Bowles’ book My River: Cleaning Up the LaHave River, which she co-wrote about her experiences, comes out in September 2019.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

Today I was @SQMSwildcats to present my river project and to train kids to test their river. The Mersey River, Liverpool, NS. @SSRCE_NS @LHNOWnews @ckbwradio @CBCNS @ns_environment

 
 
 
 

Read More: American Photographer Mustafah Abdulaziz Highlights Global Water Crisis in Pictures

3. Autumn Peltier

Autumn-Peltier-World-Water-Day.jpgAutumn Peltier, 13-year-old water advocate from the Anishinaabe tribe of Canada, addresses the event to launch the International Decade for Action titled “Water for Sustainable Development 2018–2028."
Image: Manuel Elias/UN Photo

Autumn Peltier started educating the public on why many Indigenous people living in Canada lack access to clean water at a young age. Inspired by her aunt, who walked the Great Lakes educating people on water conservation and Indigenous water rights, the teen started talking at community events about the importance of protecting Canada’s water at just 8 years old, according to the BBC. 

After advocating for water protection at the UN General Assembly, and meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, Peltier isn’t slowing down anytime soon. The 2016 International Children’s Peace Prize nominee told the BBC, "I want to be prime minister or minister of environment."

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

Yesterday Ms Fynes met Autumn Peltier, Nokomis Josephine's great-niece. She is a water walker & protector like her auntie was, & she was rewarded 4 her work. When she heard about our #JuniorWaterWalkers work she signed 💦👣book w/ a message for the class: Keep up the good work!"

 
 
 
 

4. Ramona Kasavan

Growing up in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, Ramona Kasavan saw how menstruation stops people from going to school and working because they lack access to menstrual hygiene education, hand washing facilities, and waste management. When people don't have access to clean water and soap, they can't manage their periods safely and with dignity and become susceptible to disease. Kasavan wanted to prevent young girls and women from entering child marriages, suffering violence and health complications, and living in poverty. Kasavan launched the sanitary pad and menstrual health education company Mimi in 2013 to empower girls. 

“The problem was about creating accessibility and that’s what the business does,” she told Global Citizen.

In several rural communities in South Africa, 56% of water carriers are women, who miss out on work while carrying out the task. The company gives women in disadvantaged areas the opportunity to build sustainability and sell Mimi sanitary pads. Mimi’s low-cost sanitary pads have also helped32,500 girls go to school.

5. Varshini Prakash 

Varshshini Prakash grew up in Boston, but her grandparents are from Chennai, India. In 2015, Chennai’s highest rainfall caused a massive flood — and flooding, when exacerbated by climate change, is making water availability less predictable. While an undergraduate student at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Prakash became involved in the climate movement.

“My nightmares are full of starving children and land that is too sick to bear food, of water that poisons that which it should heal, and of seas that are ever more creeping on our shores,” she said during a speech she gave at a climate change protest in Washington, DC, in 2018, according to the New Yorker. 

Prakash co-founded the Sunrise Movement that year to protect environmental resources like water, and air by promoting solar energy and creating sustainable jobs. The youth organization has raised less than a million dollars since it started and is currently advocating for the Green New Deal, a policy which proposes to keep public water clean by reducing greenhouse gases, and restoring waterways. 

 

Fearless climate change leader. Passionate, effective activist. A voice of her generation. (and a life-long Massachusetts resident and @UMassAmherst alum!)

So honored Varshini Prakash, co-founder and Exec. Director of @sunrisemvmt, will join me tonight at the #SOTU.

 
 
 
 

6. Mari Copeny

Little-Miss-Flint-Mari-Copeny-Education-MLK-Day.jpgEight-year-old Mari Copeny known as “Little Miss Flint” waves as she is acknowledged by President Barack Obama at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Mich., May 4, 2016.
Image: Carolyn Kaster/AP

At the age of 10, Mari Copeny wrote a letter to US President Barack Obama, requesting a meeting to discuss the Flint water crisis. Lead piping has caused a deadly water crisis since 2014 in Flint, Michigan. Obama went to visit Copeny’s hometown, where nearly 100,000 residents of the majority-black, low-income population were exposed to dangerously high lead levels in the water. Humanitarian crises like Flint disrupt the schooling of 75 million children, but Copeny wants to see her peers continue their educations. 

 

Friday is #WorldWaterDay and Flint has been almost 5 YEARS without tap drinkable water. Ever since the state of Michigan shut down the water sites I have partnered with @PackYourBack to bring hundreds of thousands of bottles of water to #Flint. http://gofundme.com/LMFwater 

 
 
 
 

“Anyone can change the world no matter how small you are,” she toldFortune.

Since meeting Obama, Caponey has donated more than 1,000 backpacks and school supplies to children in her city using the hashtag #PackYourBackChallenge. The campaign paved the way for Caponey to land the role as the youngest Women’s March Youth Ambassador, and work with the Nations’ Girl Up Initiative. 

 

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Nothing is more gratifying than seeing a young empowered female pay it forward and enable other young people to become leaders  📢

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

Estos supermercados están reemplazando envases de plástico por hojas de plátano

El sudeste asiático lucha con niveles extremos de contaminación plástica.

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
En respuesta a los crecientes riesgos ambientales, los gobiernos y las empresas están comenzando a reducir la producción y el consumo de plástico. Los Objetivos Mundiales de las Naciones Unidas exigen a los países que inviertan en sistemas económicos sostenibles. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí.

Los supermercados en Tailandia han comenzado a envolver vegetales en hojas de plátano para reducir los envases de plástico, según publicó Vice.

 

El desarrollo se documentó por primera vez en una publicación de Facebook el mes pasado que mostraba espárragos, pimientos y pepinos envueltos en hojas de plátano verde en la sección de productos frescos del supermercado Rimping en Chiang Mai, Tailandia.

 

Desde entonces, otros supermercados en el país y en Vietnam también han comenzado a experimentar con este empaque natural.

 

Los bananos son comunes en toda Tailandia y pueden producir hojas de hasta 2.7 metros de largo.

Las personas de todo el mundo ya los utilizan para cubrir varios tipos de alimentos, y su robustez los convierte en una forma ideal de empaque para productos frescos que se venden rápidamente (al ser biodegradables, no pueden permanecer en el estante durante meses).

 

Este cambio hacia materiales ecológicos es parte de un creciente movimiento hacia desechos cero en todo el mundo que busca eliminar los desechos no biodegradables y reducir significativamente la cantidad de desechos en general que se envían a los vertederos y contaminan los ecosistemas.

 

Además de las hojas de banano, muchas marcas se están deshaciendo de las bolsas de plástico reemplazandolas por papel y bolsas biodegradables hechas de almidón de maíz, yuca y algas.

 

Estas inversiones están impulsadas por la creciente conciencia en todo el mundo sobre el problema de la contaminación plástica, especialmente en países de todo el sudeste asiático.

 

Desde 1950, los seres humanos han creado 8.3 mil millones de toneladas métricas de plástico, más del 75% de las cuales se han desechado. Cada año, aproximadamente 8 millones de toneladas métricas de plástico ingresan a los océanos, dañando a los animales marinos que van desde las ballenas hasta el coral. Los seres humanos también son vulnerables a los residuos plásticos y absorben decenas de miles de microplásticos cada año a través del aire, el agua y los alimentos.

 

Tailandia es el hogar de algunas partes del río Mekong, que, junto con otros siete ríos en Asia y dos en África,representa el 90% de todos los desechos plásticos que ingresan a los océanos del mundo.

 

En Malasia, los lugares ilegales de quema de plástico han aparecido en todo el país durante el año pasado, contaminando el aire en diferentes pueblos y ciudades con gases nocivos. Las fábricas surgieron después de que China dejó de importar chatarra de plástico de países occidentales, como Estados Unidos y Canadá, que comenzaron a enviar su chatarra a otros países.

 

En 2018, Malasia importó 754,000 toneladas de residuos plásticos y el país no tenía la capacidad de reciclaje para procesar estos residuos de manera segura.

 

Tailandia, por su parte, prohibió la importación de la mayoría de los plásticos el año pasado después de que se inundó con basura peligrosa y difícil de reciclar.

 

El intercambio de envoltorios de plástico de un solo uso por hojas de plátano ayuda a eliminar una forma importante de residuos plásticos.

 

El siguiente paso sería introducir alternativas plásticas para todos los demás productos que se encuentran en los supermercados, lo que podría significar una revisión completa de cómo se almacenan y administran las tiendas de comestibles.

 

Pero las tiendas sin plástico no son inconcebibles: los mercados de desperdicio cero se están volviendo más comunes, lo que demuestra que el reinado de los plásticos de un solo uso podría terminar.

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Netflix Just Announced a Zambian Superhero Series Featuring Four Female Leads

In efforts to bring more content from Africa, Netflix introduced its first African cartoon series.

Why Global Citizens Should Care:
Historically, women of color have been underrepresented in the media. But things are gradually changing. Movies like Black Panther, Moonlight, and A Wrinkle in Time are putting people of color at the center of Hollywood’s storytelling. As the success of Black Panther has already shown, superhero movies with strong black female characters are powerful wins for equality and representation. Take action here to join the movement to promote equality and help end discrimination.

For decades, classic superheroes like Spiderman, Superman, and Batman have shared these two traits — they are white and male. But Netflix’s new animated production, Mama K’s Team 4, aims to break free from the stereotypical superhero mold.

In keeping with its latest effort to include more content from the African continent, Mama K’s Team 4 will be the first African children’s series to feature on the streaming service.

The show follows four teenage girls who live in a futuristic version of Lusaka, Zambia, and are on a mission to save the world. According to Variety, the story is written by Zambian screenwriter Malenga Mulendema, designed by the Cameroonian artist Malcolm Wope, and produced by South African animation studio Triggerfish.

Take Action: Empower South African Kids With Digital Literacy

Actúa: Tweet

 
 
 

 



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En asociación con: Vodacom Group

The announcement of the new show comes not long after Netflix introducedits first-ever original African TV series called Queen Sono. Last month, Netflix also releasedThe Boy Who Harnessed the Wind, a film based on the true story of a young boy who dropped out of school and built a windmill that saved his village from disaster.

“In addition to giving African writers a global platform on which to be heard, we are excited to present this powerful and entertaining new animated series that brings Malenga’s incredible and unique vision to life on Netflix,” Melissa Cobb, vice president of original animation at Netflix, said in a press release.  

Mama K’s Team 4 has the potential to give a whole new generation of African children the opportunity to see themselves on screen in the powerful, aspirational characters they look up to,” she added.

Mama K's Team 4 Classroom.jpgImage: Courtesy of Netflix

Read More: 'I Am Not for Sale': New Anti-Slavery Campaign Encourages Women to Build a Life in Nigeria

Mulendema was one of the eight winners of the Triggerfish Story Lab contest, a talent search conducted across the African continent by the Walt Disney Company and Triggerfish.

Mulendema said she was inspired to write an African superhero story based in Zambia because of the lack of representation in media that she witnessed growing up. The writer said never saw a cartoon character who looked like her or came from a world that resembled her native Zambia as a child.  

“In creating a superhero show set in Lusaka, I hope to introduce the world to four strong African girls who save the day in their own fun and crazy way,” she said. “Most importantly, I want to illustrate that anyone from anywhere can be a superhero.”

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APRIL 17, 2019

 

 
 
FINANCE & INNOVATION

Ashton Kutcher Is Fighting Online Child Sexual Abuse With Backing From a $280 Million Fund

Thorn is one of eight recipients of funding from the Audacious Project, a TED-backed fund.

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Online child sexual abuse disproportionately affects young girls and is frequently driven by poverty. While the crime against these children may occur online, the devastating effects of this exploitation are real. Join the movement to end all forms of sexual and gender-based violence here.

Ashton Kutcher’s nonprofit, Thorn, aims to eliminate online child sexual exploitation, including trafficking. The organization has already helped to identify thousands of victims, and on Tuesday it became one of eight organizations to receive money from the Audacious Project, a $280 million TED-backed fund.

Thorn, founded in 2012 by actor and tech investor Ashton Kutcher and actress Demi Moore, partners with tech companies to build products that help identify, track, and erase child sexual abuse material on the internet.  

"Child sexual abuse obviously is a human crime, but the internet is introducing this entirely new dynamic," Julie Cordua, the CEO of Thorn, told Business Insider. "Now you can find entire chat rooms and places where there are people who will convince you that this type of behavior is OK."

Take Action: Tell World Leaders to Redouble Their Efforts By Amending Laws to Prevent Sexual Violence

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
1 punto

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: Equality Now yCHIME FOR CHANGE

With the added funding, Thorn aims to build and expand Spotlight — its web-based tool, which is now used by law enforcement officers in almost all US states and in parts of Canada — and a new product called Safer.

"Time is of the essence and capital helps us move faster. The funding allows us to internally build faster," Kutcher wrote in an email to CNN Business. "This is no longer a blind unintended consequence of the democratization of information ... We need to make it a priority."

Kutcher and Moore first learned about the extent of child sex trafficking after watching a documentary on the issue in Cambodia, where children account for one third of the the country's sex industry, estimated to total 40,000 to 100,000 people. After digging deeper into the issue, they realized the story wasn’t much different at home in the United States.

Human trafficking is the fastest growing crime in the world. In 2014, children comprised 28% of detected victims. In the US alone, the human trafficking hotline registered 14,117 calls about potential victims and 5,147 cases last year.

Read More: Two South African Teens Create Groundbreaking Schoolbag That's Also a Light Source

In an effort to highlight the gravity of the issue, Kutcher testified before Congress at a hearing on about combating modern slavery in January 2017. Addressing the constitutional right to pursue happiness, he spoke about the injustices victims of human trafficking face.

“The right to pursue happiness for so many is stripped away, its raped, its abused, it’s taken by force, fraud or coercion, it is sold for the momentary happiness of another,” he said.  

According to Thorn’s user survey, Spotlight has already cut down on  63% of critical search time and has helped identify 31,197 victims of human trafficking — 9,380 of them children — and 10,496 traffickers in the past three years.

The company has its sights set on even greater impact. Cordua imagines a future where companies will be rewarded for eliminating abuse materials from their online platform.

Safer, which helps companies eliminate sexual abuse material from their platforms, is currently being beta tested by image-hosting sites Imgur and Flickr. The company plans to scale Safer and to eventually charge for the tool to help make the organization’s funding and work more sustainable, CNN reported.

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MARCH 8, 2019

 

31
 
HEALTH

These Are the Top 10 Healthiest Countries in the World

According to the Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index.

 

 

Why Global Citizens Should Care
The United Nations aims to ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all by 2030. While many countries around the world have made progress, access to health care and a healthy lifestyle remain out of reach for too many people. You can join us in taking action on this issue here.

It’s official: Spain is now considered the healthiest country in the world.

According to a study of 169 nations released last month, Spain now ranks at the top of the Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index with 92.7 points out of 100.

There’s a range of reasons: public health care, the Mediterranean diet, life expectancy, smoking habits, lower rates of obesity, environmental conditions, and access to safe drinking water.

Spain also has a higher life expectancy for newborns, and life expectancy is 83 years old.   

"Primary care is essentially provided by public providers, specialised family doctors and staff nurses, who provide preventive services to children, women and elderly patients, and acute and chronic care," according to the European Observatory on Health Systems and Policies 2018 review of Spain, noting a decline the past decade in cardiovascular diseases and deaths from cancer, according to EL PAÍS.

 

Spain — with its Mediterranean diet and high life expectancy — is the world's healthiest country, according to the Bloomberg 2019 Healthiest Country Index.

 
 
 
 

Researchers also believe that the secret is the local diet: “A Mediterranean diet, supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil or nuts, had a lower rate of major cardiovascular events than those assigned to a reduced-fat diet, according to a study led by the University of Navarre Medical School,” the Bloomberg Index stated.

The other top countries in the ranking include Italy (second), Iceland (third), and Japan (fourth).

Globally, in North America, Canada ranks 16th, the United States ranks 35th, and Mexico ranks 53rd. In the United States, life expectancy dropped because of the opioid crisis and overdose deaths. Cuba is five spots above the United States and the only nation that high in the ranking that is not classified as “high income” by the World Bank.  

In Latin America, Chile and Costa Rica are among the healthiest countries, while in Asia, Japan and South Korea are the leaders.

The unhealthiest nations in the ranking, meanwhile, are sub-Saharan economies, as well as Haiti, Afganistán and Yemen.

You can find the top 10 rankings below, and more about the Bloomberg Healthiest Country Index here.

The Top 10 Healthiest Countries in the World

1. Spain

2. Italy

3. Iceland

4. Japan

5. Switzerland

6. Sweden

7. Australia

8. Singapore

9. Norway

10. Israel

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Misha-Studying-for-his-exam-8yze2zljrrzy

NEWS: 18 Apr 2019

A HISTORIC HUMAN RIGHTS VICTORY – MISHA HAS HAD HIS RIGHTS RESTORED!

18 Apr 2019

 

It is with great pride and joy that we share the wonderful news that Misha “The Cobbler” has had his rights restored as a result of a journey that has lasted his entire life.

Misha is the first person who has progressed through all stages of CCI’s Restoration of Rights Programme, which has a strong focus on education and skill-building.   This is a historical precedent for not only our programme, but for people in institutions throughout Belarus.  Misha is blazing a trail and his future is now full of opportunity.  Most importantly, it is a future of freedom.

This is a massive victory for the human rights of so many vulnerable children and young adults, who have inherited both the medical and socio-economic fallout for Chernobyl.

CCI will continue to support Misha in his transition from institutionalised life to one of liberty within the community.

Misha was abandoned at birth because he was born with a cleft palette and hair lip.  He came into CCI’s care when we began to work   in Vesnova Children’s Mental Asylum, where he was placed as a child.  CCI worked directly with the Director of Vesnova and the Dept. of Social Protection in Mogilev to secure a place for Misha in the Community House in Glusk, from which he has demonstrated as his ability to live independently within the community.

Misha is a skilled cobbler and his strong work ethic has enabled him to grow a business in his local town, which will provide him with an independent income to support himself.

Misha has travelled to the loving Coleman family in Castlebar, Co Mayo on CCI’s Rest and Recuperation since 2008.

Congratulations Misha and thank you to our supporters who believed in Misha, and so many others like him.

 Mischa-2-1.jpg

 

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No hay descripción de la foto disponible.

 

 

Think chocolate eggs for Easter is so cliche? 😉 
Why not treat your loved one to a fairy tale book for all ages instead? 📓 
'Another seven simple and slightly silly stories' by John Foley is available now. 👍 
Proceeds donated to Mencap. 
Visit: https://bit.ly/2z7hzGE 👈

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A simple surgery is all it takes to repair obstetric fistula
930
HEALTH

A simple surgery is all it takes to repair obstetric fistula

21 May 2018 9:03PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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Written by Margarite Nathe, Senior Editor & Writer at IntraHealth International

Three days.

That’s how long Malado was in labour. That’s how long she was unable to give birth. She was only 16 years old, after all, and it was her first baby. Her body wasn’t ready.

This was back in the 1960s in rural Mali, and there were no cars to take her from her village to a health facility—even today, it’s rare to see a car pass on these dirt roads. Finally someone helped her into a donkey-drawn cart and carried her to a clinic in the nearby town of Dioila.

“They had to force the baby out,” Malado says. Her newborn did not survive.

socialObstetric-Fistula.jpg

Saiba and Malado (right) are neighbours with similar life and Fistula experience.

Aside from the emotional pain, the trauma to Malado’s body was extensive. When the health workers helped her stand up after the birth, she realized urine was leaking out of her—and it didn’t stop from then on. Nerve and muscle damage gave her such trouble walking that soon she had to use a cane to get around.

She didn’t know it yet, but less than a kilometre down the road, a young woman named Saiba was going through the same thing.

Saiba had been married at 15 and was now having her third child. A few days into her labour she still couldn’t deliver. So she too made her way to Dioila, where her baby was finally born, but dead. A few days later, Saiba was leaking urine.

“I didn’t know what was happening to me,” Saiba says. “I would spend all day crying.”

No one knew what to make of Malado and Saiba’s situation. No one knew it had a name—obstetric fistula—or that it was a direct result of their childbirth injuries.Or that it could be cured. Eventually, no one else in their communities wanted to get close to them because of the smell, and so they became friends.

For the next 50 years, both women lived with the condition, changing and washing their clothes constantly and feeling as if they had lost all dignity. Their only comfort was each other.

A problem that persists

Today thousands of women in Mali and throughout West Africa are still experiencing exactly what Malado and Saiba went through over fifty years ago. The World Health Organization estimates that every year some 50,000-100,000 women are affected by obstetric fistula worldwide. It’s difficult to confirm an exact number—no one knows how many more could be hiding or unable reach the care they need.

For most of these women, a simple surgical procedure is all it would take to heal them completely.

But in Mali, making these surgical procedures more widely available in such a vast country is tougher than it sounds. It requires boundless cooperation, determined partners, and great creativity.

The Malian government has found all three in its partnership with IntraHealth International and several local NGOs and private-sector organizations. With funding from the US Agency for International Development and others, they’ve been working together since 2008 to revolutionize fistula care in Mali. Over the past ten years, they have:

  • Trained 105 local surgeons and other health workers to perform repair surgeries. This isn’t a problem that can be solved through brief visits from foreign doctors. It takes local expertise and dedication to help women with fistula—both of which are becoming stronger than ever in Mali.
  • Held 35 repair campaigns at local hospitals and other health facilities.Women come from hundreds of miles away (often with transportation help from us and our partners) to undergo a repair surgery at no cost to them.
  • Built welcome centres for fistula clients at local health facilities. IntraHealth’s partner Orange Foundation, a major telecom company in Mali, funded the first of these centres at a hospital in Sikasso. Soon they’ll break ground on a second one in Koulikoro. The Spanish Cooperation built another centre inside the Kayes Hospital. These centres provide not only the comfort of a bed and roof for clients during some of the most difficult weeks of their lives, but also a haven among other women who understand what living with fistula is like. For someone who’s been shunned and abandoned because of their condition, this is huge.
  • Provided 1,458 women with successful, life-changing fistula repair surgeries.The benefits of these surgeries stretch far beyond the women who undergo them to their children, families, and communities.

Two friends transformed

Just over two years ago, during the first fistula repair campaign organised by IntraHealth’s Fistula Mali Project, a local health worker, matron Djénéba Boiré, heard a radio announcement about it. The ad called on women with Malado’s symptoms to come to the Koulikoro CSRef health centre, where they would receive all the care they needed at no cost to them.

moladosmall.jpg

Malado is now completely healed

Djénéba told Malado, now 73, who quickly passed the news to Saiba, 75. And together they set off for Koulikoro. (Malado even met the First Lady of Mali there as she visited fistula clients at their bedsides.)

Today, both Malado and Saiba are completely healed. They hold hands as they walk around the community, laughing and chatting with the matron.

“We consider it our role in the community now to tell every pregnant woman we see that she must go for prenatal care,” Malado says. “And that she must deliver in a health facility.”

At Koulikoro and other facilities that work with the project, officials are determined to keep providing these services, and encouraging women like Malado and Saiba to come forward.

“The women are there, just waiting to hear when there’s a campaign so they can come have their surgery,” says Abdourhamane Dicko, a gynaecologist at the Koulikoro CSRef. “They stay in the shadows until then. This is an illness where people don’t show themselves. But there are still a lot of older women who’ve been living with obstetric fistula for years and years—and we still need to help them.

“When you give a woman her dignity back, that’s better than giving her millions of dollars.”

IntraHealth’s Fistula Mali project is funded by the US Agency for International Development. Our local partners include the Medical Alliance Against Malaria; Women Action Research, Study and Training Group; and the International Association for Maternal and Neonatal Health.

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