Jump to content
tan_lejos_tan_cerca

The Action Thread Part Two

Recommended Posts

 

 
Skip to content
 
3
GIRLS AND WOMEN

3 powerful mums who aren’t afraid of a challenge

11 May 2018 4:54PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

 

 

 

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Young motherhood, HIV, severe drought – each of these moms were faced with unique challenges, but they mustered up the courage and strength to tackle them head on!

DSC0411-1024x743.jpg

Mary Nekesa
Mary lives in a small, rural village called Luucho in western Kenya with her five children. She depended on farming to provide food for her family, until her crops failed after drought struck the region. Mary said, “I couldn’t sit and watch my children starve.” So, she decided to take on a job that no other woman in her community had: sand harvesting. Now, Mary’s able to take care of her family financially and serves as a role model to her friends and neighbours, like Felistus Nanjala, who said, “I feel very encouraged by her commitment to take up this work in order to take care of her family.”

Constance-2-1024x681.jpg

Constance
Constance was only 15 years old when she found out she was pregnant. Six months after her daughter was born, Constance’s mom helped pay her tuition fees and she was able to return to school. Juggling life with a new baby and finishing her education wasn’t easy, but Constance did it. Now, she’s prepared to provide a strong future for herself and her daughter.

Gaolatlhe-Kalanke_0491-1024x653.jpg

Gaolatlhe Kalanke with her husband and daughters. Photo Credit: UNAIDS

Gaolatlhe Kalanke
In 2002, Gaolatlhe found out she and her daughter — who was born before treatment for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV was freely available — were HIV positive. When she became pregnant again, she made sure to learn about and get antenatal care to reduce the chances of passing HIV to her new baby. Nine months later, her daughter was born HIV-free. Now, Gaolatlhe runs a daily session called “Health Talk” at a youth centre to teach young people about how to maintain their health and prevent the transmission of HIV!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/Zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

ROBYN DETORO
11 May 2018 4:54PM UTC

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congo, U.N. deploy specialists to tackle Ebola epidemic

by Reuters
Sunday, 13 May 2018 22:23 GMT
Ebola killed more than 11,300 people in West Africa following an outbreak in 2014 which quickly spread out of control

(Adds interview with WHO regional director, Kabila meeting)

By Patient Ligodi and Amedee Mwarabu

KINSHASA, May 13 (Reuters) - The Democratic Republic of Congo and U.N. agencies began deploying emergency teams of specialists over the weekend to try to prevent the spread of an Ebola epidemic suspected to have infected more than 30 people, they said on Sunday.

The World Health Organisation obtained 4,000 doses of an experimental Ebola vaccine and was preparing for deployment in Congo, its Africa director, Matshidiso Moeti, told Reuters by telephone on Sunday.

Only two cases have so far been confirmed in a laboratory.

The latest suspected case was reported on Friday in the northwestern province of Equateur, which Health Minister Oly Ilunga Kalenga visited on Saturday with officials from the WHO and U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF).

President Joseph Kabila also met WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus in Kinshasa on Sunday.

Moeti said 362 contacts had been traced of those who had fallen sick - a necessary precursor to deploying the vaccines. She added that two of those contacts had got to the provincial capital, Mbandaka. The biggest worry since the epidemic was identified has been that it could spread there.

"We're concerned because this is a city of 1 million people," she said.

Congo first reported the outbreak, centred on the village of Ikoko Impenge, near the town of Bikoro, on Tuesday, with 32 suspected, probable or confirmed cases of the disease, including 18 deaths since April 4. Some deaths occurring as early as January have not yet been linked to the epidemic.

"It is evident that two or three months earlier, some cases of hemorrhagic fever and some deaths occurred," Moeti said. "Work is under way to determine the beginning of this epidemic."

Officials are racing to prevent the virus from spreading out of control, as happened in West Africa from 2014 to 2016, when Ebola killed more than 11,300 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

The WHO was criticised for bungling its response to that epidemic, and so has moved quickly.

Congo suffered eight previous Ebola epidemics. But owing to remote geography and poor transport links, they tended to fizzle out rather than spread to become a national crisis.

But this epidemic's proximity to the Congo River, a major transport route and lifeline both to Congo's capital, Kinshasa, and to neighbouring Congo Republic's capital, Brazzaville, makes it more likely the virus could break out into a wider area.

The disease - most feared for the internal and external bleeding it can cause in its victims owing to damage done to blood vessels - has already spread to three locations covering 60 km (37 miles) or more in Equateur province.

Congo's nine neighbours have been put on high alert in case Ebola crosses a border, especially to Republic of Congo or Central African Republic.

"The WHO is strengthening its presence, positioning a dozen epidemiologists who will be divided on the axes of Mbandaka, Bikoro and Iboko to investigate alerts," its Congo representative, Allarangar Yokouide, said.

The WHO said on Friday it hoped to deploy an experimental Ebola vaccine to tackle an outbreak.

(Reporting by Amedee Mwarabu; Writing by Tim Cocks; Editing by Catherine Evans)

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

Insurance turns to coral reefs and mangroves as ocean risks surge

by Emma Farge | Thomson Reuters Foundation
Monday, 14 May 2018 14:25 GMT
As climate change brings worsening threats, insurance may be a way to insure against ocean losses

By Emma Farge

SOUTHAMPTON, Bermuda, May 14 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Coral reefs, mangroves and even some fish could soon have their own insurance policies as the industry seeks new ways to boost protection for those affected by the ocean changes wrought by climate change.

Warmer sea temperatures have led to more intense storms in the Atlantic Ocean, contributing to $320 billion in disaster losses from weather and climate-related events last year, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

Only about a quarter of these were insured.

But despite high payouts, industry experts speaking at the Ocean Risk Summit in reinsurance hub Bermuda said so-called "ocean risk" - which encompasses storms and hurricanes as well as marine diseases and declines in fish stocks - can present opportunities for insurers if the risks are modelled correctly.

One way to increase coverage is to devise new financial instruments to insure "green infrastructure" - such as coral reefs, mangroves and salt marshes that act as natural barriers against storms and can reduce devastating losses on land.

"There is a new role for insurance companies in the context of development strategies for countries most vulnerable to ocean risk," said Falk Niehörster, director of Climate Risk Innovations, a risk management consultancy.

Niehörster has urged the creation of new insurance products to cover the $1.5 trillion global "blue economy" including fisheries, marine transport and other sectors.

Mark Way, a former reinsurance official who helped Swiss Re implement a policy for dozens of kilometres of coral reef and beach in Mexico this year - a world first - said his charity was inundated with calls from other insurers after the concept was announced.

"There's a lot of capital looking for investment opportunities so there are incentives to find innovative new ways to provide cover," Way, head of global coastal risk and resilience for The Nature Conservancy, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation on the sidelines of the summit last week.

Governments also have a keen interest in such insurance policies since they can reduce the human and infrastructure losses on land that devastated parts of the Caribbean last year.

Kedrick Pickering, deputy premier of the British Virgin Islands, which was hit by Hurricane Irma last year, said reef insurance was something the country would consider.

The Mexican reef insurance model works by automatically triggering payouts once storm-force winds hit a certain level.

The same concept theoretically could be applied to damage to fish stocks causes by El Niño, based on changes to water current. Payouts would go to fishermen in that case.

"There is a whole host of ideas and we are just scraping the surface," Way said.

1230
Vessels that sank during Hurricane Irma are seen in a Saint John bay 12 days after the devastating storm raked the island, on St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands September 16, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake

THE UNINSURABLE

However, some risks - such as pollution and over-fishing, which scientists say could contribute to the loss of as much as 90 percent of global reefs by 2050 - are not covered under the novel Mexican insurance model.

And many species that have an enormous value to ocean ecosystems, such as crucial oxygen-generating bacteria, do not have easily quantifiable benefits to humanity, so are difficult to insure.

"Insurance can't solve all the problems and we need to be mindful of the blindspots," said Rashid Sumaila, director of the fisheries economics research unit at the University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre.

But so far even clearly identified threats to established markets remain largely uninsured.

The nearly $23 billion a year northeastern U.S. fisheries market, which includes high-value species such as lobster, scallops and cod, is expected to suffer from rising sea temperatures but so far remains largely uninsured, for instance.

Experts say more data and research on the oceans, such as plans to map the ocean's resources as well as an ambitious project to create an ocean risk index by the end of this year, may help provide the missing pieces for insurers.

"Insurers are already developing products in response to ocean risk but an index could accelerate and deepen their engagement," said Robert Powell, a senior consultant with the Economist Intelligence Unit, which is formulating the risk index.

Creating insurance products for marine assets could also build incentives to protect them against threats, or at least the ones local communities can control, Way said.

"If you can make the case successfully that its worth investing in an insurance policy then why spend that money if you are going to kill the reef through nutrient run off or pollution?" he asked.

Still, conservationists say there is a limit to what insurance can do and other protection will have to come from regulation, such as reducing illegal fishing and implementing a U.N. goal to transform 10 percent of the world's oceans into protected areas by 2020.

Another shortcoming is that insurers, who tend to offer policies on short time horizons, are only likely to be interested in providing coverage against ocean risks in milder global warming scenarios.

Under the Paris Agreement on climate change, countries aim to hold average global temperature risk to "well below" 2 degrees Celsius, with an aim of 1.5 degrees. So far, however, inadequate global plans to cut emissions suggest temperatures could rise 3 degrees or more.

"At 3-4 degrees (temperature increase) you are looking at a structural challenge for billions of people and that creates a whole new level of economic and social challenges for which insurance may not have all the answers," said Rowan Douglas, head of capital, science and policy practice at global advisory firm Willis Towers Watson.

(Reporting by Emma Farge ; editing by Laurie Goering : (Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate change, resilience, women's rights, trafficking and property rights. Visit http://news.trust.org/climate)

Our Standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

 
About Thomson Reuters Foundation Newsnews.trust.org
footer-image.jpg

Our global editorial team of 46 journalists and 150 freelancers covers the world’s under-reported stories at the heart of aid, development, women’s rights, human trafficking, property rights, and climate change.

FIND OUT MORE

Newsletter sign up:

 

Copyright © 2018 Thomson Reuters Foundation. Thomson Reuters Foundation is a charity registered in England and Wales (registration number: 1082139)

  • Join
    Usshare-arrow.png
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

image.png

image.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Skip to content
Meet Abubakar Ibrahim, the winner of the 2018 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling
54
CULTURE

Meet Abubakar Ibrahim, the winner of the 2018 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

8 May 2018 11:39AM UTC | By: ONE

 
   

Congratulations to Nigerian writer and journalist Abubakar Ibrahim for winning the 2018 Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

Ibrahim works as a news editor at the Daily Trust in Abuja, Nigeria and was selected by an international jury from over 230 applicants.

His work conveys the human toll of terrorism and displacement and his winning story All That Was Familiar, published in Granta magazine in May 2017, puts a human face on a story often expressed in numbers: More than 2 million people from northeastern Nigeria, northern Cameroon and southern Niger have been internally displaced since Boko Haram began its insurgency. Ibrahim tells about the struggle of two women, one from Cameroon and one from Nigeria, to find their loved ones and return home.

S-and-her-children-waiting-for-food-e152

Sa’adatu and her children, who are featured in ‘All That Was Familiar’, waiting for food at the camp for Internally Displaced Persons.

The prestigious award is given by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) in partnership with ONE and the Elliott family. It was established in 2016 in honour of Michael Elliott, an outstanding editor and philanthropist whose life was a testament to the power of storytelling to bear witness to and improve the human condition. The prize aims to advance the work of an emerging journalist covering Africa who strives to strengthen people’s voices and improve their well-being. 

“Mike would be thrilled by the breadth and depth of talent displayed by the entrants for this year’s award,” said Emma Oxford, Elliott’s widow. “The Elliott family, along with ONE, ICFJ and many generous supporters, is proud to help support the development of quality journalism in Africa. I am hugely grateful to the staff of ICFJ and my fellow judges for their thoughtful review of the broad range of entries.”

The winning story “exemplifies outstanding storytelling on a difficult and important topic. Abubakar’s fearless reporting and powerful writing brought home to me the hardships faced by women, in particular, displaced by the scourge of Boko Haram,” Oxford said.  

Two broadcast journalists were commended as finalists for the award: Lindile Yolisa Mpanza of South Africa’s SABC Digital news, for her report on sexual abuse of widows; and Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman of Ghana’s GHOne, for his coverage of a community in crisis because its drinking water is contaminated.

Ibrahim will receive the award and a cash prize at a  reception in New York on May 24. He also will spend time in U.S. newsrooms to learn new skills and share knowledge in an intensive, customized program run by ICFJ. The goal is to help to deepen future reporting that engages and empowers Africans.

The international panel that selected Ibrahim was chaired by Norman Pearlstine, chief information architect, Money.net and former vice chairman of Time Inc., and included:

  • Lionel Barber, editor, Financial Times
  • Joyce Barnathan, president, International Center for Journalists
  • Matthew Bishop, managing director, Bellagio Center, The Rockefeller Foundation
  • Joachim Buwembo, former ICFJ Knight Fellow based in Uganda
  • Erik Charas, founder, @Verdade newspaper based in Mozambique and member of ONE’s Africa Policy Advisory Board
  • Kate Critchley, interim executive director, Europe department, ONE
  • Nic Dawes, deputy executive director for media, Human Rights Watch, and member of ONE’s Africa Policy Advisory Board
  • Jamie Drummond, co-founder and executive director, global strategy, ONE
  • Jerri Eddings, senior program director, ICFJ
  • Daniel Franklin, executive editor, The Economist
  • Mercy Juma, reporter, BBC Kenya and inaugural award winner
  • Rik Kirkland, partner, Global Publishing, McKinsey & Company and ICFJ Director
  • Chika Oduah, freelance journalist based in Senegal
  • Declan Okpalaeke, former ICFJ Knight Fellow based in Nigeria  
  • Emma Oxford, author, “At Least We Lived”

Elliott served as a top editor at The Economist, Newsweek and Time before becoming CEO of ONE. A passionate writer and editor with a gift for unravelling complex issues, he shone a light on global development issues and the people at their centre. A longtime board member of ICFJ, Elliott championed great journalism as a tool for empowerment. As ONE’s CEO, he lobbied to improve the lives of all Africans. Shortly before his untimely death in 2016, he spoke of his dream to establish an award that would bring together his belief in great journalism with his commitment to progress in Africa.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/Zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       

By signing you agree to ONE’s privacy policy, including to the transfer of your information to ONE.org’s servers in the United States.

You agree to receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

ONE
8 May 2018 11:39AM UTC

TOPICS

CULTURE

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Skip to content
How a man on a motorcycle is finding missing TB cases in Tanzania
597
HEALTH

How a man on a motorcycle is finding missing TB cases in Tanzania

March 26 2018 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

This post is adapted from a blog that originally appeared on the Global Fund’s website.

Four out of every ten tuberculosis (TB) cases worldwide weren’t detected in 2016. That’s a really big deal because that meant 4.1 million people didn’t know they were infected with the number one infectious disease killer in the world.

Around World TB Day, we asked: Who are the heroes working on the front lines, finding those missing cases of TB?

Enter Rashidi Gora.

TB-Photo-1-1024x683.jpg

(Photo credit: Nichole Sobecki / The Global Fund)

Another foot soldier in Tanzania’s effort to reach people left behind in the fight against TB is Rashidi Gora, a community health worker tracking missing cases of TB in Dodoma, central Tanzania.

For Gora, finding the next TB patient is a life mission. On a recent morning, Gora bid his wife goodbye, grabbed his bag and hopped on his motorbike, heading to the remotest villages of Kondoa District in the country’s interior, where rugged roads disappear into endless fields of millet and corn.

In the last year, Gora has screened hundreds of people for TB in areas far removed from mainstream health systems. It is not a glamorous job. Gora collects samples, smears the sputum on a slide for ease of transportation and delivers them to hospital labs for analysis.

TB-Photo-2-1024x683.jpg

(Photo credit: Nichole Sobecki / The Global Fund)

When the results are ready, he rides back to the distant villages – often for more than an hour – to read out the outcomes to his patients. In case of a positive result, he links patients to clinics and supports them through the long treatment process. In a calm voice, he also takes time to educate the people on how to avoid infection, or infecting others.

“When I got the training, I fell in love with community health work, and I dedicated myself to saving my community from this disaster,” says Gora. “The Global Fund and MDH gave me the training, now is my turn to contribute.”

TB-Photo-3-1024x683.jpg

(Photo credit: Nichole Sobecki / The Global Fund)

MDH (Management and Development for Health) is a local nongovernmental organization that is part of a national effort to find TB cases led by Global Fund and the nonprofit Save the Children. MDH has trained and deployed more than 2,000 community health workers across Tanzania to bring TB screening and treatment to the people.

In order to find more than 100,000 missing cases of TB spread across Tanzania – a vast country almost the size of Germany and France combined – the government is working with the Global Fund to train staff in health facilities to test for TB among all patients, and connecting community health workers like Gora and traditional healers like Milanzi with formal health systems.

The partnership is investing in prompt and accurate diagnosis of TB in health facilities with the goal of identifying all TB cases that arrive at the hospital. The partnership has made TB screening routine during all medical visits, which has more than doubled the number of TB cases detected in the last year.

TB-Photo-4-1024x683.jpg

(Photo credit: Nichole Sobecki / The Global Fund)

Rashidi Gora’s story tells us how aid saves lives. When you tell governments to fund the Global Fund, it supports the heroic work of people like Rashidi Gora on his motorcycle, bringing us closer to eliminating one of the world’s deadliest diseases.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/Zip code
Country         Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       

When you submit your details, you accept ONE’s privacy policy and will receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
March 26 2018

TOPICS

HEALTH

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Skip to content
 
521
ENERGY

How solar energy is powering bright futures in Uganda

6 December 2017 1:50PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

It isn’t easy for girls to follow their dreams in rural Uganda. Society there places little value on education for females and restricts the opportunities education gives them for future growth and achievement of their dreams.

According to UNESCO estimates, over 130 million girls between the age of 6 and 17 are out of school and 15 million girls of primary-school age—half of them in sub-Saharan Africa— will never enter a classroom.

In fact, statistics from UNICEF show that while 81% of girls in Uganda attend primary school, there is an attendance of just 15.8% at secondary schools.

A decent level of education for girls in Uganda is not a right, but something that often needs to be paid for—and for many families, this is just not possible.

DSC_3606_Jpg.jpgBut in Uganda, there is a strong desire among girls to gain an education to create opportunities for income and empower themselves to forge a better life.

The introduction of off-grid solar to Uganda is life-changing on many levels, but it is having a major impact on the access to education for girls there. Two examples of how this can help:

Solar in schools: The transition from the traditional kerosene generator to solar power for schools in Uganda has a massive impact on the opportunities for pupils, not only giving them light to study by but access to modern technology that was previously only theory in textbooks.

Solar at home: For girls in Uganda, having reliable solar energy in their homes means they have light to continue their studies at home as well as mobile technology to keep in touch with peers. For their families, solar access saves them money on fuel, meaning they can better afford education.

The impact of solar access is truly life-changing for girls in rural Uganda and across sub-Saharan Africa, and that is why Energise Africa is making it possible for UK investors to finance pioneering businesses that provide and install affordable and safe systems in homes, schools and businesses there. From just £50, investment in our projects has a real impact on the lives of African families.

These benefits were witnessed first-hand when the Energise Africa team was in Uganda visiting customers of these solar businesses, who recently had solar systems installed.

During a visit to Lumuza Secondary School, where more than 50% of the 300 students are female, the recent installation of solar energy had provided a major boost to the students’ education and future prospects.

Prior to getting solar, the school was too rural to access Uganda’s unreliable energy grid and relied on a kerosene generator, which was noisy, expensive, and provided low-quality lighting that made reading difficult and produced CO2 emissions.

DSC_3597.jpgHaving access to solar has had a huge impact on the lives of the students at the Lumuza school. Not least, having good quality reliable lighting means they can read properly after dark and study for longer each day — creating extra time in the mornings and evenings for personal study time, which is important in helping them to perform to the best of their abilities in exams.

The solar energy access also brought with it new learning opportunities as now the school was able to provide computers and have access to the internet for the first time.

Analysis of the positive social, economic and educational benefits of off-grid solar was presented by the Overseas Development Institute at the recent UN climate change summit (COP23) in Bonn just a few weeks ago. Their research found that children living in the developing world could gain significant study time each day if their homes and schools switched to solar energy.

Students who had solar access at home are also at an advantage, as children in households with solar lighting can nearly double their homework hours each night.

The study also found that there was a positive financial impact on homes and schools switching from kerosene to solar.

For girls in rural Africa, access to clean, reliable energy is a key component to a better education and a brighter future. In fact, SolarAid research shows that students rated limited lighting as their top factor for what challenged their opportunities to learn and do homework.

However, it is not just the additional time for study that has benefited the kids at Lumuza school. Previously, their learning was purely theory via textbooks. But they now have access to computers and other modern technology that gives them the opportunity to learn experientially.

Energise Africa is brought to you by two of Europe’s online impact investing platforms Ethex and Lendahand and supported by UK aid and Virgin Unite. We are committed to significantly improving clean energy access in Sub-Saharan Africa. To find out more about what we’re doing and to help us achieve our goal of enabling 110,000 families to access solar power over the next 3 years visit www.lendahand.co.uk.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/Zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       

By signing you agree to ONE’s privacy policy, including to the transfer of your information to ONE.org’s servers in the United States.

You agree to receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
6 December 2017 1:50PM UTC

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
A girl who was forced into prostitution following her migration to Europe is photographed. Millions of children are on the move across international borders, fleeing violence and conflict, disaster or poverty, in pursuit of a better life. When they encounter few opportunities to move legally, sometimes children resort to dangerous routes and engage smugglers to help them cross borders.
Alessio Romenzi/UNICEF
GIRLS & WOMEN

Ontario Is the First Province in Canada to Offer Free Legal Help to Human Trafficking Victims

Free legal advice could help efforts to put an end to modern-day slavery.

 MAY 14, 2018

 

Ontario will now offer free legal advice to human trafficking victims as part of the province’s anti-trafficking efforts.

Victims or those at risk can access free legal help by phone or in person.

The Ministry of the Attorney General pulled together a team of specialized lawyers that victims can ask for confidential legal advice, as well as support in completing a restraining order application, and representation at application hearings in any Ontario Court of Justice.

Take Action: Tell World Leaders to Redouble Their Efforts By Amending Laws to Prevent Sexual Violence

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 
In partnership with: Equality Now and CHIME FOR CHANGE

Parents and guardians of a child survivor or one at risk are also eligible for the assistance, according to the ministry.

"This will simplify it for victims because they will have trained lawyers who are specialized in human trafficking," Barbara Gosse, chief executive of the Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking, told the Canadian Press.

Ontario's Strategy to End Human Trafficking launched in 2016 and it includes an investment of up to $72 million.

Read More: Airbnb Rentals Are Increasingly Being Used for Human Trafficking, Police Say

Efforts have included the creation of an advisory forum for survivors to contribute to policy discussions, according to CP.

Still, barriers like high fees make it hard for people to access legal assistance.

"Navigating the complexities of the legal system can be quite challenging particularly for survivors experiencing significant trauma and fear," Tessa McFadzean, chair of the Hamilton Anti-Human Trafficking Coalition, said in a press release. "Specialized legal representation for human trafficking survivors will help reduce systemic barriers by improving access to critical services that were not previously available."

Read More: Sex Trafficking Is on the Rise in West Virginia Due to This Growing Problem

Gosse said that obtaining a restraining order can cost up to $6,000.

There were 206 cases of human trafficking recorded in 2014 in Canada alone, according to Statistics Canada, but experts believe the real number is much higher.

About two-thirds of reported cases were in Ontario, according to the Ministry of Community and Social Services.

Read More: One-Third of Trafficked Humans Are Kids, UN Says

More than 40 million people around the world were victims of human trafficking in 2016, according to a report by the International Labor Organization and the Walk Free Foundation.

Global Citizen campaigns on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, including issues related to women and girls. You can take action here.

+ 0
 
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP
By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Policy.

What's Trending In Girls & Women

May 10, 2018

Child marriage is still legal in some form in every other state in the US. Read More

Jan. 30, 2018

The baby was left with “horrific” injuries and is now in critical condition. Read More

Jan. 30, 2018

Johnson was forced to marry her rapist to help him evade punishment. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2018 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
 
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
 Wikimedia Commons/Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report
CITIZENSHIP

Why Activists Have Revived MLK's 'Poor People's Campaign' 50 Years Later

They're calling for increased voting rights and immigrant protections, among other demands.

 MAY 14, 2018

 

It’s been half a century since the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., but the reverend and civil rights leader's radical fight to eradicate poverty in the United States — his main focus in the last year of his life — marches on.  

Activists and faith leaders have taken up King’s mantle, reviving the “Poor People’s Campaign” he started in 1968 with a modern outlook and building off the movement to end system racism, poverty, and war.

Calling for an end to voter suppression, improvements to the country’s immigration system, and tribal recognition for Native Americans, among other demands, the “Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival” officially launched nationwide Sunday

Take Action: Be the Generation to End Extreme Poverty

Take Action: Sign Now

 
 
 
2 points

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 

Workers, civil rights activists, and faith leaders will take to the streets in Washington, DC, and state capitals across the US on Monday and call on US leaders to take action to stem poverty and inequality. It’s the first step in 40 days of planned direct action.

"We understand that in order to change things we have to do the rallies, we have to do organizing, we have to do voter mobilization, we have to engage in civil disobedience,” Rev. William Barber, national co-chair of the Poor People's Campaign, told NPR

“People who are poor and people who are homeless shouldn’t be shamed,” Nijmie Dzurinko, an organizer in West Philadelphia, told Radio Times. “It’s actually a shame of the system, which exists in the richest country in the world.”

Read More: 7 Ways Nelson Mandela’s Legacy Still Resonates Today

The movement comes after years of stagnant anti-poverty efforts. In the 50 years since the first Poor People’s Campaign, domestic poverty in the United States has remained largely unchanged. 

 

In 1968, 13% of Americans lived below the poverty line, including 32% of black people. In 2018, that number has dipped only marginally, to 12.7% and 22%, respectively, The Conversation reports

“[Poverty] affects people across all races, nationalities, ethnicities, geographies, genders, sexualities, ages, and religions,” national co-chair Reverend Dr. Liz Theoharis told The Nation

Read More: The Civil Rights Movement and Its Connection To Poverty

But organizers have a tangible roadmap for addressing this persistent issue. In April, on the anniversary of Dr. King’s famous “silence is betrayal” speech, the Poor People's Campaign released a list of more than 30 demands that range from banning assault rifles to ensuring equity in education. 

Achieving these demands will be an uphill battle, but organizers are hopeful that the movement is already taking hold. 

 

“I think something big is happening, and we need everyone to be a part of it,” Theoharis said. 

Over the next 40 days, the campaign will feature mobilizations in front of 25-30 statehouses nationwide — calling for higher wages and changes to voting rights, among other changes — and culminate in a larger action in Washington, DC, in June. Individuals are able to join the campaignor donate to the cause online.  

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, and ending extreme poverty is goal number one. You can join and call on young people to “Be the Generation” to end extreme poverty here

+ 0
 
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP
By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Policy.

What's Trending In Citizenship

May 11, 2018

“Courage, as they say, is contagious.” Read More

Dec. 12, 2014

Moving nations comes with some big challenges. Read More

May 22, 2017

Abused, deprived, exploited, enslaved. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2018 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
 
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fb.jpg twitter.jpg ytube.jpg 

Tallaght Community Arts Centre


RUA RED, South Dublin Arts Centre, 
Civic Square, Tallaght, Dublin 24, 
Email Us, 
+353 1 452 8180
 
img1.jpgimg3.jpgimg1.pngpresident-17-800x280.jpgweather-slide-06-800x280.jpgpresident-17-800x280.jpg
Aeridheacht - The Presidents visit
<>
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
weather-slide-06-800x280.jpg
  • Arts Council of Ireland

    Arts Council of Ireland

    Tallaght Community Arts Centre Newsletter




    pixel.gif

    spacer.jpg

    Tallaght Community Arts

    RUA RED,
    South Dublin Arts Centre,
    Civic Square,
    Tallaght,
    Dublin 24,
    E info@tallaght-arts.ie
    T +353 1 452 8180

  • Archives

    Archives  Select Month  May 2018   March 2018   December 2017   April 2017   February 2017   December 2016   October 2016   August 2016   July 2016   May 2016   July 2015   March 2015   January 2015   December 2014   November 2014   April 2014   March 2014   February 2014   December 2013   November 2013   October 2013   September 2013   June 2013   May 2013   April 2013   March 2013   February 2013   December 2012   November 2012   October 2012   September 2012   August 2012   June 2012   May 2012   April 2012   March 2012   February 2012   December 2011   November 2011   October 2011   September 2011   August 2011   July 2011   June 2011   May 2011   February 2011   January 2011   September 2010   July 2010   May 2010   April 2010   March 2010   February 2010   January 2010   December 2009   November 2009   October 2009   September 2009   July 2009   June 2009   May 2009   April 2009   March 2009   February 2009   January 2009   December 2008   November 2008   October 2008   September 2008  
  •  

Shake Up the South – Shukuma Mzansi!

Published May 8, 2018

group-photo-2-1.jpg

South Dublin will be host to Shukuma Mzansi (meaning Shake Up the South), a European Union – South African International Community Arts Centres Dialogue Project from May 14 to 18, 2018.

Ireland was chosen as the base for the international delegation due to its strong foundations in community arts practice, policies and systems of supports. The study visit is being hosted by the Arts Council and Tallaght Community Arts in association with Rua Red and the Civic Theatre in Tallaght.

The delegates which include the Ministry of Arts and Culture in South Africa and community arts centre professionals from South Africa, France and Belgium will be welcomed by the Ambassador of South Africa,Mr Ahlangene Cyprian Sigcau.

Shukuma Mzansi will include a number of discussion events with Irish arts organisations and others interested and experienced in community and collaborative arts practice and will provide a valuable international exchange and learning opportunity for speakers and attendees as well as visiting delegates.

The theme of the visit include community arts practice and policy, community engagement, inclusive programming and young people and the arts and up to 60 artists and arts professionals based in Ireland will participate over the course of the week. The group will also visit Firestation Artist Studios and Common Ground to experience first-hand how the arts provide a valuable source of and catalyst for community interconnectivity.

Please note that numbers for all study visit events are limited given the discursive and interactive nature of the visit.

The Shukuma Mzansi! Shake Up the South! International Community Arts Centres Dialogue Projectis led by Sibikwa Arts Centre in partnership with the National Department of Arts and Culture in South Africa, and is funded through the SA-EU Dialogue Facility.

Further information

For further details about the EU – SA Shukuma Mzansi! study visit to Ireland and related events please contact:

Tallaght Community Arts |Jennifer Webster jenniferiwebster@hotmail.com

Arts Council | Sinead O’Reilly sinead.oreilly@artscouncil.ie

For further information on the Shukuma Mzansi International Dialogue project please contact Janneke Strijdonk jannekes@iafrica.com

 

Timetable Overview: 

MONDAY 14TH MAY – RUA RED, TALLAGHT
09.15 Arrival and refreshments 
Let’s get familiar led byJenny Macdonald 
12.00 Welcome to Tallaght | Civic reception and light lunch 
13.30 The Arts in Ireland , an overview by Martin Drury 
14.15 People and Places: 
Moderated by Sinead O’Reilly, Arts Council 
Panel: Dr Victoria Durrer, Kevin Murphy, Aine Crowley 
17.15 Róisín Whelan | Dance Artist performance

TUESDAY 15TH MAY – RUA RED, TALLAGHT 
9.15 Arrival and refreshments 
Young People and the Arts – Moderated by Martin Drury.
Panel: Rhona Dunnett, Rosaleen Molloy, Orla Scannell, Veronica Coburn 
12.45 Lunch and theatre performance by Freshly Ground 
13.30 Study visit to Firestation Artists’ Studios facilitated by Helen Carey

WEDNESDAY 16TH MAY – CIVIC THEATRE, TALLAGHT 
09.15 Arrival and refreshments 
Community and Collaborative Arts | models of practice in Europe
Moderated by Ailbe Murphy
Panel: Tony Fegan, Michael Barker Caven, Yoann Gauvry, Siobhan Geoghegan, Staf Pelckmans , Edmund Mhlongo, Carla Fazio

14.00 – 16.30 Connecting Policy and Practice 
Moderated by Avril Joffe and Martin Drury

THURSDAY 17TH MAY – RUA RED, TALLAGHT
09.15 Arrival and refreshments 
Inclusive Programming 
Moderated by Ann O’Connor
Guest Speakers: Dr. Tara Byrne, Padraig Naughton, Claire Meaney, Justine Foster 
13.45 Study visit to Common Ground facilitated by Siobhan Geoghegan

FRIDAY 18TH MAY 

10.00 – 12.00 What have we learned? A group reflection on the study visit with Jenny Macdonald
12.00 – 17.00 Delegates visit organisations / sites of individual interest.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Post a Comment

 

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

Name *
Email *
Website
Comment

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With today being the #DayOfFamilies and we want to say a big thank you to an incredibly important parent, Judy Fryd! 

In 1946, angered and frustrated by the lack of support available to her daughter, who had a learning disability – Judy wrote to a magazine, asking other parents in the same boat to contact her.

Thousands of parents replied, sharing their stories and frustrations, and offering help. From there, Mencap was born.

In honour of Judy, we have a online community for parents of children with a learning disability. Parents, like Judy, who are seeking support and contact with others like them. 

Read more here: http://bit.ly/2CubzY9

#ThanksJudy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"I’m lucky that my pharmacist knows me really well. She helped calm me down. She says things in a way I can understand. She called my dad so that he could go with me." 
Do you want to hear more about Rachel's experience? ? 
Listen to our podcast: http://bit.ly/2rBiH1R?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a few short weeks, an Irish-funded life-saving surgical mission will begin in Eastern Ukraine. This mission will save the lives of many children as it battles congenital heart conditions such as the infamous 'Chernobyl Heart'.

Last December baby Stanislava's life was saved by our surgeons and this week, we are offering more children a future of hope.

Your support will go a long way in rewriting these children's futures. Donate via the following link to give these innocent children the gift of life.
www.chernobyl-international.com/donate

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today marks the United Nations International Day of Families.

This year’s observance will explore the role of families and family policies in advancing Sustainable Development Goal 16 in terms of promoting peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development.

Today we recognise the loving families of our Community Care and Hospice Programme, which was developed when CCI identified needy families who were unable to look after their children at home. 

Despite many obstacles, these families advocate for their loved ones to be cared for in their family homes, ensuring dignity, love and inclusion within the community. 

CCI supports families with physically impaired children and delivers therapeutic and personal services in their homes. Local therapeutic professionals design support plans for each family and complete a needs assessment for each child. Daily and weekly therapeutic and nursing visits, monitoring and social supports make it possible for these high-risk families to stay together as a unit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations to our Mulkear Outreach Group Leader, Donal Ryan, on this thoroughly well deserved award.  

Donal has won the Limerick Person of the Month Award for his long-standing volunteer work with CCI, for the children and families most affected by Chernobyl.

We are so proud of you Donal, and thank you for all you continue to do! 

With thanks to the Limerick Leader for this article.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We welcome President Emmanuel Macron's announcement that France will host The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Replenishment Conference in 2019.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Skip to content
How learning to code is helping girls in Zimbabwe
610
TECHNOLOGY

How learning to code is helping girls in Zimbabwe

May 2 2018 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

By Ray Mwareya, co-founder of Women Taboos Radio

To girls in Zimbabwe who have worries like accessing nutritious food or sanitary health, learning to code might seem like a low priority. But that isn’t deterring 30-year-old Anoziva Marindire from seeking out girls ages 14 to 24 and teaching them computer programming skills.

“We`re creating an army of women computer coders who spark social change across Zimbabwe – and help tackle problems,” she says.

The former Africa Union Youth Ambassador is not frightened by the vast task ahead of her. She says her movement, Girls Speak Out (GSO), is an initiative that aims to develop coding skills among young women in Zimbabwe’s under-served communities so technology moves beyond iPhones and laptops to become tools of change.

z2-1024x683.jpg

 

“Zimbabwe has no single app that enables pregnant women access to antenatal data wirelessly, thus reducing clinic travel and money burden,” she says, providing an example of a technology that could change lives.

Anoziva is driven by the untapped potential of women and girls, which is why, in 2016, Anoziva and her friend Theresa Takafuma founded the Girls Speak Out as a follow-up to the Obama-era Young African Leaders Initiative’s (YALI) Africa4Her campaign.

By 2017, GSO’s community work had grown. “From a seed of just 25 girls in our pioneer class, we reached another 160 girls through the #Jumpstart Master-classes when we were invited to tour six cities in Zimbabwe teaching digital skills.”

This year, GSO has a new set of 30 girls coming from Mufakose, Mabvuku, and Dzivarasekwa — high-density, low-income suburbs in Zimbabwe’s capital of Harare.

“State schools in Zimbabwe´s townships are crippled, their budgets hollow,” Anoziva says. “Students increasingly graduate without basic computer know-how like Microsoft Word,” she says.

“Girls are hardest hit. With no tech literacy, girls can’t communicate effectively in a growing digital world. A majority of all jobs in Africa will soon require science, maths and technology skills.”

Girls-Speak-Out-Coders-at-Work-1.jpg

Anoziva thinks local family attitudes are lopsided, too. “In Zimbabwe’s households, girls clean dishes and watch over pots each evening following schools breaks. In contrast, boys throng internet cafes to hone their skills in video literacy, email practices, or keyboard mastery,” she says.

Her organisation has brutal statistics: In Mufakose, Dzivarasekwa and Mabvuku, GSO found that – out of every 10 girls aged 14 – 24, only one knew what coding was, and only four could use Microsoft Word.

In comparison, five in every 10 boys knew what coding was; two could even write code.

Anoziva believes that the Girls Speak Out project can provide direct employment results for these girls.

z3-1024x764.jpg

“Our coding girls from the 2017 class are now online content creators for publications in Zimbabwe focusing on community development,” she says. “In Victoria Falls, some of the girls we trained under Jumpstart ZWco-founded #LetsTalkVF, a platform that engages and connects community members and public officials on issues like education and public funds distribution.”

Some of the students have gone on to succeed in a country where jobs can be difficult to obtain.

“One graduate is now a news producer at a local video-production house,” Anoziva says. “One was snapped up by Plan International’s media department, another handles communications at a mining company, and one now works for the Zimbabwean parliament’s news section.”

Even with a lack of external non-profit finance, Girls Speak Out persists, driven by the will of its participants. Non-profit technology hubs that around Harare have helped out by donating physical space and computers for the GSO students to use.

Z1-1024x768.jpg

Recently, Girls Speak Out won the Shoko Festival UnHub Conference’s Women Rising Award, Zimbabwe’s award for projects or movements that amplify women’s rights using mobile technologies.

The award inspires Anoziva to keep encouraging local girls to make coding and computer literacy a priority, preparing them for the future and hopefully unlocking their potential.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/Zip code
Country         Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
May 2 2018

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
MAY 16, 2018

 

+ 0
 
 
EDUCATION

Why North Carolina Teachers Are Walking Out of Classrooms Today

“We have school districts deciding whether or not to pay the light bill or buy toilet paper.”

Citing low teacher pay, funding cuts for basic educational programs, and high health care costs, North Carolina teachers walked out of class this morning to call on their state to invest in public education. 

The statewide protest is expected to draw as many as 15,000 teachers — and will suspend the day’s classes for an estimated 1 million students, ABC News reports

“What do we want?” a group of educators, calling themselves May 16 Coalition, asked. “We want a legislature that provides the schools our students and communities deserve. We want a legislature that invests in public education instead of giving away billions of dollars in tax breaks to big corporations run by the rich and powerful.” 

Take Action: Call on USAID to Support Global Education

Take Action: Tweet Now

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 

The state’s teacher walkout comes on the heels of teacher protests and strikes across the country, including in West Virginia, where teachers were on strike for nearly two weeks before securing a 5% raise, as well as Oklahoma and Arizona. 

North Carolina is ranked No. 41 out of 50 states in spending per student, and No. 39 in teacher pay, according to statistics from the National Association of Educators (NEA)

Since 2008, spending on “formula funding” — state funding that ensures equity across different school districts — has decreased by nearly 8% per student, even as the state has halved its corporate income tax rate. 

Organizers also say the state has cut more than 7,000 teaching assistant positions in the past decade. 

Read More: 5 Ways You Can Say Thank You to Teachers

"We have not had a textbook adoption in 15 years. We have school districts deciding whether or not to pay the light bill or buy toilet paper,” Mark Jewell, president of the North Carolina Association of Educators, told ABC News. “This is not normal. This is not the North Carolina way."

In addition to higher spending per student and teacher salaries, North Carolina teachers are calling for more school counselors, social workers, and psychologists, in a state where more than 1 in 5 students live below the federal poverty line. 

Read More: This Is Why Oklahoma Teachers Are Ditching Their Classrooms Today

Taking into account these demands could make a big difference for students and teachers alike. Studies have shown that increasing teacher pay can reduce dropout rates, and that increasing per student spending can lead to a drop in adult poverty.  

“I just feel like there’s no equity across the board with public schools, which is really important to me because I want my kids to have the same opportunities that kids in other places have,” Mahra Whitelock, a first-grade teacher in North Carolina, told Teen Vogue. “I think they’re entitled to that.”  

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals for Sustainable Development, and access to quality education is goal number four. You can join us and take action here

+ 0
 
Participants make their way towards the Legislative Building during a teachers rally at the General Assembly in Raleigh, N.C., May 16, 2018. Thousands of teachers rallied the state capital seeking a political showdown over wages and funding for public school classrooms.
Gerry Broome/AP
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP
By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Policy.

What's Trending In Education

Jan. 24, 2018

And how you can take action to fund education. Read More

Aug. 3, 2016

Africa suffers from staggering shortages in education funding. Read More

May 17, 2017

“Education rehabilitated me.” Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2018 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
MAY 16, 2018

 

+ 0
 
 
GIRLS & WOMEN

How One Girl Scout Fought Against Child Marriage in New Hampshire and Won

New Hampshire voted to raise the minimum age of marriage from 13 to 16 — a big step forward.

cassandra-leveseque-girl-scout-child-marriage.png__1264x568_q85_crop_subsampling-2.png
 Courtesy of Cassandra Levesque

Girl Scout Cassandra Levesque was shocked to learn last year that, at age 17, she was not just above the minimum marriage age in her home state of New Hampshire, but well above it. That moment became the catalyst for her fight to raise the minimum age of marriage in the “Granite State” from 13 to 18.

Her efforts paid off on May 2, when the New Hampshire State Senate unanimously passed a bill to raise the minimum marriage age to 16, the Concord Monitor reported.

Until Gov. Chris Sununu signs the bill, girls as young as 13 and boys as young as 14 can be married with parental consent and a judge’s approval in the state. Gov. Sununu has expressed support for the bill and is expected to signit into law.

Take Action: Tell world leaders to stop child marriage for good

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 

“Virtually everyone agrees that the marriage of a 13-year-old child is unconscionable,” Gov. Sununu said after the New Hampshire House of Representatives passed the bill in March.

The bill itself was a result of Levesque’s campaigning efforts, which were the focus of her  capstone Girl Scout Gold Award project. And though the bill falls short of Levesque’s goal of raising the minimum age to 18, the college freshman considers the progressive step both a personal victory and a win for girls across New Hampshire.

“I was very proud of the fact that I changed something that has been going on for so long and nobody knew until I spoke up,” Levesque told the Concord Monitor

Over the course of her year-long campaign to change the law, the teen learned that both her grandmother and great-grandmother married before they turned 18, hoping to escape ongoing domestic abuse only to find themselves in abusive marriages.

Read more: Yes, Forced Child Marriages Happen in the US, Too

Legal loopholes allow children in the US to be married before their 18th birthdays in every state, except Delaware — which became the first state to ban child marriage by raising the minimum marriage age to 18 without exceptions just last week.

The nonprofit Unchained At Last estimates that nearly 250,000 children were married in the US between 2000 and 2010. And most of those in child marriages in the US are younger girls married to adult men.

While Delaware is the first state to pass a bill banning child marriage, it wasn’t the first to try. Similar bills have been considered Arizona, Florida, Tennessee, and New Jersey recently, but, as in New Hampshire, the bills did not succeed in setting the minimum marriage age at 18 without exception, though several did manage to increase the minimum age of marriage.

Read more: Delaware Is the First State Ever to Ban Child Marriage

Levesque is still hopeful that New Hampshire will follow Delaware’s lead.

"I would have liked to see it changed to 18 because that's when you're considered an adult," Levesque told Refinery29. "But 16 is a middle ground. It's a step further."

Global Citizen campaigns in support of gender equality and women’s rights. You can take action here to call on lawmakers to put an end to child marriage and protect women and girls everywhere.

+ 0
 
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP
By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Policy.

What's Trending In Girls & Women

May 14, 2018

"Equal pay and a place at the table are the central tenets of feminism." Read More

By Daniele Selby  and  Jana Sepehr

May 15, 2018

This isn't the first time Stewart has refused to wear heels on the red carpet. Read More

May 14, 2018

While 82 seems like a small crowd, the number has a huge significance. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2018 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
HEALTH

World Health Organization Wants to Eliminate Trans Fats in the Next 5 Years

Eliminating trans fats could save more than 500,000 lives per year.

 MAY 15, 2018

 

The World Health Organization (WHO) released a step-by-step guide Monday that could see industrially-produced trans fatty acids eliminated by 2023.

The guide, dubbed REPLACE, outlines actions to take to eliminate trans fats, including promoting healthier alternatives and implementing legislation against these harmful ingredients.

The WHO estimates that trans fats lead to more than 500,000 deaths from cardiovascular disease per year.

Take Action: Good, healthy food for Canada? Yes!

Take Action: Tweet Now

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 
In partnership with: Jamie Oliver Food Foundation

With healthier options and harsher regulations, though, trans fats could be removed from the food chain and help prevent heart disease.

"Why should our children have such an unsafe ingredient in their foods?" WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said in the statement .

Foods that contain industrially produced trans fats, like fried, baked, and snack foods, generally have a longer shelf life because of them.

Read More: 7 Bad Habits That Are Also Bad for the Environment

But experts say alternatives can be used with little change to taste or cost.

Many countries are already working toward eliminating the unhealthy fats. Denmark was the first country to enforce restrictions on industrially-produced trans fats, and a ban on trans fats will come into effect in Canada in September 2018.

Other countries, like the United States, are also working toward this goal.

Read More: Junk Food Ads to Be Banned on London’s Public Transport

The WHO is now looking for middle- and lower-income countries to commit, according to Dr. Francesco Branca, director of the WHO's Department of Nutrition for Health and Development.

"Trans fat is an unnecessary toxic chemical that kills, and there's no reason people around the world should continue to be exposed," Tom Frieden, president and chief executive officer of the health initiative Resolve to Save Lives, told Reuters.

Global Citizen campaigns on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals, including issues related to ensuring health for all. You can take action here.

+ 0
 
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP
By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Policy.

What's Trending In Health

May 11, 2018

Every child deserve a happy, healthy life, and every mother deserves to be there for it. Read More

May 15, 2018

Their vital message has reached millions of people. Read More

April 25, 2018

2018 has seen an increase in attacks on medical facilities. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2018 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
WATER & SANITATION

This Solar-Powered Device Turns Air Into Water

The device could offer a safe water solution for people living off the grid.

By Jasper Lo

 MAY 15, 2018

 

Pulling water out of thin air may sound like a magic trick, but for people across Australia, it could soon be a reality.

American company Zero Mass Water is launching trials of its SOURCE hydropanels, solar-powered devices that extract water from the air in several Australian cities, towns, and rural areas. The company hopes to create a drought-resistant source of drinkable water and reduce the use of plastic bottles with SOURCE hydropanels.

Take Action: #Gofor6 and Demand Access to Clean Water and Sanitation for All by 2030

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 
In partnership with: WaterAid

The hydropanels run on solar energy and use a fan to pull water vapor from the air in any environment. Zero Mass Water is actually headquartered in Scottsdale, Arizona, and its product was built in the desert, where it succeeded in drawing moisture from the air to produce water. Just two hydropanels can produce up to 10 liters (2.64 gallons) of clean drinking water a day.

Read More: 163,000,000 People In India Don't Have Clean Water. This Is Why.

If successful, the program could serve as an example of how to provide a dependable source of drinking water without existing infrastructure in other countries. SOURCE installation is simple and requires only two steps: mounting the panels and connection to a reservoir. This means that SOURCE could be easily adapted and used in developing areas the same way that cell phones have been used to connect remote communities.

Because the hydropanels are flexible, they can be used in both rural and urban areas, an important feature for areas suffering from water security. The device's self-powered pump moves the water to reservoirs, which can be placed anywhere, so it's an especially important feature in extreme climates.

The Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) announced $420,000 AUD ($313,920 USD) in funding for the deployment of 150 SOURCE systems across Australia on April 30, 2018. This trial is part of Australia’s Department of the Environment and Energy goal of focusing on both sustainable consumption and reducing water scarcity.

The pilot will be rolled out in airports, cafes, community centers, and commercial buildings across Australia.

Read More: Why You Should Probably Never Drink Bottled Water Again

The success of the program will be determined not only by its ability to provide an alternative source of safe water, but also by its effectiveness at reducing plastic bottles usage in the country.

Global Citizen campaigns in support of Sustainable Development Goal 6, to ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all. Take action here and demand access to clean water and sanitation for all by 2030.

+ 0
 
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP
By clicking Sign Up, you agree to our Terms and Privacy Policy.

What's Trending In Water & Sanitation

Aug. 24, 2016

In Afghanistan, only 13 percent of the population has access to clean water. Read More

Aug. 24, 2016

You can drink out of some, you can’t even touch others. Read More

Sept. 1, 2016

With severe droughts affecting over 36 countries could the solution lie in the ocean? Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2018 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...