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The Action Thread Part Two

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CITIZENSHIP

Ethiopia Allows Nearly 1 Million Refugees to Leave Camps and Work

Refugees can now register births, marriages and deaths, and have access to financial services.

By Nita Bhalla

NAIROBI, Jan. 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — Ethiopia passed a law on Thursday giving almost 1 million refugees the right to work and live outside of camps, in a move praised for providing them with more dignity and reducing reliance on foreign aid.

Home to Africa's second-largest refugee population after Uganda, Ethiopia hosts more than 900,000 people who have fled conflict, drought, and persecution in neighbouring countries such as South Sudan, Sudan, Somalia, and Eritrea.

The refugees — many of whom sought refuge decades ago and have children born in Ethiopia — are largely confined to one of about 20 camps across country. Most are not permitted to work.

Take Action: Step Up to Support Migrants and Refugees!

Actúa: Tuitea ahora

 
 
 
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En asociación con: CHIME FOR CHANGE

"We are happy to inform that the new refugee proclamation has been enacted by the House of Peoples' Representatives of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia," Ethiopia's Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA) said.

"It is strongly believed that the new law will enhance the lives of refugees and host communities," added the statement posted on ARRA's Facebook page.

With record numbers of people being forced to flee their homes, most of the world's 25 million refugees are hosted by developing countries in camps where funding shortages often leave them short of basics like food and education.

The new law is in line with Ethiopia's commitment toward the United Nations Global Compact on Refugees, adopted by world leaders in December to increase refugees' self-reliance and ease the pressure on host nations.

Read More: Half of All Child Refugees Aren't in School: Why This Is a Massive Problem

The law allows refugees to move out of the camps, attend regular schools, and to travel and work across the country. Refugees can formally register births, marriages, and deaths, and will have access financial services such as bank accounts.

The head of the Ethiopian Investment Commission Fitsum Arega said the new legislation was part of the country's "Jobs Compact" — a $500 million program that aims to create 100,000 jobs — 30% of which will be allocated to refugees.

"This helps refugees & supports #Ethiopia's industrialization," said Arega on Twitter.

Aid workers said Ethiopia served as an example in a world where, in some regions, the rights and freedoms of refugees and migrants are being eroded.

"As some Western countries have adopted xenophobic policies while turning away refugees, we are pleased that Ethiopia has passed this revised refugee law," said Stine Paus, country director for the Norwegian Refugee Council in Ethiopia.

Read More: These Are 5 Reasons Why People Become Refugees

It will allow more refugees to live in urban areas, secure limited work permits, give some access to farmland, and increase education enrolment for refugee children, she said.

"The law will help refugees feel included and that they can contribute to society," said Dana Hughes, spokeswoman for the United Nations refugee agency in East Africa.

"But we must remember that access to education and employment doesn't just benefit refugees, it also contributes to the economy and benefits local communities. Such legislation isn't just the right thing to do, it's the smart thing to do."

(Reporting by Nita Bhalla @nitabhalla. Editing by Katy Migiro. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, property rights and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org)

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Calling all young singers in Dun-Laoghaire-Rathdown! Music Generation dlr is starting a new A Capella Choir for 8-12 year olds which will run every second Tuesday, free of charge, in Blackrock Library. The choir will be directed by members of the wonderful Ardú vocal ensemble.

Starting tomorrow evening, Tuesday 22 January, at 6.45pm, contact Blackrock Library (blackrocklib@dlrcoco.ie / 01 2888117) or Music Generation dlr to secure a place.

 

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18/01/2019

Music Generation Mayo programme shortlisted for the 2019 All Ireland Community and Council Awards.

Music Generation Mayo programme shortlisted for the 2019 All Ireland Community and Council Awards.

The Music Generation Mayo 'Soundworlds Early Years Music Programme,’ facilitated in partnership with Mayo County Childcare Committee, has been shortlisted as a finalist in the 2019 All Ireland Community and Council Awards for Best Education/Training Initiative.

Established in 2013 the ‘Soundworlds Early Years Music Programme’ is a creative music making programme developed specifically for pre-school children. It aims to introduce younger children to music while building self-confidence and self-esteem and creating a direct pathway to music education. Musicians collaborate with Early Childhood Care and Education staff to create a rich learning environment, where children are encouraged to explore sound and music through a range of play activities and group work. Part of the Music Generation Mayo programme, ‘Soundworlds’ is delivered in partnership with Mayo County Childcare Committee who provide childcare services suitable to the individual needs of all children and the aspirations of parents.

The All Ireland Community and Council Awards presented by IPB Insurance and LAMA highlight and recognise communities and councils working together, bringing national recognition to projects and developments that may otherwise go unrecognised. Town, Borough, City and County Councillors across Ireland nominate projects across 20+ categories that demonstrate the work implemented through unique projects that enhance their local area for the good of the community.

The winners, representing their counties, will be announced at a Gala Awards Ceremony on 9 February 2019 in Croke Park Stadium.

For further information about this or other programmes and initiatives at Music Generation Mayo contact:

T: 094 90 41013
E: Info[at]musicgenerationmayo.ie
www.musicgenerationmayo.ie/

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How shops sign away the self-worth of disabled people

When a ‘chip and signature’ payment card is refused, the impact on a shopper’s dignity is huge
Anna Tims

Anna Tims

Sun 20 Jan 2019 08.00 GMT

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Chip and pin machines present challenges for some disabled people, but many stores seem ignorant of the alternatives.  Chip and pin machines present challenges for some disabled people, but many stores seem ignorant of the alternatives. Photograph: Alex Segre/Alamy

My mother was gleeful. We had identified a pair of designer trainers coveted by her grandson and she had resolved to buy them for his Christmas present. She braved the Saturday scrum in Footasylum, queued on painful legs for the till and wrestled the shoebox into her shopping bag. It was then she was told that her custom was not allowed.

Like many people with disabilities, my mother uses a “chip and signature” debit card because she is unable to manage a pin. The cards, issued by Visa and Mastercard, operate in the same way as chip and pin, except that when they are inserted into a card reader, a message informs the trader that a signature is required.

Banks issue them to customers who can’t memorise or can’t key in a personal security number. However, Footasylum staff informed her that it could not complete the transaction because the company did not accept signatures as a valid verification and the bill was more than the £30 contactless payment limit.

My mother was run over and seriously injured on her way home from work five years ago. Once a daily visitor to the high street, she can now only leave the house when there’s someone to take her and her rare shopping trips have become her chief pleasure.

Because brain damage from the accident means she can’t memorise a pin, she’s unable to use cash machines and therefore relies on her Visa card to pay for goods. And every so often she endures humiliation when store staff refuse to accept it.

At Topshop her attempt to treat her granddaughter to a jacket was thwarted when her card was declared invalid, and on a one-off trip to Asda she had to abandon her shopping, after it had been packed into bags, because the cashier and the store manager insisted that they could not accept a signature. Both stores declared it was company policy.

Head office in each case confirmed that it was not so, and that new guidance would be issued to staff. Footasylum, however, stood firm. Its refusal of chip and signature cards was a business decision for security reasons, customer services told me.

It is, in fact, illegal for traders who accept card payments to discriminate against these cards, according to the financial trade association UK Finance. “The 2010 Equality Act has reinforced the legal responsibility for all businesses to cater for customers with protected characteristics – and this includes accepting a chip and signature card,” it says.

“Every pin terminal is designed to accept them – simply put the card in and the retailer will be automatically prompted to ask for a signature. A card should never be rejected simply because it is chip and signature.”

 

Bestselling author Joanne Harris, who has a condition that forces her to use a chip and signature card, has also been turned away by stores.

 Bestselling author Joanne Harris, who has a condition that forces her to use a chip and signature card, has also been turned away by stores. Photograph: Murdo MacLeod for the Guardian

Except it often is. The bestselling author Joanne Harris relies on one of these cards and says that she is turned away by checkout staff every few weeks.

“I suffer from dyscalculia, the inability to process and remember numbers,” she says. “I’ve been told by JD Sports staff, and by its customer service, that it’s company policy to refuse the cards for security reasons, except in the case of international customers. My local Tesco has refused it on several occasions, despite a letter from head office telling them otherwise, and House of Fraser apologised fulsomely after it did the same before repeating the error. This behaviour, either as a result of poor training or because of an illegal policy, denies access to a disabled minority. It humiliates me in public and makes me feel like a criminal. But my main concern is for elderly people, who may be reluctant to state their rights, and may be more likely to believe the ‘store security policy’ myth.”

JD Sports, Tesco and House of Fraser all confirmed to the Observer that, contrary to what store staff claimed, they did accept chip and signature cards and would remind their staff of the fact.

The problem seems to be ignorance, rather than intolerance. Although the cards are widely used by those with disabilities, even national bodies we contacted appear to be unfamiliar with them. UK Finance, despite a page on its website about the legal requirement to accept them, initially referred me to the British Retail Consortium (BRC), which referred me back to UK Finance. The BRC admitted that it was not an issue it had come across before and said its payments policy adviser would investigate and it might issue guidance to its members in the future.

Footasylum, which is not a member of the BRC, tells me that it was unaware of a legal requirement to accept the cards. “We acknowledge your concerns and we are going to raise it to the highest level we can from a retail standpoint,” was the initial response from customer service. “We do not want to be in breach of any laws and we will do our best to correct any mistake or process currently in place.”

After the issue was highlighted by the Observer the company added: “We are grateful to have had this incident brought to our attention because, while we have the technology in our stores to allow chip and signature payment, it is clear that this is not widely understood among our colleagues. This is in part because requests to pay by chip and signature are infrequent.

“However, we are now rolling out a training programme across all of our stores and customer experience teams to help ensure that colleagues are fully aware of this method of payment and can comply with any future requests of this kind.”

Although it’s an invisible problem to the majority of shops and shoppers, the impact on those affected is huge. The accident which deprived my mother of her career and her mobility means that she can no longer care for her disabled husband, cook a meal or babysit for her grandchildren.

Treating those who now care for her to small gifts is the one way she feels she can contribute, and is therefore essential to her sense of self-worth. Each time her card is refused, it’s a reminder of the independence she has lost and the powerlessness of disability.

“Disabled people must be treated like everyone else and not like second-class citizens,” says Rebecca Hilsenrath, chief executive at the Equality and Human Rights Commission. “Under the Equality Act businesses must make reasonable adjustments so that disabled people aren’t unfairly disadvantaged, and sensible, modern businesses should value their custom.”

Excluded from the high street

People with disabilities are likely to be disproportionately affected by financial exclusion, despite a legal requirement for companies to make “reasonable adjustment” to accommodate them, and pin codes and security questions are a particular problem, according to a parliamentary select committee report published in 2017.

Customers with visual impairment struggle to acquire pin codes in braille and the report found cases where banks insisted on telephoning deaf customers and were unable to offer another form of contact.

Bank and ATM closures are causing further isolation, since only 64% have access to the internet compared with 89% of the population as a whole, meaning that online banking services are beyond the reach of more than a third.

The charity Mencap has called for banks to offer essential information such as charges and terms and conditions in more accessible formats to cater for a variety of needs.

The Financial Conduct Authority agrees that vulnerable customers are being “let down” and is this year consulting on guidance for firms. “We have challenged the industry on its treatment of vulnerable consumers and sought to stimulate debate on wider access issues,” it says.

“We continue to encourage firms to consider the challenges faced by consumers in a changing world, particularly those in vulnerable circumstances, and take steps to mitigate potential risks or harm.”

 
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GIRLS AND WOMEN

These women’s rights activists inspire us to fight for equality

February 9 2017 | By: SAMANTHA URBAN

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Right now, our newsfeeds are packed with incredible stories of women taking action. To honor the persistence and drive of those women, we’re taking a look at some truly influential women’s rights activists:

Suffragists around the world

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A 1915 photograph of large crowd of suffragists on Capitol steps, some with banners, one with American flag, some in academic gowns, overseen by two uniformed policemen. (Photo credit: Public domain/Wikimedia Commons)

Suffrage has been a worldwide movement with countless determined activists organizing for the right to vote in their respective countries. (See the timeline of women’s suffrage here.)For example, activists like Millicent Fawcett and Emmeline Pankhurst in the United Kingdom and Alice Paul and Lucy Burns in the United States organized marches and demonstrations in order to fight for the right of women to vote in their respective countries.

Lillian Ngoyi (1911 – 1980)

lillian_blog-1024x644.png

This anti-apartheid activist in South Africa organized marches for women’s rights, including one with 20,000 women to the Union Buildings of Pretoria in protest against the apartheid government requiring women to carry passbooks. A President of the Women’s League, she went on to be the first woman elected to the executive committee of the African National Congress, and helped launch the Federation of South African Women.

Elizabeth “Betita” Martinez (1925 – )

Elizabeth_S_Marti%CC%81nez.png

(Photo credit: Jerome Rainey/Wikimedia Commons)

The first Latina student to graduate from Swarthmore College, Elizabeth worked as a researcher in the United Nations Secretariat in the 1950s, and as a coordinator for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee during the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. (She was one of only two Latina women who worked for the SNCC.) Since moving to California in 1976, Martínez has organized around Latino community issues, taught Women’s Studies, conducted anti-racist training workshops, and worked with youth groups — she even ran for governor in 1982.

Manasi Pradhan (1962 – )

Manasi_Pradhan_with_Dr._Nirmala_Deshpand

Women’s rights activist Manasi Pradhan with social activist Padma Vibhushan. (Photo credit: Sravanimohanty/Wikimedia Commons)

Known as one of the pioneers of the 21st century global feminist movement, Manasi founded two major organizations: OYSS Women, which aimed to help female students achieve higher education and develop them as future leaders in the society, and the Honour for Women National Campaign, a nationwide movement to end violence against women in India.

Malala Yousafsai (1997 – )

Malala_Yousafzai-1024x683.jpg

As part of WOW 2014, Malala Yousafzai talked about the systemic nature of gender inequality and bringing about change. (Photo credit: Southbank Centre/Wikimedia Commons)

This inspirational Pakistani woman was attacked by the Taliban because she was a vocal advocate for girls’ education. Today, she continues to campaign for women’s rights and is the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate.

ONE members (2004 – )

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While the above list of women show the power that just one person has to make a huge difference, our members remind us of the power we have in numbers, as well. For more than 10 years, our members have been campaigning and organizing to fight poverty and preventable disease. Together, they have stood together and told world leaders that poverty is sexist. This year, they’ll keep fighting for the rights of girls around the world to get the education they deserve. Join them today.

Did we leave out your favorite activist? Tell us about them in the comments!

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HEALTH

Ebola Cases Expected to Double in DRC's Second-Deadliest Outbreak Ever

As of Jan. 20, there had been 689 confirmed or probable cases of Ebola.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Ebola is a devastating disease and an international effort is essential to containing it and minimizing deaths. The UN calls for a unified, global effort to achieve its Global Goals, including the goal to achieve universal good health and well-being. You can join us by taking action in support of this goal here.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo’s current Ebola outbreak could soon spread to neighboring countries Uganda, Rwanda, and South Sudan — and the number of cases is expected to double, the Guardian reported.

The World Health Organization (WHO) issued a statement last week advising that the virus could soon spread. This warning comes after efforts to contain the current outbreak have proven to be difficult.

Less than a month after an Ebola outbreak was declared in the DRC, a case was confirmed in North Kivu Province, in Oicha, an eastern town that is surrounded by the Allied Democratic Forces, an armed insurgent militia.

Take Action: Stand With Every Woman, Every Child: Ask World Leaders to End Preventable Deaths

Actúa: Sign Petition

 
 
 
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The case in Oicha was the first to be confirmed in such a dangerous region of the country — which presented great challenges to health workers attempting to contain the outbreak — but it was far from the last, as violence erupted in Beni.

Since then, the cases have increased and there have been attacks on aid organizations and health workers.

In December, the presidential elections in the DRC were postponed reportedly due to insecurity and the Ebola outbreak, but critics argued it was an attempt by president Joseph Kabila to remain in power. This led to violence and protests, and hindered health efforts even more.

 

My colleagues in #DRC are working day & night to support the government to end the #Ebola outbreak. The response is just one example of the incredible work that @WHO staff are doing every day all over the 🌍 to promote health, keep the world safe, & serve the vulnerable. #EB144

 
 
 
 

Virus tracing efforts were delayed and about 30 health centers were targeted by protesters, further delaying efforts to contain the disease, according to the Guardian.

The number of cases is increasing according to Jean-Philippe Marcoux, Mercy Corps’ country director for DRC.

“Now it’s doubling — it’s very possible that it can double again,” Marcoux told the Guardian. “If we don’t significantly increase the resources, it will keep increasing. It will spread progressively to other health areas and it will be there for a long time.”

Related StoriesJan. 11, 2019This Ebola Survivor Delivered a Healthy Baby During One of the Worst Outbreaks in History

There have been 689 confirmed or probable cases of Ebola since August, and 422 deaths as of Jan. 20, according to the WHO.

About half of the cases were transmitted within health centers, but there is concern around the fact that source of transmission is unclear for other cases, which could mean an increase in unsafe burial practices.

Marcoux said that more needs to be done to keep Ebola from spreading, and that he expects the current outbreak to last another nine to 12 months, the Guardian reported.

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CULTURE

Why documentaries have the power to change the world

20 December 2016 5:32PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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In today’s “post-truth” world, educating ourselves about important issues and finding varied and reliable information sources is as critical as ever. Recent events across the globe coupled with how we obtain, share, and replicate news of these events demands we step up and seek out quality sources of information about our world and what is happening in it.  

film

Documentaries have the power to educate.

Documentary films are an in-depth and informative resource which are a perfect platform to create dialogue. They serve as powerful tools that bring important topics to the table in a captivating way that also sparks conversation, and sometimes even social movements. Character-driven, feature-length documentaries focused on the stories of real people put a human face on global issues that might otherwise seem distant or unrelatable. Hearing and seeing these real experiences through the dedicated work of documentary filmmakers helps us put ourselves in the shoes of others, building bridges of empathy in a world that desperately needs our engagement and compassion.

Not only do documentaries provide an opportunity to understand and connect with the world, they are also a great way to gather together with friends to watch and engage around the important issues of our times. Watching more documentaries is important, but talking about them together in person is equally important. With social media channels at our fingertips 24/7, we often miss out on face-to-face conversations, yet these conversations are needed. They remind us of the real people on the opposite side of an issue, the complexity and nuances of the different conditions in which we live, and the importance of honest and earnest discussions.

“Watching Sepideh with my daughter and a few of her friends started a conversation about being ‘girls,’ and if being a girl means some jobs or studies are not right for you. Hearing these young girls discuss their feelings about studying whatever they wanted instead of what someone says they should made the film even more special to me.”  

—Alexandra, London

film2

A ONE Campaign film screening event in the US.

A great way to delve into the potential of documentary film is to host a film club. Film clubs put the great resource of documentary film together with real-time conversations. Think of it as the quick version of a book club, a chance to learn about, engage with, and take action on issues with others, that also allows you to pool your resources, knowledge, and energy toward making the world a better place. Coming together to watch and discuss a documentary is an efficient way for a group of busy people to start conversations about meaningful and timely content.

“If I hadn’t watched Bully with my film club, I would never have known how many of my close friends had been the victim of bullying when they were young. The open conversation after the film really opened my eyes to the severity and widespread problem of bullying.”

—Sam, Stockholm

It’s simple. First, pick a documentary. Influence Film Club can help you with its documentary recommendations, free film club resources, and discussion guides online at www.influencefilmclub.com. Then invite others to join you—the young, the old, the engaged, the disconnected, the believers, and the skeptics—because the world needs us all in conversations about things that matter and that elevate our humanity.

Connect to the global community through documentaries, and remember that now is the time to engage in making a difference in our collective future.


Influence Film Club is a non-profit organisation with an online platform that seeks to engage new and diverse audiences around documentary film. Find resources and documentary recommendations to watch alone or with your film club at Influence Film Club.

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EDUCACIÓN

ONU: 1 de cada 3 niños ya han sido acosados en la escuela este mes

El ciberacoso también está en aumento.

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
La mitad de los adolescentes del mundo experimentan violencia entre pares en y en las escuelas. La ONU publicó un nuevo informe como parte de su campaña "Seguro para aprender" para alentar al mundo a avanzar y hacer que las escuelas sean más seguras. Puedes unirte a nosotros y tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí.

Un número creciente de estudiantes en todo el mundo no está obteniendo la experiencia educativa completa que merecen porque están siendo acosados, según un nuevo informe.

 

Después de analizar detenidamente la prevalencia del acoso escolar, la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Educación, la Ciencia y la Cultura (UNESCO) está llamando la atención sobre la necesidad de promover entornos de aprendizaje "seguros e inclusivos", informa UN News.

 

La UNESCO lanzó el martes “Detrás de los números: terminar con la violencia y el acoso escolar” en el Foro Mundial de la Educación en Londres.

 

Las estadísticas son alarmantes. Según la UNESCO, uno de cada tres niños ha sido acosado al menos una vez en la escuela durante el último mes. Cerca de la misma cantidad han sufrido violencia física.

 

"Todos los niños y jóvenes tienen derecho a entornos de aprendizaje seguros, inclusivos y efectivos", dijo Stefania Giannini, directora general de educación de la UNESCO, en el foro.

 

En la actualidad, la mayoría de los niños que son víctimas de acoso en todo el mundo son atacados físicamente y otros niños varones tienden a ser los autores, según el informe. Las niñas tienen más probabilidades de usar el abuso psicológico, que es la forma más común de acoso escolar en América del Norte y Europa, y el acoso sexual no está muy lejos.

 

El estudio encontró que el bullying online es un problema creciente. Unicef publicó un estudio en 2017, indicando que el 70% de los niños en Malasia han sido acosados en línea y que una cuarta parte ha sido acosada. En países en desarrollo como Malasia, recibir una buena educación es clave para escapar de la pobreza, lo que coloca a los niños que son acosados en una desventaja importante.

 

La investigación de la UNESCO muestra que los acosadores tienen más probabilidades de dirigirse a estudiantes que se perciben como diferentes, con la apariencia física como la razón principal. Los estudiantes de una raza, color de piel o nacionalidad diferente son los segundos más vulnerables.

 

New @UNESCO publication reveals the latest and most comprehensive evidence on school violence and bullying.

Check out the new report released today at the #EducationWorldForum https://on.unesco.org/2HpU1Dx  #ENDviolence #EWF2019

 
 
 
 

 

El acoso escolar puede obstaculizar severamente la carrera académica de un niño. Los niños que son acosados regularmente tienen casi tres veces más probabilidades de sentirse rechazados y más del doble de probabilidades de faltar a la escuela.

 

También es menos probable que vayan a la universidad, según informó UN News.

 

A pesar de los números, la UNESCO sigue siendo optimista. Giannini dijo que la mitad de los países que recibieron información sobre violencia escolar e intimidación han hecho un esfuerzo por cultivar entornos de aprendizaje más seguros.

 

En el informe la UNESCO incluye consejos para reducir la violencia escolar y reducir la intimidación. Estas recomendaciones incluyen la implementación de apoyo para maestros y estudiantes afectados, creando sistemas de informes y monitoreo, y alentando la participación de los estudiantes en la clase.

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JAN. 24, 2019

 

 
 
FOOD & HUNGER

Closing the Loop on Food Production Could Generate Trillions of Dollars

Redesigning the food industry into a "circular economy" would reduce health costs.

By Thin Lei Win

ROME, Jan. 24 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — The pesticide exposure, antibiotic resistance, air and water pollution and other factors caused by industrial food production could kill 5 million people a year by 2050, a new report said.

That is four times the number of deaths caused by traffic accidents globally.

Take Action: Are you a Global Food Citizen?

Actúa: Take the Quiz

 
 

 



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Preventing that from happening requires producing food locally, using eco-friendly methods, eliminating waste and designing and marketing healthier products, said a foundation set up by record-breaking British sailor Ellen MacArthur.

Redesigning the food industry into a so-called "circular economy" model would reduce health costs, save land and water and create new business opportunities, said the report, launched Thursday at the World Economic Forum.

Cities could be important catalysts in this change as 80% of all food is expected to consumed in cities by 2050, it said.

Under the current linear system, food enters cities where it is processed or consumed and only a small portion of the resulting organic waste, in the form of discarded food, byproducts or sewage, gets used again.

In a circular economy, raw materials and byproducts are reused and very little is wasted.

Cities would need to source food produced locally in ways that regenerate the ecosystem, distribute the surplus to those who cannot afford it, and turn byproducts into new products from fertilizer to feed to materials for bioenergy.

The benefits "could be worth $2.7 trillion a year to the global economy", according to the report.

In contrast, the "extractive, wasteful, and polluting nature" of current food production costs society $5.7 trillion a year globally, through costs to human and environmental health, the report said.

"What you eat matters, but how it has been produced matters as well. You could very well be eating healthy, but still be exposed to the negative impacts because of the way food is produced," said Clementine Schouteden, the report's lead author.

Read More: The EU Just Took a Major Step Toward Cutting Food Waste in Half by 2030

"We are at an absolutely critical point," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation from Davos.

Scientists are increasingly calling for systemic changes to the way food is being produced and consumed, saying industrial farming has led to a food system that contributes to climate change, cripples the environment and causes a malnutrition crisis.

Agriculture, forestry and other land uses are responsible for a quarter of the greenhouse gas emissions heating up the planet, according to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

Meanwhile, one third of all food produced, worth nearly $1 trillion, is wasted globally every year, FAO figures show, even as 821 million people go hungry and one in eight adults are obese.

Last week, scientists unveiled for the first time what they say is an ideal diet for the health of the planet and its people, recommending a doubling of consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables and legumes, and a halving of meat and sugar intake.

(Reporting By Thin Lei Win @thinink, Editing by Jason Fields)

(Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, climate change, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, and property rights. Visit www.trust.org)

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La imagen puede contener: 6 personas, personas sonriendo

 

This week Bono is at the annual World Economic Forum in Davos to call on world leaders and the private sector to step up the fight against AIDS withThe Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria - the organization where all (RED) money goes. The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria recently announced its fundraising target - 14 billion for the next three years to help save 16 million lives. The private sector, aka companies, are crucial to helping us reach this target.

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84
EDUCATION

International Day of Education: Time to step it up!

24 January 2019 10:39AM UTC | By: NATASHA SOMJI AND CARMEN BELAFI

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Education is one of the most powerful weapons we have in the fight against extreme poverty. When a child is equipped with the knowledge and skills that quality education can deliver, whole communities and societies benefit.

On 24 January, the world celebrates the first ever International Day of Education. It could not come at a better time to highlight the urgency of getting more children into school and learning. We are still not seeing the progress needed to provide 12 years of quality education to every child in the world. We need to reverse this trend. Time to step it up! And it’s time to make sure all children have the opportunities in life that a good education provides.

Why education?

Education is not just a right in itself, it’s also an important catalyst: for peace, for health, for prosperity, for gender equity. If everybody completed secondary education, we could lift over 420 million people out of poverty. And if every girl in Sub-Saharan Africa completed primary school, maternal mortality could fall by 70%. In short: Quality education for all is the world’s best antidote to poverty and instability.

What are the challenges?

The good news first. Since the turn of the century, we have come a long way getting children into school. UNESCO estimates that while there were over 375 million children and youth out of school in 2000, today this has reduced to 262 million.

Now, the bad news. We’re not making nearly enough progress, and the number of children accessing education has stagnated. In fact, 1 in 5 children and youth did not go to school last year – the numbers go up to 1 in 3 in Sub-Saharan Africa.

And that isn’t all. More than 600 million children and adolescents worldwide are not even learning basic skills – and two-thirds of them are in school! The World Bank shows that in some African countries, such as Zambia and Malawi, more than 85% of primary school students are unable to read proficiently.

As the numbers show, poor access to education, and education that is failing to deliver even basic levels of learning disproportionately affects children living in the world’s poorest countries. This is a global learning crisis testament to the biggest issue: investment and interventions in education too often fail to target learning.

How can we step it up?

There is no silver bullet – no “one size fits all” strategy to remedy this crisis. But there are three lessons that are holding true for reforms across the globe:

  • Focus on early grade learning: The early years are decisive for a child’s learning trajectory. If they fall behind by age 10, it is almost impossible to get back on track later in life. Children need to learn basic academic skills like literacy and numeracy, but also 21st-century skills such as creativity or problem-solving, that are becoming more and more important in a globalized and technologically advanced economy.
  • Better financing: Simply spending more money on education does not automatically improve children’s learning. Countries and donors need to be better at tracking how much they spend on education, what they spend it on, and most importantly, whether children’s learning is improving. Being open and transparent about how money is spent, is crucial. Financing must lead to results.
  • Better data systems: World leaders have committed to ending extreme poverty by 2030 by agreeing on 17 Sustainable Development Goals. One of these Goals is to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all. Yet, just 23% of countries are currently reporting against measurement indicators to achieve this goal. Without better information about the exact size and shape of the education crisis, the world’s efforts to address it will not be as effective as it could be.

This #EducationDay is a great reminder of what has been achieved so far, and the challenges still to come. We don’t have time to waste – children need to be on track to learning. Let’s get to it.

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33
GIRLS AND WOMEN

How this growing business is helping women thrive

January 25 2019 | By: PATIENCE MURUNGI

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All photos are credited to the Kula Project.

My name is Patience Murungi, and I am the leader of Kula’s mentorship program in Rwanda’s Northern Province. The Kula Fellowship is 15-month program where women receive industry training, learn life and leadership skills, and have the opportunity for business investment. The majority of our fellows are coffee growers or artisans. As a Kula mentor, I operate from the field, providing life skills training, support, and guidance to our fellows.

Patience-at-a-celebration-1024x683.jpg

One of my fellows is a woman named Florida. She is an entrepreneur learning how to build her business and take better care of her coffee trees. The skills she’s learning are helping her increase productivity and improve the quality of her coffee.

Florida is a single mother who is providing for herself and her six children through her business. For her, a thriving coffee business means she can fulfill her dream of sending her children to school. She hopes to eventually watch each one of them graduate from college. Investing in women like Florida is important because when you empower a woman, you empower an entire country.

The Impact of Empowerment

Rwanda is an unfolding female empowerment success story. 61% of the Rwandan Parliament is female, making it the highest ranked country for representation of women in the world. Young girls are able to receive an education and fill roles dominated by men, like science and technology.

Coffee-cherries-1024x683.jpg

I believe that empowering women is the key to economic and social transformation and stability. Rwanda is proof of that.

Even though Rwanda leads Africa in every development statistic, there is still a lot of work ahead. We, at Kula, believe it is not charity that will continue to build our country, but our businesses. It will be thanks to the women and men who start coffee businesses, weaving and tailoring cooperatives, open their own stores, and start taxi services.

I have the honor of strengthening that impact through mentorship. That’s what makes Kula’s work different. We focus on relationships, loving and caring for every single one of our fellows through one-on-one mentorship. Kula develops entrepreneurs, empowering women like Florida to invest in the next generation.

Leading with Community

Kula was founded on community-led development, listening to the people and communities we work to uplift. We’ve built on that foundation through the launch of Kula Coffee. The majority of our fellows are coffee growers, and we kept hearing about the need for direct access to the international market. Late last year, we were finally able to make that happen and sell our fellows’ coffee for the first time. The women are so excited to finally see the coffee from their farm in a Kula Coffee bag.

Kula-coffee-1024x683.jpg

Eradicating poverty seems like an unattainable goal. But through the development of female entrepreneurs, we are all committed to the work at hand.

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25 DE ENERO DE 2019

 

3
 
EDUCACIÓN

Estudiantes de todo el mundo se declaran en huelga por el cambio climático

Están dejando de asistir a clases y piden pasar a la acción.

El sistema educativo vive una revolución que crece semana a semana. Jóvenes de todo el mundo y, en especial, en Europa han dejado de asistir a clases al menos una vez a la semana.

Los escolares se declararon en huelga con un objetivo claro: le piden a los líderes mundiales tomar acción inmediata y resolver la crisis del cambio climático y el calentamiento global.

 


Las protestas a las que cada semana se suman más estudiantes ya ocurrieron en Canadá, Irlanda, Alemania, Bélgica, Reino Unido, Austria, Australia y Japón. Se reportaron protestas también en Uganda y una joven estudiante anunció una protesta masiva el próximo 15 de marzo en New York. Esta semana en Bruselas, por ejemplo, más de 32,000 niños y jóvenes estudiantes marcharon por las calles e informaron que lo harán todos los jueves hasta lograr la implementación de las protecciones climáticas necesarias.


“Climate now, homework later” (el clima ahora, la tarea después), “Climate is changing, why not we” (el clima está cambiando, por qué nosotros no), “Try holding your breath while you count your money” (intenta contener tu respiración mientras cuentas tu dinero), son algunos de los carteles que pueden leerse en las protestas semanales según publicó AP.


Esta semana, solo en Berlín, Alemania, más de 35,000 estudiantes también dejaron de asistir a la escuela y se manifestaron en las calles para pedir un cambio urgente y la implementación de políticas que busquen resolver la crisis climática de inmediato.

 

 

Progressive #peoplepower kicking off all over Europe this week! 🌍

Yesterday: 14,000 Belgian schoolchildren go on strike & march through Brussels for climate action

Tomorrow: tens of thousands take to the streets of Berlin for local, sustainable agriculture#Wirhabenessatt

 
 
 
 
Eaz5HXDM_normal.jpg

Miles de niños se manifiestan Berlín contra el carbón y el cambio climático #FridaysForFuture

 
Video insertado
 

-3 grados en Berlín y los escolares siguen su marcha por el clima tras pasar por la cancillería #FridaysForFuture pic.twitter.com/DoTQBSiFeD

 
Video insertado
 
 
 
 

 

Algunos estudiantes le dijeron a la BBC que “no hay ninguna lógica en asistir a la escuela si nuestro mundo va a morir” y que entienden que en muchos casos “asisten a las protestas sin permisos y se exponen a ser sancionados por no asistir a clases, pero que vale la pena”.

“Se trata de nuestro futuro. Necesitamos que hagan algo al respecto y que lo hagan ahora”, dicen. “Las soluciones están, pero necesitamos que pasen a la acción ahora mismo. El clima es mucho más importante que ocho horas de escuela a la semana”, afirman.

Algunos padres y maestros, incluso, han decidido acompañar a los estudiantes en las marchas. Las protestas han cobrado tanta notoriedad que hasta el famoso artista y activista Ai Wei Wei se ha unido en Berlín. “Estoy realmente asustado por el futuro de todos”, afirmó.

 
Video insertado
 

"I am really scared about everybody’s future."
As part of #fridaysforfuture, Chinese artist and human rights activist Ai Wei Wei (@aiww) is protesting along with thousands of German students for more climate protection.

 
 
 
 


Muchos estudiantes se sienten inspirados y siguen el modelo de Greta Thunberg una joven estudiante sueca de 15 años que comenzó una huelga escolar el año pasado y se convirtió en una de las principales referentes en la lucha contra el cambio climático.

Thunberg cobró tanta notoriedad que se presentó recientemente en la Conferencia de las Naciones Unidas por el clima. Allí dijo en su discurso que “nunca somos demasiado pequeños para impulsar un cambio. Y si los niños de todo el mundo logran cambiar algo dejando de ir a la escuela, imaginen lo que podríamos lograr si todos hicieramos algo”.

 


“No quiero tu esperanza. Quiero que sientas pánico, como si la casa se estuviese incendiando porque lo está”, dijo Thunberg recientemente en su presentación en el foro de DAVOS.

“Nuestra civilización está siendo sacrificada para que unos pocos tengan la oportunidad de seguir haciendo grandes cantidades de dinero. No les rogamos a los líderes que se preocupen. Nos han ignorado en el pasado y lo siguen haciendo. Se quedaron sin excusas y nos estamos quedando sin tiempo. Hemos venido para decirles que el cambio está llegando, les guste o no. El poder real pertenece al pueblo”, dijo la líder de este movimiento en un discurso que ya se ha vuelto viral.

 

 
Video insertado
 

“Our house is on fire.”
A part of my speech at the World Economic Forum today. Thank you for inviting me! #wef

 
 
 
 



“Mucha gente cree que somos jóvenes y que no sabemos de lo que hablamos, pero nosotros realmente podemos impulsar un cambio”, dicen mientras tanto los estudiantes en las calles en las que, semana a semana, seguirán movilizándose bajo los lemas #ClimateStrike y #FridaysForFuture

Global Citizen realiza campañas para alcanzar los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible. Puedes unirte y pasar a la acción aquí.

 

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70
CULTURE

Everything you need to know about Afrobeats

December 5 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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From Lagos to London to Los Angeles, a new style is taking dance clubs and music charts by storm. Chances are, you’re already familiar with the sound, even if you haven’t heard the name.

Afrobeats, a music genre from Nigeria, is shaking up the global music industry. Growing since the early 90s, the genre really took off in the international music scene with Drake’s 2016 hit “One Dance,” featuring Nigerian artist Wizkid. Other US artists, including Ciara and Major Lazer, have incorporated Afrobeats sounds and featured African artists in their music.

The success of Afrobeats continues to grow and it looks like the style is here to stay. So we’ve put together a guide of everything you need to know.

The Sound

Afrobeats gets its distinct sound from a couple of different influences. The style is anchored in West African music styles, particularly highlife music. American jazz and funk are also added to the mix, creating a hybrid sound from across continents.

You’ll know when you’re listening to Afrobeats from complex rhythms, heavy percussion, repeating vocals, and Pidgin English. It’s no wonder this music is taking-off internationally — the upbeat, fun, and energetic melodies get people dancing in clubs around the world.

“This is music that has come a long and joyous way in a very short time,” says Nigerian-American author Teju Cole. “Dance to it—note its persistent tone of joy—then come back and listen to it.”

Don’t confuse Afrobeats with Afrobeat, the style pioneered by Fela Kuti. Afrobeat is a highly political, non-commercial music style, making it really different from Afrobeats!

The Artists

There are plenty of artists creating hip-shaking hits, so it’d be hard to list every artist out there. If you’re just getting into Afrobeats, there are a few acclaimed artists to start with, and plenty more to discover from there!

Wizkid became internationally known with “One Dance,” but his success as an artist goes far beyond that hit. His 2011 debut album Superstar earned him immediate recognition, with several singles coming from that album. His rise in popularity was clear in 2014 when he became the first Nigerian musician to get over a million followers on Twitter. To date, he is one of the most recognizable Afrobeats artists, earning him the nickname “Star Boy.”

Tiwa Savage is one of Nigeria’s leading female Afrobeats singers. As a female singer, she struggled to gain popularity in the male-dominated music scene. Despite the obstacles she faces, she’s become one of the most prominent Afrobeats artists today. She even won Best African Act at the 2018 MTV Europe Music Awards!

Davido quickly rose to popularity in 2011 with his debut album Omo Baba Owolo, continuing his success with his second album, The Baddest. He won Best International Act at the BET Awards in both 2018 and 2014, and was the first African artist to receive his award in person on the BET stage.

Other popular artists include Burna Boy, Mr. Eazi, Tekno, and 2baba. You can find all of these artists and more on Quartz’s Afrobeats playlist on Spotify.

Combating Piracy

Despite growing popularity, many artists struggle to achieve financial success from their music. Piracy — selling illegal copies of an artist’s work — is one of the biggest challenges African artists face. Piracy makes it incredibly difficult, if not impossible, to make money from selling their music.

Many artists rely on live performances, endorsements, and digital streaming to make money. Some artists are also profiting from ringback tones — for a small monthly fee, you can pick a song for someone to listen to while they call you, instead of hearing a traditional ring. With streaming services widely unavailable, ringback tones have generated over US$100 million in Nigeria’s music market.

The Future of Afrobeats

Recently, Sony Music and Universal Music Group opened offices in Lagos, hoping to sign local artists and further their success. These labels are also tackling piracy, which will secure better legal ownership and rights over music.

Afrobeats artists paved their own way to international success. Now that major music labels have taken notice, these artists have nowhere to go but up.

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HEALTH

Here are the female bikers that ride to save lives in Nigeria

18 May 2018 4:10PM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

 
  

This story was originally reported by Adaobi Tricia Nwaubani and edited by Claire Cozens for the Thomson Reuters Foundation

Whenever the all-female Nigerian biker group D’Angels hit the streets, people would stare in amazement at the sight of women on motorbikes. So they made up their minds to use the attention for a good cause.

Enter the Female Bikers Initiative (FBI), which has already provided free breast and cervical cancer screening to 500 women in Nigeria’s commercial capital Lagos.

589_378442295564809_1100924018_n.jpgThis August, D’Angels and another female biker group in Lagos, Amazon Motorcycle Club, plan to provide free screening to 5,000 women – a significant undertaking in a country where many lack access to proper healthcare.

“What touched us most was the women,” D’Angels co-founder Nnenna Samuila, 39, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation by phone from Lagos.

“Some asked if the bikes really belonged to us. Some asked if they could sit on our bikes. We decided to use the opportunity to do something to touch women’s lives.”

Breast and cervical cancer are huge killers in Nigeria, accounting for half the 100,000 cancer deaths each year, according to the World Health Organization.

12309763_922499704492396_655342331158519Screening and early detection can dramatically reduce the mortality rate for cervical cancer in particular.

But oncologist Omolola Salako, whose Lagos charity partnered with the FBI last year, says there is not enough awareness of the need for screening.

“Among the 600-plus women we have screened since October, about 60 percent were being screened for the first time,” said Dr. Salako, executive director of Sebeccly Cancer Care. “It was the first time they were hearing about it.”

Even if women do know they should be screened, affordability is a barrier, said Salako, whose charity provides the service for free and also raises funds to treat cancer patients.

RAISING AWARENESS

This year the bikers will put on a week of awareness-raising and mobile screening, after which free screenings will be available at Sebeccly every Thursday for the rest of the year.

Members of the two clubs and any other female bikers who want to join in will ride through the streets, to schools, malls and other public places, distributing fliers and talking to women about the importance of screening.

“All the bikers turn up,” said Samuila, one of five women on the FBI’s board of trustees. “We just need to tell them, this is the location for the activity, and this is what we need you to do.”

Last year their funds, from private and corporate donors, could only stretch to two mastectomies, and they hope they will be able to sponsor more treatments this year.

bikers_social1-1024x512.jpg“We encourage this person to come, and then she finds out that something is wrong and you abandon her,” said Samuila, a former telecoms executive who now runs her own confectionery and coffee company.

“We would love to be able to follow up with whatever comes out of the testing.”

This is just the latest in a number of projects the bikers have organised.

In 2016 they launched Beyond Limits, a scheme to encourage young girls to fulfil their potential beyond societal expectations of marriage and babies.

They travel to schools to give talks and invite senior women working in science, technology and innovation to take part.

TURNING POINT

Samuila formed D’Angels with 37-year-old Jeminat Olumegbon in 2009 after they were denied entry to the established, all-male bikers’ groups in Lagos.

“They didn’t want us. They were like, ‘No, women don’t do this. Women are used to being carried around. Why don’t you guys just be on the sidelines?’ That sort of pissed us off and we then went on to form our own club,” said Samuila.

In 2010, the pair rode from Lagos to the southern city of Port Harcourt to attend a bikers’ event, a 617-km (383-mile) trip that the men had told them was impossible for a woman.

Bikers_Social-1024x512.jpg

“That was the turning point in our relationship with the male bikers,” said Samuila.

The two-day ride earned them a new respect from the male riders, some of whom now take part in the screening awareness programmes themselves.

In 2015 Olumegbon, also an FBI board member, took on an even bigger challenge riding 20,000 km through eight West African countries in 30 days to raise funds for children in orphanages.

“I’ve been riding since 2007. At first, I was the only female riding, then I found Nnenna and the other girls,” she said.

“Because we started riding, more females decided to look inwards, and decided that they could do so as well.”

bikers_featured-1024x1024.jpgThe bikers plan to extend their initiative to other parts of Nigeria, and have also received invitations from women riders in other West African countries.

For now though, they want to focus on making sure their efforts reach every woman in Lagos.

“When we speak to people on the streets, many don’t even know of cervical cancer,” said Samuila.

“It’s so painful to hear that so many people are dying from the disease when it can be prevented.”

*images via D’Angels Motorcycle Club

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HIV/AIDS

We answer your most Googled questions about HIV and AIDS

28 November 2018 8:49PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

 
  

WADGoogle_Social-1024x512.pngHIV/AIDS is a global health crisis that impacts the lives of millions of people a year, yet still many people don’t know enough about what it is, what it does to the body, and the best ways to prevent it. That’s why we’ve answered your most googled questions about HIV and AIDS, and added a couple extra in for good measure:

How many people alive today are living HIV or AIDS?

Around 37 million people are living with HIV/AIDS. That’s nearly the entire population of Canada.

What is the difference between HIV, AIDS, and HIV/AIDS?

You probably have a general idea what these three terms mean, but there are some key differences between them.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a virus that weakens the body’s immune system. The virus moves into the body’s “T cells”, which fight off infections, and rearranges the DNA inside them. The infected cell is no longer able to combat diseases, and instead creates more HIV cells.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the most extreme form of HIV infection. HIV becomes AIDS when the body has an extremely low amount of T cells left, greatly weakening the body’s immune system. It can take anywhere from two to fifteen years for untreated HIV to develop into AIDS.

HIV/AIDS is a term to describe the two together. The term also serves as a reminder that HIV always comes first. It is possible to have HIV without developing AIDS, but it’s impossible to contract AIDS without first having HIV.

How did HIV/AIDS start?

HIV didn’t begin in humans. The virus was originally an SIV— Simian Immunodeficiency Virus — that infects chimpanzees, and it is generally believed that the virus crossed over into humans through hunting. While this crossover happened around 1920, the virus wasn’t verified in humans until 1959 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

How do you contract HIV/AIDS?

The virus is spread through the exchange of certain kinds of bodily fluids, including blood, breast milk, semen, and vaginal fluids. That means you can’t contract HIV through things like hugging, hand-shaking, kissing, or sharing food and water.

What are the first signs of HIV/AIDS

In the first few weeks after infection, some people develop flu-like symptoms, including a rash, sore throat, fever, and headaches. However, not everyone has symptoms in the first few weeks. As the infection continues to develop in the body, some people experience swollen lymph nodes, fever, weight loss, diarrhea, or coughing.

Since the symptoms of HIV can be mistaken for the flu, or may not be present at all, testing is the only sure way of knowing whether someone has HIV.

If the virus develops into AIDS, the symptoms are more severe. Tuberculosis, meningitis, bacterial infections, and some forms of cancer can all develop due to a weakened immune system.

Is there a cure for HIV/AIDS?

While there is no cure for HIV/AIDS, it is possible to treat. Antiretroviral (ARV) drugs can help control the virus and even prevent transmission to other people. Antiretroviral therapy (ART), the combination of 3 or more ARV drugs, should start as soon as possible after diagnosis to slow the progression of HIV.

Who are the most ‘at risk’ groups for contracting HIV/AIDS

In some hard-hit countries in sub-Saharan Africa, girls and young women are especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Girls make up three out of four new infections among children between the ages of 10 and 19. Young women ages 15 to 24 in the region are also twice as likely to contract HIV than young men the same age.

The most-at-risk groups are men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, transgender people, and sex workers.

How do you get tested for HIV/AIDS?

Access to HIV tests are vital to prevent the spread of infection. An estimated 25%of HIV-positive people are not diagnosed. That means a quarter of HIV-positive people are not receiving treatment and are at risk of transmitting the disease to more people.

Serological tests are tests that examine the antibodies in blood. Basically, they’re tests that take a closer look at how the body’s immune system is working. A serological test with abnormal results could mean a positive HIV diagnosis. If someone has an abnormal result, it’s important to test again to make sure the diagnosis is correct.

How do you prevent HIV/AIDS?

There are lots of different ways to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS. Prevention, in all its forms, can’t happen without knowledge. Awareness of HIV/AIDS and how it’s contracted is necessary for someone to protect themselves against contracting the virus.

Safe sex practices, including the use of condoms, can prevent transmission during sex. Voluntary medical male circumcision can also reduce the likelihood of contracting the virus by up to about 60%.

ART not only controls the virus in those living with HIV/AIDS, but also prevents HIV-positive people from transmitting the virus to other people. ART coverage for pregnant and breastfeeding women is at an all-time high of 80%, reducing the likelihood of mother-to-child transmission.

ART isn’t the only way to help to prevent transmission. If you are HIV-negative but considered high risk (if you have an HIV-positive partner, for example), you can take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) before coming in contact with risk factors in order to prevent infection. When taken consistently, PrEP reduces the risk of HIV infection in people who are at high risk by over 90%. PrEP cannot be used by those who are already HIV positive.

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking ARVs within 72 hours of potential exposure to the virus to prevent becoming infected. PEP is not meant for regular use and should only be used in emergency situations.

Which countries have the highest HIV prevalence?

All of the top ten countries with the highest HIV prevalence are in Africa. Eswatini, formerly Swaziland, has the highest prevalence, with over 27% of the adult population living with HIV/AIDS. The virus takes a much larger toll on the female population, with over 35% reporting an HIV-positive status.

Lesotho and Botswana take second and third for highest prevalence. In both countries, over a fifth of the population is HIV-positive. Like in Eswatini, gender inequality increases the prevalence among women in both countries.

How long can people live with HIV/AIDS?

With ART, HIV-positive people can continue to live full, healthy lives. Access to this life-saving medication creates near-normal life expectancy. That’s great news for people who have access to ART, but this isn’t the case for everyone.

Last year, almost a million people died from AIDS-related causes. That’s 2,500 people every day, nearly two every minute. This means that the life expectancy of a person with HIV depends on whether they are able to access and afford treatment.

There’s no doubt about it: AIDS is still a crisis. The numbers may be intimidating, but this fight is far from lost. We have the knowledge and resources to help those who are HIV-positive, while also preventing more people from contracting the virus. By increasing access to ART, education, and health services, we can create a world free of HIV/AIDS.

To win the fight against AIDS, we need you. This World AIDS Day, ONE members are turning our outrage into action and putting our leaders on notice – add your voice today!

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51
CULTURE

Here’s how to use your democratic power for good

September 13 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Changing the world may seem like an impossible task. Though it may seem a big goal, the truth is that all change starts at home. If you’re passionate about ending extreme poverty, there are actions you can take in your everyday life to make a difference. By using your democratic power, you can create a domino effect that can lead to lasting impact on the world.

Here are five ways you can participate in democracy and create change in the world:

1. Vote

The power to choose who represents us is a choice that can change the world. From local government, to state, all the way up to federal, who we vote for has lasting effects. Our elected officials have a lot of power – but we’re the ones that give it to them, so exercise that power at the polls whenever you have the opportunity!

2. Contact your representatives

Your democratic power doesn’t stop at the voting booth. After elected officials take office, keep in touch with them. Make sure your representatives know what their constituents want and encourage them to stick to their promises.

If you’re wondering how to contact your representative, here’s a quick guide:

3. Work within your community

No matter where you live, you can participate in your community. Town hall meetings, school boards, and local political programs are just a few ways you can advocate on a local level. Encourage the people around you to get involved, too. As more people get mobilized within a community, bigger changes will happen!

4. Stay informed

There’s lots of news out there, and sometimes it can be hard to find out what information is accurate. If you’re unsure what to believe, do your research and seek out sources you can trust. The more information you have, the better equipped you are to participate in democracy.

5. Stand up for your beliefs

You have the power to take action, in lots of different ways! Whenever an opportunity comes along for you to support what you believe in, stand up and raise your voice. If you’re looking for a good first step in taking a stand, you can become a ONE member and support the fight to end extreme poverty.

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79
GIRLS AND WOMEN

How this growing business is helping women thrive

January 25 2019 | By: PATIENCE MURUNGI

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

All photos are credited to the Kula Project.

My name is Patience Murungi, and I am the leader of Kula’s mentorship program in Rwanda’s Northern Province. The Kula Fellowship is 15-month program where women receive industry training, learn life and leadership skills, and have the opportunity for business investment. The majority of our fellows are coffee growers or artisans. As a Kula mentor, I operate from the field, providing life skills training, support, and guidance to our fellows.

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One of my fellows is a woman named Florida. She is an entrepreneur learning how to build her business and take better care of her coffee trees. The skills she’s learning are helping her increase productivity and improve the quality of her coffee.

Florida is a single mother who is providing for herself and her six children through her business. For her, a thriving coffee business means she can fulfill her dream of sending her children to school. She hopes to eventually watch each one of them graduate from college. Investing in women like Florida is important because when you empower a woman, you empower an entire country.

The Impact of Empowerment

Rwanda is an unfolding female empowerment success story. 61% of the Rwandan Parliament is female, making it the highest ranked country for representation of women in the world. Young girls are able to receive an education and fill roles dominated by men, like science and technology.

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I believe that empowering women is the key to economic and social transformation and stability. Rwanda is proof of that.

Even though Rwanda leads Africa in every development statistic, there is still a lot of work ahead. We, at Kula, believe it is not charity that will continue to build our country, but our businesses. It will be thanks to the women and men who start coffee businesses, weaving and tailoring cooperatives, open their own stores, and start taxi services.

I have the honor of strengthening that impact through mentorship. That’s what makes Kula’s work different. We focus on relationships, loving and caring for every single one of our fellows through one-on-one mentorship. Kula develops entrepreneurs, empowering women like Florida to invest in the next generation.

Leading with Community

Kula was founded on community-led development, listening to the people and communities we work to uplift. We’ve built on that foundation through the launch of Kula Coffee. The majority of our fellows are coffee growers, and we kept hearing about the need for direct access to the international market. Late last year, we were finally able to make that happen and sell our fellows’ coffee for the first time. The women are so excited to finally see the coffee from their farm in a Kula Coffee bag.

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Eradicating poverty seems like an unattainable goal. But through the development of female entrepreneurs, we are all committed to the work at hand.

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