Jump to content
tan_lejos_tan_cerca

The Action Thread Part Two

Recommended Posts

 

Traditional Arts Pedagogy: An Introduction to Traditional Music Teaching is a new 2-day module coming to Ulster University which introduces students to the roles and responsibilities of the traditional music teacher in community settings.

Taking place 9 March and 6 April, contact flexed@ulster.ac.uk for further information.

50978667_2321931104498143_7119074598548668416_n.jpg?_nc_cat=110&_nc_ht=scontent.fmad3-6.fna&oh=536e3f0923b476b92a65fa066f8ed161&oe=5CF6F841

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
455
GIRLS AND WOMEN

This South African pilot started a camp to inspire young girls

6 December 2018 4:57PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

ADD YOUR NAME

Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement

 
  

The “Zulu Sierra – Papa Whiskey Whiskey” (ZS-PWW) may look like any other plane but this aircraft is special. It’s carrying bright young minds to an exceptional future. The plane is owned by Refilwe Ledwaba — the first black woman to fly for the South Africa Police Service and the first black woman to be a helicopter pilot in South Africa!

Refilwe grew up in Lenyenye, a small township in the Limpopo region of South Africa. Originally, she wanted to become a doctor, but everything changed on a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town. That fateful flight had a female pilot who inspired her to take to the skies.

To achieve her goal, she wrote to over 200 South African companies asking them to help fund her education. The South Africa Police Service responded, offering to pay for her training and help her get a commercial pilot license.

Since then, she’s founded the Girls Fly Programme in Africa Foundation (GFPA) — a non-profit that has set-up a training programme and an annual flying camp for teenage girls —  giving a head start to the next generation of women aviation and space leaders in Africa. The camp (run with Women and Aviation) teaches girls from South Africa, Botswana and Cameroon all about aviation.

Camp attendees spend their days learning about computer coding, building robots and completing flight simulations. They also get an opportunity to take a flying lesson on board the ZS-PWW, where they learn the basics of flying.

The girls come from different backgrounds, from townships to private schools, but all achieve high scores in math and science at their schools. GFPA gives them the opportunity to meet professionals working in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), and learn about the exciting and hugely varied career opportunities for them in these fields.

“I think STEM is very important because, on a personal note, it opened a lot of doors for me,” says Refilwe. “So if you’re not going to prepare women for those jobs in the future, then we’re lost.”

Refilwe made history in South Africa. Now, she’s paving the way for a new generation of girls to do the same.

Every girl deserves the opportunity to reach the skies. If you want to support girls worldwide, join the Poverty is Sexistmovement!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
561
MEMBERS IN ACTION

Dear World Leaders: Youth is not wasted on the young

8 August 2018 1:15PM UTC | By: ONE AMBASSADORS

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Whoever said youth is wasted on the young has probably not met us.

We are one hundred young activists: 50 in Nigeria and 50 in France. We have not met in person, but we are all fighting for the same goal. We are the generation that could end extreme poverty, and we intend to do everything that is in our power to make this happen.

Each one of us, on our respective continents, advocate to convince our governments to do more to fight AIDS and other preventable diseases in the poorest places on the planet, to make sure every girl in the world can go to school and to combat corruption so governments are accountable to their citizens.

https://www.facebook.com/ONE/videos/10155940386619472/

From France to Nigeria, the European Union to the African Union, we all believe the fight against poverty is not about charity, but about justice and equality. We also believe that there are no national solutions to international challenges and that Europe and Africa need, now more than ever, to build a strong partnership together, a partnership from which each partner would benefit equally.

NG_2.jpg

ONE Champions in Abuja, Nigeria

Africa is on the cusp of demographic transformation, which will give it the world’s youngest population by 2050 – 10 times the size of the European Union’s. With this comes a huge opportunity for growth on an unprecedented scale for both our continents and for the rest of the world. However, doing more of the same will not be sufficient. Seizing this opportunity will mean that African and European countries need to come together and make commitments for policy reforms, on key areas such as transparency, education and health; as well as create the millions of new jobs each year that will be needed for our generation and the next ones to become a transformative power for the economies and societies of our continents.

World leaders, we would like you to know that citizens are your greatest allies. We are affected when a policy is ineffectual. We know when implementation is inadequate. We can validate when an international policy does not work.

DXnW7v0WkAAqmWZ.jpg-large.jpeg

ONE Youth Ambassadors in Paris, France

We have seen some encouraging signs: in France, over the first year since his election, President Emmanuel Macron has clearly made the relationship with Africa and girls education some of his top priorities, and in Nigeria, the Buhari administration has committed significant resources towards youth empowerment. However, new commitments are needed.

We hope that as our leaders meet, they will agree that together they can lead our world towards the strong future that the youngest generation needs. We will pay attention to your discussions, ultimately, they affect us.

We know that only by working together will we achieve the Sustainable Development Goals that our leaders agreed on just a few years ago. We have a roadmap, now we need our leaders to transform their commitments into actions. By 2030 we will be too old to be called young, and as we will look back, we will be assured that we did not waste our youth and that we did everything we could to make this world a better place – and we hope our world leaders will too.


Najib Ait Hammou, Ibraim Assogba, Yacine Belhadi, Sarah Bouaffou, David Bouchard, Annabelle Buisson, Charlotte Castillon, Léna Collette, Laëtitia Coly, Marion Cubizolles, Mariam Diallo, Flore Faveyrial, Pauline Ferraz, Paul Frégeai, Chloé Fuchs, Daphné Gatté, Arthur Gazagne, Solenne Geffroy, Marion Giard, Benoît Golitin, Madeline Heudes, Adrien Hors, Anthony Ikni, Camille Imbert, Salomé Jacquet, Laure Jégard, Sarah Juan Dané, Yvan Koa Biloa, Anthony Lamaudière, Amel Lamri, Claire Leduc, Jordan Madiande, Jade Martineau, Charline Martin-Ramelli, Romane Mika, Audrey Morice, Chloé Petat, Caroline Pusset, Mia Raichon, Jean-Baptiste Rallu, David Reviriego, Younès Rifad, Hugo Rivet-Rodriguez, Pauline Robin, Héma Sibi, Lina Sibi, Bastien Tournié, Eugénie Tressens, Adrian Uracs, Marie Véron, Vanessa Woerner, Joshua Alade, Adi Nuhu, Clinton Ezeigwe, Ijeoma Chiemela, Chidinma Ibemere, Terese Akpem, Atuogu Abigail, Austin Ekwujuru, Zara Mohammed Kareto, Fausiat Bakare, Olasupo Abideen, Sophie Abache, Fatty Bello, Sipasi Olalekan, Aliyu Tukur Mukaddas Gengle, Ebere Chukwu, Alhaji Muazu Modu, Sarah Williams, Melanie Idehen, Ijeoma Chiemela, Olaloluwa Oluwasola, Clinton Ezeigwe, Ngunan ioron Aloho, Benedicta Uweru, Idris Mohammed, Chidinma Ibemere, Hadiya Usman, Joseph Stanley, Rosemund Edem, Sani Muhammed, Adeniyi Joel, Amina Abdulazeez, Wadi Ben Hirki, Kemi Vaughan, Ibrahim Banaru, Georgeleen Ekon, Grace Gara, Akeukereke Ibrahim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This map will change the way you see Africa
229
CULTURE

This map will change the way you see Africa

October 12 2017 | By: GLOBAL CITIZEN

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE

Can you correctly identify these nine African countries on a map?
 
  

This post originally appeared on Global Citizen.

In the last 500 years, a certain kind of map has been used to teach children about our planet. But public schools in Boston have made a big change  — and it might alter the way you think about the world.

It’s about power.

Most might recognize the old map from faded school textbooks. It’s called the Mercator projection. In 1569, Gerardus Mercator built a whole world drawn along colonial lines — literally. The biggest economic powers were given the space on paper to flex their border biceps.

The Mercator projection. (Photo credit: Public domain)

The Mercator projection. (Photo credit: Public domain)

The problem? It’s nowhere near to scale. Europe is not the center of the universe — Mercator just moved the equator. North America is nowhere near that big — although it might feel that way if you watch the news. In reality, South America should be twice the size of Europe. Greenland should be 14 times smaller than Africa and three times smaller than Australia, whilst Alaska appears three times larger than its actual big sibling, Mexico.

The Mercator projection vastly exaggerates aged imperialist power, at the expense of developing countries and continents like Africa that are shrunk to inferiority. There’s a reason why the Northern Hemisphere is associated with wealth and significance — it’s because it’s literally on top, permanently etched into our subconsciousness as superior from our earliest encounters with learning.

But there is another map. A map that laughs in the face of the old world order, that is scaled without topographical bias, that actually tries to tell the truth. Say hello to our survey savior: the Gall-Peters projection.

The Gall-Peters projection. (Photo credit: Public domain)

The Gall-Peters projection. (Photo credit: Public domain)

More commonly known as the Peters projection, it was published in 1974 by Dr. Arno Peters. It’s an “equal-area” map, borrowed from the work of 19th century Scotsman James Gall, which means it accurately scales land according to surface area, creating a far more balanced reflection of what the world really looks like. It’s totally free of colonial bias.

All new maps bought by public schools in Boston will be Peters projection. According to Colin Rose , assistant superintendent of opportunity and achievement gaps for Boston public schools, it’s “the start of a three-year effort to decolonize the curriculum in our public schools,” to draw away from the cultural whitewashing of history in places of education.

“Eighty-six percent of our students are students of color,” said Hayden Frederick-Clarke, director of cultural proficiency for Boston Public Schools, in an interview with WBUR . “Once students feel like the school isn’t being truthful, there’s a tendency to shut down and reject information.”

No map is perfect — a two-dimensional reflection of a spherical world will always be flawed. Even the derivation of the world implies vulnerability; it comes from the Latin “mappa ”, meaning “napkin”, to describe the surfaces first used to draw them. The Peters projection is not without its blemishes either — it can appear stretched, since there’s just not enough land to effectively translate onto a flat map.

If you’re still not entirely sure what on earth we’re talking about, let The West Wingexplain:

“In our society, we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power,” says one of the cartographers in the video. “When third-world countries are misrepresented, they’re likely to be valued less.”

And the problem extends way beyond the classroom. Incredibly, even Google Maps is stuck on the Mercator projection. When the internet has inherited internal bias, a bad idea can spread like an epidemic. The whispered notion that the West is somehow bigger and better than the rest of the world persists, subtly, sneakily, until suddenly world leaders can transform the invisible precedent into rhetoric that swivels between patriotism and nationalism in reckless lurches.

Every journey starts with a map. But if you set off on the wrong foot, misdirection can become misadventure. It’s easy to get lost. The hard part is making sure nobody else follows in your footsteps.

Already knew Africa was that size? Well, can you correctly guess the location of nine African countries on the map? Find out with our new game

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our ‘Homes of Hope’ Programme provides an alternative to state run institutions. We believe that children belong where their interests are best met – in loving, caring families, not in orphanages.

Thousands of children across Belarus are languishing in long-term care. Many suffer in appalling conditions and this hinders not only their development, but their overall wellbeing and safety.

Our programme endeavours to break the cycle of poverty and abandonment and give children a chance to live in a home and with a real family.

CCI has purchased and renovated 30 homes for our ‘’Homes of Hope’ programme and these homes have provided 300 previously institutionalised children with a loving home and family of their own... the equivalent of closing two orphanages.

To learn more about this and our other programmes, please visit www.chernobyl-international.com

50724691_10156163807243295_7682017903360606208_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&_nc_ht=scontent.fmad3-7.fna&oh=14896f4c3324fbd9d68657464ac33507&oe=5CB31C2B

La imagen puede contener: 2 personas

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sentado, niños e interior

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51
HEALTH

Ten threats to global health in 2019

25 January 2019 12:42PM UTC | By: JANE EAGLES

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

This blog is derived from ‘Ten Threats to Global Health in 2019’ . 

The World Health Organization (WHO) has outlined top ten threats to global health this year. We’re glad to say that at ONE, we’ve been campaigning on some of the same major health issues, and we’re ready to step-up the pressure in 2019.

Through our #EUAid campaign, we’re fighting for EU member states to increase their funding for international development (through their Multiannual Financial Framework). This funding will help to tackle the factors that can lead to population displacement, conflict, drought, and other threats to health. 

Our Make Naija Stronger campaign fought for an increase in government funding for the healthcare service — and we won. This funding helps the most marginalised in Nigeria access primary healthcare. 

And last, but by no means least, our members will be campaigning for a fully funded Global Fund, to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

Read on to find out the other primary threats to global health…

TIJ_3587.jpg

HIV

There has been enormous progress in the fight against HIV. But the epidemic continues to rage with nearly a million people dying from the condition every year. A group increasingly affected by HIV are young girls and women (aged 15-24), who are at higher risk and account for 1 in 4 HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa despite being only 10% of the population. This year, WHO will work with countries to support the introduction of self-testing so that more people with HIV know their status and can receive treatment.

Weak primary healthcare

WHO will work with partners to revitalize and strengthen primary health care in countries as many do not have adequate primary health care facilities. In 2019, WHO will work with partners to revitalize and strengthen primary health care in countries, and follow up on specific commitments made by in the Astana Declaration.

Fragile and vulnerable settings

More than 1.6 billion people — 22% of the global population — live in places where protracted crises including drought, famine, conflict and population displacement, and weak health services leave them without access to basic care. WHO will continue to work in these countries to strengthen health systems.

Ebola and other high-threat pathogens

In 2018, the DRC saw two separate Ebola outbreaks, both of which spread to cities of more than 1 million people, some of the affected provinces were also in an active conflict zone, showing the context in which an epidemic of a high-threat pathogen such as Ebola is critical.

Vaccine hesitancy

The reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-preventable diseases. In 2019 WHO will ramp up work to eliminate cervical cancer worldwide by increasing coverage of the HPV vaccine, among other interventions.

Global influenza pandemic

The world will face another influenza pandemic. WHO is constantly monitoring the circulation of influenza to detect potential pandemic strains: 153 institutions in 114 countries are involved in global surveillance and response.

Air pollution and climate change.

With nine out of ten people breathing in polluted air every day – it comes as little surprise that air pollution is considered by the WHO as the greatest environmental risk to health. The microscopic pollutants in the air kill 7 million people a year.

Noncommunicable diseases

Noncummunicable diseases including diabetes, cancer and heart disease are collectively responsible for over 70% of all deaths worldwide. This includes the premature deaths of 15 million people aged between 30 and 69. This year WHO will work with governments to help them meet the global target of reducing physical inactivity by 15% by 2030.

Antimicrobial resistance

The development of antibiotics, antivirals and antimalarials are some of modern medicine’s greatest successes. But time with these drugs is running out. Antimicrobial resistance is rising. WHO is working to implement a global action plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance.

Dengue

This mosquito-borne disease can be lethal and has been seen as a growing threat for decades. An estimated 4% of the world is at risk of dengue fever, and there are around 390 million infections. WHO’s Dengue control strategy aims to reduce deaths by 50% by 2020.

You can read more about our work on health here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
EDUCATION

This awesome teen established a library in her community in Kenya

June 8 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

SIGN THE PETITION

This awesome teen established a library in her community in Kenya

 
  

Story and photos by Zachary Ochieng

A young woman’s mission to promote education and improve literacy levels in her community is already bearing fruit. At just 19, Leah Kibe is the director and brainchild behind the Colour World Green Initiative Library.

Leah-with-community-members-outside-the-

Leah with other community members outside the library.

Leah’s journey hasn’t been easy: At one point in her education, she nearly dropped out because she had no way to continue paying the school fees. Even though she’d earned good marks that would qualify her to attend, she almost missed her place at Kenya High School, a leading national school. When her parents could not afford the annual $600 school fees, she was helped out by well-wishers and extended family members.

“My parents were so poor that my uncle had to see me through my primary level. After that, I just stayed home hoping for a miracle,” Leah says. “It was so traumatizing to imagine I would drop out of school due to lack of fees. That’s when I started applying for scholarships. The school principal was very understanding and gave me more time to seek help.”

Just when she had almost given up on getting a scholarship, help finally arrived from Akili Dada, an organization promoting the ideals of women and leadership.

Through their scholarship programs, Akili Dada’s mission is to nurture transformative leadership in girls and young women from underprivileged backgrounds, in order to meet the urgent need for more African women in leadership roles. The organization also provides psychological support to girls in their programs. The recipients benefit from an extensive network of devoted mentors who are drawn from a wide range of professional networks.

Akili-Dada-experientia-learning-retreat-

The experiential learning retreat at Akili Dada.

“Every school holiday, girls on the scholarship program are taken through a five-day residential academy that focuses on different aspects of leadership, offering lifelong learning practices designed to adapt to the growing needs of the girls,” says Anne Njeru, Akili Dada’s communications officer.

With the support of Akili Dada, Leah completed high school and excelled in her exams. She enrolled in the organization’s Young Change Makers Programme, which helps young women between the ages of 17 and 20 to develop as leaders in their schools and communities. Dadas (sisters) in this program are provided the space and support to develop their personal leadership style, learn how to identify issues and areas of need in their communities, and build tangible skills to address those issues.

Akili-Dada-mentees-in-a-discussion-sessi

Akili Dada mentees in a discussion session.

Akili Dada has so far awarded 121 scholarships to academically talented girls from under-resourced backgrounds. These girls have come up with social change initiatives in their communities that have directly impacted 27,344 community members!

“When I was in Form One [first year in high school], I was a very shy girl, but Akili Dada’s continuous leadership training and designed thinking inspired me to be a leader, to bring change in my community,” Leah says.

As part of this program, Leah was inspired to build a library in her community.

Her decision was buoyed by her determination to improve her younger brother’s reading skills. While on holiday, Leah gave some basic learning materials to her brother to read, but noticed he struggled with them.

Akili-Dada-Mentoring-session-at-Kenya-Hi

An Akili Dada mentoring session at Kenya High School.

“This shocked me and I realized something needed to be done,” Leah says. “I started collecting story books from friends, relatives, and anyone willing to donate. I would organise to have children within the community come to our home and read the books. However, there was a lot of resistance from their parents due to illiteracy levels, and also because children were expected to assist with house chores. This however only motivated me even more.”

Seeing how enthusiastic the children were to learn, Leah approached the County Development Fund for funds and secured $900, all of which went towards the establishment of the library. Today, the library serves around 1,000 students!

Leah-with-a-local-administrator-at-the-e

Leah and a local administrator at the entrance to the library.

“I have grown in confidence and courage to challenge situations,” says Leah. “I now know I can contribute in the development of my community and as a result, be a role model to others. This library is my success story that young people can bring positive change regardless of their circumstances.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
74
AGRICULTURE

Buzzworthy: Why some Kenyan women have started beekeeping

August 2 2017 | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Residents of Kailer village normally live to the rhythm of mooing cows and bleating goats. But over the past year, silence has reigned over these swathes of dry land dotted with cacti and mathenge, a dense shrub.

Faced with severe drought, herders and their animals have had to travel further than normal to find water or grazing – and to escape worsening raids on their livestock at home, say the village’s women.

“We don’t know when they’ll return, as cattle raiders may attack them on the way,” said a worried Christine Lewatachum of Kailer, a village in the Rift Valley county of Baringo.

 

With worsening drought and more erratic rainfall, competition for water and grazing is growing, stoking rivalry and theft between livestock herders.

Women and their children, left to mind some of the animals at home, also find themselves vulnerable to livestock raids – and left without an income when they happen.

But an unusual kind of livestock is helping: bees.

Wild honey bees. (Photo credit: Bob Peterson/Wikimedia Commons)

Wild honey bees. (Photo credit: Bob Peterson/Wikimedia Commons)

Since 2009, women in the village – and others like it in the region – have managed beehives as a new way of earning a living.

They use the hives to produce honey, soap, beauty creams, candles, and cough syrup, among other products, and sell them to residents from neighboring villages.

While the business has been going on for some time, it is proving particularly valuable as droughts grow more frequent and severe.

Even as conditions grow more uncertain, “we want to break free from poverty,” said Josephine Lemangi, one resident.

Solomon Kerieny, an animal production officer at the Ministry of Agriculture, said that a longer dry season and erratic rainfall have severely affected earnings from livestock, making families more vulnerable.

“When houses lose livestock, they lose their livelihood,” he said. “Women need to embrace alternative sources of income like beekeeping so they can withstand weather shocks like these.”

 

FOILING CATTLE RAIDERS

For women in Baringo county, cattle raids and violence are a fact of life. In 2009, Faith Lekimosong, a member of the women’s group, was forced to leave her village of Kiserian without her livestock – 80 goats and 18 cows – after eight raiders attacked her home.

“After that, I would hear gunshots ringing in my head for a long time,” she recalled, having found refuge in a nearby village.

“It is a nightmare to live in a place where you have no idea if your animals will be there tomorrow,” she added.

The women’s group, which Lewatachum co-founded in 2000, initially specialized in buying and raising dairy goats “to stop depending on our husbands’ income”.

In 2005, however, cattle raiders stole most of the women’s herd. “It was too much,” said Lewatachum. “We sold the few remaining goats and had to find a new solution.”

INCOME AND JOBS

Every three months, the group harvests and sells about 22kg of unprocessed honey for 4,000 Kenyan shillings (about $38). Processed honey sells for three times that price.

A 100g pot of body cream goes for 200 shillings ($2), while a piece of honey soap fetches between 20 and 30 shillings ($0.20-0.30).

Other products made from honey or honeycomb are more unusual.

“The arthritis and asthma syrup, as well as the snake venom antidote, are particularly popular,” said Lewachtum. “Residents often get bitten by snakes lurking in shrubs when fetching water or searching for grazing spots.”

The women display their products at weddings or farm fairs, she said. When they aren’t able to meet demand, they buy honey from other beekeepers.

 

“In times of drought there is no nectar for bees to feed on, so we can only harvest once a year instead of three times,” said Lemangi, another group member.

The women put the profit they make into a fund from which members can take out loans with a 1 percent interest rate.

This has allowed them to expand their operation to 14 beehives and to buy a 2.25-acre piece of land in the village, where they plan to set up a honey processing plant.

“We will use it (the plant) to increase our production so we can sell products in the rest of the country and offer jobs to women and girls,” said Lewatachum, as she straightened a crumpled bee suit in a makeshift shed.

She said the initiative has provided women with not only a better income but better prospects for the future.

“When the members take out loans, they know they have to pay them back and that prompts them to think about potentially setting up their own businesses or renting a portion of land to farm it,” she said.

Group members now earn an average of 26,000 shillings (about $250) per month from their various businesses, compared to next to nothing previously, as everything was stolen by raiders, she added.

SECURITY STILL AN ISSUE

While the women are becoming more secure economically, continuing insecurity threatens their progress, experts say.

“Without physical security, the women cannot establish long-term investments, as cattle raids or counter-attacks routinely burn houses and injure residents,” said Tom Nyamache, a professor of economics at Kenya’s Turkana University College.

In February, the government deployed over 100 police reservists to the area to reinforce local authorities – but even they were attacked by the bandits, Nyamache said.

But while cattle raids continue, the beehives have so far remained intact.

This story was originally published at Thomson Reuters Foundation News.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CULTURE

MEET THE KENYAN ENGINEER WHO CREATED GLOVES THAT TURN SIGN LANGUAGE INTO AUDIBLE SPEECH

23rd January 2019 by BOTWC Staff

Meet The Kenyan Engineer Who Created Gloves That Turn Sign Language Into Audible Speech
485K
SHARES
 
 

 4_bc9067f2-732b-400d-a039-52fcc3878dfa_1

Photo: Roy Allela 

Twenty-five-year-old Kenyan engineer and innovator, Roy Allela, has created a set of gloves that will ultimately allow better communication between those who are deaf and those who are hearing yet may not necessarily know sign language. The Sign-IO gloves in essence translate signed hand movements into audible speech.

Allela's gloves feature sensors located on each finger that detect the positioning of each finger, including how much each finger will bend into a given position. The glove connects via Bluetooth to an Android phone which then will leverage use the text-to-speech function to provide translated speech to the hand gestures of a person signing.

The inspiration behind the Sign-IO gloves comes from the personal experience of having a young niece who is deaf. He nor his family knows sign language and often struggled to adequately and consistently communicate with her. "My niece wears the gloves, pairs them with her phone or mine, then starts signing. I’m able to understand what she’s saying," Allela shared in an interview with The Guardian

Allela’s vision for the gloves is to have them placed in schools for special needs children throughout his home country of Kenya and then expand from there to positively impact the experiences of as many deaf or hearing-impaired children as possible. His gloves are amongst a number of cutting-edge projects that are contributing to the growing market of assistive technology devices that seek to provide aid to those with specific impairments and limitations.

Many sensor-based devices are starting to be created to bridge communication and capability gaps between different populations and once available to the public marketplace are projected to generate revenue upwards of $30 billion by 2024 according to Global NewsWire.

While the gloves are currently in the prototype phase of development and not available to the public market, they are already generating quite a buzz and have even won some awards. Sign-IO was the 2018 grand winner of the “Hardware Trailblazer Award” at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) global finals in New York and also took home a second runner-up acknowledgement at the Royal Academy of Engineering Leaders in Innovation Fellowship in London.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Billions of UK aid failing to reduce poverty, report finds

Shortfall in standards casts doubt on transparency of Britain’s aid spending

Larry Elliott

Mon 4 Feb 2019 06.00 GMTLast modified on Mon 4 Feb 2019 12.14 GMT

  •  
  •  
  •  
 
 
 

A displaced Yemeni girl drinks water in a camp set up for people who fled Hodeidah.  A displaced Yemeni girl drinks water in a camp set up for people who fled Hodeidah. Photograph: Saleh Al-Obeidi/AFP/Getty Images

Too much of Britain’s aid budget is being spent poorly by Whitehall departments on projects that fail the test of reducing poverty in the world’s poorest countries, a campaign group has said.

The One Campaign – an advocacy organisation set up by the U2 singer Bono – said the huge gulf in standards across government was undermining the battle to build public trust that taxpayers’ money was being well spent.

The UK is one of only a handful of countries to meet the UN target of spending 0.7% of national income on aid and around 70% of the £14bn a year budget is spent by the Department for International Development (DfID).

Romilly Greenhill, the One Campaign’s UK director, said that money spent by DfID scored highly for poverty focus, effectiveness and transparency, but the same could not always be said of the 30% of the budget spent by other Whitehall departments.

The campaign group’s new Real Aid Index said that only 5% of the £765m spent by the business, energy and industrial strategy department (BEIS) and 16% of the £1.05bn spent by the Foreign Office (FCO) went to the countries that needed it most.

UK aid funding must not be privatised | Letter

 
 
Read more

“This index shows that while most UK aid does exactly what it’s meant to, some parts of government need to up their game. If they’re spending aid which doesn’t bring real change for people in poverty, should it really be called aid at all?” she said.

The report also found:

  • £1.5bn of aid was being spent with barely any transparency about where and how it was delivered.

  • At least £475m of aid came with strings attached so that is has to be spent through UK institutions, contravening Britain’s system of untied aid.

  • £115m of FCO aid was being spent to subsidise relatively affluent students going to university in the UK.

  • Three of the five largest (in cash terms) programmes within the Newton Fund – which aims to develop science and innovation partnerships that promote the economic development and social welfare of partner countries – were based in China and were not focused on global poverty reduction.

Britain’s aid budget has become increasingly controversial, since the higher spending necessary to meet the 0.7% UN target has come at a time when other Whitehall departments have faced stringent austerity. Some Conservative MPs believe the commitment should be scrapped.

Greenhill said: “The lion’s share of UK aid is poverty-focused, effective and transparent – it’s real aid that we can be proud of. But some parts of government don’t adhere to these principles – in short, they’re not delivering ‘real aid’.

“If their aid is going to richer countries or on programmes that don’t address poverty, then they’re not only failing the people it’s meant for, they’re letting down the UK taxpayer.”

Greenhill said the Treasury should take the opportunity of this year’s spending review to ensure the taxpayer was getting value for money and that aid spending was targeted at poverty reduction.

UK Foreign Office ranks among world's worst on revealing how aid is spent

 
 
Read more

“As collaboration becomes the new normal for government departments spending UK aid, every penny must be ‘real aid’. As the Treasury is deciding who gets what in this year’s spending review, they shouldn’t allocate any more aid to departments which don’t deliver ‘real aid’,” she said.

A BEIS spokesperson said: “The government’s overseas development assistance focuses on countries where we can deliver the greatest impact, helping to build a safer and more prosperous planet.

“We are leveraging the UK’s world-leading research base to address global challenges including antimicrobial resistance, food security and building resilience to natural disasters. And through International Climate Finance we are focusing on countries that have the largest emissions growth to mitigate the impact of climate change for the most vulnerable.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
130
HIV/AIDS

Clara: HIV shaped me, but it did not stop me

30 November 2018 5:05PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

 
 
  

Written by Clara

I tested positive for HIV in 2004. I was working in a HIV counselling centre and I noticed that I was experiencing some of the same symptoms as my patients. I gathered the courage to sneak home an HIV test and tested myself, and my baby, in private.

When I first discovered my HIV status, aged 25, I was worried that I might die. But I was also filled with anger, and a determination to fight back. I refused to leave my child motherless.

At first, my doctor refused to put me on HIV treatment because I did not outwardly appear sick, but inside I felt I was draining away. I lost stamina to the point that I could not lift up my one-year-old daughter.

I had to travel 400km to get my immune system levels tested. When the test showed how weak my immune system was, I was allowed to begin HIV treatment.

HIV affects all of aspects of your life. It is not just about you, but your loved ones as well.

My husband and my daughter, who are also HIV positive, both suffered from drug-resistant TB. As a wife and mother who was nursing them, I experienced the horror of dealing with this killer disease. And every time I got the flu, I thought I might be next.

Social stigma and gender inequality compound the impact of HIV in Malawi. I have worked with many women whose husbands blame them for bringing HIV into the home and divorce them when they find out they are HIV positive. And even though it is now illegal, some communities still practice ‘sexual cleansing’ where a woman must have sex as a cleansing ritual after becoming a widow.

I’ve faced stigma myself. When my community first found out about my status, my own neighbour would not talk to me. But when she was sick and needed help, I was the one who took her to hospital.

My experience made me want to help others – to stop them from going through the same struggle. Thanks to funding from the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, I have been able to access free lifesaving medicine and my life is very different than it could have been.

Thanks to the medicine, I also have a second child – who is HIV negative.

Now I am channelling my energies into helping others.

I am the National Coordinator of International Community of Women Living with HIV, Malawi Chapter. I help others who are in similar situations to the one I was in 14 years ago. My work is about helping women living with HIV address the challenges they face in their own lives and also campaigning on national issues to make sure the Malawian Government deliver on their health commitments.

My story is not just one of ill-health, but one that shows how women are taking charge of their own destinies. Working together we can create change so that my daughter, and all our daughters, will not face the same challenges that I did.

YES: To win the fight against AIDS we’ll need to work together. Add your name to join us today.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Stuck on a gift for Valentine's Day? These cool tech products give back with every purchase

Jacob Krol, CNN Underscored
Tue January 29, 2019

 

Valentine's Day is right around the corner, and whether it's a friend or a special someone in your life, you'll want to find the perfect gift. Well, what if that gift could fit the color theme and give to a worthy cause as well?

(RED) has teamed with several tech brands to craft special editions of gadgets big and small that not only look great, but give back. Apple, Amazon, Mophie, Beats by Dre and Vizio have all created (RED) products.

The prices are the same. Just the color has changed. The other significant change is that a portion of the purchase helps fight AIDS. No matter how you look at it, the result is a win-win.

 

 

Here are our favorite (RED) gadgets and gizmos.

Amazon Echo 2nd Generation ($89.99, originally $99.99; amazon.com)

190129132647-4-underscored-product-red-t

On its own, the latest Amazon Echo is smaller than the original and sounds better. Plus the Product (RED) variant has a sweet paint job and keeps the classic Alexa experience. Amazon is always working to improve its smart assistant and developers are continually releasing new Alexa skills.

6,000mAh mophie powerstation ($49.95; amazon.com)

190129132715-1-underscored-product-red-t

Those who've used an external battery know how much of a lifesaver these simple mobile accessories are. Mophie's powerstation in (RED) has a black design with "EMPOWE(RED)" across the front in red. It packs a large battery and two USB ports for charging.

Beats Pill+ ($129, originally $179.95; amazon.com)

190129132743-2-underscored-product-red-t

It's easy to give the gift of music with the Beats Pill+, a tiny Bluetooth speaker that packs a punch with sound and features. For starters, it can pump up the jams and has a 12-hour battery. It not only allows you to play music, but thanks to a hidden USB-A port, you also can charge your iPhone. Not to mention the speaker itself charges through Lightning. A 1.5-meter cable and power brick is included.

Beats Solo3 Wireless On-Ear Headphones ($239.95; amazon.com)

190129132703-3-underscored-product-red-t

While the Pill+ is excellent for a shared listening experience, the Solo3 headphones are perfect for solo listening. For starters, the (RED) color looks great, and you can rock out for a long time with up to 40 hours of battery life. The W1 chip allows for fast and easy pairing with an iPhone or iPad running at least iOS 11.

Apple iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch Accessories

190129132757-6-underscored-product-red-t

The company that makes the iPhone and iPad also offers an array of cases. These range from silicone to leather, and from a basic case all the way to a folio. And all are available in the oh so lovely (RED) shade.

 

INSPI(RED) T-Shirt ($30; amazon.com)

190129132729-5-underscored-product-red-t

It's not necessarily a gadget, but it is the shirt that started a revolution. You can get the INSPI(RED) T-shirt in classic cranberry or mix it up with red, dark heather or black. Plus (RED) offers it in a plethora of sizes for youth, women and men.

Note: The prices above reflect the retailer's listed price at the time of publication.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HEALTH

Acid Attack Survivors Say Cambodia Is Denying Them Care

About 1,500 acid attacks are reported globally each year, most of them against women.

By Matt Blomberg

PHNOM PENH, Feb 5 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — For Moung Sreymom, survival comes down to accessing doctors that will treat her wounds for free.

As the target of an acid attack in Cambodia, the law entitles Sreymom to free medical care at state hospitals. But she — and many others like her — are yet to receive any.

"Nobody can help me. I have been treated unjustly," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Take Action: Support Women in South Africa Who Have Been Victims of Domestic Violence

Actúa: STOP GBV

 
 
 
1 punto

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: Vodacom Group

In late 2014, the now-single mother's life changed course when a rival vendor poured flesh-eating acid over her head as she worked her market stall in rural Cambodia.

Her daughter, aged two at the time, was splashed across the face.

They have since moved to Phnom Penh to be close to two charities that provide treatment, and Sreymom lives with wounds under her arms that re-open when she works.

"I can't bear to talk about it — I just want to forget," she said.

About 1,500 acid attacks are reported globally each year, most of them against women, according to Acid Survivors Trust International, a London-based charity.

The attacks are usually carried out as revenge, sometimes for suspected infidelity, and can leave their targets severely disfigured — and in need of ongoing treatment — for life.

Sreymom is one of 17 Cambodians profiled by Human Rights Watch (HRW) in a new report that accuses Phnom Penh of failing to enforce a law passed in 2012 to curb acid attacks and provide legal and medical support to victims.

The report, "'What Hell Feels Like': Acid Violence in Cambodia," said while the number of attacks had fallen, not a single survivor had received treatment free of charge at a public hospital.

Read More: A Woman or Girl Is Killed in Canada Every 2.5 Days: Report

"Instead, survivors face the full range of problems anyone in need of emergency and other serious medical treatment faces in Cambodia, including denial of treatment until they show proof that they can pay or provide out-of-pocket payments," it said.

Cambodia's health sector is beset by allegations of corruption and informal payments, with the health of patients often held to ransom.

But health ministry spokesman Ly Sovan said the government was holding up its end of the bargain with regard to acid attack victims, contrary to HRW's findings.

"We would like to deny the accusation. We have the law, and we provide the service for free," he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, referring further questions to a second spokesman who did not respond.

'KARMA'

Survivors of acid attacks in Cambodia describe feeling helpless and alone in their fight for justice and health care — and not just because of official inaction.

One woman profiled by HRW described how she was doused in a crowded market where shoppers cheered for her attacker to escape as acid ate through her face and upper body.

Only after she convinced them that she was the wife — and not the mistress — of the attacker did they come to her aid.

"There is a general perception in Cambodia that somehow the attack was deserved, they were in an extramarital affair, it was their karma, etc." said Erin Bourgois, former head of the shuttered Cambodian Acid Survivors Charity, or CASC.

CASC was the only charity dedicated to acid violence in Cambodia and a key driver behind implementation of the acid law.

It ran support groups and aftercare shelters; educated medical professionals, local police and government officials; and provided aftercare for survivors, both physical and psychological.

Between 2010 and 2014, it measured an 83% decrease in acid attacks.

Read More: These Powerful Portraits of Acid Attack Victims Tell a Story of Courage and Survival

Then, in 2015 with about 50 survivors on its books, CASC phased out and handed over responsibility to the government.

"There was an expectation that the Royal Government of Cambodia would fulfil its end of the bargain by providing these free services to survivors as prescribed in the law," Bourgois said.

But Sun Nov, a garment worker who has required regular treatment since her jealous husband doused her in acid in 2016, said she'd seen nothing of it.

"There is no free treatment," she said. "I've never heard of this policy."

(Reporting by Matt Blomberg @BlombergMD; Editing by Claire Cozens. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, property rights, and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SALUD

La salud global es buena para la paz mundial, dice Melinda Gates

Cada dólar invertido en los fondos de salud globales genera $20 en beneficios sociales y económicos.

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
Organizaciones como Gavi, la Iniciativa de erradicación mundial de la poliomielitis ayudan a salvar millones de vidas en todo el mundo al proporcionar servicios de atención médica. Sin financiamiento, las comunidades más pobres están en mayor riesgo de padecer enfermedades que amenazan la vida. Puedes ayudar a aumentar el acceso a los recursos de salud tomando medidas aquí.

Melinda Gates se encuentra realizando una campaña para asegurar que las organizaciones que trabajan para mejorar la salud de mujeres y niños estén alineadas y obtengan los fondos que necesitan para continuar con su trabajo de salvamento. Esa y otras preocupaciones es lo que transmitió en una reciente nota de opinión que escribió para CNN.

 

La Iniciativa de Erradicación Mundial de la Polio; Gavi, la Alianza de Vacunas; el Fondo Mundial de Lucha contra el SIDA, la Tuberculosis y la Malaria; y el Global Financing Facility (GFF) necesitan recaudar fondos en los próximos 18 meses para continuar haciendo su trabajo, según el artículo de opinión.

 

"Con los políticos de todo el mundo recurriendo a la retórica del aislacionismo, me preocupa que los gobiernos que han sido donantes confiables, incluido mi propio país, Estados Unidos, dejen de invertir y dejen que los fondos se agoten", escribió Gates. "Esto podría ponerle fin a la oportunidad de hacer un progreso histórico en la lucha contra la enfermedad a través de una inversión sostenida en los fondos de salud mundiales".

 

En los últimos 20 años, Gates y su esposo Bill han donado más de $10 mil millones a estas organizaciones, y la pareja dice que ha valido la pena cada centavo.

 

“Estas organizaciones no son triviales ni prescindibles. De hecho, probablemente sean las mejores inversiones que haya hecho nuestra fundación”, dijo Bill.

 

Estos programas salvan millones de vidas en todo el mundo, por ejemplo, proporcionando vacunas vitales y atención médica a las comunidades empobrecidas.

 

Gavi, la Alianza de Vacunas, ha vacunado a cerca de 700 millones de niños, y desde su fundación, el número de niños menores de 5 años que mueren en países de ingresos medios y bajos se ha reducido en un 40% aproximadamente.

 

El Fondo Mundial ha ayudado a combatir el VIH, el SIDA, la tuberculosis y la malaria en todo el mundo. Los programas de salud que han trabajado con la asociación del Fondo Mundial han salvado 27 millones de vidas.

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
2 puntos

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

"Si no estamos ganando la guerra contra las enfermedades, la estamos perdiendo", dijo Peter Sands, director ejecutivo del Fondo Mundial.

 

Los casos de poliomielitis han disminuido en un 99,99% desde la creación de la Iniciativa de erradicación mundial de la poliomielitis en 1988.

 

Pero sin una mayor financiación, estas organizaciones tendrán una capacidad extremadamente limitada para continuar ayudando a otros a lograr y mantener una buena salud, y eso no solo es malo para la salud de las personas, sino que es malo para la paz mundial.

 

"He descrito el impacto de los fondos de salud globales en términos de vidas salvadas. Es una métrica bastante buena por sí misma, pero también es parte de algo más grande: salvar vidas es el primer paso hacia un mundo más próspero y pacífico", dijo Melinda.

 

Mejorar la salud global también tiene buen sentido financiero. De acuerdo con el Centro de Consenso de Copenhague, cada dólar que se invierte en mejorar la salud mundial genera alrededor de $ 20 en beneficios socioeconómicos.

 

"Con una inversión sostenida, los fondos de salud mundiales continuarán salvando millones y millones de vidas y encontrarán el camino para un futuro seguro y estable", dijo Melinda. “Esas son las clases de inversiones que deberían duplicarse en el mundo”.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CITIZENSHIP

Angelina Jolie Says ‘We Cannot Say We Had No Warning’ About Rohingya Crisis

The actress and superstar humanitarian is currently in Bangladesh visiting refugee camps.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
The Rohingya crisis emerged as a result of extreme poverty and human rights abuses. Nearly 730,000 Rohingya fled violence at the hands of the Burmese military, seeking safety in neighboring Bangladesh in 2017 — but their struggles are not over. Angelina Jolie is urging world leaders to address this humanitarian crisis. You can take action on this issue here.

Angelina Jolie is calling out world leaders for failing to prevent and address the Rohingya refugee crisis.

“What is most tragic about this situation is that we cannot say we had no warning,” Jolie, a special envoy for the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), said on Tuesday. “It is the result of four decades of persecution and discrimination, which have gone unaddressed for far too long.”

The actress and superstar humanitarian is currently in Bangladesh as part of a UNHCR mission to assess humanitarian needs in the refugee camps. 

Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees have been living in camps in Bangladesh since fleeing neighboring Myanmar in droves in August 2017.

Angelina-Jolie-Rohingya-Refugees-Feburary-2.jpgUNHCR Special Envoy Angelina Jolie speaks with Rohingya refugees in Chakmarkul camp, in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh.
Image: © Santiago Escobar-Jaramillo/UNHCR

Take Action: Step Up to Support Migrants and Refugees!

Actúa: Tuitea ahora

 
 
 
2 puntos

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: CHIME FOR CHANGE

The Rohingya are a predominantly Muslim, ethnic minority who have been deprived of their rights for generations in Buddhist-majority Myanmar. For decades, the Burmese government has refused to recognize Rohingya people — who can trace their roots in Myanmar back centuries — as citizens and severely limits their movements and economic opportunities.

Jolie had met with Rohingya refugees in 2005 and displaced Rohingya in Myanmar in July 2015, who had fled this oppression. But in 2017, decades of tension and rights abuses came to a head as the Burmese military engaged in a violent crackdown on Rohingya communities. UN investigators have likened the abuse of the Rohingya to genocide — causing approximately 730,000 Rohingya people to seek refuge in Bangladesh.

The terms of the Rohingya refugees return to Myanmar have been under negotiation since late 2017, but the UN says the refugees cannot yet safely be returned home.

“The Rohingya families I have met are no different from other refugees in one crucial respect: they want to be able to return home … And they have an absolute right to return home, but only when they feel safe enough to do so voluntarily and they know that their rights will be respected,” Jolie shared.

“I met a woman yesterday, a survivor of rape in Myanmar and she told me, ‘You would have to shoot me where I stand before I go back without my rights’,” she said.

Read More: Timeline: How the Rohingya Crisis Unfolded in Myanmar

The government of Myanmar has consistently denied responsibility for the violent atrocities, mass killings, and widespread rape that has been reported. Jolie called on both the government and the global community to support the Rohingya.

Angelina-Jolie-Rohingya-Refugees-Feburary-3.jpgAngelina Jolie visits the transit center in Kutapalong refugee settlement, in Cox's Bazar, where she met Jarina, 18, a Rohingya refugee who arrived a few weeks earlier. Her father was killed and her mother died of natural causes so she is now by herself.
Image: © Santiago Escobar-Jaramillo/UNHCR

“I urge the Myanmar authorities to show the genuine commitment needed to end the cycle of violence and displacement and improve the conditions for all communities in Rakhine State, in line with the recommendations of the Rakhine Advisory Commission, and working together with UNHCR and others,” she said.

“Until they can return, we have a collective responsibility to ensure that they can live dignified lives here in Bangladesh,” she added.

The UN has announced it will launch a $920 million appeal for humanitarian funding to continue to support the needs of the Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh’s camps, who will not be returning home any time soon, according to aid groups.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

SALUD

Esta loción orgánica podría ser la última herramienta en la lucha contra la malaria

Ginette Karirekinyana cree en el poder de las hierbas.

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
La malaria afecta a países con altos índices de pobreza. Karire Cosmetics está tratando de hacer que la prevención de la malaria sea fácil y asequible. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí.

 

La investigadora Ginette Karirekinyana cree que esta loción podría ser la clave para erradicar la malaria.

 

Karirekinyana lanzó la línea de cosméticos orgánicos Karire en 2017, y sus productos repelentes de mosquitos continúan creciendo en popularidad, informó recientemente Quartz África.

 

"Si la malaria es un problema africano, los países africanos deben encontrar sus propias soluciones", dijo Karirekinyana a Quartz.

 

La malaria se propaga a través de parásitos transmitidos por mosquitos infectados. El África subsahariana, que enfrenta las tasas más altas de pobreza extrema, también ve las tasas más altas de malaria. Solo en 2017 hubo 1.8 millones de casos de malaria en Burundi. Pero la malaria también es una amenaza importante para la salud en todo el mundo. En 2017, 435,000 personas murieron de malaria.

 

Karirekinyana, nacida en Burundi, llevó a su equipo a descubrir cómo usar el aceite esencial de catnip destilado para protegerse de los mosquitos que transportan la malaria. Durante un ensayo que Karirekinyana realizó para probar la loción, 55 de los 60 participantes dijeron que no fueron mordidos por el mosquito cuando lo usaron. Ahora, con un equipo ágil de 20 personas, Karire también produce jabones asequibles y té con el mismo aceite de hierba gatera y está buscando vender detergente repelente de mosquitos online.

 

Cuando Karirekinyana comenzó su negocio, los mosquiteros eran el método de prevención de la malaria, pero según el director ejecutivo Martin Edlundde la organización Malaria No More, se están volviendo menos efectivos. Al mismo tiempo, los mosquitos se están volviendo inmunes a los insecticidas, los productos químicos utilizados para matarlos. Adempas, tampoco hay fondos suficientes dedicados a detener la epidemia, dijo Edlund.

 

Karirekinyana quería lanzar un producto económico que sea fácil de integrar en la rutina diaria. Aplicar loción es mucho más fácil que envolver una casa entera en una red.

Actores e influencers ya promueven el emprendimiento Karire, pero la compañía está luchando para lograr poner el producto en manos de las personas que viven en áreas rurales.

 

Karire es solo un ejemplo de múltiples innovaciones recientes para la prevención de la malaria. Los investigadores lanzaron un nuevo medicamento contra la malaria hecho con oro en enero. Ese mismo mes, los estudios encontraron que una vacuna contra la malaria asociada con el embarazo era segura.

 

Erradicar por completo la enfermedad sigue siendo un reto. En 2018, la OMS anunció que el progreso en la lucha contra la malaria se ha estancado. Ahora, depende de investigadores como Karirekinyana encontrar nuevas soluciones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2.1k
GIRLS AND WOMEN

5 gender equality campaigns you need to get behind in 2018

25 February 2018 12:25PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

 
  

Right now, a seismic shift is happening when it comes to addressing gender inequality.

Women around the world are speaking up and stepping forward in their millions, calling out the injustice they experience every day. These movements are changing conversations, changing culture, and changing laws. And it’s critical that the girls and women hit hardest by gender inequality – those living in extreme poverty – are not left behind.

If you want to live in a world where there is justice for women and girls everywhere, here are five campaigns you need to get behind:

He for She

 

This movement, initiated by UN Women, aims to engage boys and men because gender equality doesn’t discriminate — it affects both sexes. Since its launch, over 1.3 million (and counting!) actions advocating for a more gender equal world have been completed. Be part of the change here.

Women’s March

 

On January 21, 2017, millions of women and men across the globe marched together in an effort to generate transformative social change — and it worked. Why? Because the Women’s March wasn’t just a march, it was the spark that started a fire. Get involved with their 2018 activities here.

#EndFGM

 

Around the world, a grassroots, Africa-led movement is happening to end female genital mutilation (FGM) within a generation. With incredible organisations like The Girl Generation leading the charge, it’s clear that progress is possible. Learn more about how you can #EndFGM here.  

Times Up

 

A brand new movement created in the wake of #MeToo seeks to address the systemic inequalities and injustices women experience in the workplace around the world. Times Up will raise awareness about these experiences AND provide valuable subsidies towards legal support for individuals that bring legal action against perpetrators of sexual harassment or related retaliation in the workplace. To find out how you can get involved, check out their site.

Poverty is Sexist

 

We know sexism is global – and we know the fight against it should be too.

Our #PovertyIsSexist campaign aims to break down the barriers that keep women and girls in the world’s poorest countries from achieving their full potential.

If YOU agree that none of us are equal until all of us are equal, then join the movement today.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2.5k
GIRLS AND WOMEN

This chess champion is using her love of the game to empower girls everywhere

8 October 2018 10:10AM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

SIGN THE PETITION

An open letter to leaders

 
  

Chances are, you already know about Phiona Mutesi – AKA the Queen of Katwe! Phiona’s journey as a chess prodigy inspired the 2016 Disney movie, but her story didn’t stop when the credits rolled. To this day, she continues to be an inspiration for girls everywhere!

Phiona’s upbringing — like many kids in Katwe, Uganda — was far from easy. Her father passed away from complications with AIDS, and her sister passed shortly after from unknown causes. Her mother worked long hours to provide for her family, but there wasn’t enough left over to afford school fees. As a result, Phiona had to leave school when she was nine.

Despite the odds stacked against her, she found her calling. The same year she left school, Phiona joined a chess program run by the Sports Outreach Institute where she quickly gained recognition as a chess prodigy. By 2012, she was a three-time junior girls’ champion of Uganda!

As if that wasn’t impressive enough, her and Ivy Amoko earned Woman Candidate Master titles. This made them the first titled female chess players in Uganda. She’s also won multiple categories in Uganda’s National Junior Chess Championships.

Last year, Phiona began college at Northwest University in the United States and she’s already accomplished a lot in her freshman year! She competed on her school’s chess team in the Pan-American Intercollegiate Chess Championshipsand, even though it was the team’s first time competing, they swept the competition in the Top Small College Team category!

Phiona’s determined to create opportunities for other girls to thrive. In 2013, she was invited to the Women of the World Summit and awarded a grant for her work — which she used to promote girls’ access to education and chess in Uganda. She also founded a girls-only chess clinic, where girls can learn how to play the game and hear about the importance of education!

Phiona’s success is proof that when girls are given access to the resources they need to thrive, they can achieve anything.

We’re fighting for a world where every girl has the opportunity to build the future she deserves. Join us by adding your name to our open letter right now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
71
HEALTH

Ten threats to global health in 2019

25 January 2019 12:42PM UTC | By: JANE EAGLES

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

This blog is derived from ‘Ten Threats to Global Health in 2019’ . 

The World Health Organization (WHO) has outlined top ten threats to global health this year. We’re glad to say that at ONE, we’ve been campaigning on some of the same major health issues, and we’re ready to step-up the pressure in 2019.

Through our #EUAid campaign, we’re fighting for EU member states to increase their funding for international development (through their Multiannual Financial Framework). This funding will help to tackle the factors that can lead to population displacement, conflict, drought, and other threats to health. 

Our Make Naija Stronger campaign fought for an increase in government funding for the healthcare service — and we won. This funding helps the most marginalised in Nigeria access primary healthcare. 

And last, but by no means least, our members will be campaigning for a fully funded Global Fund, to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria.

Read on to find out the other primary threats to global health…

TIJ_3587.jpg

HIV

There has been enormous progress in the fight against HIV. But the epidemic continues to rage with nearly a million people dying from the condition every year. A group increasingly affected by HIV are young girls and women (aged 15-24), who are at higher risk and account for 1 in 4 HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa despite being only 10% of the population. This year, WHO will work with countries to support the introduction of self-testing so that more people with HIV know their status and can receive treatment.

Weak primary healthcare

WHO will work with partners to revitalize and strengthen primary health care in countries as many do not have adequate primary health care facilities. In 2019, WHO will work with partners to revitalize and strengthen primary health care in countries, and follow up on specific commitments made by in the Astana Declaration.

Fragile and vulnerable settings

More than 1.6 billion people — 22% of the global population — live in places where protracted crises including drought, famine, conflict and population displacement, and weak health services leave them without access to basic care. WHO will continue to work in these countries to strengthen health systems.

Ebola and other high-threat pathogens

In 2018, the DRC saw two separate Ebola outbreaks, both of which spread to cities of more than 1 million people, some of the affected provinces were also in an active conflict zone, showing the context in which an epidemic of a high-threat pathogen such as Ebola is critical.

Vaccine hesitancy

The reluctance or refusal to vaccinate despite the availability of vaccines threatens to reverse progress made in tackling vaccine-preventable diseases. In 2019 WHO will ramp up work to eliminate cervical cancer worldwide by increasing coverage of the HPV vaccine, among other interventions.

Global influenza pandemic

The world will face another influenza pandemic. WHO is constantly monitoring the circulation of influenza to detect potential pandemic strains: 153 institutions in 114 countries are involved in global surveillance and response.

Air pollution and climate change.

With nine out of ten people breathing in polluted air every day – it comes as little surprise that air pollution is considered by the WHO as the greatest environmental risk to health. The microscopic pollutants in the air kill 7 million people a year.

Noncommunicable diseases

Noncummunicable diseases including diabetes, cancer and heart disease are collectively responsible for over 70% of all deaths worldwide. This includes the premature deaths of 15 million people aged between 30 and 69. This year WHO will work with governments to help them meet the global target of reducing physical inactivity by 15% by 2030.

Antimicrobial resistance

The development of antibiotics, antivirals and antimalarials are some of modern medicine’s greatest successes. But time with these drugs is running out. Antimicrobial resistance is rising. WHO is working to implement a global action plan to tackle antimicrobial resistance.

Dengue

This mosquito-borne disease can be lethal and has been seen as a growing threat for decades. An estimated 4% of the world is at risk of dengue fever, and there are around 390 million infections. WHO’s Dengue control strategy aims to reduce deaths by 50% by 2020.

You can read more about our work on health here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...