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The Action Thread Part Two

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Opinion: We have to think bigger about investments in women and girls

By Megan O’Donnell // 12 February 2019
 
_fNcuG_U15aonG1702dlUDbC3sdPO86woKMaUe-Kc7ipN0uvqhoO2N-kZeJ9s-AUwanucXABhJnGQ62438_7cy6acut2IfqJ-SItKDpqhkl4xkxZciuykOjEq9zPqUTikeJ3Wjgj A woman at work at a vocational training center in Khomasdal, Namibia. Photo by: John Hogg / World Bank / CC BY-NC-ND

They called 2018 “the year of the woman,” yet still, nowhere on earth do women have as many opportunities as men. Nowhere.

That’s why 2019 must be the year the world finally gets serious about long-term investments in women and girls, and especially those living in extreme poverty.

How can we address violence against women and girls with disability?

At the Global Disability Summit in July, governments, NGOs, multilateral institutions, and more vowed to help address the issue of violence facing people with disability. These case studies suggest how.

We have to think bigger, and we have to think differently. For years, many in the development community have focused primarily on trying to improve girls’ and women’s individual capabilities — making them more educated, healthier, and better trained. But in addition to focusing on women and girls’ capabilities, more needs to be done to improve their opportunities and change the economic system that is biased against them.

Study after study tells us that giving women and girls equal access to economic opportunities, including productive and financial assets and quality employment, is the key to unlocking economic growth in an unprecedented way. If we create a system where women in sub-Saharan Africa have the same economic opportunities as men, it could add up to $700 billion to the global economy. For perspective, that’s roughly the size of the economies of Nigeria and South Africa combined.

 

More importantly, closing gender gaps in the economy and society at large would mean that this wealth is more evenly distributed — that women stand to benefit more equally from the value they contribute to their communities and countries. It would give women the capacity to invest more in the health, education, and the overall well-being of their children, thus securing a more prosperous future for the next generation.  

The potential payoffs are enormous — and we can’t afford to ignore them. But neither can we shy away from the fact that we have our work cut out for us. Over 1 billion women do not have access to a bank account. Some 43 million women do not have access to a health facility to deliver their babies. Right now, 86 percent of girls don’t have basic math skills by the time they are 14. Fortunately, 2019 is ripe with opportunities to help women and girls get the education, economic opportunities, and resources they need and deserve to thrive.

In August, France will host the G-7 Summit, where world leaders have an opportunity to make historic policy and financial commitments that benefit women and girls. World leaders should build on the successes of last year’s G-7: Through the 2X Challenge, all G-7 development finance institutions committed to mobilizing $3 billion to economically empower women in developing countries.

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France has the chance to go further by championing a broader array of legislative and financial commitments and by launching a robust accountability mechanism to track progress and hold leaders accountable.

France is also hosting the replenishment of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria in October 2019. HIV/AIDS remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age, and nearly 1,000 girls are infected with HIV every day. The reasons behind this are complex, but in part relate to limitations on girls’ opportunities — their economic vulnerability and their limited bargaining power in their sexual relationships.

As the Global Fund has acknowledged, we’ll need a successful replenishment and a prioritization of all of adolescent girls’ unique needs and constraints in order to end the AIDS crisis for good.

Donor countries will play an important role at the G-7 and in fighting AIDS, but so too will African governments, who need to increase investments in their citizens and ensure that investments effectively reach women and girls. That’s why the ONE Campaign and our partners will call upon African leaders to also increase their ambitions in 2019 with regard to promoting gender equality, implementing, and financing necessary policy changes to meaningfully improve women and girls’ capabilities and opportunities alike.  

 

Beating extreme poverty by tackling global gender inequality will, of course, require more than just one G-7 or replenishment. It’ll take a steady stream of victories both big and small. And that important work must not wait a minute longer.

Investing in women and girls is the single most promising economic, political, and social opportunity of our time. 2019 should be the year we treat it that way.

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These motivational backgrounds will keep you going in 2019
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CULTURE

These motivational backgrounds will keep you going in 2019

20 December 2018 6:41PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

We made things happen this year — seriously, check out everything we achievedthanks to YOU — and now we’re more motivated than ever to keep up the fight in 2019. To keep ourselves at the top of our game, we created a set of phone backgrounds to remind us that we’re in it to win it.

Check them out below and download your favourite one!

Maya-Wallpaper.png

DOWNLOAD

Joan-Wallpaper-250.png

DOWNLOAD

Jasilyn-Wallpaper-250.png

DOWNLOAD

Want to join us in the fight for a more equal world in 2019? Become a ONE Member today!

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CULTURE

Nigeria’s youth are ready to vote for their future

14 February 2019 8:39PM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

As Nigeria gets ready to go the polls and elect a new President (16 February), young Nigerians have been busy debating the issues, quizzing the candidates and getting ready to make their votes count.

ONE’s #VoteYourFuture campaign has been empowering young people to create the future they want to see – by understanding the issues that affect Nigeria and voting for a President based on their policies, not who they are.

On the road

Determined to make their voices heard, ONE Champions, volunteers and a host of influential speakers took #VoteYourFuture on the road, leading panel discussions and debating policies from one side of Nigeria to the other.

ONE Champion Ibrahim Abubakar (left) and ONE Campaigns Assistant Olalekan Obisesan in Kaduna State University, Kaduna.

ONE Champion Ibrahim Abubakar (left) and ONE Campaigns Assistant Olalekan Obisesan in Kaduna State University, Kaduna.

Young Nigerians talked about their role in the elections, and how entertainment can be used to educate them about the issues that count. Job creation, education and health were hotly debated, and soon spread beyond the room, trending on Twitter.

ONE Members at the University of Ilorin, Kwara State.

ONE Members at the University of Ilorin, Kwara State.

In her closing speech, ONE’s Nigeria Director, Serah Makka-Ugbabe told the crowd in Gombe, North East Nigeria, “Holding our leaders to account is the bulk of our work and that lasts for 4 years… Nigeria only works if each of us does our part.”

ONE’s Nigeria Director, Serah Makka-Ugbabe with participants at Federal College of Education, Gombe.

ONE’s Nigeria Director, Serah Makka-Ugbabe (centre) with participants at Federal College of Education, Gombe.

Throughout the tour, thousands of young people signed the Youth Declaration and demanded that leaders invest in Nigeria’s youth. The Declaration lays out what matters most to young Nigerians. Job creation comes top of the list – not a surprise when around a third of 15 – 35 year olds can’t get work or can only find low-skilled jobs.

The great news is that six presidential candidates have listened, and also endorsed the Declaration!

On air

While some young people were taking #VoteYourFuture on the road, others were taking it on air. ONE partnered with TRACE, a Nigerian TV Channel, and Enough is Enough to produce a series of interviews with five of the Presidential Candidateswho signed the Youth Declaration. Young Nigerians, including ONE Champions, quizzed the candidates about their policies.

The interviews, will educate and empower even more youth to vote and have a say in their future.

Ready to vote…

Rosemond Edem, ONE Champion, welcoming participants at the University of Calabar, Cross River State.

Rosemond Edem, ONE Champion, welcoming participants at the University of Calabar, Cross River State.

Over 85,000 young people have so far signed the Youth Declaration, and it’s not over yet. Rosemond Edem, ONE Champion, South South region of Nigeria said “We are all eager and ready to exercise our rights at the upcoming elections by voting based on the issues.”

Stay up to date with ONE’s work in Nigeria by following us on Twitter & Facebook!

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221
HEALTH

This powerful activist and mentor is fighting HIV stigma in Uganda

5 February 2019 2:24PM UTC | By: PRUDENCE NYAMISHANA

ADD YOUR NAME

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

 
  

We first introduced you to Robinah in 2016, and now we’re catching up with her to see what her life has been like since she revealed her HIV status to her classmates and began her journey as an HIV/AIDS activist.

When Robinah Babirye was ten years old, her mother sat down with her and her twin sister Eva and told them they were both HIV positive. Robinah was devastated.

Now 25, Robinah sees that moment as a beginning, sparking what has become an incredible journey into HIV activism work.

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Robinah started her journey as an HIV activist with a photo on Facebook (left). Four years later, she’s achieved more than ever (right).

She took the first step on Facebook. One morning, she decided it was time to tell the world about her status. She wore a t-shirt with an inscription that said HIV Positive, took a photo, posted it on her Facebook page and waited for the responses to come.

To her relief, they were overwhelmingly supportive and she has been unstoppable since. Now Robinah is well-known in Uganda as a powerful advocate for HIV patients and vulnerable girls. She won the crown as Uganda’s Miss Young Positive, graduated from Kyambogo University in December 2016, works with school outreach programs, and uses media, film and music to amplify her cause.

Her first film with her twin sister Eva, Don’t Dare Touch, premiered in Côte d’Ivoire in 2017 during the International Conference on AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa. The movie addresses issues faced by HIV-discordant couples, prevention of mother to child HIV transmission, stigma and treatment. The audience loved it so much they wanted more, and now a series is in the works.

IMG_9364.jpgRobinah works with the African Young Positives Network and volunteers with the Uganda Network of Young People Living with HIV to carry out training and community outreach programs, such as the Young Positive Beauty Pageant and the People in Need Agency (PINA) Uganda, an organisation for whom she was originally a pioneer beneficiary.

Through PINA, Robinah dedicates much of her time to mentoring younger HIV advocates. “I have to give back,” she says.

Robinah-1.pngTo date, she has mentored more than 45 girls in Kalangala Island and Kasenyi Landing Site on Lake Victoria and recently teamed up with two of her mentees, 19-year-old Winnie Nansamba and 21-year-old Ritah Nansamba, to establish the Roof and Equip Winnie campaign. They are now working to establish services for child survivors of sexual abuse and trafficking in Lake Victoria’s Ssese Islands.

“Some of the girls [on the islands] have been sexually violated multiple times, others by their close relatives. Others have been trafficked from the mainland to the islands,” Robinah says.

IMG_9357.jpgAnother of her mentees, Fionah, won a scholarship last summer to attend the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam.

“When I listened to Robinah share her story, I decided to come out,“ Fionah says. “She is such a wonderful mentor she even recommended me to attend the conference in Amsterdam.”

Next on Robinah’s agenda is a plan to build a rehabilitation center for girls who are survivors of sexual violence. Designed to be a safe haven for survivors to talk about their experiences and challenges, the center will offer post-traumatic care, psychosocial support, counselling and treatment, and will work with survivors to rebuild their self-esteem.

Robinah-2.png“We also plan to have vocational training facilities to skill them for financial empowerment,” Robinah says, adding that she hopes the empowered girls will become change agents for others, do away with toxic cultural constructs and break the cycle of poverty.

What matters most to her, she says, is inspiring others in her work, even when she encounters challenges.

“I think about the people who look up to me and I wonder what will happen to them if I give up now,” she says. “So, I keep going.”

Join Robinah in the fight against HIV by adding your name now and asking world leaders to back the Global Fund.

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Image for Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Today, about 1,000 young women will be infected with HIV. Tomorrow, it will be another 1,000. One week from now, nearly 7,000 young women will have contracted HIV.

The grim news: AIDS isn’t a disease of the past, it's a crisis now. The great news: we have the means to end it.

The Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB, and malaria has helped slash deaths from these diseases by a third. This innovative partnership backs brave frontline nurses and doctors and the latest technologies to help people fight back against these killer diseases.

Millions of women and girls are still at risk, but if enough of us take action, 2019 could be a turning point in the fight. This year, government and business leaders will gather in France to decide whether or not to expand the reach of the Global Fund. With full funding, we could help save 16 million more lives and stem the spread of disease. That’s the kind of bold ambition the world needs.

Tell world leaders to step things up so progress doesn’t slip back. Join the call to fully finance the Global Fund.

Dear government and business leaders,

We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good.

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WHY 2019 IS A CRITICAL YEAR IN THE FIGHT TO END AIDS

This year, nearly ONE MILLION people will die from a disease that can be treated with just one pill that costs 20 cents per day. 

This week, 7,000 young girls will be newly infected with a preventable disease. 

Today, 500 babies will be needlessly born with HIV.

As you’re reading this, a teenager will be newly infected with a virus… we’ve been fighting for 30+ years. 

These are not headlines of the past, but the story of today. AIDS is still a crisis and it won’t be over unless we act now.

RED Swaziland July 2018-162.jpg

THE GOOD NEWS? WE KNOW HOW TO FIGHT THIS — AND END IT. ONCE AND FOR ALL. SAY HELLO TO THE GLOBAL FUND.

The Global Fund was founded in 2002 to accelerate the end of AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria as epidemics.

The Global Fund is an organization made up of partners including governments, civil society and the private sector, and they mobilize and invest nearly $4 billion a year to support life-saving programs in more than 140 countries— programs that are set up and run by the very same people are directly impacted by these diseases. These programs not only combat these diseases, but  ultimately revitalize entire communities, strengthen local health systems and improve economies. Bill Gates has called the Global Fund “one of the kindest things people have ever done for one another.”

100% of the money (RED) raises goes to the Global Fund—this has helped save millions of lives and provide critical prevention, treatment and care services. 

This October, The Global Fund will host their sixth replenishment conference in France, the second-largest donor to the Fund. There, they will ask government and corporate leaders and private donors to come together and help save 16 million lives over the next 3 years by meeting their funding goal of US $14 billion.

RED Swaziland July 2018-13.jpg

It’s an ambitious ask, but US $14 billion for the Global Fund would...

  • Help get the world back on track to end HIV, tuberculosis and malaria.

  • Save 16 million lives between 2021 and 2023, reducing the mortality rate by 52 percent across the three diseases by 2023, relative to 2017 levels.

  • Reduce the death toll across the three diseases to 1.3 million in 2023, down from 2.5 million in 2017, and from 4.1 million in 2005.

  • Avert 234 million infections or cases reducing the incidence rate by 42 percent across the three diseases by 2023, relative to 2017 levels.

ENDING HIV, TUBERCULOSIS AND MALARIA BY 2030 IS WITHIN REACH, BUT NOT YET FULLY IN OUR GRASP. WITH ONLY 11 YEARS LEFT, WE HAVE NO TIME TO WASTE. WE MUST STEP UP THE FIGHT NOW.

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Fingal County Council has announced a new opportunity for musicians within their Musician-in-Residence Programme 2019.

Expressions of interest are invited from musicians who wish to be included on a Musicians’ Panel, with a view to delivering high quality music lessons to children in primary schools during the academic year 2019 – 2020.

The purpose of the Musician-in-Residence programme is to enhance the music education children receive through the primary school curriculum. It supports schools to deliver instrumental or choral tuition; and assists class teachers build their capacity for music teaching.

Visit www.fingalarts.ie/education for the Application Guidelines & Criteria and the Application Form.
Application deadline: 8 March 2019.

http://fingalarts.ie/education?fbclid=IwAR3oUxtb6GSB0Tnnqo3UxEQgAmsuNmscWsZBYgBYF4n0yiEFqJLqx6Kfst0

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Great news released this afternoon by CreativeIrl, including the announcement that Music Generation will expand into 5 new areas of the country in 2019. This commitment as part of Creative Youth brings us closer than ever to realising our vision for universal access to music tuition for all children and young people, regardless of circumstance. We’re grateful for the ongoing support of our funders and donors, U2, The Ireland Funds, The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships.

We’re looking forward to sharing more details of the next five areas to get underway in the coming weeks — stay tuned!

#CreativeSchoolsIRL #CreativeYouth

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sentado

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MEMBERS IN ACTION

5 things you can do to make the world a better place in 2019

19 December 2018 6:57PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

To say there’s a lot going on in the world right now might be an understatement. That’s why we’re vowing to be bigger, better and bolder in our fight to make the world a better place in 2019. But, creating big change requires a group effort and we’ll need you to get involved!

Here are 5 things you can do to make sure we start tipping the scales:

Find a cause.

Start the new year off on the right foot by supporting the cause (or causes!) you believe in. Not sure where to start? Here are a few of our favourite organisations that fight for causes we can get behind: The Nadia Initiative, Love Our Girls, New Faces New Voices, Restless Development, the African Women’s Development Fund, and Global Fund for Women.

Learn something new.

Educating yourself is one of the first steps you can take to make the world a better place. Set aside time in the new year to learn about the issues that get you fired up and seek out a better understanding of how your involvement can help push a movement forward.

Start conversations.

Put your newly acquired knowledge to the test by engaging in conversations about the issues at hand with everyone (think grandparents, best friends, classmates, workout buddies, etc.) you know. Speaking to others is one of the best ways to gain insight into how other people feel and can give you the power to understand what barriers lay in the way of solving the issue and where opportunities exist to leverage change. Plus, it’s a great way to spread information to people who may not otherwise have been reached!

Participate.

Participation in change making is all about giving one thing: time. Here are a few ways you can get involved: sign a petition, volunteer, show up to the march, write a letter to the editor or follow your favourite organisations on social media.

Get out of your comfort zone.

Here’s the truth: fighting to make the world a better place isn’t always the most comfortable task. But if there was ever a time when the world needed its citizens to challenge themselves and fight for what’s right, it’s now. We have some big issues to tackle and your actions and voice are important to creating change and holding our leaders accountable. The good news is determining how far out of your comfort zone you go is up to you.

Fired up? Become a ONE Member to get in on our world-changing actions in 2019.

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1 DE FEBRERO DE 2019

 

34
 
MEDIO AMBIENTE

¿Por qué Beyoncé y JAY-Z quieren que seas vegetariano?

El motivo te hará cambiar tu dieta.

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
Adoptar una dieta basada en vegetales y frutas podría ser la mejor manera de mejorar tu propia salud y reducir tu impacto personal en el medio ambiente. Beyoncé y JAY-Z están pidiendo a sus fanáticos que consideren este cambio como un nuevo desafío. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí.

¿Comerías una ensalada de col rizada solo para obtener entradas de por vida a los conciertos de Beyoncé? ¿Qué tal un batido de plátano para ver a JAY-Z?

 

Si la respuesta es sí, entonces probablemente deberías entrar a Proyecto Greenprint, un movimiento apoyado por esta famosa pareja, que alienta a las personas a adoptar una dieta vegana.

 

Beyoncé le dijo recientemente a sus seguidores en Instagram que podrían ganar boletos de por vida para ver sus shows y los de JAY-Z si se unen al Proyecto Greenprint.

 

Una "huella verde" es el "impacto positivo que podemos tener en el mundo al comer comidas basadas en frutas y verduras", según indica el sitio web. A los fanáticos que ingresan al sorteo se les pide que proporcionen su dirección de correo electrónico, y luego se les muestran varias infografías sobre los beneficios ambientales de una dieta vegetariana o vegana.

 

Por ejemplo, comer nueve comidas a base de frutas y verduras equivale a mantener en pie 14 árboles que aportan oxígeno y quitan químicos dañinos de la atmósfera durante un mes, según el sitio.

 

El objetivo del movimiento no es empujar a las personas a adoptar una dieta del todo vegana. Lo que buscan es alentar a las personas a realizar pequeños cambios en la dieta y pensar sobre el impacto ambiental de sus hábitos alimenticios en el proceso.

 

A las personas que se unen al movimiento se les pide que incorporen más de estas comidas en sus rutinas semanales.

 

Para Beyoncé, esto significa "lunes sin carne" y "un desayuno de frutas y verduras”.

 

"La información es difícil de ignorar", dijo Beyoncé en un comunicado. “Los beneficios de una sola comida diaria hecha a base de frutas y verduras pueden tener un impacto tan profundo en nuestra salud y en el medio ambiente, que va desde reducir las emisiones de carbono hasta conservar el agua. Queremos desafiarte a medida que nos desafiamos a nosotros mismos para avanzar hacia un estilo de vida más saludable basado en frutas y verduras, y defender tu salud y la salud del planeta".

 

Beyoncé ha sido durante mucho tiempo una defensora de las dietas vegetarianas y, a menudo, come más comidas veganas cuando se está preparando para sus giras, de acuerdo a los consejos de su nutricionista Marco Borges, quien fundó 22 Días de Nutrición, el grupo que supervisa el Proyecto Greenprint.

 

Recientemente, un grupo de 30 científicos propuso la "Dieta de la salud planetaria" como una forma de frenar el cambio climático, prevenir la degradación ambiental y mejorar los resultados de salud global. La dieta hace que las personas coman más verduras, frutas y granos, mientras comen menos carne y productos lácteos.

 

A nivel mundial, la producción de carne es uno de los mayores impulsores de la deforestación, la degradación del suelo y el agotamiento del agua, mientras que las prácticas agrícolas sostenibles pueden producir más alimentos, ocupar menos tierra y tener un efecto regenerador en los ecosistemas locales.

 

"La dieta de salud planetaria se basa en pruebas epidemiológicas realmente duras, donde los investigadores siguieron a grandes grupos de personas durante décadas", dijo a The Guardian Marco Springmann, de la Universidad de Oxford, quien participó en el estudio. "Sucede que si se juntan todas las pruebas, se obtiene una dieta similar a algunas de las dietas más saludables que existen en el mundo real".

 

Otro informe encontró que volverse vegano es la "forma más grande" de ayudar al planeta, y las Naciones Unidas sostienen que las dietas deficientes son más peligrosas que las infecciones mortales como la malaria, causando 1 de cada 5 muertes en todo el mundo.

 

Respaldado por argumentos éticos, ambientales y de salud, las dietas vegetarianas se han vuelto populares en la última década.

 

Retos como "los lunes sin carne" han dado a muchas personas que no están dispuestas a renunciar por completo a los productos cárnicos un punto de entrada en el movimiento.

 

Ahora Beyoncé quiere que muchas personas cambien sus vidas y ayuden al planeta, y ella sabe que necesitan un punto de partida. Por eso, con tantas alternativas a la carne sus fans podrían estar felices de seguir su ejemplo.

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JULY 25, 2018

 

21
 
CITIZENSHIP

Oklahoma Woman Volunteers to Be Stand-In Mom at LGBTQ Weddings

Sara Cunningham also offers “free mom hugs” at Pride marches and festivals.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Same-sex marriage remains illegal in several states throughout the US. But actions like the one this mom has taken increase LGBTQ acceptance, curb violence, and reduce inequalities throughout the nation. You can join us in taking action on this issue and the rest of the UN’s Global Goals here.

A Midwestern woman is offering to be a stand-in mom at the LGBTQ weddings of strangers.

Sara Cunningham, who hails from Oklahoma, wants to be a source of comfort to couples whose families have not yet accepted their relationship, reports CBS News.

Related StoriesJune 22, 201815 LGBTQ Activists of the Past and Present You Should Know

"If you need a mom to attend your same-sex wedding because your biological mom won't, call me. I'm there," Cunningham wrote in a Facebook post that has since gone viral.

Up to 1.6 million young people experience homelessness in the United States every year, and 40% of them identify as LGBTQ, according to a 2012 studyconducted by the Williams Institute at UCLA Law.

The figures illustrate the harsh challenges many young queer individuals face in seeking acceptance from family members.

To wit, 46% of homeless LGBTQ youths ran away due to family rejection of their sexual orientation or gender identity, while 43% were forced out by their parents, the study noted. Yet another 32% faced physical, emotional, or sexual abuse at home, reported the Washington Post.

Cunningham is no stranger to LGBTQ activism. She told CBS News that ever since her son, Parker, first came out to her at the age of 21, she undertook her own journey of understanding and acceptance via private Facebook groups. She also wrote a book to help other mothers struggling to accept their LGBTQ children: How We Sleep at Night: A Mother's Memoir.

Related StoriesJune 25, 2018NYC Pride Marchers Tell Us What They Want Our Generation to Fight For

But it was after attending her first Pride march that Cunningham encountered stories of individuals being disowned by their families due to their sexual orientation.

The experience inspired her to begin offering “Free Mom Hugs” to anyone who wanted or needed one at subsequent Pride events, and spawned a support group of 3,000 members under the same name, noted CBS News.

She has since become ordained as an officiant and has officiated at 12 LGBTQ weddings.

“Many of the weddings I officiate, I'll say, 'How are your parents? Are they accepting?' And they say, 'Well, I don't know if I'll invite them or not, they don't acknowledge my relationship,'" Cunningham told CBS News.

It was such instances that prompted her to volunteer to be a "stand-in mom" at weddings, too.

"I'll be your biggest fan,” she wrote. “I'll even bring the bubbles."

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GIRLS & WOMEN

32 Posters of Badass Women in Science to Inspire Girls Today

“At the end of the day we're standing on the shoulders of giants, and most of these women are lost."

science_posters.jpg__1264x568_q85_crop_subsampling-2.jpg
 All images: Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya

Open the pages of a science book, or skim through a Google search for notable scientists, and a sea of white males dominate the lists of award-winners, accomplishments, and imagery. 

Now, imagine a world where every young classroom had a poster of Chen-Shiung Wu, the “First Lady of Physics,” who was born in a time when girls in China were not allowed to attend school, or Rosalyn Sussman Yalow 1977 Nobel Peace Prize winner for her work in radioimmunoassay, who began as secretary because she didn’t believe a graduate school would support her studies. 

roaslyn_sussman_yalow.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

The message these women send could encourage more girls to enter and stay in science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) careers, if only more people knew their legacies. Currently, male college students are three times more likely to be interested in STEM careers than females. In 2009, only 12% of chemists were women, and of those women, 2% were minority womenaccording to the National Science Foundation. 

chien_shiung_wu.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

Read More: Girls Start Doubting Their Own Intelligence at Age 6, Study Shows

Fortunately, neurologist turned designer, and one-time ballerina, Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya is adding to a growing movement to uncover and celebrate the lost women, like Yalow and Wu, of scientific history — an act to give girls more role models and encouragement to equal out STEM fields. 

Her project, Beyond Curie, is re-breathing life into science’s buried women with 32 stunning modern prints of badass women scientists you’ve most likely never heard of.

ada_lovelace.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

“At the end of the day we are standing on the shoulders of giants, and most of these women have been lost to history,” Phingbodhipakkiya told Global Citizen. “Many of these women have been barred from institutions and from receiving awards.” 

“This project is about highlighting all the other women besides Marie Curie who have built the foundation of scientific discovery our society depends on, and to create an awareness for women currently in STEM and how badass they are,” said Phingbodhipakkiya. 

Phingbodhipakkiya has long been an advocate for bridging the gap between science and art. Similar to many the scientists of Beyond Curie, an obstacle led Phingbodhipakkiya to the work she loves today.  

barbara_mcclintock.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

“I’ve always been in love with both art and science. My interest in neuroscience began when I got injured in college and couldn’t dance anymore. I desperately wanted to understand why I couldn’t move as gracefully as I used to, and began studying the intricacies of how the nervous and musculoskeletal systems work together. But the real turning point for me was when I was working at Columbia Medical Center doing Alzheimer's research. I realized, as scientists, we needed to be better equipped to convey the vital urgency of our work. I gained a new sense of purpose and made it my mission to learn how to use design to shine a light on science,” said Phingbodhipakkiya.

Read More: One Reason Why Girls Are Closing the Gap in Math Scores

carol_greider.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

Now, she is a design strategist and creative director. Her TED Talk dives into the power of storytelling and science, she started the Leading Strand, an initiative to connect designers and researchers. Personally, she bridged the two by taking science discipline into the creative process with Creative Habit, where she created a design a day for 270 days finishing each in just an hour. 

Beyond Curie began as an interest in civic engagement after the US election, and later became a larger design project, after a friend suggested Phingbodhipakkiya pick a cause and go for it. So Phingbodhipakkiya merged what she knows best, design and science, and took inspiration from working on the Leading Strand. 

elizabeth_blackburn.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

Then she opened a Kickstarter campaign, hoping to bring some awareness and long-deserved recognition to the countless lost women of STEM fields from astrophysics to biology and chemistry. Her Kickstarter quickly jumped its goal of $1,000 and has now raised nearly $15,000. 

Beyond Curie offers prints, pillows, postcards, and digital downloads for those who pledge their support for the project through the Kickstarter page. All proceeds not used for printmaking and shipping go to the Association for Women in Science. 

francoise_barre_sinoussi.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

Each print tell the story of stereotypes and boundary breaking women, like Rita Levi-Montalcini, who defied her father to become a doctor, and persisted carrying out neurology experiments in her bedroom after Mussolini banned Jews from professional careers. A total badass, Levi-Montalcini is also one of only 16 women to win a Nobel Peace Prize in a science field. 

rita_book_report (1).jpgCombining STEM, art, and women empowerment at a young age, Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya discovered Rita Levi-Montalcini in 4th grade. She shared her book report on the badass Neurologist with Global Citizen. Image courtesy Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya.

The prints themselves artfully combine the science field that each women was a mastermind within in a modern way. The clues and hints to their work are shown in each print revealing their stories. 

Read More: This All-female Coding School in Afghanistan is Tearing Down Gender Inequalities

“The best part has been to learn about women, their stories, their accomplishments and getting back into science,” said Phingbodhipakkiya. “It’s been a combination of searching online and looking for books, and images of these women who’ve done amazing things and haven't been celebrated in the way they deserve.” 

In addition to creating awareness, Phingbodhipakkiya also received a flood of support from other women in STEM fields. 

grace_hopper.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

One programmer shared via a Kickstarter response just how meaningful it was to see the role models she’d been missing after working in STEM for 25 years. 


I am a woman programmer who's been working in the field for over 25 years and I feel like I have really missed out on having women role models to look to. I feel so strongly that it is critically important to be able to SEE women doing things, to know how capable and strong and smart women are, and that it's not just some fluke one-off thing. (Or that we need to be 'tolerated' in the workplace.) Even after all these years, I desperately need to be able to know these women, as my own inspiration to keep going.” 


Another takeaway Phingbodhipakkiya and Beyond Curie reminds us, is, though these women were given honors later down the road in life, much of their work was done as young women, and while their youthful images may be lost or never were recorded, it’s important to remember this in thinking of these STEM feminist leaders as role models. 

katherine_johnson.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

Phingbodhipakkiya is also acutely aware of the importance for drawing attention to women of color in her project, like astronaut Mae Jemison or mathematician Mary Jackson, who recently gained notoriety through the Oscar nominated film “Hidden Figures.” 

“I wanted to be conscious of highlighting women of color, I think race was a contributing factor to their lack of recognition. Taking the care and time to celebrate them now is especially important,” she said.   

Read More: Chicago Public Schools Will Now Teach All Graduates Computer Science

mae_jemison.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

And for any girl hesitant about entering STEM, or facing obstacles, Phingbodhipakkiya has words just as inspirational as her prints. 

“There has been a long history of people telling brilliant women in STEM that they are less capable or what what they've imagined can't be done. And every step of the way, they've proved them wrong. Keep proving the naysayers wrong,” said Phingbodhipakkiya. 

STEM lovers can look forward to more from Beyond Curie. Phingbodhipakkiya is already working on future plans that include a book in the works and a potential exhibit for the women currently featured in the project. 

lise_meitner.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

margaret_ann_bulkley.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

maryam_mirzakhani.jpgAmanda Phingbodhipakkiya

To explore more of the project's badass STEM women, visit www.BeyondCurie.com. To purchase a print go to the Beyond Curie Kickstarter here

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FEB. 8, 2019

 

16
 
GIRLS & WOMEN

Sierra Leone Has Declared Rape a National Emergency

The rate of rape cases in the country has steadily risen over the past few years.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
After years of conflict, followed by an Ebola outbreak, Sierra Leone is still healing in many ways. Sexual violence, common during the country’s civil war, remains a major problem in the nation. The work of activists caught the attention of the government, which has pledged to do more to protect girls and women against rape. You can take action here to call on world leaders to prevent sexual violence.

Editor’s note: This story contains language and details of sexual violence.

Outrage over rising rates of sexual violence and rape in Sierra Leone led President Julius Maada Bio to declare a “national emergency” on Thursday.

Last year, the shocking rape of a 5-year-old girl by an uncle nearly six times her age devastated the country, Reuters reported. The young girl is now paralyzed from the waist down — her life is forever changed, while her rapist has faced no consequences for his actions.

Unfortunately, this story is all too common in Sierra Leone, where the rate of sexual and domestic violence has steadily increased over the past few years, according to police data. Although rape has been punishable by up to 15 years in prison in the West African, few cases have been successfully prosecuted, Reuters reported.

Take Action: Tell World Leaders to Redouble Their Efforts By Amending Laws to Prevent Sexual Violence

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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En asociación con: Equality Now yCHIME FOR CHANGE

Now — after months of public outcry and activists, including the First Lady of Sierra Leone, calling for stricter sexual violence laws — Bio has raised the penalty for the sexual abuse of minors and said his government will work to strengthen legislation and law enforcement, according to CNN.

More than 12,000 cases of sexual or domestic violence were reported in 2017, but the true number of cases is likely higher, as many cases are never reported out of shame and fear.

Nearly half of girls and women in Sierra Leone experience physical or sexual violence in their lifetime, according to the United Nations. Approximately 90% of women between the ages of 15 and 49 in Sierra Leone have been subjected to female genital mutilation (FGM) — a form of gender-based violence that involves the total or partial alteration or removal of female genitalia for non-medical reasons.

The president highlighted the sexual abuse of minors as a particular problem saying that 70% of sexual assault survivors in the country are under the age of 15.

Read More: Women in Zimbabwe Are Wearing All Black to Protest Being Raped by the Military

"We as a nation must stand up and address this scourge,” President Bio said, adding that “sexual penetration” of a minor will now be punishable by a lifetime of imprisonment.

Bio also highlighted the need to make treatment and support for survivors of sexual assault more accessible and affordable.

"My government will ensure that men who rape have no place in society and also any man who rapes will be jailed forever so that a single rape becomes the last rape," he said.

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FEB. 20, 2018

 

21
 
HEALTH

Philippines President Tells Men Not to Use Condoms as HIV Rate Soars 3,000%

“Avoid condoms because it is not satisfying.”

3,000%. 

That staggering number represents the increase in HIV diagnoses in the Philippines over the past decade, even as efforts to combat HIV around the world have made remarkable progress in the same period. 

Between 2015 and 2016, the number of new HIV cases around the world decreased from 2.1 million to 1.8 million. Meanwhile, in the Philippines, the number rose from 9,264 new cases to 11,103 new cases from 2016 to 2017, a year-over-year increase that is just one example of a decade-long trend of increases, according to data from the country’s health agency, Al Jazeera reported

Global Citizen campaigns on improving access to health care for individuals around the world, and works to support efforts to eliminate HIV/AIDS. You can join us in taking action here

Since 2007, there has been a 3,147% increase in new cases, which the UN saysis the fastest growing HIV epidemic in the Asia-Pacific region.  

So what is going on in Philippines that runs counter to the rest of the world’s efforts to fight HIV?

One contributing factor, according to health experts, is the actions of President Rodrigo Duterte, who has discouraged condom use among men. He said last week that citizens should avoid using condoms because they are “not satisfying.” 

"I am not joking. Just follow the government programme [on reproductive health]. We have free pills but just avoid condoms, because it is not satisfying," he said.

Read More: 5 Reasons To Be Hopeful About the AIDS Crisis

According to the Miami Herald, Duterte then put a wrapped piece of candy in his mouth for comparison. 

“Here, try eating it without unwrapping it,” he said. “Eat it. That’s what a condom is like.”

More than 95% of new HIV cases in the Philippines involved male transmission, which can be prevented through condom use, according to Al Jazeera.

Carlos Conde, a Human Rights Watch representative, told Al Jazeera that Duterte "should take meaningful action" on policies, such as expanding condom access.

Because HIV is a sexually transmitted disease, condom use and safe sex practices can help prevent its spread. Conde and HIV activists have encouraged Duterte to promote condom use as one method of decreasing new HIV cases in the country. 

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APRIL 11, 2018

 

40
 
GIRLS & WOMEN

Married at 10 Months Old, This 19-Year-Old Now Wants Her Marriage Annulled

"I do not accept child marriage. I want to study," she said.

Urma Bishnoi is just 19, but she’s been married for more than 18 years. No, that’s not a typo.

When Bishnoi was 10 months olds she was married to a boy in her village of Kaparda, India, the Hindustan Times reported. But the now 19-year-old said she will no longer tolerate this fate and is seeking an annulment of her child marriage.

“I do not accept child marriage,” Bishnoi told the Indo-Asian News Service. “I was married when I was just 10 months. I want to study.”

Since refusing to accept the marriage, Bishnoi’s in-laws have threatened to cut off her nose and ears, according to the Hindustan Times. If her marriage is annulled, Bishnoi’s family may be socially ostracized for bucking the long-accepted cultural norm of child marriage within their community.

Take Action: Stand with Sonita: Tell World Leaders to End Child Marriage

 

Bishnoi’s case for annulment is being supported by the Saarthi Trust, an India-based nonprofit that works to fight child marriage and establish children's’ and women’s rights. The organization has managed to annul at least 30 child marriages so far, and hopes to add Bishnoi’s marriage to the growing list.

In 2017, UNICEF reported that nearly half of all child brides were in South Asia and with 23 million girls married before their 18th birthdays, India is home to more child brides than any other country in the world. Nationwide, approximately 27% of children under the age of 18 are married, but in the state of Rajasthan, where Bishnoi lives, the rate is significantly higher at 35%.

Poverty tends to be a major motivating factor behind child marriage and because girls are often seen as a financial burden on their family, the practice disproportionately affects them. Cultural attitudes that treat girls and women as property rather than people have also contributed to the persistence of the practice. 

Read more: This Child Bride Used Facebook Posts to Get Her Marriage Annulled

When girls are forced to enter into marriages at a young age, they may be taken out of school and lose out on education opportunities, but Bishnoi hopes that this won’t be the case for her.

"I look forward to the start of a fresh life where I can study and make a future of my own," she said.

Global Citizen campaigns for gender equality. Stand up for the rights of girls and women, and against child marriage, by taking action here.

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JAN. 10, 2019

 

25
 
GIRLS & WOMEN

Female Genital Mutilation Is Now Criminalized in Ohio

The brutal practice will be punishable by fines and jail time.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
FGM is an internationally recognized human rights violation. Ohio just criminalized the cultural tradition that affects many African immigrants living in the state. You can now join us in taking action this issue here

Female genital mutilation (FGM) is officially criminalized in Ohio, Cincinnati Public Radio reports

FGM is the cruel process of intentionally altering or injuring the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. Ohio Governor John Kasich signed the SB214 bill Friday, which makes performing FGM a felony punishable by fines and jail time. 

Take Action: Urge Leaders to Step Up for Women’s Rights and Health

 

“All of us involved with the #EndFGMToday movement are thankful that Ohio lawmakers have seen the importance of outlawing FGM in their state,” said Elizabeth Yoremm, head of the advocacy group EndFGMToday. 

FGM is a tradition practiced across cultures and religions around the world. In Ohio, it’s most likely to affect immigrants from Somalia and Ethiopia. Columbus, Ohio, has the second largest Somali immigrant population in the US.

 

Ohio is the 28th state in the US to criminalize FGM. The practice has been illegal on a federal level since 1996, but a federal judge dismissed charges in a Detroit, Michigan, case in November, stating that the responsibility to regulate the harmful practice falls on individual states.

Read More: FGM Among Us

FGM is performed on girls as young as 7 years old around the world and can have negative long-term effects. It is thought to help a young girl transition to adulthood and marriage but does just the opposite. The practice is an internationally recognized human rights violation that threatens women’s health — it causes severe bleeding, higher risk of HIV transmissions, infections, infertility, complications in childbirth, and an increased risk of newborn deaths. 

Sarah Hayford, a sociologist at Ohio State University, told Cincinnati Public Radio that officials cannot measure exactly how many Somalis are at risk of FGM in Ohio, since immigrants often change their practices when they move to other countries. But 24,320 girls and women are at risk for FGM in Ohio according to the Population Reference Bureau, and 12,079 of them are under the age of 18.

Read More: FGM in the US: The Hidden Crime Next Door

The Centers for Disease Control estimates over 500,000 women and girls are at risk for FGM across the US. Around the world, at least 200 million girls and women have undergone some form of FGM. 

While criminalization helps stop people who are already considering not performing FGM anymore, Hayford says it often pushes the practice underground rather than stopping it altogether. 

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GIRLS & WOMEN

This Mom Died Delivering Her Child After Waiting Seven Hours for Medical Care

Black mothers are 243% more likely than white mothers to die from pregnancy complications


Why Global Citizens Should Care 
Black mothers are 243% more likely than white mothers to die from pregnancy or complications related to childbirth in the US. This is because of socioeconomic factors and racism that permeates the medical industry. You can help by taking action here.

"We walked in for what we expected to be the happiest day of our life. And we walked straight into a nightmare," Charles Johnson V recently told 11alive, an NBC affiliate, on Oct. 19. 

Johnson was describing the day he unexpectedly lost his wife, two years ago, during childbirth. Now he’s an advocate for better maternal health care, particularly for black women in the US, and speaking out about pregnancy-related deaths.

Kira Johnson waited seven hours for emergency medical assistance in extreme pain, shaking and crying, according to 11alive. She eventually died from post-childbirth complications, and although her death is devastatingly personal to her family, her story is tragically common.

Take Action: Urge Leaders to Step up For Women's Rights and Health 

 

 

 

More women die from pregnancy-related complications in the US than any other developed country, and the US is the only developed country where the mortality rate has been increasing, according to an investigation by NPR and ProPublica. For every 100,000 births in the US, 26 mothers died in 2015 according to the Global Burden of Disease Study. This is compared to nine in the UK, seven in Canada, and four in Sweden, Italy, and Denmark.

But these health risks are not felt equally, throughout the US, black women are far more likely to die from childbirth than white women. 

Black women are three to four more times more likely to die during childbirth compared to white women, according to the CDC. This racial disparity gap is wider today than it was in 1850, which was fifteen years before the end of slavery and over 100 years before the Civil Rights Movement.

Black women are 49% more likely to have a premature birth than white mothers, and white infants are twice as likely to live to see their first birthday than black babies.

Read More: Why More Mothers Appear to Be Dying in the United States

And while poverty is a major factor in these stastics — black women living in poverty face economic barriers that can prevent them from getting proper medical care, according to NPR — it's far from the only factor at play. Black women are also more likely to be uninsured and start using Medicaid during their pregnancy. This causes them to receive prenatal care later and to lose medical coverage after the delivery.

But the problem isn't just access to medical care, it's also the quality of care black women receive. Influential black women, from Serena Williams to Beyoncé, have recently spoken out about how racial bias affects the medical care they receive.

A black woman with an advanced degree is still more likely to have a miscarriage or infant death than a white woman with less than an eighth-grade education. Thirty-three percent of black women feel like they have been discrimiated against because of their race when visiting a doctor or health clinic, and 21% have avoided seeking medical care because they fear they will be discriminated against. 

Even women with access to the most elite health care face challenges. 

Williams spoke out about how she had to tell her doctors about a blood clot that they missed, possibly saving her own life in the process. She experienced a pulmonary embolism, a large hematoma in her abdomen, and a ripped C-section wound that tore as the blood clot caused her to cough. She spent six weeks on bed rest to recover.

Read More: Serena Williams’ Scary Childbirth Story Is Part of a Larger Pattern of Discrimination Against Black Moms

Beyoncé revealed in Vogue that she also experienced pregnancy complications. She was put on bed rest for over a month before delivering her twins and then had to have an emergency C-section because she and her children’s health were in jeopardy.

She suffered from preeclampsia, “a pregnancy complication that involves high blood pressure and protein in the urine.” While the condition affects only about 3.4% of pregnancies, it is 60% more common in African American women than white women. Black women in the US have higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity which can affect pregnancy mortality, but hospitals in areas with high African American populations are often of a lower quality than those in white areas and may be less equipped to deal with these conditions.

This year, Charles Johnson filed a medical malpractice lawsuit against Cedars-Sinai, the hospital where his wife passed away. He claims that the staff did not respond to Kira’s condition in a timely manner.

The hospital responded in a statement saying “Cedars-Sinai strongly agrees with Mr. Johnson and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that no mother should die giving birth.  Based on our findings, we make any changes that are needed so that we can continue to provide the highest quality care to our patients.”

Johnson and his mother have created 4Kira4Moms a campaign that advocates for better health care for mothers. They’re also lobbying for new legislation to improve the review process for pregnancy-related deaths and complications.

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MEDIO AMBIENTE

Esta botella de agua se disuelve si entra en contacto con el océano

Una solución especial para aquellos lugares donde aún no se recicla.

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
Las empresas están compitiendo para encontrar alternativas sostenibles al plástico para reducir los niveles de contaminación global, el número 12 de los Objetivos Globales de las Naciones Unidas. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí.

Cerca de la mitad de mil millones de botellas plásticas de agua se compran y consumen cada año, y menos del 7% se reciclan como botellas de agua nuevas.

 

Esto significa que cientos de miles de millones de botellas de agua se desvían como desechos hacia los flujos de agua anualmente, y un porcentaje de este total finalmente ingresa a los océanos del mundo, donde representa una amenaza existencial para la vida marina.

 

Ahora, una nueva empresa llamada Cove quiere que este escenario sea mucho menos perjudicial para el medio ambiente. Cove ha patentado una botella de agua compostable que se disuelve si alguna vez entra en contacto con un cuerpo de agua o llega a un vertedero.

 

“Realmente no tenemos tiempo. Probablemente tenemos menos de 30 años, o tendremos un océano lleno de más plástico que peces. Si bien los esfuerzos de limpieza son realmente importantes, también necesitamos detener la cantidad de plástico que entra en nuestro entorno, especialmente el plástico de un solo uso", dijo Alex Totterman, fundador de Cove, a Fast Company.

 

La botella de agua Cove está hecha de un biopolímero llamado PHA que proviene de una bacteria fermentadora. Una vez que se ha conformado como producto final, el material de PHA actúa como una botella de agua de plástico normal, pero una vez que interactúa con las bacterias naturales ubicadas en ambientes silvestres, comienza a descomponerse.

 

“El PHA es el único polímero que es totalmente biodegradable en todas las condiciones", dijo. "Por lo tanto, es como eludir la necesidad del sistema de reciclaje que tenemos".

 

Totterman dijo a Fast Company que ideó esta alternativa porque la gente ha crecido confiando en la conveniencia de las botellas de plástico. Aunque muchos consumidores han optado por botellas reutilizables, la cantidad de botellas de agua de un solo uso vendidas aumenta cada año, lo que sugiere que la conveniencia a menudo prevalece sobre las consideraciones de sostenibilidad.

 

La botella de Cove puede satisfacer el hábito en el camino de recoger rápidamente algo para beber en una tienda, al tiempo que elimina el riesgo ambiental de la contaminación plástica. El sistema de reciclaje global ha sido objeto de un intenso escrutinio en los últimos años por su incapacidad para manejar el volumen de residuos que se producen cada año. En lugar de mejorar estos sistemas, el producto de Cove podría ayudar a muchos países a ir más allá de lo que se percibe como un modelo roto.

bottle-image.jpgCove

 

Las primeras botellas de agua de Cove llegarán al mercado de Los Ángeles el 28 de febrero y la compañía planea expandirse en los próximos meses y años. También planea abastecerse de agua de manera sostenible y ética.

 

Otras alternativas plásticas han surgido en los últimos años.

Actúa: Firma ahora

 
 
 
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Por ejemplo, una marca de cerveza reemplazó los anillos de plástico de seis paquetes con pegamento reciclable, también se creó una alternativa de envoltura de plástico con conchas y plantas, y los científicos inventaron una bolsa de comestibles que los animales pueden comer.

 

Actualmente, una de las principales marcas de bienes de consumo está en marcha para encontrar alternativas sostenibles al plástico.

 

Por ejemplo, compañías como Procter & Gamble, Nestlé, Unilever y PepsiCo Inc. anunciaron recientemente que pilotearán un programa de contenedores reutilizables para varios productos que se recolectarán y reutilizarán regularmente.

 

Otras empresas se están deshaciendo del plástico por completo. Las compañías hoteleras, aerolíneas, restaurantes, tiendas de artículos para el hogar, supermercados y marcas de ropa han anunciado planes para eliminar los plásticos de un solo uso.

 

Mientras tanto, más de 60 países han restringido la producción de plástico de alguna manera, y lugares como la Unión Europea buscan eliminar completamente los microplásticos.

 

Por su parte, Cove no está tratando de acaparar el mercado y ocultar sus innovaciones. En cambio, Totterman dijo que espera que las compañías busquen asociaciones.

 

"Estamos construyendo con la plena intención de ver la transición de estas grandes empresas para trabajar con nosotros o con la PHA", dice Totterman. "Y tenemos que trabajar con ellas. No somos el enemigo".

 

"Estamos tratando de equipar a las personas con las herramientas para superar este problema", agregó.

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APRIL 24, 2018

 

9
 
ENVIRONMENT

Mass Death of Baby Penguins in New Zealand Points to Climate Change

The birds starved to death.

When scientists opened the stomachs of 11 young penguins that washed up on beaches in northern New Zealand, 10 had nothing in their guts and one had a small amount of grass, according to the South China Morning Post.

It was a stark confirmation that these birds — and scores of others — had starved to death.

Over the past two weeks, New Zealand’s Department of Conservation’s Tauranga office has received at least 58 calls of little penguins washing up on the shores of Omaha Beach and Tawharanui Peninsula during a record marine heat wave and tropical storms in the Tasman Sea, SCMP reports.

Take Action: Stand Up for the Arctic

 

The penguins were all emaciated, a clear sign of starvation, and follow-up analysis by a team at Massey University proved that most of the penguins had entirely depleted their fat reserves and were beginning to digest muscle, according to the New Zealand Herald.

This mass starvation, according to the scientists, is because of freak weather patterns driven by climate change that made it hard for the penguins to find food after “moulting,” when birds shed feathers to make room for new growth.

“We are concerned that with climate disruption causing high sea temperatures, summer storms could become more common and what has been previously seen as a one in 20-year event could become more frequent,” Dr. Karen Baird, forest and bird expert, told SCMP.

Read More: Fishing Companies Are Trying to Hide How Penguins Are Showing Up Dead in Their Nets

“Populations like little blue penguins and other species can recover from infrequent bad events by breeding, but if it happens much more frequently, the population doesn’t get a chance to recover,” she said.

The scientists fear that the collected corpses are just the tip of the iceberg and that many more birds have been killed or are threatened by the extreme conditions, SCMP notes.

Hundreds of other animals, including shearwaters, petrels, fair prions, and shags, washed on shores in recent weeks as well, additional casualties of the heat wave and storms.

The penguin sightings, however, were strange enough to spur local residents to notify the Department of Conservation who then investigated the situation.

All around the world, bird species are being endangered by environmental degradation, with more than 1,476 threatened with extinction.

Read More: 1,500 Bird Species Are Facing Extinction Thanks to Climate Change

The scientists at the Department of Conservation said that the debilitating heat wave was so extreme that it goes beyond predictions for 2050, suggesting that the climate change is intensifying climatic patterns more deeply than previously thought.

“I think it’s a wake-up call that we can’t expect always to have penguins, unless we start to think more about how we can actively manage them,” Baird said.

Global Citizen campaigns on the United Nations’ Global Goals, which call on countries to protect biodiversity. You can take action on this issue here.

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