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The Action Thread Part Two

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HIV/AIDS

We answer your most Googled questions about HIV and AIDS

28 November 2018 8:49PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

SIGN THE PLEDGE

Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS

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WADGoogle_Social-1024x512.pngHIV/AIDS is a global health crisis that impacts the lives of millions of people a year, yet still many people don’t know enough about what it is, what it does to the body, and the best ways to prevent it. That’s why we’ve answered your most googled questions about HIV and AIDS, and added a couple extra in for good measure:

How many people alive today are living HIV or AIDS?

Around 37 million people are living with HIV/AIDS. That’s nearly the entire population of Canada.

What is the difference between HIV, AIDS, and HIV/AIDS?

You probably have a general idea what these three terms mean, but there are some key differences between them.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a virus that weakens the body’s immune system. The virus moves into the body’s “T cells”, which fight off infections, and rearranges the DNA inside them. The infected cell is no longer able to combat diseases, and instead creates more HIV cells.

Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is the most extreme form of HIV infection. HIV becomes AIDS when the body has an extremely low amount of T cells left, greatly weakening the body’s immune system. It can take anywhere from two to fifteen years for untreated HIV to develop into AIDS.

HIV/AIDS is a term to describe the two together. The term also serves as a reminder that HIV always comes first. It is possible to have HIV without developing AIDS, but it’s impossible to contract AIDS without first having HIV.

How did HIV/AIDS start?

HIV didn’t begin in humans. The virus was originally an SIV— Simian Immunodeficiency Virus — that infects chimpanzees, and it is generally believed that the virus crossed over into humans through hunting. While this crossover happened around 1920, the virus wasn’t verified in humans until 1959 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

How do you contract HIV/AIDS?

The virus is spread through the exchange of certain kinds of bodily fluids, including blood, breast milk, semen, and vaginal fluids. That means you can’t contract HIV through things like hugging, hand-shaking, kissing, or sharing food and water.

What are the first signs of HIV/AIDS

In the first few weeks after infection, some people develop flu-like symptoms, including a rash, sore throat, fever, and headaches. However, not everyone has symptoms in the first few weeks. As the infection continues to develop in the body, some people experience swollen lymph nodes, fever, weight loss, diarrhea, or coughing.

Since the symptoms of HIV can be mistaken for the flu, or may not be present at all, testing is the only sure way of knowing whether someone has HIV.

If the virus develops into AIDS, the symptoms are more severe. Tuberculosis, meningitis, bacterial infections, and some forms of cancer can all develop due to a weakened immune system.

Is there a cure for HIV/AIDS?

While there is no cure for HIV/AIDS, it is possible to treat. Antiretroviral (ARV) drugs can help control the virus and even prevent transmission to other people. Antiretroviral therapy (ART), the combination of 3 or more ARV drugs, should start as soon as possible after diagnosis to slow the progression of HIV.

Who are the most ‘at risk’ groups for contracting HIV/AIDS

In some hard-hit countries in sub-Saharan Africa, girls and young women are especially vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Girls make up three out of four new infections among children between the ages of 10 and 19. Young women ages 15 to 24 in the region are also twice as likely to contract HIV than young men the same age.

The most-at-risk groups are men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, transgender people, and sex workers.

How do you get tested for HIV/AIDS?

Access to HIV tests are vital to prevent the spread of infection. An estimated 25%of HIV-positive people are not diagnosed. That means a quarter of HIV-positive people are not receiving treatment and are at risk of transmitting the disease to more people.

Serological tests are tests that examine the antibodies in blood. Basically, they’re tests that take a closer look at how the body’s immune system is working. A serological test with abnormal results could mean a positive HIV diagnosis. If someone has an abnormal result, it’s important to test again to make sure the diagnosis is correct.

How do you prevent HIV/AIDS?

There are lots of different ways to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS. Prevention, in all its forms, can’t happen without knowledge. Awareness of HIV/AIDS and how it’s contracted is necessary for someone to protect themselves against contracting the virus.

Safe sex practices, including the use of condoms, can prevent transmission during sex. Voluntary medical male circumcision can also reduce the likelihood of contracting the virus by up to about 60%.

ART not only controls the virus in those living with HIV/AIDS, but also prevents HIV-positive people from transmitting the virus to other people. ART coverage for pregnant and breastfeeding women is at an all-time high of 80%, reducing the likelihood of mother-to-child transmission.

ART isn’t the only way to help to prevent transmission. If you are HIV-negative but considered high risk (if you have an HIV-positive partner, for example), you can take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) before coming in contact with risk factors in order to prevent infection. When taken consistently, PrEP reduces the risk of HIV infection in people who are at high risk by over 90%. PrEP cannot be used by those who are already HIV positive.

Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking ARVs within 72 hours of potential exposure to the virus to prevent becoming infected. PEP is not meant for regular use and should only be used in emergency situations.

Which countries have the highest HIV prevalence?

All of the top ten countries with the highest HIV prevalence are in Africa. Eswatini, formerly Swaziland, has the highest prevalence, with over 27% of the adult population living with HIV/AIDS. The virus takes a much larger toll on the female population, with over 35% reporting an HIV-positive status.

Lesotho and Botswana take second and third for highest prevalence. In both countries, over a fifth of the population is HIV-positive. Like in Eswatini, gender inequality increases the prevalence among women in both countries.

How long can people live with HIV/AIDS?

With ART, HIV-positive people can continue to live full, healthy lives. Access to this life-saving medication creates near-normal life expectancy. That’s great news for people who have access to ART, but this isn’t the case for everyone.

Last year, almost a million people died from AIDS-related causes. That’s 2,500 people every day, nearly two every minute. This means that the life expectancy of a person with HIV depends on whether they are able to access and afford treatment.

There’s no doubt about it: AIDS is still a crisis. The numbers may be intimidating, but this fight is far from lost. We have the knowledge and resources to help those who are HIV-positive, while also preventing more people from contracting the virus. By increasing access to ART, education, and health services, we can create a world free of HIV/AIDS.

To win the fight against AIDS, we need you. This World AIDS Day, ONE members are turning our outrage into action and putting our leaders on notice – add your voice today!

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Posted (edited)

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, comidaToday on #WorldWaterDay we’re celebrating Tencia as our #ActivistoftheWeek, highlighting how clean water is empowering entrepreneurs like her in Mozambique. Before Tencia had access to clean water, she could only make bread as a means for survival. But thanks to charity: water, a brand new drilled well was installed in her community, giving her the chance to turn her bread-making business into a reality. Instead of living day to day, she’s thinking about the future, growth, and opportunity. By joining The Spring, charity: water's recurring giving program, you can help give clean water to someone like Tencia every single month! http://bit.ly/2TZsrSV

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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15th March

Making music with cross Border project

By Jessica CampbellReporter
Darcey Pancott, Grainne Reynolds and Marc Hennessy who performed as part of the Ukes4Youth ukulele orchestra.

Darcey Pancott, Grainne Reynolds and Marc Hennessy who performed as part of the Ukes4Youth ukulele orchestra.

 
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Ukes4Youth is Music Generation Leitrim’s cross border project for teenagers, which has been developed with partners Enniskillen Royal Grammar School and Carrigallen Vocational School under Leitrim County Council’s Peace IV programme. The programme involves over sixty teenagers from across the two counties who have had the opportunity to meet new friends and share in the learning of a new instrument, learn new songs and be introduced to bands and styles that perhaps they wouldn’t otherwise have considered.

As part of the project, the group of young people performed a relaxed concert for family and friends in St. Macartin's Cathedral Hall, Enniskillen on Saturday March 9.

During the event the group performed three songs on ukuleles and also a percussion piece led by the main group facilitator Andy Spearpoint.

Enniskillen Royal Grammar School student Marc Hennessy introduced the first song of the concert, which was 'Teenage Kicks' by the Undertones. Marc explained that the song was first performed in 1978 in the height of The Troubles within Northern Ireland and how it "thrived in a time of such civil unrest."

Following the introduction of the song, Marc was asked what he had enjoyed about the project so far.

He said: "I've enjoyed it immensely. It's mainly the people who you meet that is actually one of the best parts about it. If it wasn't for this programme I wouldn't have met many of the people who are sitting here today who I have got along with so well over the past few months."

He continued: "The ukulele is completely new to me, I had never learned an instrument so I thought this was a great opportunity for me to finally actually learn one and I have enjoyed it very much."

Darcey Pancott who is also a student of Enniskillen Royal Grammar School said: "It's been really fun and I've met so many new people who are all really nice."

Commenting on her experience, Grainne Reynolds from Carrigallen Vocational School said: "Me and my family usually play Irish traditional music so I wouldn't have really played any of the songs that I have learnt today. It's been great because it's opened me up to a whole new genre of music that I never really would have thought of listening to and it's given me new favourite songs that if I'd heard them on the radio I wouldn't have actually stopped to listen to, which has been great."

She added: "I very much enjoyed the project, I have made so many new friends from Northern Ireland."

A great afternoon of live music was enjoyed by all in attendance.

Music Generation is Ireland’s National Music Education Programme which seeks to transform the lives of children and young people through access to high-quality, subsidised performance music education. Established in 2010 by Music Network, Music Generation is co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds, the Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships. Leitrim was one of nine new Music Education Partnerships selected to participate in Music Generation in September 2017 and since then has successfully begun to develop new programmes for children and young people in the county. The lead partner for Music Generation Leitrim is Mayo, Sligo and Leitrim Education and Training Board, supported by Leitrim County Council.

Speaking at the launch of the project Therese McCartin, Music Generation Leitrim Development Officer said: "The children and young people of Leitrim are very lucky to have Music Generation in the county at last. It is already creating wonderful and exciting opportunities to learn an instrument and engage in ensemble work in the county."

 
 
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Infinite Music is Music Generation dlr's inclusive music performance programme for young people ages 3-14 years with special educational needs. Help Music Generation dlr achieve even more for young people in the programme by voting for them in the Google.org Impact Challenge here: http://g.co/DublinChallenge

More information about the #GoogleImpactChallenge is in the link below. Voting closes next Tuesday 19 March!

19/03/2019

Vote now to help Music Generation dlr in the Google.org Impact Challenge!

Vote now to help Music Generation dlr in the Google.org Impact Challenge!

Music Generation Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown (dlr) has been announced as a finalist in the Google.org Impact Challenge 2019 for its Infinite Music programme and now has the opportunity to double its funding through a public vote.

Google today named the fifteen finalists of its Google.org Impact Challenge Dublin, with each receiving €50,000 in grants to bring their ideas to life. Of the 15 finalists, one will receive an additional €50,000 in funding following the outcome of a public vote. To help Music Generation dlr achieve even more for children and young people in the county, you can vote here

Voting is open for one week from Tuesday 19 March – Tuesday 26 March 2019.

Music Generation dlr’s Infinite Music programme is an inclusive music performance programme for young people aged 3 - 14 years with special educational needs. Working together with schools and early years settings, they have developed a dynamic music programme created to meet the young people’s unique needs and abilities. The programmes are designed to provide these young people with the opportunity to participate in music performance and to contribute to future developments for Music Generation dlr, from choirs to instrumental ensembles, so that all group programming becomes inclusive for all children and young people.

The Google.org Impact Challenge supports local nonprofits and social enterprises with big ideas to create opportunity in the Dublin area. Launched last November, the Challenge invited nonprofits, social enterprises and educators throughout Dublin to submit proposals to grow economic and social opportunities in their local communities. The 15 finalists were selected by a panel of judges: Cllr Nial Ring, Lord Mayor of Dublin; Senator Lynn Ruane; Mary Rose Burke, CEO of Dublin Chamber; Dublin GAA legend Bernard Brogan; journalist Róisín Ingle; Tomás Sercovich, Business In The Community CEO; and Fionnuala Meehan, head of Google Ireland.

Support from the Google.org Impact Challenge will allow Music Generation dlr to invest in cutting-edge technology so that every child and young person participating in the programme can enjoy the most accessible, creative and inclusive music-making experience possible. It will enable training and support for the dedicated team of skilled musician-educators to deliver a programme to the highest standards of excellence. 

Vote now for Music Generation dlr!

The winner of the public vote will be announced at a celebratory event on the evening of Thursday 4 April 2019.

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54520659_2394794630545123_2810490057197092864_n.jpg?_nc_cat=101&_nc_ht=scontent.fmad3-8.fna&oh=4f0e7fd0d635830e4a06853264c703e6&oe=5D47451C

 

Legendary vocal coach Dave Stroud will return to Dublin next month with a 4-hour Vocal Masterclass. Taking place in the Grifith Conference Centre on 4 April, this masterclass will be a great opportunity to learn how the voice works at its best. More information can be found here: www.universe.com/ds-vocal-magic

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Today is World Down Syndrome Day! 🎈🎈🎈
Hear what Berge had to say about what having Down Syndrome means to him. 
Do you or someone who love have Down Syndrome?
What does it mean to you/them? 
#WDSD #WDSD19

 

 

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“These experiences were completely new to Fauzia and she found them intensely traumatic, resulting in a catastrophic deterioration in her mental state.” 
Fauzia spent 22 long months at an inpatient unit, away from her family.

We want to see people with a learning disability back home in their communities, living fulfilling lives close to their families and friends, with proper support in place for them in their local area.

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10
HEALTH

These health workers are fighting TB one community at a time

19 March 2019 4:23PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

SIGN THE PETITION

Tell world leaders to step up the fight against preventable diseases

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Tuberculosis (TB) is the number one infectious killer in the world, but around 36% of people with TB still go undiagnosed every year. To help step up the fight against TB, countries — like Ethiopia — are adopting community health worker programs.

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At Mekelle Health Sciences College in Ethiopia, a class for health extension workers strengthens their skills as providers of services in their villages.

Ethiopia’s National Health Extension Program was founded in 2004 with funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. At the time, there was a critical shortage of health services, with a ratio of one health worker per 40,000 citizens. The extension program was introduced to help bridge the gap between rural communities and health care by training health extension workers (HEWs) to provide services at a community level.

By 2016, 38,000 HEWs — the majority of whom are women — were providing health services to 15,000 villages across Ethiopia.

Health Workers in Action

Every day, HEWs — trained for a full year in basic health delivery — trek through Ethiopian communities, knocking on doors to speak with local residents and check on their health. They are trained to conduct basic health tests for preventable diseases like TB, maintain family health records, provide treatment for diseases and encourage communities to use contraceptives and get vaccinated.

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Health extension worker Workalem talks to villagers during one her frequent visits to this rural community.

Workalem Haile, a HEW in Southern Ethiopia’s Chama Hembecho village, manages the local health centre which provides care to over 2,200 families. She tests patients for disease and provides long-term care and support as her patients go through treatment.

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Workalem visits a husband and wife who are both HIV-positive and explains proper use of antiretroviral treatment.

Abinet was one of Workalem’s patients. “At the beginning, I thought it was just a common cold but I had a very serious cough. I couldn’t sleep late at night,” he said. His condition did not improve with traditional medicines, so, with help, he made his way to the local clinic where he was tested for TB. After Abinet’s results came back positive and he was prescribed the proper medication, Workalem visited him regularly over the next 6 months to support him with his treatment. Abinet says, “My health has improved because of Workalem’s help. I would like to thank her very much.”

The Impact

By 2016, over 95% of Ethiopia’s population had access to primary health care resources within 10 kilometres. Now, communities are better educated about how to limit the spread of communicable and preventable diseases, like TB, and have better access to treatment. Plus, health issues are addressed earlier and communities have better access to effective long-term care. Life expectancy in Ethiopia has increased to 64 years, jumping by 10 years since the program’s launch in 2004.

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Sister Eden, another Ethiopian HEW, regularly visits 50-year-old tuberculosis patient Desta in her home to oversee the final months of her TB care.

Excitingly, the introduction of the program didn’t just improve people’s health. The HEW program shifted gender roles and cultural norms in Ethiopia by creating a wealth of new opportunities for women to enter the workforce. “In a country where unemployment is still high, finding fulfilling work can be life changing. The health extension worker program has transformed the lives of thousands of workers who have become breadwinners for their families,” said Dr. Kesetebirhan Admasu, Ethiopia’s former minister of health.

The Global Fund

To make sure the Global Fund can continue its critical work, like funding Ethiopia’s National Health Extension Program, it will be hosting its sixth replenishment conference in October. They’re asking world leaders and private investors to come together and help save 16 million lives over the next 3 years by investing a minimum of US$14 billion.

This is the bold ambition the world needs to get us on track to stop the spread of diseases like tuberculosis — and it’s why we’re calling on world leaders to #StepUpTheFight by fully financing the Global Fund.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

Tell world leaders to step up the fight against preventable diseases

More than 17 million people are alive today because of your investments in the Global Fund’s work to fight AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Please fully finance the Global Fund so it can save 8 million more lives over the next 3 years.

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110
HEALTH

There’s a health care revolution in the DRC

4 March 2019 10:25AM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

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Join the fight against extreme poverty

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Vaccines don’t just stop us from getting sick, they keep us healthy too, which means we can take advantage of all the opportunities that life has to offer. For many of us, getting vaccinations is pretty easy – we just arrange an appointment at our local health centre. For others, it’s a lot harder.

Victor is a health worker in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) capital city. Delivering healthcare in communities affected by extreme poverty is hard enough, but without a working fridge to store and transport vaccines, it is even harder for Victor to vaccinate children who need it.

Health worker Victor, DRC.

Health worker Victor, DRC.

“We were only doing two or three vaccination sessions per month. We had to take the cooler back and forth to pick up the vaccines – a distance of four kilometres between here and the central office. The only mode of transport, the motorbike, cost CF2000 (US$ 1.25) for each journey. That cost us a lot.”

Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC.

Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC.

Keeping cool

Vaccines need to be kept at stable, low temperatures. If not, they stop working. So, cold-chain equipment such as fridges and cool boxes are essential to keep vaccines chilled. This hasn’t been an easy feat to achieve in the DRC – an equatorial country with a tropical climate. Until now, health centres have used petrol-fuelled fridges to keep vaccines cool, but they are unreliable, often breakdown and fuel is hard to get and transport.

What makes transportation even harder, is that the DRC is a big country – the size of Western Europe, much of which is covered by dense forest without good roads.

“The distances here are too large to supply some areas with vaccines,” said Didier Maundé, Head of Logistics for the DRC’s Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI). “Sometimes fuel was nowhere to be found either, or was too expensive. The cold-chain was at risk, and it was having a negative impact on vaccination.”

Despite some recent progress, the DRC still has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Every year nearly two million children miss out on a full course of vaccines, contributing to almost one in ten Congolese children not surviving to see their fifth birthday.

Now the good bit…

In October 2018, the Ministry of Health, working closely with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners, launched a plan to increase immunisation by 15% by 2020. If successful, an additional 220,000 children could be immunised.
Crucial to the success of the Ministry’s plan is improved cold-chain equipment. With more reliable equipment and better methods of transportation to cover the country’s huge distances, children in the DRC will be able to reap the benefits of life-saving vaccinations.

Almost 5,000 new solar-powered fridges have been delivered to the DRC and more are on the way!

Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year.

Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year.

Victor, who received his solar fridge last year, said “This has reduced the cost for us and increased the number of [vaccination] sessions. I think we are at ten sessions per month now. We are very happy to have this.”

Supersizing

Meanwhile, another quiet revolution is also taking place that will improve healthcare in DRC: the creation of Central Africa’s largest vaccine storage hub.

The hub (funded by Gavi) recently opened in Kinkole, just outside central Kinshasa. It can safely store more than 200 million vaccine doses and other medical supplies before they are distributed to health centres.

The state of the art facility is also equipped with all kinds of transportation, including 150 canoes and boats powered by outboard motors to help deliver vaccines around the country. For a nation that currently uses aeroplanes to deliver 80% of its vaccines to the provinces, the use of boats is expected to deliver massive long-term savings. Excitingly, two more major regional hubs are planned. “The impact is visible,” said Didier Maundé. “More and more vaccines are available in the field. The cold chain is now reliable, and long distances are less of a problem.”

A big thank you to Gavi for providing the story.

Gavi is a global Vaccine Alliance that brings together public and private organisations with a shared goal — to make vaccines more available, accessible and affordable to children who need them the most. Incredibly, Gavi has so far supported some of the world’s poorest countries to immunise 700 million children, averting 10 million future deaths that would be lost to vaccine-preventable diseases.

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373
HEALTH

Why are nearly 1000 girls and young women infected with HIV every day?

5 February 2019 2:18PM UTC | By: MEGAN O’DONNELL

ADD YOUR NAME

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

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We have come a long way in the fight against HIV/AIDS since the outbreak of the crisis, with institutions like the Global Fund and PEPFAR partnering with country governments to prevent mother-to-child transmission, allow those infected with HIV to access treatment, and ultimately save tens of millions of lives.

But despite these impressive efforts, there is still one demographic that is disproportionately likely to contract HIV. Globally, girls and women ages 15 to 24 are infected at a rate of nearly 1000 every day, and the vast majority of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, young women are twice as likely as young men to be living with HIV.

Ong%E2%80%99ielo-Health-Center-Kenya-EDI

The Ong’ielo Health Center in Kenya is funded by the Global Fund and covers 10,300 people and offers a range of health services, including malaria and HIV testing and treatment.

And though those figures might be surprising at first, upon closer inspection we shouldn’t be surprised at all.

Risk Factors

The risk of getting infected with HIV is tied not only to physical health but to economic and social factors – and more specifically, layers of gender-based discrimination.

Across the globe, stigma and social taboos still surround girls being sexually active. This limits open conversation and education about safe sex and protection. As a result, girls often don’t have vital information they need to protect themselves against HIV and other sexually-transmitted diseases.

High infection rates are also tied to girls’ economic vulnerability. Facing limited opportunities to earn income, girls face pressures to enter into transactional sexual relationships, where unprotected sex is exchanged for financial support. This is true both outside and inside of marriage, as many parents opt to marry their daughters off as children, due to a combination of economic constraints and social norms.

Finally, high rates of infection among women and girls are tied to their limited autonomy and bargaining power in their relationships; particularly at risk are those forced to marry as children. Even financially secure girls and women armed with information about protection face pressures from their partners to have unprotected sex.

The Global Fund

Fortunately, we know there are evidence-based ways to address all of these constraints, and the Global Fund and its partners are prioritising a holistic approach that gets to the root of all of them.

More than half of the Fund’s spending is now specifically targeted to programs for women and girls, contributing to a total investment of US$18 billion since 2002. The Global Fund launched a program called (HER) to mobilise additional resources to address the specific needs of adolescent girls and young women.

In Botswana, the Global Fund provides legal aid services and support to women and girls who are survivors of gender-based violence, while eliminating structural barriers to quality health care.

In Kenya, Swaziland, and South Africa, programs aim to keep girls and women ages 14-22 in school and to offer them additional educational and social support.

Sexual and reproductive health services have been integrated into HIV services in Lesotho so women can access both services in one place.

Quality secondary education (including comprehensive sexuality education), cash transfers that decrease girls’ economic insecurity, and interventions aimed at increasing girls’ agency and bargaining power all contribute to ensuring girls are less likely to contract HIV.

We Need to #StepUpTheFight

As we gear up for the Global Fund’s 2019 replenishment, let’s make sure the fund is able to access the financial resources it needs and eradicate HIV/AIDS once and for all, by continuing to put the needs and constraints of girls and women front and center in their investments.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Dear government and business leaders,
We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good.

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FEB. 5, 2018

 

12
 
FINANCE & INNOVATION

Bill Gates Is Investing in a Technology That Turns CO2 into Clean Fuel

Engineers are creating “mechanized trees” to clean up the air.

Microsoft billionaire and Global Citizen Bill Gates is banking on a new technology that could reduce atmospheric CO2 levels on an industrial scale, The Guardian reports.

Known as Direct Air Capture (DAC), this technology enables scientists to literally suck CO2 out of the air by separating it from other molecules and converting it to solid matter.

Carbon Engineering, one of a handful of companies leading the development of these technologies, and a recipient of Gates Foundation funding, claims their current prototype technology can remove 1 million tons of pure CO2 from the air each year.

Take Action: Stand Up for the Arctic

 

 

 

While this technology could play a part in the fight to reduce climate change,   its exorbitant costs pose a serious challenge. According to a 2011 paper, the cost of removing one single ton of atmospheric CO2 is anywhere from $600-$1,000.

 

Experts estimated that total CO2 emissions in 2017 were around 37 billion tons, which means the world would need about 370,000 of Carbon Engineering’s plants to absorb all emissions.

The discrepancy between cost and effectiveness is tempering scientists’ enthusiasm for DAC as a long-term solution to human carbon-emissions. However, Carbon Engineering has developed a potential solution to this problem by creating a highly-valuable byproduct from their carbon removal process: clean fuel.

Carbon Engineering predicts that fully-operational commercial plants would be able to remove carbon from the atmosphere at a cost of only $100-$150 per ton.

Global Citizen campaigns on the United Nations’ Global Goals. Taking action on climate change is goal number 13. You can join us by taking action here.

Some scientists are concerned that focusing on DAC technology could also prohibit scientists from finding a much more more affordable and logical solution: reducing and preventing CO2 from entering the atmosphere in the first place.

Read More: These Tweets From Bill Gates Will Remind You That 2017 Wasn’t All Bad

Jon Gibbins, the director of the UK Carbon Capture and Storage Research Centre told the Guardian that working to clean up emitting industries should be the number one goal.

“Cutting emissions from existing sources at the scale of millions of tonnes a year, to stop the CO2 getting into the air in the first place, is the first priority,” he said. “We need to get to net zero emissions before the sustainable CO2 emissions are used up.”

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FEB. 5, 2018

 

12
 
FINANCE & INNOVATION

Bill Gates Is Investing in a Technology That Turns CO2 into Clean Fuel

Engineers are creating “mechanized trees” to clean up the air.

Microsoft billionaire and Global Citizen Bill Gates is banking on a new technology that could reduce atmospheric CO2 levels on an industrial scale, The Guardian reports.

Known as Direct Air Capture (DAC), this technology enables scientists to literally suck CO2 out of the air by separating it from other molecules and converting it to solid matter.

Carbon Engineering, one of a handful of companies leading the development of these technologies, and a recipient of Gates Foundation funding, claims their current prototype technology can remove 1 million tons of pure CO2 from the air each year.

Take Action: Stand Up for the Arctic

 

 

 

While this technology could play a part in the fight to reduce climate change,   its exorbitant costs pose a serious challenge. According to a 2011 paper, the cost of removing one single ton of atmospheric CO2 is anywhere from $600-$1,000.

 

Experts estimated that total CO2 emissions in 2017 were around 37 billion tons, which means the world would need about 370,000 of Carbon Engineering’s plants to absorb all emissions.

The discrepancy between cost and effectiveness is tempering scientists’ enthusiasm for DAC as a long-term solution to human carbon-emissions. However, Carbon Engineering has developed a potential solution to this problem by creating a highly-valuable byproduct from their carbon removal process: clean fuel.

Carbon Engineering predicts that fully-operational commercial plants would be able to remove carbon from the atmosphere at a cost of only $100-$150 per ton.

Global Citizen campaigns on the United Nations’ Global Goals. Taking action on climate change is goal number 13. You can join us by taking action here.

Some scientists are concerned that focusing on DAC technology could also prohibit scientists from finding a much more more affordable and logical solution: reducing and preventing CO2 from entering the atmosphere in the first place.

Read More: These Tweets From Bill Gates Will Remind You That 2017 Wasn’t All Bad

Jon Gibbins, the director of the UK Carbon Capture and Storage Research Centre told the Guardian that working to clean up emitting industries should be the number one goal.

“Cutting emissions from existing sources at the scale of millions of tonnes a year, to stop the CO2 getting into the air in the first place, is the first priority,” he said. “We need to get to net zero emissions before the sustainable CO2 emissions are used up.”

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MARCH 20, 2019

 

18
 
CITIZENSHIP

These Are the 10 Happiest Countries in the World

The least happy countries have higher rates of poverty.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
The World Happiness Report ranks countries based on socioeconomic factors including life expectancy length, wealth, freedom, and more. These topics are essential to combating poverty and align with the Global Goals. You can help end extreme poverty by taking action here.

Wednesday is the International Day of Happiness, and according to the United Nations’ latest new report, Finland is the happiest country on Earth.

The UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network's Happiness Report ranked 156 countries based on six factors: social support, healthy life expectancy, freedom, corruption, generosity, and GDP per capita.

Take Action: What Does it Mean to You to be a Global Citizen?

Actúa: Submit response

 
 
 
 
 
 

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

Finland topped the list for the second year in the row, making it the happiest country in the world. It was followed by other Nordic countries like Denmark, Norway, Iceland, and the Netherlands.

Despite the recent Christchurch attack, New Zealand also scored well, coming in eighth place for the second year in a row.

"What stands out about the happiest and most well-connected societies is their resilience and ability to deal with bad things," said report co-editor John Helliwell, referencing New Zealand. "After the 2011 earthquake and now the terrorist attack in Christchurch, with high social capital, where people are connected, people rally and help each other and [after the earthquake] rebuild immediately."

Six out of the 10 countries that are the least happy are in Africa, including South Sudan at the very bottom of the list. Over 80% of South Sudan’s population live in extreme poverty, with less than US $1 per day.

Yemen and Afghanistan also scored poorly on the happiness scale, according to the report. These countries both have high levels of poverty and contain high conflict zones.

Venezuela, which is in the midst of an economic and political crisis, had the most drastic decline in comparison to previous years. It fell 88 places from number 20 in 2013 to now number 108 on the list.

The United States also dropped five spots on the list since 2017, despite ranking in 10th place for income. The report said that while the US is a wealthy nation, its citizens struggle with addiction, and high social media usage is decreasing social interaction. Because of this, the US has high levels of sadness and anxiety, especially among adolescents.

Decreases in happiness from densely populated countries like the US and India have caused the world’s happiness levels to fall overall. The report also noticed an increase in negative emotions worldwide.

Read More: These Were the 10 Happiest Countries in the World in 2018

Here are the happiest and least happy countries around the world:

The happiest countries:

1. Finland
2. Denmark
3. Norway
4. Iceland
5. Netherlands
6. Switzerland
7. Sweden
8. New Zealand
9. Canada
10. Australia


The least happy countries:

1. South Sudan
2. Central African Republic
3. Afghanistan
4. Tanzania
5. Rwanda
6. Yemen
7. Malawi
8. Syria
9. Botswana
10. Haiti

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GIRLS & WOMEN

A Woman Just Won the 'Nobel Prize of Math' for the First Time

Karen Uhlenbeck is a mathematician and professor at the University of Texas.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Science, technology, engineering, and math have been historically male-dominated fields, but trailblazers like Karen Uhlenbeck are proving that they don’t have to be. Uhlenbeck is shattering stereotypes simply by succeeding in her field and showing girls and women everywhere that anything is possible. You can take action here to help advance gender equality.

Pythagoras, Euclid, Guillaume L’Hôpital, Johann Bernoulli, John Nash. History is littered with the names of famous mathematicians, nearly all of them men, after whom formulas and entire fields of math have been named.

But Karen Uhlenbeck, a mathematician, has proven that when it comes to math, women are absolute equals — and she didn’t even need theorems to do it.

The University of Texas professor became the first woman to win the Abel Prize, considered the “Nobel Prize of Math,” on Tuesday.

Take Action: Sign this petition to #LeveltheLaw and empower girls and women around the world!

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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Uhlenbeck’s decades of work have touched on several disciplines, including geometry, quantum theory, and physics, but is being recognized, in particular, for her “pioneering achievements in geometric partial differential equations, gauge theory and integrable systems, and for the fundamental impact of her work on analysis, geometry and mathematical physics,” according to the prize’s website.

 

Congratulations to my dear friend and long-term @the_IAS visitor Karen Uhlenbeck, 2019 #AbelPrize laureate. Fantastic mathematician, role model, and honorary physicist—her work on moduli spaces is crucial for understanding modern gauge theories.

 
 
 
 

The Abel Prize, first awarded in 2003, is bestowed by the King of Norway and comes with a 6 million Norwegian kroner (approximately $700,000) cash prize.

Uhlenbeck is a celebrated mathematician, having previously won the National Medal of Science in 2000 and receiving a MacArthur Fellowship — also known as a “genius grant” — in 1983.

“Uhlenbeck’s research has led to revolutionary advances at the intersection of mathematics and physics,” Paul Goldbart, dean of the University of Texas’ College of Natural Sciences, said in a statement.

“Her pioneering insights have applications across a range of fascinating subjects, from string theory, which may help explain the nature of reality, to the geometry of space-time,” he added.

Read More: The First Person on Mars Will 'Likely' Be a Woman, NASA Head Says

Uhlenbeck told the New York Times that she has been acutely aware of the unique opportunity she had to be a role model for the next generation of women in academia. Growing up, she said her own role model was famed chef and television personality, Julia Child.

“I certainly very much felt I was a woman throughout my career. That is, I never felt like one of the guys,” she said.

Still she considers herself lucky, telling the Times, “I was in the forefront of a generation of women who actually could get real jobs in academia.”

 
 
 
 

But almost as important as her contributions to her field, are Uhlenbeck’s contributions to the next generation of women. Trailblazers like Uhlenbeck help show women and girls around the world that science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, which have traditionally been male-dominated, do not need to remain so.

Her historic win is not only helping to advance the field of mathematics, but shattering gender stereotypes.

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HEALTH

What is the World’s Deadliest Disease?

Brought to you by:Johnson & Johnson

 

 

 

More than a quarter of the world’s population is infected with tuberculosis bacteria.

TB — and, in particular, drug-resistant TB — is one of the greatest public health emergencies facing the world today, yet for too long, it has been overlooked and underfunded. Global Citizen and Johnson & Johnson are prioritizing ending TB by 2030.

Take action this World Tuberculosis Day by learning about the disease with our video.

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15 DE MARZO DE 2019

 

3
 
ADVOCACYEDUCACIÓN

Rachel Brosnahan quiere que pongamos el foco en la educación de las niñas

"Las mujeres están limitadas solo por la posibilidad de lo que pueden lograr".

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
Las niñas que reciben una educación de calidad tienen el poder de detener el cambio climático, fortalecer la economía y promover la paz. Para ponerle fin a la pobreza extrema, cada niña debe tener la oportunidad de aprender. Puedes unirte a nosotros y tomar acción sobre este tema aquí.

La actriz, activista y embajadora de Global Citizen, Rachel Brosnahan, ha demostrado recientemente cuán comprometida está con la educación de las niñas.

 

La estrella ganadora del Premio Emmy por The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel instó a través de un discurso a los líderes mundiales a asegurar que las niñas y mujeres afectadas por la crisis puedan educarse, en su discurso de apertura de la celebración para la 63ª Comisión sobre el Estatus de la Mujer en la ciudad de Nueva York.

 

Organizado conjuntamente por el Gobierno de Irlanda, en el evento se destacaron los logros de la campaña #SheIsEqual de Global Citizen y se invitó a los líderes a comprometerse a trabajar para ponerle fin a la desigualdad de género.

 

Brosnahan compartió su experiencia reciente al visitar a refugiados venezolanos en Perú. En febrero, Brosnahan se unió a Global Citizen para reunirse con niños pequeños y mujeres resilientes en la ciudad fronteriza de Tumbes, cuyas vidas fueron devastadas después de un evento de El Niño en 2017, y otro grupo que huyeron de la actual crisis humanitaria de Venezuela(más de 3 millones de personas han escapado de la violencia, la pobreza y el hambre en el país desde 2015).

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
 
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"Las mujeres son héroes cotidianas; hacen muchas cosas extraordinarias cada día para mejorar un poco la vida de sus familias, sus comunidades, sus países y el mundo", dijo Brosnahan.

 

En su discurso recordó a dos mujeres en particular: una madre y abuela de dos niños pequeños llamados Evans y Kauri, quienes están alentando a las niñas de su familia a seguir sus sueños y priorizar la educación. Education Can't Wait (ECW), un fondo mundial creado para brindar educación en situaciones de emergencia, está apoyando a la UNESCO para que reconstruya las escuelas que fueron destruidas por aludes en su comunidad.

 

Graham Lang, asesor senior de educación de ECW, dijo el miércoles que la organización necesita más fondos, y de manera rápida, para defender a las niñas.

 

Brosnahan presentó un video de Simon Coveney, Viceprimer Ministro de Irlanda, y le pidió al gobierno irlandés que cumpla con el compromiso de € 250 millones para la educación de las niñas que se realizó en el escenario en el Festival Global Citizen de 2018. En el video, Coveney señaló la política de desarrollo internacional del país "Un mundo mejor", lanzada en febrero. La igualdad de género y el empoderamiento de las mujeres constituyen una de sus cuatro prioridades principales, "porque, como todos saben en esta sala, cuando las mujeres tienen éxito, todas tenemos éxito", dijo Coveney.

 

Esther Ngemba, ex refugiada de la República Democrática del Congo, también subió al escenario para pronunciar un discurso sobre cómo ha aprendido por experiencia que la educación es la única solución para ponerle fin a la guerra. Brenda Madumise-Pajibo, quien ayudó a lanzar el movimiento de ciudadanos más grande de Sudáfrica para luchar contra la violencia de género #Total Shutdown en 2018, recordó a los asistentes lo importante que es proteger a las mujeres y las niñas.

 

Hay 420 millones de niños que viven en áreas afectadas por conflictos en todo el mundo, según datos de Save the Children, y 130 millones de ellos son niñas. Las niñas que viven en áreas afectadas por el conflicto son las que más sufren: son 90% más propensas a faltar a la escuela secundaria y pierden la oportunidad de alcanzar su máximo potencial. Las jóvenes refugiadas son especialmente vulnerables cuando carecen de oportunidades para aprender. Abandonar la escuela conduce a tasas más altas de matrimonio infantil, explotación y tráfico.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter
 

Massive thanks to @USAID and US Government staff for meeting with me last week to reflect on my time with @glblctzn in Peru. We discussed the urgent need to support education through @educannotwait to help kids, esp. girls, heal & rebuild from trauma. See you at #CSW63 tonight!

 
 
 
 

 

"Dado que las mujeres están limitadas solo por la posibilidad de lo que pueden lograr, es fundamental que las empoderemos tanto como podamos", dijo Brosnahan.

 

"Y para esto es fundamental la necesidad de educar a todas las niñas, en todas partes, y asegurarse de que cada mujer tenga el pleno apoyo de su gobierno, de las grandes empresas y de las instituciones, además del apoyo de la comunidad para alcanzar su máximo potencial".

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