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The Action Thread Part Two

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APRIL 1, 2019

 

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Slovakia Just Elected Its First Female President — And She’s an Environmental Activist

Zuzana Caputova has been called the "Erin Brokovich of Slovakia."

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Worldwide, women have been underrepresented in their countries’ governments, but that is now slowly changing. Zuzana Caputova’s win is a win for women everywhere. Join us by taking action here to empower women and girls around the globe.

Slovakia elected its first female president, Zuzana Čaputová, an environmental activist who ran on an anti-corruption platform on Saturday.

Čaputová, 45, was recently elected vice chairman of Progressive Slovakia, a liberal party established only two years ago, which had no seats in the parliament, making her win after a second run-off vote all the more remarkable.

She defeated European Commission Vice President Maros Sefcovic who was nominated by the governing Smer-Social Democracy party.

Čaputová will become the youngest president of Slovakia after scoring 58% votes.

Take Action: Sign this petition to #LeveltheLaw and empower girls and women around the world!

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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“I see a strong call for change in this election following the tragic events last spring and a very strong public reaction,” Čaputová said on Saturday, referring to the murder of a Slovakian journalist who had been investigating corruption. “We stand at a crossroads between the loss and renewal of public trust, also in terms of Slovakia’s foreign policy orientation.”

The scandal led to the resignation of Prime Minister Robert Fico last year.

The Journalist Ján Kuciak, 27, and his fiancee, Martina Kušnírová, were found shot dead at the home they shared. Kuciak covered tax evasion stories for the news website Aktuality.sk where his last piece was published on Feb. 9, 2018. He mostly reported on fraud cases involving businessmen with political connections, including governing party leaders at the time.

Kuciak’s murder led to a massive outcry in Slovakia where tens of thousands of people took to the streets to protest government corruption.

Read More: Pakistan Unveils Plan to Make Health Care, Housing, and Food Fundamental Human Rights

A lawyer by profession, Čaputová first received recognition after winning the 2016 Goldman Environmental Prize for her decade-long struggle to close a toxic landfill in her hometown. She is sometimes called the “Erin Brokovich of Slovakia” for her work.

In a conservative Roman Catholic Country, Čaputová, a divorced mother of two, supports both LGBTQ rights and access to reproductive health care.

Even though the presidential role in Slovakia is mostly ceremonial — the prime minister oversees most of the country’s affairs — Čaputová will hold blocking powers, will be commander-in-chief of the armed forces, and will appoint top judges.

Her win could also be turning a point for Slovakia, which was ranked 83 out of 149 countries in the Global Gender Gap Report 2018, scoring especially poorly for women's participation in politics.

“Zuzana Čaputová gives us hope, but the real fight will only come now,” wrote Dennik N, a leading opposition publication, on Sunday.

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La imagen puede contener: una o varias personas, personas de pie, nube, cielo, exterior y naturaleza

The sky is the limit for our incredible volunteers 2764.png❤️

Emily O'Keefe is volunteering as a nurse with CCI later this year...and has just climbing Mount Kilimanjaro to raise funds for CCI's life-saving programmes! 🏔

At 5,895m, Mt Kilimanjaro is the largest freestanding mountain in the world and Emily reached the it's peak on 12th March.

If you love an adventure and would like to raise funds for CCI, get in touch today and see how you can make the world of difference to Chernobyl's children and grandchildren.

Thank you and congratulations, Emily!

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La imagen puede contener: 2 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie y traje

La imagen puede contener: 6 personas, personas sonriendo

Today we wish all the team at Mac Domhnaill Dental a hearty congratulations and best of luck as they official open their new premises in Tralee. 👏👏

Comhghairdeas mór le Marcas agus foireann go leir! Go n'eírí go gheal libh.

In just two weeks time, Dental Nurse and Award winning Volunteer, Mary Sugrue, will travel to give children high-quality dental care through our Dental Programme.

This programme was set up in 2006 by Mary and dentist Marcas Mac Domhnaill. The programme focuses on giving children at Vesnova Children’s Mental Asylum the most comfortable dental experience possible. Each dental mission to Vesnova examines children with poor levels of oral care and maintenance. A priority for them is to provide emergency care and preventative maintenance in an effort to break the chain of infection.

The programme has gone from strength to strength, having included many volunteer dentists and dental nurses from all over Ireland. Huge improvements have been made since 2006, both to the oral health of the children and to the dental facilities in Vesnova. Every volunteer says that they receive much more themselves as volunteers than they could ever give to these children.

Congratulations Marcas, Mary and team and thank you for your continued support.

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There's a busy weekend of music making ahead!

26 young musicians from Music Generation South Dublin will take to the stage of The Grand Social tomorrow at 1.45pm to showcase their original songs and collaborative work, developed over the last 6 months as part of the Suburban Sounds programme.

Meanwhile in Louth, the Music Generation Louth String Orchestra will present an afternoon showcase concert at St.Nicholas’ Church of Ireland at 1pm tomorrow, while on Sunday a number of young musicians engaged in the Louth programme will perform in the 'Sundays in Spring’ Concert Series in Carlingford’s Heritage Centre.

Wishing all of these young musicians well this weekend!

La imagen puede contener: 19 personas, personas sonriendo, personas sentadas

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Nurse Nana plays a critical role in the fight against HIV/AIDS by educating expectant moms on how to make sure their babies are born HIV-free. ✊🏾 ❤️

Make sure nurses like Nana can keep doing lifesaving work by adding your name here: bit.ly/2V0ZlQf

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418
HEALTH

Why are nearly 1000 girls and young women infected with HIV every day?

5 February 2019 2:18PM UTC | By: MEGAN O’DONNELL

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Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

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We have come a long way in the fight against HIV/AIDS since the outbreak of the crisis, with institutions like the Global Fund and PEPFAR partnering with country governments to prevent mother-to-child transmission, allow those infected with HIV to access treatment, and ultimately save tens of millions of lives.

But despite these impressive efforts, there is still one demographic that is disproportionately likely to contract HIV. Globally, girls and women ages 15 to 24 are infected at a rate of nearly 1000 every day, and the vast majority of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. Here, young women are twice as likely as young men to be living with HIV.

Ong%E2%80%99ielo-Health-Center-Kenya-EDI

The Ong’ielo Health Center in Kenya is funded by the Global Fund and covers 10,300 people and offers a range of health services, including malaria and HIV testing and treatment.

And though those figures might be surprising at first, upon closer inspection we shouldn’t be surprised at all.

Risk Factors

The risk of getting infected with HIV is tied not only to physical health but to economic and social factors – and more specifically, layers of gender-based discrimination.

Across the globe, stigma and social taboos still surround girls being sexually active. This limits open conversation and education about safe sex and protection. As a result, girls often don’t have vital information they need to protect themselves against HIV and other sexually-transmitted diseases.

High infection rates are also tied to girls’ economic vulnerability. Facing limited opportunities to earn income, girls face pressures to enter into transactional sexual relationships, where unprotected sex is exchanged for financial support. This is true both outside and inside of marriage, as many parents opt to marry their daughters off as children, due to a combination of economic constraints and social norms.

Finally, high rates of infection among women and girls are tied to their limited autonomy and bargaining power in their relationships; particularly at risk are those forced to marry as children. Even financially secure girls and women armed with information about protection face pressures from their partners to have unprotected sex.

The Global Fund

Fortunately, we know there are evidence-based ways to address all of these constraints, and the Global Fund and its partners are prioritising a holistic approach that gets to the root of all of them.

More than half of the Fund’s spending is now specifically targeted to programs for women and girls, contributing to a total investment of US$18 billion since 2002. The Global Fund launched a program called (HER) to mobilise additional resources to address the specific needs of adolescent girls and young women.

In Botswana, the Global Fund provides legal aid services and support to women and girls who are survivors of gender-based violence, while eliminating structural barriers to quality health care.

In Kenya, Swaziland, and South Africa, programs aim to keep girls and women ages 14-22 in school and to offer them additional educational and social support.

Sexual and reproductive health services have been integrated into HIV services in Lesotho so women can access both services in one place.

Quality secondary education (including comprehensive sexuality education), cash transfers that decrease girls’ economic insecurity, and interventions aimed at increasing girls’ agency and bargaining power all contribute to ensuring girls are less likely to contract HIV.

We Need to #StepUpTheFight

As we gear up for the Global Fund’s 2019 replenishment, let’s make sure the fund is able to access the financial resources it needs and eradicate HIV/AIDS once and for all, by continuing to put the needs and constraints of girls and women front and center in their investments.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Dear government and business leaders,
We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good.

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10
HEALTH

Why global health is good for everyone

4 April 2019 8:57PM UTC | By: KATIE RYAN

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Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

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What is global health?

It’s a big year for global health so ONE is going to be talking about it a lot. But before we jump into the nitty gritty statistics or the importance of getting funding for the world’s most innovative partnerships, let’s talk about what global health actually is!

Global health is about improving people’s health worldwide, reducing inequality and, protecting societies from global threats, such as preventable diseases, that don’t stop at national borders.

So why is it important?

We are at a tipping point. In 2017, nearly one million people died from AIDS-related causes globally and another 1.8 million contracted HIV. After 10 years of steady decline, malaria is back on the rise, especially among children under 5 years old, who account for two-thirds of all malaria deaths. Though more than 10 million people contract TB every year, nearly 40% of those are “missed” – that is almost 4 million people left undiagnosed, untreated, and therefore, contagious.

As a global community, we all benefit when our neighbours are healthy. Access to prevention and treatment should be a right, not a privilege. Yet, so many of our community members cannot enjoy this right because of prohibitive costs, distance, or stigma and discrimination.

If people can access affordable healthcare, they can invest in bettering their community: kids can attend school, adults can pursue careers, families can enjoy their time together, the list goes on. Quality of life skyrockets when prevention and treatment are affordable and accessible.

Human rights always come first. But it is important to realize that ensuring our global community is healthy, educated and empowered has another benefit: economic growth. Failing to protect health could quickly thwart this potential. The 2014 Ebola epidemic is a staggering illustration of the economic consequences of just one outbreak of disease: in 2015, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone lost US$2.2 billion in gross domestic product, threatening economic stability and private sector growth in the region.

We know that investments made in health today will pay dividends tomorrow.

  • Every $1 invested in immunisation, for example, leads to a return of US$60.
  • Every $1 invested in reducing malaria infections delivers a return of US$36.
  • Every $1 invested in health spending for the world’s poorest leads to a return of US$13.

Simply put, health is a smart investment with big returns.

Where do we go from here?

Health has been one of the most recognised and celebrated success stories in global development since the turn of the 21st century. This progress has not happened by accident. It has been driven largely by new public-private collaborations, breakthrough commitments to increase investments in health alongside greater investment from national governments, and passionate citizen activism.

This is a proud legacy that should be celebrated as a benchmark for what is possible. But it stops well short of being an indicator for future gains. Progress will not continue, and could go into reverse, if our global community, including world leaders, do not commit to looking out for our neighbours.

The Global Fund is one of the best weapons we have to fight AIDS, TB and malaria. The Fund supports programs run by local experts in the countries and communities that need it most – helping to save 27 million lives so far. To help save another 16 million lives between 2021-2023, the Global Fund needs to raise at least US$14 billion by its Replenishment Conference this October.

We must not stall progress now. Are you up for the challenge?

Add your name to tell world leaders they must back this bold partnership. Then share the action with your family and friends.

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Posted (edited)

Have you thought about volunteering anywhere before? 🤔

Has there been a reason that made you decide not to volunteer? 💭

Reply. 🙂 Tell us more. 

giphy.gif&cfs=1&upscale=1&fallback=news_

 

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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GIRLS & WOMEN

Israeli Nurse Breastfeeds Baby of Injured Palestinian Woman

"The human connection is very strong."

hadassah_hospital_.jpg__1264x568_q85_crop_subsampling-2.jpg
Hadassah Hospital

Sometimes, differences don’t matter.

For a heroic nurse in a Jerusalem hospital earlier this month, one of those times arrived as she showed up at the hospital for her night shift.

Earlier that day a deadly car crash had killed a Palestinian man and sent his wife to Hadassah Ein Kerem Medical Center in Jerusalem with a critical head injury. The couple’s baby, Yamen, had only minor injuries, but with his mother unable to feed him, he had no source of food, according to NBC News.

Yamen’s aunts arrived at the hospital and tried to feed the 9-month-old with a bottle, but he would not take it, and they were forced to sit and watch for seven hours as he cried in hunger.

That is, until Ola Ostrowski-Zak arrived for work that night. The Israeli nurse said she immediately knew she had to do something.

“I thought to myself, ‘I must help this baby,” she told The Today Show.

Ostrowski-Zak, who has an 18-month-old baby at home, decided to feed the 9-month-old Palestinian baby herself.

After Yamen fed and calmed down, his aunts hugged and thanked Ostrowski-Zak for being willing to feed a Palestinian baby, according to the report. The nurse then posted to Facebook asking more women to volunteer to help feed little Yamen, and more than 1,000 women responded that they would drive to the hospital to help.

“This story represents the real Israel,” Ostrowski-Zak said. “Any mother in Israel would have helped him. The human connection is very strong.”

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SALUD

Estos 50 alimentos no solo son buenos para tí, también lo son para el medio ambiente

Una dieta basada en plantas es saludable para tí y la Tierra

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
La cría de ganado es el segundo mayor contribuyente al cambio climático después de los combustibles fósiles. Adoptar una dieta basada en plantas puede ayudar a reducir su huella de carbono y disminuir las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. Puedes tomar medidas sobre estos temas y apoyar los Objetivos Globales de Desarrollo aquí.


Cambiar tu dieta podría ayudar a salvar el planeta, según un nuevo informedel World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

 

El informe "Future 50 Foods" ha identificado 50 productos alimenticios a base de plantas que contribuyen a un sistema alimentario global más sostenible y promueven dietas más saludables.

 

Según el informe, producido en sociedad con la compañía de alimentos Knorr, el 75% de los alimentos que consumimos provienen de solo 12 fuentes vegetales y cinco fuentes animales.

 

La cría intensiva de animales está asociada con importantes emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero. Un estudio reciente publicado en la revista Nature estimó que el consumo de carne debía reducirse en un 90% para evitar una tasa alarmante de calentamiento global, deforestación y escasez de agua.

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

"La mayoría de nosotros puede creer que son nuestras elecciones de energía o transporte las que causan el daño ambiental más grave. Pero es nuestro sistema alimentario el que genera el mayor impacto", dijo en el informe el Dr. Tony Juniper, director ejecutivo de defensa de WWF en el Reino Unido.

 

Según el informe, tres cultivos, a saber, el trigo, el maíz y el arroz, constituyen casi el 60% de las calorías de origen vegetal que consumen la mayoría de las personas. Y estas elecciones de alimentos tienen un gran impacto en el medio ambiente.

 

La monotonía dietética que resulta de la falta de diversidad en nuestro consumo de alimentos es una amenaza para nuestra salud y el medio ambiente, según el informe. También fomenta el monocultivo, el acto de cultivar y cosechar un solo cultivo en la misma tierra una y otra vez, lo que resulta en el agotamiento de nutrientes en el suelo.

 

Para compensar la pérdida de nutrición, los agricultores a menudo usan fertilizantes y pesticidas, que en última instancia entran en el ciclo de los alimentos por medio de animales herbívoros y pueden ser peligrosos para la salud.

 

Si más personas variaran y expandieran sus opciones de alimentos, particularmente al consumir más dietas basadas en plantas, se alentaría a los agricultores a cultivar diferentes cultivos y ayudar a la agrobiodiversidad.

 

"Las dietas diversificadas no solo mejoran la salud humana sino que también benefician el medio ambiente a través de sistemas de producción diversificados que fomentan la vida silvestre y un uso más sostenible de los recursos", dijo Peter Gregory, asesor de investigación de Crops for the Future, en el informe.

 

El informe espera hacer que el sistema alimentario sea más sostenible y enumera los cereales, frijoles, verduras, champiñones, cactus y raíz de loto como "alimentos para ser más saludable y tener un planeta más saludable". Como parte de sus esfuerzos para discutir la sostenibilidad, Knorr también ha creado nuevas recetas basadas en estos productos.

 

En un momento en que el cambio climático está alterando continuamente el paisaje del planeta, más personas están cambiando hacia una dieta basada en plantas para reducir sus huellas de carbono.

 

Con esta lista abundante de opciones de alimentos, WWF y Knorr están alentando a las personas a comer más comidas basadas en plantas que sean sabrosas, saludables y tengan menos impacto negativo en el medio ambiente.

 

"Future 50 Foods es el comienzo de un viaje y una manera en que las personas pueden hacer un cambio, a través de un delicioso plato a la vez", dice el informe.

 

Consulta aquí el informe para ver la lista completa de 50 alimentos.

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OCT. 25, 2018

 

65
 
WATER & SANITATION

These South African Women Are Using Menstruation Cups to Change the World

In Africa, 1 in 10 girls are having their education interrupted because of their periods.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Girls and women everywhere are proving that, when they're given equal opportunities, they can achieve whatever they put their minds to. But still, education access and employment opportunities aren't being made equally accessible. Period poverty is a significant barrier, with girls having to drop out of school because they simply can't afford the menstruation products they need. You can join us by taking action here for the UN Global Goals for gender equality, and adequate water and sanitation for everyone. 

Around the world, millions of girls are being forced to miss school because they can’t afford period products.

In place of tampons and pads, young girls are resorting to using old clothes, rags, newspapers, leaves, bark, and grass to try to stop the leaks. 

Across Africa, a 2016 study by Human Rights Watch estimated that 1 in 10 girls are having their education interrupted because of their periods. And some are having to drop out of school altogether. 

Take Action: #ItsBloodyTime: Urge the Government of South Africa to Fund Menstrual Health & Sanitation

Actúa: Send Email

 
 
 
 
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United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe

 

 

En asociación con: Menstrual Hygiene Day yWSSCC

Ultimately, it’s having a massive impact on their education and can leave a legacy that lasts a lifetime. 

That’s why the MINA Foundation has launched an initiative to provide free menstrual cups to young women and girls to prevent a setback in their education.

“We are passionate about bridging the gap between classes and life,” Zaakira Mahomed, who founded MINA, the Zulu word for “mine”, told Global Citizen.
 

Related StoriesAug. 16, 20183 Issues South Africa Needs to Address as We Celebrate Women's Month

“Our approach includes sessions with teachers and parents, to ensure an inclusive strategy that is mindful of cultural barriers that are sensitive to young girls to this day,” she continued. “Along with a team of phenomenal facilitators, we dive into the lives of the girls with passion and conviction, sharing their expectations, obstacles, and feelings.”

“We want as many young women and girls as possible to join the menstrual cup movement. We are a team on a mission to MINA-rise the world,” she said.

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Mahomed founded the organisation because she was struggling to raise funds for her own local sanitary pad drive. 

“Back when I was a studying at GIBS [the Gordon Institute of Business Science], we had already started an initiative to raise funds to give away free pads and tampons to young girls,” she continued. “That’s when my friend told me about menstrual cups. These were invented in 1932, so why haven’t we been using them all along?”

 

The MINA Foundation was then officially launched in 2015 and is run by just three women who produce and distribute the menstrual cups, as well as teaching young women and girls about feminine hygiene and sanitation. The team, which is based in Johannesburg, has now visited over 100 schools and has distributed over 20,000 menstrual cups to young girls.

On October 24, Global Citizen partnered with Mina Foundation, the Department of Health, and the Department of Social Development, for an event in Katlehong, Ekurhuleni. 

Over 400 people gathered for an educationanal and inspirational day hosted by Tiyang Basadi and the Mina Foundation — covering a whole range of health-related topics, in support of the UN Global Goals for health, the environment, and gender equality. 

Related StoriesNov. 1, 2018Women Just Silently Stood in Protest During President’s Speech at South Africa’s First Gender Violence Summit

And attendees who had opted to try a complementary Mina menstrual cup were entered into a draw — with 20 pairs of tickets to Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100, presented and hosted by the Motsepe Foundation, given away to winners. 

The MINA team also facilitates teaching sessions with the young girls, so that they know how to use the cup, and also shows them how much safer, reliable, and easy it is to maintain the cups. 

“Most of our girls don’t have the opportunity of having open conversations about their womanhood,” Mahomed added. “It’s important for us to educate them in a sensitive way.”

Related StoriesAug. 29, 20185 South African Musicians You Should Definitely Be Paying Attention to

MINA aims to save the planet and give young girls their power back, one cup at a time. 

The cups themselves are made out of 100% silicone, making them soft and flexible enough to insert. They also have a lifespan of up to five years, making them more eco-friendly than traditional period products. 

“Sanitary wear takes over 500 years to degrade,” Mahomed continued. “With the MINA cup, we are able to help young girls and take care of the environment at the same time.” 

They can be worn for up to 12 hours, depending on your flow, which makes your period less admin-intensive, compared to the frequent changing of tampons and pads. Because of the longevity of the cup, it reduces the cost dramatically — making it a valuable product.

 

This allows for girls around the world to continue with their education seamlessly which, in turn, helps them gain the necessary tools to make themselves a success in the future.

Empowering young women and advocating for gender equality is a key focus of the Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100, in proud partnership with the Motsepe Foundation, coming to Johannesburg on 2 December.

Learn more: Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 on Dec. 2 in Johannesburg

Women and girls are disproportionately affected by poverty and if the world doesn’t unite to uplift them, they can become trapped in the cycle of poverty.

Once the world eliminates gender inequality, the millions of young girls being held back from education and employment opportunities will finally be on a level playing field with their male counterparts.


The Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100 is presented and hosted by The Motsepe Foundation, with major partners House of Mandela, Johnson & Johnson, Cisco, Nedbank, Vodacom, Coca Cola Africa, Big Concerts, BMGF Goalkeepers, Eldridge Industries, and associate partners HP and Microsoft.

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CITIZENSHIP

This Woman Bought 204 Pairs of Shoes and Donated Them to Nebraska Flood Victims

“This is just part of being a human being.”


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Extreme weather caused by climate change is causing natural disasters more frequently. Donations by global citizens help protect crisis-affected communities who are more likely to experience extreme poverty. You can join us and take action on this issue here.

Addy Tritt just showed how donating to a good cause doesn’t have to cost a fortune. 

When Tritt, a 25-year-old woman from Hays, Kansas, noticed a closing sale at her local Payless shoe store, she saw it as an opportunity to give back to a community in need, according to CNN. After heavy negotiating, she convinced the store to let her purchase the shoes at a price she could afford. 

The graduate teaching assistant bought 204 pairs for $100, and on Monday, the shoes (the majority of which were baby shoes), were donated to Nebraska flood victims.

Take Action: Ensure All Communities Can Withstand Climate Disaster

 

Actúa: Firma

 
 
 
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 "I've done huge donations in the past and this is the biggest I've ever done," Tritt told CNN. "I have this need to help people and if I can help, I'm going to do it."

247d881d8b603927132d8d0a2b03c47c_normal.
 
 

Hays' Addy Tritt bought every single pair of shoes at her local Payless - more than 200, in all - to give to flood victims in Nebraska. https://www.wibw.com/content/news/Hays-woman-buys-out-closing-Payless-store-to-donate-to-Nebraska-508005571.html 

 
 
 
 

Tritt didn’t think about who she’d donate the shoes to until after she left Payless. She landed on Nebraska because it was one of several areas in the Midwest hit by the “bomb cyclone” in March. More than 2,000 homes were damaged by record flooding, and at least three people died. 

At first, Tritt posted on Facebook, asking for help transporting the shoes to Nebraska. One woman offered to pick up some of the shoes and deliver them, but Tritt ended up donating the rest to her alma mater, Fort Hays State University. The school’s Sigma Alpha agricultural sorority chapter was in the process of gathering supplies for those affected by the Nebraska floods.

Read More: These Photos of a College Student on Spring Break Went Viral for All the Right Reasons

Emily Bennigsdorf, president of the Fort Hays Sigma Alpha chapter, toldGood Morning they sent the shoes, and other supplies they collected, to the youth organization Future Farmers Association’s Wilcox, Nebraska location. 

“These families will have to build from the ground up so just being able to give them anything is a huge gift in itself,” Bennigsdorf said

She said Sigma Alpha is in awe of Tritt, but Tritt didn’t donate for recognition. 

“This is just part of being a human being,” Tritt said. “It brings me so much joy.” 

The shoe donation probably won’t be Tritt’s last. She told CNN that she’s previously organized supply drives for animal shelters and infants, and volunteered her time giving out school supplies to children in her local community. She’s just getting started. 

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AID AND DEVELOPMENT

What is fragility and why does it matter in the fight against extreme poverty?

April 10 2019 | By: EMILY HUIE

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If you’ve watched the news lately, you might have heard the term “fragile state.” When a crisis hits a fragile state, the effects can be devastating, and often contribute to the cycle of extreme poverty. In order to end extreme poverty [by 2030], the world must do better about reaching the extreme poor who live in fragile states. This is a big challenge, but not an insurmountable one.

There are currently more than 735 million people living in extreme poverty. Almost two-thirds (over 514 million) of these people are concentrated in fragile and conflict-affected states, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In fact, 35 of the world’s current fragile states are in sub-Saharan Africa. Experts predict that by 2030, more than 80% of people living in extreme poverty will be in fragile states.

So what exactly is fragility and how can it affect countries? A country or region is generally classified as fragile when it is vulnerable to shocks – violent conflict, natural disasters or economic crises – and lacks the capacity to cope with them. Citizens of a fragile state have to deal with a lot of instability, and they are exposed to higher risks when the unexpected happens.

Countries can be fragile for a number of different reasons. Some governments do not have the capacity to create a resilient environments . In some cases they lack the resources, in others corrupt leaders are more concerned with consolidating power and wealth for themselves than using state resources to provide basic services. Other factors such as natural disasters, regional instability, ethnic conflicts or violence can also make a country fragile.

Regardless of what causes fragility, when things go wrong, the citizens are hardest hit.

If you keep up with current events, you’re probably familiar with the Ebola crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

In the DRC, decades of exploitation and ethnic rivalries have led to protracted and violent conflicts over political power and natural resources. Although the civil war officially ended in 2003, violence is still widespread, particularly in the eastern part of the country. These conflicts have been at the expense of citizens’ basic needs.

When an Ebola outbreak began last August in the DRC, medical professionals, aid workers, and government officials were unable to reach communities because of poor infrastructure, weak health systems, and conflict. To make things worse, while medical workers struggled to reach those affected, communities struggled to trust those workers because often their experiences lead them to distrust the government and other officials. The result is an ongoing health crisis that has led to over 900 infections, and over 560 deaths.

People living in fragile states, like the DRC, face even more difficulty escaping extreme poverty.

Displacement, increased likelihood of disease, and food scarcity are just some of the things that can come about from a crisis. That’s why working to end fragility will have immense effects on combating extreme poverty, and prevent bad situations from becoming catastrophic.

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Advocacy in Action: ONE’s 2019 agenda to end extreme poverty

Thursday, April 18, 5:00 PM

ONE events are a great way to learn about ONE, international development and the fight against global poverty, and meet other ONE members in your area. Please enter your information below to sign-up and the event host will be in contact.

TIME

VENUE

Reeve Union, Room 210

ADDRESS

748 Algoma Blvd
Oshkosh, WI 54901

EVENT DESCRIPTION

OSHKOSH! On Thursday, April 18th the UWO Global Scholars program will be hosting the Advocacy in Action: ONE’s 2019 agenda to end extreme poverty training! 

At this exclusive training, led by Regional ONE staffer Shawn Phetteplace, you will learn about our plan to help end extreme poverty, end AIDS and make sure that the most at-risk people get the help they need. We'll give you a background briefing on ONE, these issues and you'll be able to even take action right then and there! Want to step your activism and make a difference? Sign up now! 

Pizza and some light snacks will be provided. This training will last for 2 hours. 

In Oshkosh and the area we'll be tabling at Lifest, Mile of Music, other local events and on campus to mobilize others to help us fully fund the Global Fund to end HIV, TB and Malaria and help those most at risk. Want to help make the world a better place and get the skills and influence to make an impact with lawmakers? Join us for this training to get started!

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Today is #NationalSiblingsDay. ❤️ 
Some memories you have with your sibling are simply unforgettable. 💭 
Like Matt Humphrey's recent experience with his brother Scott. 🌟 
What special moment between you and your sibling really made you smile? 😃

La imagen puede contener: 2 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie, texto y exterior

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08/04/2019

Opportunity: Musicians/Music Tutors (Music Generation Galway City and Galway County)

Opportunity: Musicians/Music Tutors (Music Generation Galway City and Galway County)

Galway and Roscommon Education and Training Board (GRETB) invites applications for the positions of Music Generation Musician/Music Tutors in Galway City and County.

Music Generation Musicians/Music Tutors will be appointed by GRETB in Galway City and County, and will be responsible for delivering performance music education programmes on behalf of the Local Music Education Partnership.

Further particulars and application forms are available from galwayroscommon.etb.ie

The closing date for receipt of completed application forms is 12 noon, 23 April 2019

Late applications will not be accepted.

Galway & Roscommon ETB is an equal opportunities employer.

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ENVIRONMENT

5 Countries Hold 70% of the World’s Remaining Wilderness

“Wild places are facing the same extinction crisis as species.”

Why Global Citizens Should Care
Biodiversity is essential to the healthy functioning of ecosystems around the world and helps mitigate climate change. You can join us in taking action on this issue here.

Unspoiled wilderness is an increasingly rare phenomenon as humans open up more and more landscape to industrial activity and settlement, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Nature.

The report found that 70% of the world’s remaining untouched wilderness exists in just five countries, and these areas are preserved largely because they’re far from human civilization, suggesting that countries just haven’t gotten to them yet.

As a sign of that, 77% of the world’s land and 87% of the world’s oceans have so far been modified by humans.

“Numerous studies are revealing that Earth’s remaining wilderness areas are increasingly important buffers against the effects of climate change and other human impacts,” James Watson, the report’s lead author and director of the science and research initiative at the Wildlife Conservation Society, wrote in an article for Nature. “But, so far, the contribution of intact ecosystems has not been an explicit target in any international policy framework, such as the United Nations’ Strategic Plan for Biodiversity or the Paris climate agreement.”

“This must change if we are to prevent Earth’s intact ecosystems from disappearing completely,” he wrote.

Take Action: Ensure All Communities Can Withstand Climate Disaster

The researchers behind the report, from the University of Queensland (UQ) and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), created a map to show where these landscapes and marine environments exist.

The largest remaining tracts of pristine wilderness are the vast forests and plains of Northern Canada, Alaska, and Russia.

In recent years, industrial interests have made inroads in these regions to extract fossil fuels and harvest wood.

Screen Shot 2018-11-01 at 12.53.22 PM.pngScreenshot from the report

Russia also holds most of the world’s remaining untouched marine environments.

Brazil is another member of this group because of the Amazon rainforest, the largest tropical forest in the world. Notwithstanding a brief period of environmental regulation that protected the forest in the mid to late 2000s and early 2010s, the Amazon has faced relentless destruction over the past several decades, and has shrunken by 20%. The country’s new president Jair Bolsonaro is expected to be greenlight logging, mining, and more throughout the Amazon.

Read More: What Brazil's New President Means for Poverty, Inequality, and More

The final country holding the bulk of the world’s wilderness is Australia, which is home to vast deserts.

Zooming out, 94% of the world’s remaining wilderness exists in just 20 countries.

The research highlights the need for these countries to adopt strong environmental measures to protect these landscapes to maintain ecological balance and integrity.

It also emphasizes an inequality of natural resources around the world, a matter which will become of increasing concern as water resources become strained in the decades ahead. By 2050, more than 5 billion people are expected to be affected by water shortages.

Read More: Animal Populations Have Dropped by 60% Since 1970

Untouched wilderness is crucial to generating, cleaning, and distributing water around the world, and could help to mitigate the looming water crisis.

These landscapes also clean the air and act as carbon sinks, regulate the global environment, buffer countries from natural disasters, and they’re critical refuges for countless species.

The precedent for conservation, however, is not especially promising, according to the authors.

Globally, the world has lost 1.2 million square miles to human activity between 1993 and 2009, which is around 20 times the size of Germany.

Read More: 87% of the World’s Oceans Are Dying: Report

“Wild places are facing the same extinction crisis as species. Similarly to species extinction, the erosion of the wilderness is essentially irreversible,” Watson said in the article. “Research has shown that the first impacts of industry on wilderness areas are the most damaging. And once it has been eroded, an intact ecosystem and its many values can never be fully restored.”

“Already we have lost so much,” he added. “We must grasp this opportunity to secure the wilderness before it disappears forever.”

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HIV/AIDS

These Zambian acrobats are flipping HIV taboos on their head

28 September 2018 3:47PM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

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This post was originally written by Emma Batha. Editing by Claire Cozens for Thomson Reuters Foundation

The Zambian slum of Chibolya is notorious for crime and drugs, but acrobat Gift Chansa wants to get the township’s youth hooked on a very different high – circus.

Chansa is co-founder of Circus Zambia, the country’s first social circus, which provides disadvantaged young people with education and job opportunities while teaching them everything from unicycling and fire-eating to tumbling and juggling.

The circus also runs a “Clowns for Condoms” project to help tackle the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Zambia, where myths persist that the disease is linked to witchcraft.

Set up in 2015, Circus Zambia has already gained international attention, performing in Britain, the United States, Japan, Belgium, the Netherlands and across Africa.

Chansa grew up in Chibolya, a poor Lusaka township which one Zambian journalist recently likened to Sodom and Gomorrah.

It is an image the charismatic acrobat is keen to dispel. He says young people are discriminated against and refused jobs simply for mentioning they come from Chibolya.

“When you grow up there, no one takes you seriously,” Chansa told the Thomson Reuters Foundation during a tour of Britain this month.

“So we wanted to say, ‘Look, not everybody is a criminal. There are young people coming up that are knowledgeable … young people that are ready to take over the world’. And that’s why we created the platform Circus Zambia.”

 

Source: BBC What’s New? Circus Zambia UK Tour, August 2018

 

While in London, Chansa met Queen Elizabeth to receive the Queen’s Young Leader Award which recognises “exceptional people” from across the Commonwealth who are transforming lives in their communities and beyond.

Drink & drugs

The eldest of six children, Chansa never knew his father. He was raised by his mother and grandparents, who provided him with his distinctive name, calling him a “a gift to the family”.

There were no parks, libraries or youth centres in the township so Chansa and his friends, including Circus Zambia co-founder Benard Kaumba, amused themselves with acrobatic contests in the street.

In 2014, Chansa and Kaumba were invited to train at a circus school in northern China under a scheme sponsored by Beijing after their talents were spotted by a Chinese circus troupe visiting Lusaka.

Chansa, 27, and Kaumba, 28, say if they had not discovered circus they could have easily been dragged into a world of drink and drugs.

“Things were hard for me. Circus kept me busy and helped me stay away from bad influences,” said Kaumba, dressed in his brightly coloured African-print tumbling costume.

“When you go back and see your friends, you see their life is just drugs,” he added, reeling off a list of illicit substances available on the streets of Chibolya.

Today the circus boasts 15 performers and works with 80 children. It has new premises which include a library, class room and training room and is raising money to finish building a theatre.

Zambian-acrobats_body.jpg

Source: Circus Zambia

Circus Zambia is part of a growing global movement of social circuses including Circus Kathmandu in Nepal, created by survivors of trafficking, and Circolombia in Colombia, which works with children from areas where gangs and drugs are rife.

Through circus skills, marginalised young people learn self-esteem, discipline, trust and team-work as well as physical fitness and creative expression.

Social circuses also use entertainment as a tool to engage communities on social or health issues such as alcohol abuse or HIV/AIDS.

Juju myths

Two years ago, Chansa watched a young friend die of HIV/AIDS after he refused medicine, believing he had been cursed. Chansa is now determined to help tackle widespread ignorance around an epidemic that has left one in six people in Lusaka HIV positive.

“In Zambia it’s hard to talk about sex, nobody talks about sex,” said Chansa, who believes the HIV rate is even higher in Chibolya.

“A lot of people will say (HIV/AIDS) is witchcraft, it’s juju, and then they won’t take their medicine – and then they die. We want to say it’s not juju.”

Last year Circus Zambia launched Clowns for Condoms, an initiative that uses circus to bust taboos around HIV, increase awareness and distribute condoms.

Chansa says their colourful wigs and costumes help overcome barriers.

“It’s easy to attract people when you go into the community and people see you dressed as clowns,” he said. “You can (talk to) them just there and then, so that’s why we use circus.”

Chansa wants to expand Circus Zambia to other regions and ensure it has a secure future for the next generation of performers.

He is also dreaming big for his own future.

“I want to be a politician,” Chansa said. “That’s my ambition – because people don’t understand what young people are going through, especially in communities like mine.”

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organisations highlighted.

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