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The Action Thread Part Two

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Has the sun inspired you to go outside and enjoy the outdoors? ☀️ Why not lace up your trainers and take part in one of our 5K/10K events near you! 🏃‍♀️🏃‍♂️
Whatever your pace and abilities, we’ll be right there with you.

Make your move and sign up now: mencap.org.uk/runningevents

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HEALTH

These health workers are fighting TB one community at a time

19 March 2019 4:23PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

SIGN THE PETITION

Tell world leaders to step up the fight against preventable diseases

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Tuberculosis (TB) is the number one infectious killer in the world, but around 36% of people with TB still go undiagnosed every year. To help step up the fight against TB, countries — like Ethiopia — are adopting community health worker programs.

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At Mekelle Health Sciences College in Ethiopia, a class for health extension workers strengthens their skills as providers of services in their villages.

Ethiopia’s National Health Extension Program was founded in 2004 with funding from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. At the time, there was a critical shortage of health services, with a ratio of one health worker per 40,000 citizens. The extension program was introduced to help bridge the gap between rural communities and health care by training health extension workers (HEWs) to provide services at a community level.

By 2016, 38,000 HEWs — the majority of whom are women — were providing health services to 15,000 villages across Ethiopia.

Health Workers in Action

Every day, HEWs — trained for a full year in basic health delivery — trek through Ethiopian communities, knocking on doors to speak with local residents and check on their health. They are trained to conduct basic health tests for preventable diseases like TB, maintain family health records, provide treatment for diseases and encourage communities to use contraceptives and get vaccinated.

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Health extension worker Workalem talks to villagers during one her frequent visits to this rural community.

Workalem Haile, a HEW in Southern Ethiopia’s Chama Hembecho village, manages the local health centre which provides care to over 2,200 families. She tests patients for disease and provides long-term care and support as her patients go through treatment.

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Workalem visits a husband and wife who are both HIV-positive and explains proper use of antiretroviral treatment.

Abinet was one of Workalem’s patients. “At the beginning, I thought it was just a common cold but I had a very serious cough. I couldn’t sleep late at night,” he said. His condition did not improve with traditional medicines, so, with help, he made his way to the local clinic where he was tested for TB. After Abinet’s results came back positive and he was prescribed the proper medication, Workalem visited him regularly over the next 6 months to support him with his treatment. Abinet says, “My health has improved because of Workalem’s help. I would like to thank her very much.”

The Impact

By 2016, over 95% of Ethiopia’s population had access to primary health care resources within 10 kilometres. Now, communities are better educated about how to limit the spread of communicable and preventable diseases, like TB, and have better access to treatment. Plus, health issues are addressed earlier and communities have better access to effective long-term care. Life expectancy in Ethiopia has increased to 64 years, jumping by 10 years since the program’s launch in 2004.

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Sister Eden, another Ethiopian HEW, regularly visits 50-year-old tuberculosis patient Desta in her home to oversee the final months of her TB care.

Excitingly, the introduction of the program didn’t just improve people’s health. The HEW program shifted gender roles and cultural norms in Ethiopia by creating a wealth of new opportunities for women to enter the workforce. “In a country where unemployment is still high, finding fulfilling work can be life changing. The health extension worker program has transformed the lives of thousands of workers who have become breadwinners for their families,” said Dr. Kesetebirhan Admasu, Ethiopia’s former minister of health.

The Global Fund

To make sure the Global Fund can continue its critical work, like funding Ethiopia’s National Health Extension Program, it will be hosting its sixth replenishment conference in October. They’re asking world leaders and private investors to come together and help save 16 million lives over the next 3 years by investing a minimum of US$14 billion.

This is the bold ambition the world needs to get us on track to stop the spread of diseases like tuberculosis — and it’s why we’re calling on world leaders to #StepUpTheFight by fully financing the Global Fund.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

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HEALTH

You need to know about the bold fund fighting HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria everywhere

5 February 2019 2:25PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

ADD YOUR NAME

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

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Fact: Every day, nearly 1,000 young women contract HIV.

Fact: Globally, there are 37 million people living with HIV — more than 15 million of whom can’t get life-saving treatment, which puts them at risk of developing AIDS-related symptoms — and another 1.8 million people contract HIV every year.

Fact: Over 2,500 people die from AIDS-related causes every day.

Fact: AIDS isn’t a disease of the past. It’s a modern-day crisis and it’s impacting people and communities around the world right now.

Enter, the Global Fund — a 21st-century partnership organisation designed to accelerate the end of AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria as epidemics.

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A child being administered malaria screening with Global Fund supported medical supplies at the Nduo-Eduo community Health Centre in Nigeria.

Formed in 2002, they work in partnership with governments, civil society, the private sector and people affected by HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria to put an end to these epidemics by investing in and funding all kinds of health resources and interventions, like doctors, nurses, innovative technologies and education programs.

The Global Fund is one of the world’s most powerful tools in the fight against these diseases. In 2017 alone, regions and countries where the Global Fund invests treated 108 million cases of malaria and 5 million people for TB, plus 17.5 million people were on ARV therapy to treat HIV. In the same year, 197 million mosquito nets were distributed, over 79 million HIV tests were completed and HIV prevention services and programs reached 9.4 million people.

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A team of mobile community health workers trained with Global Fund support on their way to rural Kenyan homes to provide health checks and care.

This is what progress looks like. But there’s still work to be done, particularly for young women and girls.

To make sure the Global Fund can continue with their critical work, they will be hosting their sixth replenishment conference in October. They’re asking world leaders and private investors to come together and help save 16 million lives over the next 3 years by meeting their replenishment goal of US$14 billion.

This investment is the bold ambition the world needs to get us on track to stop the spread of these diseases — and it’s why we’re calling on world leaders to #StepUpTheFight by fully financing the Global Fund.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Dear government and business leaders,
We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good

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The special Bible edition Bono read to his children

It's no traditional King James version, that's for sure
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May 16, 2019, 1:07 AM GMT+2 / Source: TODAY
By Rebecca Dube

At TODAY we take care to recommend items we hope you’ll enjoy! Just so you know, TODAY may get a small share of the revenue.

Using interviews with specialists, online reviews and personal experience, TODAY editors, writers and experts take care to recommend items we really like and hope you’ll enjoy! TODAY does have affiliate relationships with various online retailers. So, while every product is independently selected, if you buy something through our links, we may get a small share of the revenue.

READ MORE

Bono did not grow up in a household of big readers. But, the U2 frontman tells TODAY's Jenna Bush Hager, he loved reading the classics ranging from Harry Potter to the Bible to his own children.

Bono being Bono, of course, he did not read from the traditional King James version. Instead he favors "The Message," a contemporary Bible by Eugene Peterson that's won praise the world over for putting the Biblical message in compelling, easy-to-understand language.

What is The Message?

Eugene Peterson translated the Bible from Greek and Hebrew texts, but referred to his version as a paraphrase rather than a word-for-word translation, aiming to capture the spirit of the original in plain language.

 

For example, here's John 3:21 in the King James version: "But he that doeth truth cometh to the light, that his deeds may be made manifest, that they are wrought in God."

"The Message," by Eugene Peterson, $8, Amazon

 

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And Peterson's version in "The Message": "But anyone working and living in truth and reality welcomes God-light so the work can be seen for the God-work it is."

The Message has sold more than 20 million copies, with Bono just one of many fans.

Peterson died last October at the age of 85. "“Among his final words were, ‘Let’s go,’" his family reported in a statement they released at the time. "And his joy: my, oh my; the man remained joyful right up to his blessed end, smiling frequently."

Bono's love of books

When he was growing up in Dublin, Bono's family wasn't real big on reading to him.

"No," he told Jenna with a laugh, "that wouldn't have happened. My dad played opera so we had deafening music. But reading wasn't such a big thing. And I developed my own passion for reading in my teenage years."

He fed his fascination with America by reading authors like John Steinbeck, Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg. "I still read poetry," he said. "When you're busy, poetry's powerful."

When Jenna's daughter Mila was born, Bono even gave her a book as a gift.

"But did you use it, Jen?" he inquired.

Indeed she did — it was a copy of "Peter and the Wolf," with a very personal inscription to Mila.

"Peter and the Wolf," by Sergei Prokofiev, $16, Amazon

 

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"It said, 'Welcome to the world. There's a lot of work for you to do but not just yet'," Jenna recited from memory.

"Oh, my gosh," Bono replied.

"I cried," Jenna said. "Thank you."

Image:    Rebecca DubeRebecca Dube

Rebecca Dube is the Head of TODAY Parents, Digital, and a mom of two boys. Follow her on the TODAY Parenting Team and Twitter.

 
 

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16/05/2019

New opportunities: Musicians (Wicklow) and Administrator (Roscommon)

New opportunities: Musicians (Wicklow) and Administrator (Roscommon)

Applications are being sought for Musician and Administrator roles in Wicklow and Roscommon respectively.

Music Generation Wicklow – Musicians (part-time)

Kildare and Wicklow Education and Training Board on behalf of Music Generation Wicklow is currently recruiting for the following:

Panel of Music Tutors (all genres: all instruments, Choral Practitioners, Voice, Music Therapy, Early Learning Music etc.)

Candidates must have prior experience in delivering musical tuition to young people and have proven performance experience.

Applications for this post should be made online at www.etbvacancies.ie or www.kwetb.ie where more detailed information is available. 

The deadline for applications is 5pm on Friday 24 May 2019

Music Generation Roscommon — Administrator

Galway & Roscommon Education and Training Board (GRETB) invites applications from suitably qualified persons for the position of Administrator at Music Generation Roscommon. The post is full time, 37 hours per week and the successful candidate will be employed on a fixed-term contract for a period of three years.

Music Generation Administrator will be appointed by GRETB in Music Generation Roscommon and will be responsible for assisting with the organisation, promotion and day-to-day running and delivery of performance music education services provided by Music Generation Roscommon.

Application forms, job descriptions and person specifications available online at – www.galwayroscommon.etb.ie

A panel may be formed. Closing date for receipt of completed application forms:Friday 31 May 2019.

Late applications will not be accepted. Galway & Roscommon ETB is an equal opportunities employer.

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We are enormously proud to be the official charity for the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon. 😍

This is an incredible opportunity for us to kick-start a movement of change, and take a huge step towards greater inclusion for people with a learning disability.

Will you run with us? 🏃 https://bit.ly/2Lvooug 👈

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Posted (edited)

One of the most important elements of our De-institutionalisation Programmes is integration and building understanding of how to live outside of an institution.

Many of the children and young adults on our programmes have never known life outside the confines of an orphanage, so it is very important that they are carefully prepared for a life of independence in the future.

Our Volunteer Teams play a vital role in helping to integrate these children and young adults into communities, and build understanding. This week's volunteer medical team brought some of our Restoration of Rights, Life Skills and Wood Workshop gang to a furniture factory in Bobruisk to show them a potential future career path.

While a number of this group already have very fine woodworking skills through CCI's workshop, it was interesting for them to see how these skills could be applied on an industrial level. It is also a great opportunity to have conversations and interactions with some new people outside of the institutional setting.

A big thank you to our volunteer team and staff who made this educational visit a possibility!

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La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas de pie

La imagen puede contener: 6 personas

La imagen puede contener: 4 personas, personas sonriendo

 

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Adi Roche: Heroic men were sent in to fight a nuclear disaster with shovels and their bare hands

‘The Chernobyl series on Sky TV is an honest, truthful and a jarring appraisal of human behaviour – acting as a cautionary tale for all of us’, writes Adi Roche.

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Adi Roche in the Exclusion Zone
Adi Roche in the Exclusion Zone

33 YEARS HAVE PASSED but sadly the spectre of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster continues to stalk across the generations – in the land, water, air and in people’s DNA. 

Chernobyl isn’t something from the past. Chernobyl is forever. It remains an unfolding and everlasting, cautionary tragedy.  

The impact of that single shocking nuclear accident can never be undone; its radioactive footprint is embedded in our world forever.

Countless people are still being affected by its legacy shadowing their lives for future generations. 

This deadly weapon is silent, invisible, not even a smell warns you of the extreme danger.

Radiation is a silent killer that knows no borders and penetrates all life-  the land, the air, the water as well as human life.
 
There’s no safe haven, there is no antidote.

More than 33 years on, the Chernobyl zone is even more radioactive than previously thought, that is according to research by the American Geophysical Union.

To this day, continuing low dose exposure through the food chain poses a huge risk to people.  There are an estimated two million people living in the affected areas – some 500,000 of those are children. 

We may never know the full extent of that contamination or be able to prove that a specific case of illness relates to it – but the tragedy that is Chernobyl is very, very real.

Tragedy reminds us of our shared humanity. Tragedy brings out our innate nobility and bravery.  

I believe that no other nation in the world has responded to this disaster as well as Ireland has. We continue to champion the lives of people affected by the Chernobyl disaster. 

Two weeks ago, I spoke again at the United Nations headquarters in New York. I want to see all of the 700,000 men – the so-called ‘ liquidators’ – who fought to contain the deadly fallout from the Chernobyl nuclear explosion, be nominated for a Nobel Peace Prize.

They were soldiers, firefighters, helicopter pilots, engineers and construction workers, who were ordered into the still burning, still disintegrating, nuclear plant to try to cut off the clouds of radioactivity that were spreading across Europe.

Many of these heroic men died within days of being sent in to fight a nuclear disaster with little more than shovels and their bare hands. 

Some died shortly afterwards and others lingered on in ill health for years before passing away.

Some of the men survive today, still battling radiation-linked illnesses and living on meagre pensions.  To a large extent they have been forgotten, almost airbrushed out of history.

Their intercession is unparalleled in history and their self-sacrifice cannot be overstated

With the passing of time – after all 33 years is more than a generation – disasters like Chernobyl can fade from the headlines, from the global consciousness and from the memory of ordinary people.

 

And then comes a film, confident enough to proclaim itself and its intent with that single, haunted, forever place-name, ‘Chernobyl’. 

A series that will reveal to a new global audience the ignominy, the betrayal and the heroism behind the deadliest accident in history.  

It is of great significance that HBO and Sky co-commissioned the powerfully impactful new series ‘Chernobyl‘.

Their dramatisation of the events is based on the true story and reveals the role of the liquidators, their heroism and also the betrayal of that day.

The 5-part series, currently running on Sky is retelling the story to a new and wider audience as never articulated or envisioned before.

This fantastic, creative series is helping us all to see Chernobyl with fresh eyes and ears and a fresh heart. It creates solidarity with those affected by the disaster and allows for compassion and understanding. 

This series took the United Nations by storm– it doesn’t shy away from telling it like it is and it is not for the faint-hearted. It was a shock for the delegates to see the story told in such a frank and direct way.

The revelation of deception and cover-up is deeply disturbing.

For the first time, the public will discover what happens when we reject the truth and ignore the advice of experts – instead running with that which is convenient. 

Because the truth remains the truth and in the end it will always reveal itself.

This Chernobyl series is an honest, truthful and a jarring appraisal of human behaviour – acting as a cautionary tale for all of us.

I truly believe that this series will be one of the most influential shows of our time

I congratulate and applaud the decision of all concerned in the making of this powerful series. They honour the many victims and heroes of Chernobyl.

Our charity work with the children and now grandchildren of Chernobyl, in Ukraine and Belarus, continues and we cling to the hope that a tragedy like Chernobyl will never happen again.

So much is already lost and compromised but we owe it to those who sacrificed their lives for our safety – to do all that we can to keep the memory of their sacrifice alive. 

To those who died, with a loud and clear voice, we say – ‘we will not forget you’.

Adi Roche is the founder and Voluntary CEO of Chernobyl Children International (CCI) and was one of the leading international figures to respond to the humanitarian crisis which ensued after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986.

For more than 40 years she has been passionately campaigning for and is publicly active in, issues relating to the environment, peace and social justice.

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GIRLS AND WOMEN

This South African pilot started a camp to inspire young girls

6 December 2018 4:57PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement

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The “Zulu Sierra – Papa Whiskey Whiskey” (ZS-PWW) may look like any other plane but this aircraft is special. It’s carrying bright young minds to an exceptional future. The plane is owned by Refilwe Ledwaba — the first black woman to fly for the South Africa Police Service and the first black woman to be a helicopter pilot in South Africa!

Refilwe grew up in Lenyenye, a small township in the Limpopo region of South Africa. Originally, she wanted to become a doctor, but everything changed on a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town. That fateful flight had a female pilot who inspired her to take to the skies.

To achieve her goal, she wrote to over 200 South African companies asking them to help fund her education. The South Africa Police Service responded, offering to pay for her training and help her get a commercial pilot license.

Since then, she’s founded the Girls Fly Programme in Africa Foundation (GFPA) — a non-profit that has set-up a training programme and an annual flying camp for teenage girls —  giving a head start to the next generation of women aviation and space leaders in Africa. The camp (run with Women and Aviation) teaches girls from South Africa, Botswana and Cameroon all about aviation.

Camp attendees spend their days learning about computer coding, building robots and completing flight simulations. They also get an opportunity to take a flying lesson on board the ZS-PWW, where they learn the basics of flying.

The girls come from different backgrounds, from townships to private schools, but all achieve high scores in math and science at their schools. GFPA gives them the opportunity to meet professionals working in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), and learn about the exciting and hugely varied career opportunities for them in these fields.

“I think STEM is very important because, on a personal note, it opened a lot of doors for me,” says Refilwe. “So if you’re not going to prepare women for those jobs in the future, then we’re lost.”

Refilwe made history in South Africa. Now, she’s paving the way for a new generation of girls to do the same.

Every girl deserves the opportunity to reach the skies. If you want to support girls worldwide, join the Poverty is Sexistmovement!

Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement

Nowhere on earth do women have as many opportunities as men. Nowhere. But for girls and women in the poorest countries, that inequality is amplified.
Poverty is sexist, so I’m adding my voice to ONE’s global movement of more than 9 million people calling for change.

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Listen, we get it. There's so much happening, all the time, EVERYWHERE. That's why we're introducing "Sam Gives a Damn," highlighting important info about the fight against AIDS, amazing people who are leading the charge, & how YOU can get involved.

https://www.red.org/reditorial/introducing-sam-gives-a-damn?fbclid=IwAR3QhDD1dutBA1hIPim8u1KQLubI4X0gXNclY5WJQWtp5v1wrd1LlIFH-_0

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👭 👬 👫 with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are, like everyone else, unique individuals!  
We want to ensure that 👫 👬 👭 with PMLD are fully included in society. 🌎 
Like if you agree! 👍 Find out more: http://bit.ly/2wdCFjI 👈

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CULTURE

Poverty may not actually mean what you think

October 16 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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Around the world, there are over 9 million people who are united by the same cause. From different walks of life, across ages and nations, careers and faiths, these 9 million people are all ONE members. Each of them working towards the same goal: ending extreme poverty.

There’s no question, this is an important cause. But if we asked some people to explain poverty, chances are they would say different things. That’s because poverty is complicated. It looks different depending on where you are, and there are lots of reasons why it happens.

We’ve put together a quick explainer on poverty, why it matters, and what you can do to help eradicate it.

The Definitions

Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines poverty as “the state of one who lacks a usual or socially acceptable amount of money or material possessions.” On definition alone, the concept of poverty is pretty vague. That’s why there are different ways of measuring poverty.

Two of the most frequent ways of defining poverty are absolute and relative. Absolute poverty means that you don’t have enough money for basic needs, like food and housing. Relative poverty compares your circumstances to other people. Since this measurement is based on societal norms, being in relative poverty can lead to social exclusion

Then, there’s extreme poverty, which is ONE’s focus. This is defined as living on less than US$1.90 a day. As of 2015, about 10% of the world’s population was experiencing extreme poverty. Of these people, more than half were in sub-Saharan Africa.

These are some of the most common ways of defining poverty, but this isn’t all of them. It’s important to be aware of which measurements a source is using.

The Causes

Just as there are a ton of different definitions of poverty, there are a ton of different causes.

There’s an obvious cause that comes to mind: income. Food, shelter, health, and education are all affected by a person’s wages. However, poverty is about a lot more than just income. Access to land, financial services, medical services, social participation, and safe living conditions are all contributing factors.

These causes affect some people more than others, meaning that discrimination plays a role. That’s why we say poverty is sexist. There is nowhere in the world where women have the same opportunities as men (and here are 25 facts to prove it). But for girls living in extreme poverty, sexism can be a death sentence. This is unacceptable.

Future Potential

Behind the definitions and causes of poverty, we must remember that we’re talking about people. We’re talking about girls who are forced into marriage, children who can’t get an education, sick people who can’t get better, and countless others facing difficult situations because of poverty.

Even though defining poverty can be difficult, there’s a simple truth: it doesn’t have to be this way. The first Sustainable Development Goal is to end poverty in all its forms by 2030. If we achieve this, people all over the world will be free to reach their potential.

Ending poverty is not only possible, but necessary. Together, we can all create an equal, poverty-free world.

Are you ready to join the fight against extreme poverty? Become a ONE member today!

 

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MEMBERS IN ACTION

5 ONE in America activists you oughta know for our 15th anniversary

May 15 2019 | By: SUZANNE GRANVILLE

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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ONE members come from every walk of life and from across the political spectrum. They’re artists and activists, faith and business leaders, students and scientists. ONE members take action day in, day out — organizing, mobilizing, educating, and advocating so that people will have the chance not just to survive, but to thrive. They all give their time and talents to ONE for the same reason — a commitment to ending extreme poverty and preventable diseases. They know that you don’t need to agree on everything if the one thing you agree on is important enough.

This has been a guiding principle for ONE since it was founded in Philadelphia 15 years ago. Today, we’re taking the time to celebrate some of these amazing activists who make up ONE.

Barb Barrar – Magnolia, NJ

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Barb Barrar is a CDL from Magnolia, NJ.

Barb has been with us almost since the beginning. She jumped onto the ONE bandwagon at the Philadelphia kick-off event in 2004 and helped sign up some of our very first supporters! Today Barb organizes ONE members in her community as a Congressional District Leader (CDL).

Do you remember the exact action, issue, or campaign and what or who convinced you to take it?
I first became interested in the fight against extreme poverty during the Jubilee 2000/Drop The Debt Campaign which led to the creation of D.A.T.A. , which then became ONE.

Andrew Gyimah – Indianapolis, IN

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Andrew Gyimah from Indianapolis, IN joined ONE in 2017.

Andrew joined ONE in 2017 when he made a call to urge his congressmen to support the BUILD Act.

What motivated you to join ONE?
As an activist from my country, Liberia, I have always yearned to be a part of a global advocacy group that sees all mankind as equal. So after meeting with the ONE team and taking part in a Power Summit, I was convinced that there’s no better place to join the fight than ONE. Campaigns like the BUILD Act, the Global Fragility Act, and ONE’s support of the Global Fund are why my support to ONE is unwavering.

Matt Staniz  – Chesterbrook, PA

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Matt Staniz and his family have been supporters of ONE for a decade.

Matt has been a supporter of ONE for over 10 years! As a pastor in suburban Philadelphia, he hopes of seeing his congregation live their lives in ways that actively build a world that reflects the love that their faith professes.

What do you hope the future holds for ONE factivists?
A better world for all people because ONE volunteers are leading the way when it comes to informed, civil, and compassionate political action. I hope ONE’s commitment to non-partisan and action-driven advocacy will be recognized as the model for advocacy around the world.

Ali Escalante – Boise, ID

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Ali Escalante is a CDL from Boise, ID

Ali has been a member of ONE since 2005, doing online actions and volunteering. She was a CDL in 2012, first in Florida and now she represents ONE in Idaho.

Tell us about your proudest moment as a ONE leader?
Having Senator Risch tweet a photo of our ONE group with him in Washington and going on the record in support of The Global Fund. 

What do you hope the future holds for ONE factivists?
I hope we will continue to add more and more factivists to our ranks so our collective voice is so loud that we cannot be ignored.

Kamryn Ronca – University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse

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Kamryn joined ONE through the ONE Campus chapter at her university.

Kamryn joined ONE as a sophomore in college. She saw the ONE banner during our Involvement Fest and recognized it from her parents and their love of U2 and signed up!  

Favorite part of being a volunteer leader with ONE?
All of the learning opportunities! I feel so lucky to have joined ONE and then to be able to go on and hold a leadership role on my campus.

What is your favorite ONE Campaign slogan?
Actions Speak Louder.

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HEALTH

There’s a health care revolution in the DRC

4 March 2019 10:25AM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

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Vaccines don’t just stop us from getting sick, they keep us healthy too, which means we can take advantage of all the opportunities that life has to offer. For many of us, getting vaccinations is pretty easy – we just arrange an appointment at our local health centre. For others, it’s a lot harder.

Victor is a health worker in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) capital city. Delivering healthcare in communities affected by extreme poverty is hard enough, but without a working fridge to store and transport vaccines, it is even harder for Victor to vaccinate children who need it.

Health worker Victor, DRC.

Health worker Victor, DRC.

“We were only doing two or three vaccination sessions per month. We had to take the cooler back and forth to pick up the vaccines – a distance of four kilometres between here and the central office. The only mode of transport, the motorbike, cost CF2000 (US$ 1.25) for each journey. That cost us a lot.”

Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC.

Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC.

Keeping cool

Vaccines need to be kept at stable, low temperatures. If not, they stop working. So, cold-chain equipment such as fridges and cool boxes are essential to keep vaccines chilled. This hasn’t been an easy feat to achieve in the DRC – an equatorial country with a tropical climate. Until now, health centres have used petrol-fuelled fridges to keep vaccines cool, but they are unreliable, often breakdown and fuel is hard to get and transport.

What makes transportation even harder, is that the DRC is a big country – the size of Western Europe, much of which is covered by dense forest without good roads.

“The distances here are too large to supply some areas with vaccines,” said Didier Maundé, Head of Logistics for the DRC’s Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI). “Sometimes fuel was nowhere to be found either, or was too expensive. The cold-chain was at risk, and it was having a negative impact on vaccination.”

Despite some recent progress, the DRC still has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Every year nearly two million children miss out on a full course of vaccines, contributing to almost one in ten Congolese children not surviving to see their fifth birthday.

Now the good bit…

In October 2018, the Ministry of Health, working closely with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners, launched a plan to increase immunisation by 15% by 2020. If successful, an additional 220,000 children could be immunised.
Crucial to the success of the Ministry’s plan is improved cold-chain equipment. With more reliable equipment and better methods of transportation to cover the country’s huge distances, children in the DRC will be able to reap the benefits of life-saving vaccinations.

Almost 5,000 new solar-powered fridges have been delivered to the DRC and more are on the way!

Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year.

Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year.

Victor, who received his solar fridge last year, said “This has reduced the cost for us and increased the number of [vaccination] sessions. I think we are at ten sessions per month now. We are very happy to have this.”

Supersizing

Meanwhile, another quiet revolution is also taking place that will improve healthcare in DRC: the creation of Central Africa’s largest vaccine storage hub.

The hub (funded by Gavi) recently opened in Kinkole, just outside central Kinshasa. It can safely store more than 200 million vaccine doses and other medical supplies before they are distributed to health centres.

The state of the art facility is also equipped with all kinds of transportation, including 150 canoes and boats powered by outboard motors to help deliver vaccines around the country. For a nation that currently uses aeroplanes to deliver 80% of its vaccines to the provinces, the use of boats is expected to deliver massive long-term savings. Excitingly, two more major regional hubs are planned. “The impact is visible,” said Didier Maundé. “More and more vaccines are available in the field. The cold chain is now reliable, and long distances are less of a problem.”

A big thank you to Gavi for providing the story.

Gavi is a global Vaccine Alliance that brings together public and private organisations with a shared goal — to make vaccines more available, accessible and affordable to children who need them the most. Incredibly, Gavi has so far supported some of the world’s poorest countries to immunise 700 million children, averting 10 million future deaths that would be lost to vaccine-preventable diseases.

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GIRLS AND WOMEN

This South African pilot started a camp to inspire young girls

6 December 2018 4:57PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement

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The “Zulu Sierra – Papa Whiskey Whiskey” (ZS-PWW) may look like any other plane but this aircraft is special. It’s carrying bright young minds to an exceptional future. The plane is owned by Refilwe Ledwaba — the first black woman to fly for the South Africa Police Service and the first black woman to be a helicopter pilot in South Africa!

Refilwe grew up in Lenyenye, a small township in the Limpopo region of South Africa. Originally, she wanted to become a doctor, but everything changed on a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town. That fateful flight had a female pilot who inspired her to take to the skies.

To achieve her goal, she wrote to over 200 South African companies asking them to help fund her education. The South Africa Police Service responded, offering to pay for her training and help her get a commercial pilot license.

Since then, she’s founded the Girls Fly Programme in Africa Foundation (GFPA) — a non-profit that has set-up a training programme and an annual flying camp for teenage girls —  giving a head start to the next generation of women aviation and space leaders in Africa. The camp (run with Women and Aviation) teaches girls from South Africa, Botswana and Cameroon all about aviation.

Camp attendees spend their days learning about computer coding, building robots and completing flight simulations. They also get an opportunity to take a flying lesson on board the ZS-PWW, where they learn the basics of flying.

The girls come from different backgrounds, from townships to private schools, but all achieve high scores in math and science at their schools. GFPA gives them the opportunity to meet professionals working in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), and learn about the exciting and hugely varied career opportunities for them in these fields.

“I think STEM is very important because, on a personal note, it opened a lot of doors for me,” says Refilwe. “So if you’re not going to prepare women for those jobs in the future, then we’re lost.”

Refilwe made history in South Africa. Now, she’s paving the way for a new generation of girls to do the same.

Every girl deserves the opportunity to reach the skies. If you want to support girls worldwide, join the Poverty is Sexistmovement!

Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement

Nowhere on earth do women have as many opportunities as men. Nowhere. But for girls and women in the poorest countries, that inequality is amplified.
Poverty is sexist, so I’m adding my voice to ONE’s global movement of more than 9 million people calling for change.

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Posted (edited)

Listen, we get it. There's so much happening, all the time, EVERYWHERE. That's why we're introducing "Sam Gives a Damn," highlighting important info about the fight against AIDS, amazing people who are leading the charge, & how YOU can get involved.

https://www.red.org/reditorial/introducing-sam-gives-a-damn?fbclid=IwAR3W7WWOF8qPRBfjfuhZ-Fdi6Kme1CuSWCcV249wnC_6C99d-h9DzLEjn74

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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As it is Saturday, have you got three minutes? 

Fancy nominating us to win a £1,000? 🙏

All you need to do is visit 👉 https://bit.ly/2W27h4g
Search for our charity number - 222377 🔎 
Say why you would like to nominate us. ✍️

We would really appreciate a cheeky share of this post too! 😉 
Thanks for your kind support. ❤️ #MovementForGood

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sonriendo, lentes de sol, primer plano y exterior

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