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We demanded Progress not Promises at the Gender Ministerial
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MEMBERS IN ACTION

We demanded Progress not Promises at the Gender Ministerial

17 May 2019 9:05AM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER

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On International Women’s Day, we told world leaders that we wanted progress, not promises, towards gender equality. Now, we’re working to make sure that they follow through.

The G7 Summit isn’t until August, but the journey to it has already begun. On May 10th, gender ministers from the G7 met up in Paris to talk about their priorities for gender equality. Here’s how we joined the conversation:

On the Web

Over 131,000 people around the world have signed our open letter so far. Many of these signers took to social media and sent messages to their gender ministers. The message was simple: Commit to progress for gender equality.

By the ministerial, thousands of people sent messages across Facebook and Twitter. Their messages got across in a big way. On May 9th, France’s Gender Minister, Marlene Schiappa, tweeted out our message of Progress not Promises!

On the Ground

In the offline world, ONE Youth Ambassadors gathered in front of the UNESCO building carrying bright signs. Each one conveyed a bold message taken from the open letter, bringing its message to the public. Hundreds of thousands of French citizens saw these statements throughout the day as they headed in for the Women 7 Summit.

SWP_2344-1024x683.jpg

Inside the building, Aya Chebbi joined a panel on feminist diplomacy. Aya is an African Union Youth Envoy, pan-African feminist from Tunisia, and a spokeswoman for the open letter. In other words, she’s an expert on gender equality!

 

"How can I not be a feminist when every day I am reminded of my gender, whether on the street or on a panel?" says @aya_chebbi #FeministsCount

 
 
 
 

 

She gave a powerful speech on why she’s a feminist, and how we can create an equal world for everyone. Her inspiring words covered how to achieve justice, make women decision-makers and put an end to violence. She also touched on her role as an open letter spokeswoman:

“I am one of 45 activists from 15 African countries who co-signed an open letter with ONE to ask political leaders to end the empty promises and act for women and girls living in the extreme poverty,” says Aya. “As activists, we work every day to improve the situation of women around us. But political leaders must also do their part because they are committed to achieving gender equality by 2030.”

The Results

At the end of the day, ONE Youth Ambassadors, Aya, and Belgian actress Deborah François delivered our open letter to gender ministers. They discussed why we need gender equality, and why G7 leaders should make it a priority.

 

YES! 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽
Our #ONEYouth19 Ambassadors, Tunisian activist @aya_chebbi, and actress @DeboFrancoisOff just gave @MarleneSchiappa and other gender ministers our open letter to demand genuine progress for gender equality! @G7 #ProgressNotPromises #G7France

 
 
 
 

 

The gender ministerial is only the first stop on the way towards the G7. We’ve still got a long way to go, from sherpa meetings in June to more ministerials in July, all leading up to the G7 Summit at the end of August. That means we have a lot of opportunities to tell world leaders what we want for gender equality!

Are you ready to join the fight for gender equality? Sign our open letter to world leaders!

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HEALTH

Why global health is good for everyone

4 April 2019 8:57PM UTC | By: KATIE RYAN

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What is global health?

It’s a big year for global health so ONE is going to be talking about it a lot. But before we jump into the nitty gritty statistics or the importance of getting funding for the world’s most innovative partnerships, let’s talk about what global health actually is!

Global health is about improving people’s health worldwide, reducing inequality and, protecting societies from global threats, such as preventable diseases, that don’t stop at national borders.

So why is it important?

We are at a tipping point. In 2017, nearly one million people died from AIDS-related causes globally and another 1.8 million contracted HIV. After 10 years of steady decline, malaria is back on the rise, especially among children under 5 years old, who account for two-thirds of all malaria deaths. Though more than 10 million people contract TB every year, nearly 40% of those are “missed” – that is almost 4 million people left undiagnosed, untreated, and therefore, contagious.

As a global community, we all benefit when our neighbours are healthy. Access to prevention and treatment should be a right, not a privilege. Yet, so many of our community members cannot enjoy this right because of prohibitive costs, distance, or stigma and discrimination.

If people can access affordable healthcare, they can invest in bettering their community: kids can attend school, adults can pursue careers, families can enjoy their time together, the list goes on. Quality of life skyrockets when prevention and treatment are affordable and accessible.

Human rights always come first. But it is important to realize that ensuring our global community is healthy, educated and empowered has another benefit: economic growth. Failing to protect health could quickly thwart this potential. The 2014 Ebola epidemic is a staggering illustration of the economic consequences of just one outbreak of disease: in 2015, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone lost US$2.2 billion in gross domestic product, threatening economic stability and private sector growth in the region.

We know that investments made in health today will pay dividends tomorrow.

  • Every US$1 invested in immunisation, for example, leads to a return of US$60.
  • Every US$1 invested in reducing malaria infections delivers a return of US$36.
  • Every US$1 invested in health spending for the world’s poorest leads to a return of US$13.

Simply put, health is a smart investment with big returns.

Where do we go from here?

Health has been one of the most recognised and celebrated success stories in global development since the turn of the 21st century. This progress has not happened by accident. It has been driven largely by new public-private collaborations, breakthrough commitments to increase investments in health alongside greater investment from national governments, and passionate citizen activism.

This is a proud legacy that should be celebrated as a benchmark for what is possible. But it stops well short of being an indicator for future gains. Progress will not continue, and could go into reverse, if our global community, including world leaders, do not commit to looking out for our neighbours.

The Global Fund is one of the best weapons we have to fight AIDS, TB and malaria. The Fund supports programs run by local experts in the countries and communities that need it most – helping to save 27 million lives so far. To help save another 16 million lives between 2021-2023, the Global Fund needs to raise at least US$14 billion by its Replenishment Conference this October.

We must not stall progress now. Are you up for the challenge?

Add your name to tell world leaders they must back this bold partnership. Then share the action with your family and friends.

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Dear government and business leaders,
We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good.

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AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Follow the Money win big at SDG Action Awards

24 May 2019 3:47PM UTC | By: JANE EAGLES

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The talented and ambitious from every corner of the globe were recently in Bonn, Germany, for the annual UN SDG Action Awards. The awards are a celebration of the campaigners who have been taking real action to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The UN SDG Action Awards recognises individuals, civil society organisations, subnational governments, foundations, networks, and private sector leaders from across the globe with the most innovative, impactful and transformative initiatives that are building a global movement of action for the SDGs.

FollowtheMoneytwitter1.jpg

via Twitter

Among this year’s winners were Follow the Money (partners of ONE!), a project spearheaded by Connected Development. Follow the Money picked up the Mobilizer Award for their impressive work on targeting corruption in aid-giving. They have already impacted over 2,000,000 rural lives through tracking over $10 million meant for social development across African communities.

The Nigerian-based organisation was born out of a desire to tackle the corruption that can have dire consequences on budget allocations or aid for health, education and WASH. Frustrated by the fact that people living in poverty were not receiving the designated resources, and a widening gap of inequality, they decided to take a stand.

Screen-Shot-2019-05-24-at-11.50.06.png

via Twitter

Founded by Hamzat Lawal and Oludotun Babayemi, Follow the Money follows a social accountability model, where the team conduct data mining, and track budgets and appropriations to ensure aid funding is being spent accurately. Using technology, Follow the Money is able to get to the core of what’s happening with budgetary allocation.

Followthemoneytwitter3.jpg

via Twitter

Savvy Freedom of Information requests, empowering people to hold their elected officials accountable and conducting regular community outreach efforts, cemented the team’s win in the Mobilizer category.

Through their disruptive interventions, essential public projects have been completed. Their commitment to stopping corruption, ending poverty and furthering inclusive development shines through.

Congratulations to all of this year’s winners! Click here to find out who else won big at the SDG Action Awards.

 

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IS THERE A CURE FOR HIV/AIDS?

If you’ve been paying attention to the news lately, you’ve likely seen a few headlines about the AIDS fight—but unlike 30 years ago, it’s been mostly good news. Thanks to developments from doctors, scientists, and researchers, the world is inching closer and closer to finding a cure to HIV/AIDS. However, despite the incredible progress, the fight to end AIDS is still in jeopardy.

So, is there a cure? The answer isn’t a simple yes or no. Here’s what you need to know about the “cure” to HIV/AIDS:

THE REAL STATUS ON THE “CURE”

Let’s be clear on what the latest cases of reported “cures” mean. Scientists are careful to describe the current “cure” as a case of “long term viral remission,” meaning that the HIV virus is suppressed, but still present in the body. The patients currently reported as “cured” are off treatment and not experiencing any symptoms.

THE BERLIN PATIENT

Original Image Courtesy of USC Annenberg Center for Health Journalism https://www.centerforhealthjournalism.org/resources/lessons/putting-face-search-aids-cure

 

Talk of the first known, sustained cure started with Timothy Brown, known as “the Berlin Patient.”

Brown was diagnosed with HIV in 1995 and in 2007, his HIV went into remission after undergoing a bone marrow stem cell transplant.

Prior to his transplant, Brown had been diagnosed with leukemia. His body wasn’t responding to aggressive chemotherapy, so his doctor came up with the novel idea to swap his vulnerable tissue with healthy stem cells from a donor carrying a rare CCR5 mutation called CCR5-delta 32. CCR5 is a protein receptor that HIV uses as an entry point to the immune system. If someone carries the CCR5-delta 32 mutation, this entry point is blocked off, making it essentially impossible for the carrier to be infected with HIV. Only a very small population of the world has this mutation.

After finding the right donor with this mutation, Brown received the transplant and then stopped taking his ARVs. Brown was observed to see if his HIV would resurge, and after a year, his doctor deemed him HIV-free. In February 2009, the final results were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Today, Brown is still off HIV treatment and continues to show no signs of the virus.

THE LONDON PATIENT

Over the next decade, similar attempts to replicate Brown’s results failed—that was until “the London Patient” earlier this year.

While he has chosen to keep his identity anonymous, we know the London patient was diagnosed with HIV in 2003, and then with advanced Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2012. Like Brown, his body resisted chemotherapy, and as a result, his doctors recommended a stem cell transplant from a donor with the CCR5 mutation, which was conducted in 2016.

After observing him for 18 months, scientists declared the London Patient to be HIV-free. In March 2019, the final results were published in the science journal Nature and made front page news with headlines like “HIV is Reported Cured in a Second Patient.”

Original Image Courtesy of AP News  https://www.apnews.com/9e62d8e565dc41d1bdd09d8b4e9a25f1

 

 

THE FIRST LIVING HIV+ ORGAN DONOR

A few weeks after word was out on the London Patient, the world received more hopeful news.

Nina Martinez became the world’s first living HIV-positive person to donate an organ to an HIV-positive recipient, giving the anonymous patient one of her kidneys. Until recently, the medical world considered it unsafe for someone with HIV to live with only one kidney, but thanks to antiretroviral treatment, those with HIV can be organ donors without the past fear of complications.

 

WHAT IT ALL MEANS

These results are incredibly hopeful and show that new approaches to HIV treatment are slowly becoming increasingly effective. That being said, it’s important to remember that these successes occurred under very special circumstances. The procedures were intended to treat cancer, and they came with a large price tag and an even larger risk. After the Berlin Patient, many of the attempts to replicate his treatment ended with the virus coming back, or with HIV+ patients dying from their cancer. Brown himself almost died because of the toll the procedure took on his immune system.

These discoveries also do not change the current situation for most of the 37 million people currently living with HIV, nearly two-thirds of whom are in sub-Saharan Africa. Given nearly half of all people living with HIV still need access to HIV medication, a rare, dangerous and costly procedure isn’t a realistic solution to the AIDS fight.

This is why the Global Fund, the organization that receives 100% of (RED) dollars, is so important. While the medical community continues to work on finding a safe, cost-effective cure for HIV/AIDS, Global Fund programs in over 100 countries are focused on scaling up access to antiretroviral treatment—the current, closest thing to a cure for people living with HIV. These programs also provide prevention services, care, treatment and education to the people most affected by HIV, which are crucial to limiting the spread of the virus.

We should applaud these discoveries, but we’re not at the finish line yet. AIDS is still a crisis but it doesn’t have to be. When you shop (RED) products on Amazon.com/red, you’re helping to change this.

 
 

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The brilliant Ardú is set to host this year's Irish International A Cappella Festival, taking place 28-30 June at Liberty Hall, Dublin. The festival will feature performances by over twenty Irish and international ensembles, free public workshops by expert facilitators and performance opportunities for choirs. Roll on a musical June!

https://www.irishacappella.com/?fbclid=IwAR2l-EXSy89df5AGL6CTvnwZvAN4K-tR4Pp8OFVRfGBl8kOWTLe20X8I-aA

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It is nearly the weekend and we want to make you smile until the end of Friday.

This video will leave you with the biggest smile possible.

You are awesome Kodi! ❤️

 

 

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MAY 31, 2019

 

 
 
WATER & SANITATION

This Town Will Be First in US to Offer Free Tampons in All Public Restrooms — Regardless of Gender

Brookline, Massachusetts, is setting the bar for menstrual equity.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Stigma and shame around periods make it difficult for people to reach their full potentials. Providing access to period products is a step toward achieving menstrual equity. You can join us and take action on this issue here

Students in the greater Boston area just helped their town become the first in the US to provide free period products in all public restrooms. 

Brookline Town Meeting Member Rebecca Stone and two students presented the issue on May 23, according to the Hill. They made a convincing argument and compared period products to toilet paper, Patch reported. That night, residents voted to approve a plan to stock male and female bathrooms with tampons and pads. 

Product dispensary machines will be installed by July 2021. They will cost about $40,000 to set up in the first year and then $7,300 to maintain annually, according to Patch. Advocates in Massachusetts are hopeful for what this means for the future of the menstrual equity movement.

Take Action: Prioritizing Menstrual Hygiene Management is Key to Ensuring Girls Can Stay in School

Sasha Goodfriend, president of Mass NOW, the Massachusetts chapter of the National Organization for Women, is excited and proud that Brookline is the first city to make menstrual products available in public buildings.

“The menstrual equity movement, in general, is about taking periods out of the closet, and making sure that we are talking about menstruation,” Goodfriend told Global Citizen. 

Restrooms in Brookline public buildings, including town hall libraries and parks, will stock menstrual products in both male and female bathrooms, to accommodate all people who have periods.

“It’s important to remember that not all women menstruate, and not all menstruators are women,” Goodfriend pointed out. “Trans men also menstruate, for example, and if they’re using men’s bathrooms, they need not only access to menstrual products but also access to garbages, to put the products in afterward.”

Lack of adequate garbage disposal seems like an oversight, Goodfriend explained, but it’s an essential part of making sure people who menstruate feel safe, comfortable, and included. 

Related StoriesMarch 26, 2019Free Pads and Tampons Aren't the Only Answer to Period Poverty

Brookline High School students first raised the issue of access to period products in public spaces in a column published in the school newspaper in 2018. Officials expressed concern about the cost of providing free period products and the possibility of some people taking advantage of the supplies.

“Is it that big of a deal if someone in need takes more than one?" Brookline High School student Eva Stanley asked Thursday night, according to Patch.

The Brookline School Committee will have to vote to have the new law apply to public schools. 

“We know not having access to menstrual products causes menstruators to miss school,” Goodfriend said, “by working on menstrual equity policy we’re also combating education inequality, health inequality, and income inequality.”

Read More: Period Poverty: Everything You Need to Know

Some states including New York, Georgia, and New Hampshire provide free tampons and pads in schools already. Mass NOW is currently working on the I Am (Increased Access to Menstrual products) bill, which will be the first statewide legislation to guarantee period products are free in public schools, prisons, and shelters. 

Menstrual health advocates across the world are fighting to end period poverty, which is not only the lack of access to sanitary products. People who get periods need access to menstrual hygiene education, toilets, and hand washing facilities, too, to manage their periods safely, and with dignity. 

“It’s not only about access but it’s about combating the stigma against menstruation because the real power of the stigma is in the taboo, it’s in the fact that we can’t even talk about periods,” Goodfriend said.

 

 

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MEMBERS IN ACTION

Our 2019 ONE Champions in Nigeria are ready to fight for change

31 May 2019 12:31PM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

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A big welcome to 50 new ONE Champions in Nigeria! Selected from nearly 3000 hopefuls, the new Champions kicked-off by learning all about ONE, the issues and how to drive social change.

ONE Champions arrive at the ONE office in Abuja, Nigeria.

ONE Champions arrive at the ONE office in Abuja, Nigeria.

Passionate about equality and sustainable development, many of the Champions have been working in their communities to drive positive change. By becoming a ONE Champion, they’re able to take their activism to the next level.

Melanie Tejiri Idehen

Melanie Tejiri Idehen

“I am super excited for this opportunity to be on the frontlines of ONE’s fight against extreme poverty and preventable diseases for the next one year… The ONE Champions training was a dynamic blend of empowering lectures, interaction with experienced activists, hands-on learning, unforgettable experiences and of course fun,” said Melanie Tejiri Idehen, ONE Champion, Edo State.

 

Knowledge is power

The Champions sharpened their campaigning skills, gained insights into grassroots mobilisation, got tips on using the media for campaigning and, brushed-up on their public speaking skills. They also picked-up pointers on social media campaigning from well-known Nigerian influencer Chioma Agwuebo.

ONE Champions Amina Mubarak (left) and Osaro Adamu (right) share their ideas.

ONE Champions Amina Mubarak (left) and Osaro Adamu (right) share their ideas.

“The training was a lifetime learning experience that will stay with me forever. I learnt so much about the issues facing young people in Nigeria and how we can strategically tackle our challenges if we are a team… Power belongs to the people, but the people don’t realise it and it is up to us all to take steps to build a collective and brighter future,” said Fausiat Modupe Bakare, ONE Champion, Lagos State.

ONE Champions debate the issues.

ONE Champions debate the issues.

They got a great insight into how Nigeria is governed by visiting the National Assembly and watched the House of Representatives in session.

Vice Chairman of the House Committee on Health, Hon. Muhammad Usman talks with ONE Champions at the Nigerian National Assembly.

Vice Chairman of the House Committee on Health, Hon. Muhammad Usman talks with ONE Champions at the Nigerian National Assembly.

And back at ONE Nigeria HQ, they heard from Senator-elect Ibrahim Oloriegbe, who supported ONE’s Make Naija Stronger campaign. He shared his insider knowledge of how ONE effectively campaigns and influences national policy.

Serah Makka-Ugbabe (left), ONE’s Country Director in Nigeria, and Dr. Ibrahim Oloriegben (right), Senator-elect, Kwara State.

Serah Makka-Ugbabe (left), ONE’s Country Director in Nigeria, and Dr. Ibrahim Oloriegben (right), Senator-elect, Kwara State.

Making connections

For many of the Champions, connecting with other grassroots activists was a big highlight. During a visit to YIAGA Africa — an organisation that promotes democracy, human rights and political participation — they shared ideas with Yiaga Programme Manager, Dr. Isaac Olufadewa

ONE Champion Dr. Isaac Olufadewa talks with Cynthia Mbalu, lawyer and Programme Manager, YIAGA Africa.

ONE Champion Dr. Isaac Olufadewa talks with Cynthia Mbalu, lawyer and Programme Manager, YIAGA Africa.

“I know many programs where you are told WHAT to do to change your community, but few programs talk about HOW to do it. The ONE Champions Advocacy training did both! The ONE training was a wonderful opportunity for me to learn, grow and network with influential leaders… I strongly believe now that the power of the people can influence the people in power,” said Isaac Olufadewa, ONE Champion, Oyo State.

Star quality

Singer Waje Iruobe and rapper/actor Banky W dropped by and stayed for dinner! They shared their experiences of campaigning with ONE. Banky W recently ran for the House of Representatives and was able to give a great insider view.

Singer Waje Iruobe (left) and rapper/actor Banky W (aka Bankole Wellington, right) with ONE’s Innocent Edache (middle).

Singer Waje Iruobe (left) and rapper/actor Banky W (aka Bankole Wellington, right) with ONE’s Innocent Edache (middle).

Ready to go…

Nwabuisi Gospel

Nwabuisi Gospel

“ONE’s training gave us the tools and strategies needed to be a voice in the fight against extreme poverty. With the best global hospitality, facilitators and staff we felt at home. Networking with other Champions, sharing our passions and experiences. I wish the induction didn’t end. We are the future and the future is now. I Am Proud to be a One Champion,” said Nwabuisi Gospel, ONE Champion, ABIA State.

 

ONE Champions with their Certificates after a full-on, but fun, three days.

ONE Champions with their certificates after a full-on, but fun, three days.

By the end of the induction, ONE Nigeria’s 50 new Champions were trained-up and raring to go. It’s going to be an exciting year!

  • Champions_Slideshow2
ONE Champions Current SlideONE Champion Titilayo Ogunbambi asks a question during the Emotional Intelligence session. Current SlideONE Champions hard at work. Current SlideONE Champions hard at play enjoying the after party! Current SlideONE ChampionsCurrent Slide Previous Slide◀︎Next Slide▶︎

Want to stay up to date with our Champions? Follow us on Facebook & Twitter!

ONE Champions

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HEALTH

How the Global Fund is tackling malaria at every angle

25 April 2019 11:50AM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

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Until recently, global deaths from malaria had been dropping year over year. But that positive trend has come to a concerning end. In 2017, there were 2.4 million more cases of malaria globally than the year before.

This isn’t because we don’t know how to battle malaria effectively — we do. But we’re up against some big challenges, including complacency and wavering commitment.  As a result, investments have plateaued and progress has stalled.

Ong%E2%80%99ielo-Health-Center-Kenya-EDI

Ong’ielo Health Center funded by the Global Fund in Kenya.

Luckily we have a powerful tool that’s fighting complacency and pushing for governments to #StepUpTheFight against malaria — The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The powerful organisation provides nearly 60% of all international financing for malaria and is actively working with partners to help communities around the world get back on track to eliminate this preventable disease.

Right now, the Global Fund and their partners are taking a multi-pronged approach to fighting back against malaria. Here’s how they’re doing it:

Education

Partners of the Global Fund work with communities to teach them what malaria is, how it is transmitted, how it can be prevented, and how to treat malaria when someone is diagnosed with it. Providing communities with knowledge not only empowers them to prevent malaria, but teaches them when it’s necessary to seek out treatment.

Prevention

Equipping communities with malaria control measures like mosquito nets to place over sleeping areas, indoor residual spraying (insecticide sprays), and preventive malaria medicines (antimalarials) means they’re able to protect themselves from being infected in the first place. In 2017 alone, six million pregnant womenreceived preventive malaria treatment.

Diagnosis

The Global Fund supports community health workers, who bring health care to areas where it previously didn’t exist. Mobile workers are equipped with rapid diagnostic kits to quickly and easily diagnose malaria and start administering lifesaving treatment. The workers may also be equipped with mosquito nets to distribute and are trained to provide community education sessions on malaria prevention and treatment.

Treatment

Treating malaria is becoming increasingly more difficult as drug-resistant malaria becomes more prevalent. Nevertheless, the Global Fund has made huge strides in getting treatment to the people who need it. Global Fund-supported programs distribute lifesaving antimalarial drugs and have treated 108 million cases of malaria in 2017 alone!

The Global Fund

To make sure it can continue its critical work, the Global Fund will be hosting its Sixth Replenishment conference in October. They’re asking world leaders and private investors to come together and help save 16 million lives over the next 3 years by investing a minimum of US$14 billion.

This is the bold ambition the world needs to get us on track to stop the spread of diseases like malaria — and it’s why we’re calling on world leaders to #StepUpTheFight by fully financing the Global Fund.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Dear government and business leaders,
We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good.

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"I know you have got to get used to people straight away but she is one of my best friends. You know what I mean."
Dennis's volunteer is so much more than just a volunteer. ❤️
She is his best friend. 👫
Why not volunteer too? https://bit.ly/2JfzcdY 👈 
#VolunteersWeek #MencapVolunteering

 

 

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FEB. 11, 2019

 

2
 
WATER & SANITATION

This Program Puts 'Menstrual Hygiene Warriors' in India's Schools

“We can do all that we want to do during periods.”


Why Global Citizens Should Care
People who menstruate are ostracized from society every day. The Administrative Staff College of India launched a WASH program to debunk period myths and teach menstrual hygiene in schools. You can join us in taking action on this issue here

More than 40% of women between the ages of 15 and 24 in India don’t have access to sanitary products, but the Administrative Staff College of India (ASCI) in Hyderabad is working to change that. 

Launched in 2018, its Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) program is helping 150 government schools smash period taboos, the Hans India reports. The WASH in Schools Leadership Course teaches menstruators to have pride and dignity. It aims to break antiquated traditions and beliefs that label people who menstruate as dirty or impure. The class also teaches nutritious eating, helps young girls learn about their bodies and reproduction, and explains menstrual hygiene management. 

In each school, two students and two teachers are selected to be menstrual hygiene educators.

Two sisters who completed the training project are already seeing changes in their community change as a result.

Take Action: Prioritizing Menstrual Hygiene Management Is Key to Ensuring Girls Can Stay in School

 
Take Action:
Help Girls Stay in School: Prioritize Menstrual Hygiene Management
TAKE ACTION

“We never used to touch flowers,” Soumya Kadari, one of those students, explained. “Now we know that flowers don’t die if we touch during our periods and we can do all that we want to do during periods.” 

Since completing the course in December 2018, Kadari and her sister Bharathi, eighth graders at a high school in Subedari, Hanumakonda, were appointed “Sani Warriors.” Now they’re educating other students in their school, and their families about menstrual hygiene. Following the course, their school agreed to administer free period products for three months. 

Read More: Period Poverty: Everything You Need to Know

The cultural shame attached to periods and a shortage of resources stop people who menstruate from going to school and working every day. It has been estimated that as many as 1 in 5 girls in India drops out of school after they get their periods. Educating girls and boys on menstruation at home and school promotes healthy habits and breaks stigmas around the natural process, as the Kadari sisters can attest. Souyma said since finishing the program she no longer feels like her life has to stop just because she’s on her period.

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22 DE ENERO DE 2019

 

16
 
MEDIO AMBIENTE

El hielo que se derrite rápidamente en Groenlandia amenaza a los más pobres

"Tiene el poder de destruir todo lo que toca".

 

 

Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens
Debido a que las capas de hielo que se derriten provocan un aumento del nivel del mar, los pobres del mundo son los más vulnerables que en muchos casos se ven forzados a desplazarse. El mundo aún tiene tiempo de reducir sus emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y minimizar los daños del cambio climático. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí.


Los científicos dicen que las capas de hielo de Groenlandia podrían haber alcanzado un "punto de inflexión", una etapa de fusión irrevocable, que tendría graves consecuencias para las personas que viven en las costas, según informó el New York Times.

La investigación más reciente, publicada en  Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, se suma al creciente consenso de que la fusión del hielo de Groenlandia solo se acelerará con el tiempo. Cuando el hielo se convierte en agua, se vuelve más oscuro y absorbe más luz solar. Esto, a su vez, eleva la temperatura circundante y hace que se derrita más hielo.

Si todas las capas de hielo de Groenlandia se derritieran, el nivel global del mar aumentaría alrededor de 7 metros, lo suficiente para desplazar a miles de millones de personas en todo el mundo.

 
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Tal aumento abrupto del nivel del mar dañaría o destruiría los sistemas agrícolas costeros, contaminaría los cuerpos de agua potable, intensificaría las tormentas tropicales, entre otras cosas. Por ejemplo, innumerables productores de arroz en toda la costa de Vietnam ya han tenido que abandonar sus tierras en los últimos años debido a la intrusión de agua salada por el aumento del nivel del mar.

Los pobres del mundo son más propensos a verse afectados por el aumento del nivel del mar debido a la falta de recursos para reubicarse a medida que se deterioran las condiciones costeras. Los países de todo el mundo están lidiando con el concepto de "refugiados climáticos" y están tratando de redactar protocolos para la reubicación de personas, como consecuencia del clima.

El Pacto Mundial de las Naciones Unidas para la Migración Segura, Ordenada y Regular, adoptado en 2018, es un hito importante ya que crea un marco legal para las personas desplazadas por desastres naturales, tanto de forma gradual como abrupta. En gran parte se entiende que las personas cuyas casas son destruidas por huracanes necesitan ayuda en caso de desastres naturales, pero hasta ahora se han hecho pocas previsiones para aquellas personas cuyas casas se están sumergiendo lentamente por el aumento del nivel del mar.

Nueva Zelanda, en particular, se ha convertido en un pionero en este espacio, comprometiéndose a convertirse en el primer país en reubicar a los refugiados del cambio climático de otros países.

La fusión de las capas de hielo de Groenlandia se han reanudado, luego de una fase de enfriamiento, con una suma de 400 mil millones de toneladas de hielo derretido por año”.

“Construir una capa de hielo es un proceso muy largo y elaborado. Pero podría tomar muy poco tiempo derretirlo todo", dijo Marco Tedesco, un glaciólogo de la Universidad de Columbia. "Esta agua que fluye tiene una larga memoria, probablemente se congeló antes de que naciera Roma. Lo que me sorprende es el poder que tenemos los humanos para generar cambios en tan poco tiempo. Esta capa de hielo, es como la piel de un elefante. Es un animal dormido muy poderoso. Pero cuando lo despertamos, tiene el poder de destruir todo lo que toca”.

Es poco probable que el derretimiento absoluto de Groenlandia ocurra en este siglo, pero las tasas actuales de emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero indican que es probable que ocurra en algún momento.

Como resultado, muchos científicos enfatizan que usar el marco de un "punto de inflexión" es peligroso porque sugiere que las intervenciones ya no son posibles.

Por el contrario, si los países reducen agresivamente sus emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero y hacen la transición a fuentes de energía renovables, las capas de hielo de Groenlandia podrían salvarse del derretimiento, según el testimonio que los científicos le dieron al New York Times.

"Es posible que podamos controlar la rapidez con que cambian las capas de hielo en el futuro", le dijo al New York Times Luke D. Trusel, un glaciólogo de la Universidad de Rowan y autor de otro informe sobre Groenlandia. “Al limitar las emisiones de gases de efecto invernadero, limitamos el calentamiento y, por lo tanto, también limitamos la rapidez e intensidad con que Groenlandia afecta nuestros medios de vida a través del aumento del nivel del mar. Eso, al parecer, es lo que debemos hacer".

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FEB. 5, 2019

 

 
 
WATER & SANITATION

Billions Rely on Himalayan Glaciers for Water. But They're Disappearing.

“This is the climate crisis you haven’t heard of.”

Why Global Citizens Should Care
The Himalayan glaciers provide a crucial source of water to billions of people. As climate change intensifies, the glaciers are disappearing. You can join us in taking action on this issue here.

At least one-third of the Himalayan glaciers will disappear by the end of the century even if countries entirely curb their greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, according to a new report by the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development.

The Himalayan glaciers play a critical role in supporting Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Nepal, China, Bhutan, Bangladesh, and Myanmar.

More than 1.9 billion people rely on the water that flows from the glaciers, whether for drinking, agriculture, energy, or other purposes. As the region warms, critical rivers and groundwater sources could eventually dry up, which could trigger conflicts, undermine economies, and spur mass migration, the report argues.

Himalayas-Water-Climate-Change-2.jpgInternational trekkers pass through a glacier at the Mount Everest base camp, Nepal. Scientists say a third of the ice stored in Asia’s glaciers will be lost by the end of the century even if global warming stays below 1.5 degrees Celsius.
Image: Tashi Sherpa/AP

If emissions continue to be released into the atmosphere beyond 2050, then up to two-thirds of the Himalayan glaciers will melt by 2100.

Take Action: Encourage South African Corporates to Invest More Funds For Water Conservation

 

Since global emissions are still rising, and countries have been slow to transition away from fossil fuels, this is the more likely scenario, the report argues.

In fact, if emissions remain steady over the next several decades, temperatures throughout the region could rise far more than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, the maximum temperature increase the Paris climate agreement recommends. The World Bank warns that the planet warming by 4 degrees Celsius would cause doomsday climate catastrophes.

“Global warming is on track to transform the frigid, glacier-covered mountain peaks of the Hindu Kush Himalayas cutting across eight countries to bare rocks in a little less than a century,” Philippus Wester of the center, who led the report, told the AP.

Read More: These Kung Fu Nuns Are Biking Thousands of Miles to Empower Women

The glaciers sit atop the Hindu Kush Himalaya mountain peaks where more than 240 million people live. The communities around the mountain range get water directly from pools created by the massive ice hunks. Numerous rivers that provide water to billions of people throughout Asia, including the Ganges, Yangtze, Irrawaddy, and Mekong, all originate from the Himalayas. These rivers serve as the primary source of water for many in these regions.

In the short term, these rivers are expected to flood more frequently, which could destroy neighboring homes and farmland. As the glaciers shed more of their ice, however, the rivers are eventually expected to run dry, adding strainto agricultural activity throughout the region.

Without a reliable source of water, crop yields are expected to decline, potentially threatening food security in multiple countries. Already, more than 30% of the people living in the countries bordering the Himalayas do not have access to enough food and 50% experience malnutrition, according to the report.

Himalayas-Water-Climate-Change-1.jpgAn aerial view of the Siachen Glacier, which traverses the Himalayan region dividing India and Pakistan, about 750 kilometers (469 miles) northwest of Jammu, India.
Image: Channi Anand/AP

Read More: World's 'Highest' Village Runs Dry as Warming Hits the Himalayas

The weakened flow of rivers fed by the glaciers will also impact hydropower dams that generate a significant portion of the region’s energy, according to the Guardian.

These changes are expected to lead to an increase in regional migration and climate refugee levels in ways that could exacerbate geopolitical tensions. For example, more than 90% of Afghanistan’s agriculture depends on groundwater sources created by the Himalayan glaciers. If these sources dry up in the decades ahead, millions of people could be left without a source of food or income, driving people to find relief across the border in Pakistan where the government has cracked down on refugee populations in recent years.

The new report also explores the impact of the glacier’s rapid depletion on air quality, gender issues, and poverty. More than 350 researchers from 22 countries contributed to the report, which took five years to complete.

Read More: Why the Himalayan Glaciers May Be the Most Important in the World

“This is the climate crisis you haven’t heard of,” Philippus Wester, the lead author, told the Guardian. “In the best of possible worlds, if we get really ambitious [in tackling climate change], even then we will lose one-third of the glaciers and be in trouble. That for us was the shocking finding.”

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JUNE 4, 2019

 

 
 
GIRLS & WOMEN

Divorced at 11, Yemeni Filmmaker Is Using Her Lens to Fight For Women's Rights

In Yemen, 32% girls get married before the age of 18.

By Lin Taylor

LONDON, June 4 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — At 2 years old, Yemeni filmmaker Khadija Al-Salami witnessed her father beating her mother so violently she was rushed to the emergency room at hospital.

When her father was not punished, and Al-Salami was married off at the age of 11, she rebelled and started using a camera to expose girls' suffering in Yemen, where 1 in 3 are wed before they turn 18, campaign group Girls Not Brides data shows.

 

Yamen-701x450.jpgYemeni filmmaker Khadija Al-Salami (L) and Save the Children International chief Helle Thorning-Schmidt (C) speak at a panel session at the Fortune Most Powerful Women International Summit on June 4, 2019, in London, Britain.
Image: Lin Taylor/ THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

"I use the camera as a tool to fight," Al-Salami, now 48, said in a phone interview with the Thomson Reuters Foundation from Paris, where she is now based, ahead of her appearance at the Fortune Most Powerful Women International Summit.

 

 
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"When you grow up in a very conservative society, where the weight of tradition marginalizes human rights, and the personal freedom of women doesn't exist ... you're only left with one choice: and that's to revolt against it."

One of almost 50 accomplished women speaking at the London event, Al-Salami is feted as one of Yemen's first female filmmakers, with her stories of girls who have refused to wear the veil, faced trial for murder and marched on the streets.

In Yemen, one of the poorest countries in the Middle East, 32% of girls become wives before their 18th birthday, and almost 10% are married by the time they turn 15, according to Girls Not Brides.

"Women unfortunately are abused everywhere in a different way. We need everybody's help, to get together and fight these bad traditions," award-winning Al-Salami said.

"I was able to overcome all these difficulties. That's given me a lot of force to do something for other people who are afraid to speak up."

Read More: Child Marriage: Everything You Need to Know

Al-Salami was granted a divorce after attempting suicide, disowned by her family for shaming them, and moved to the United States when she was 16 to study.

But she regularly returns to her home country to make films — mostly in secret — to spotlight taboo women's rights issues.

Al-Salami shared a stage at the summit with Helle Thorning-Schmidt, head of the charity Save the Children, who called for an end to Yemen's ongoing conflict, which began in late 2014 between the Houthi movement and Saudi-led coalition forces.

"Yemen is perhaps the worst place to be a child right now," Thorning-Schmidt, who was Denmark's first female prime minister, told the audience.

"Children in Yemen are dying from hunger. I sat with one of those children in my arms, she was 8 months old but she had the weight of a newborn."

More than 12 million children in Yemen need aid, and 360,000 of those under 5 are severely malnourished, according to the United Nations' children's agency, UNICEF.

"What's going on now with Yemen and with the war for the last five years, my heart is broken. The whole population is under bombs and they're just trying to find shelter and the most basic thing in order to survive," said Al-Salami.

Despite the violence, Thorning-Schmidt said the children she met in Yemen last year still dreamed of change.

"Little girls ... they always say, 'I want to go to school, I don't want to marry'. Whatever they'd been through, there's still that glimmer of hope in their eyes," she said.

(Reporting by Lin Taylor @linnytayls. Editing by Katy Migiro. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking and slavery, property rights, social innovation, resilience and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org to see more stories.)

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JUNE 4, 2019

 

 
 
GIRLS & WOMEN

Caster Semenya Can Run Again (For Now) After Swiss Court Suspends Testosterone Ruling

The Swiss supreme federal court has ordered the IAAF to suspend its testosterone regulations.


Why Global Citizens Should Care
Global Citizen campaigns on the UN Global Goals including Goal 5 for gender equality, which promotes equality and inclusivity. Join us here to take actions supporting the Global Goals.

Caster Semenya is free to run again as she is. At least until the end of June.

The Swiss supreme federal court on Monday announced that it has ordered the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) to suspend its new testosterone regulations.

According to the regulations, female athletes with naturally high testosterone levels should take medicine to suppress their testosterone levels.

Alternatively, the regulations state, they have to change their distances to longer ones or compete against men.

 
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The ban against Semenya competing came into effect on May 8, several days after she won an 800m race in the Diamond League in Doha.

The ban was quickly followed by an announcement from Semenya and Athletics South Africa (ASA) that they would appeal the decision at the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). The CAS specialises in international sports-related disputes.

Semenya’s lawyer Greg Nott said the news is “morally uplifting and good for Caster.”

Related StoriesMay 3, 2019Olympian Caster Semenya Could Race for the Last Time as South Africans Rally Behind Her

Nott added: “The court has ordered the IAAF to suspend immediately the implementation of the regulation with regard to Caster and has given the IAAF until June 25 to respond to the suspense of effect. It is absolutely positive news.”

Even though Semenya is not the only female athlete affected by regulations that the IAAF says are aimed at levelling the playing field, most restrictions apply to distances that Semenya runs.

 

We welcome the decision taken by the Swiss Federal Supreme Court to suspend the implementation of the IAAF’s regulations for athletes with "differences of sex development" pending @Caster800m #CasterSemenya's appeal. We will never rest until justice is served! #IStandByCaster

 
 
 
 

This includes the 800m distance in which she has been unbeaten since 2015. The restrictions also apply to pole vault, the 400m hurdles, and the 400m and 1,500m races.

Related StoriesMay 14, 2019Athletics South Africa Is Going To Appeal Testosterone Ruling Against Caster Semenya

At the moment, it’s not yet known if the the ruling by the CAS will be in effect long enough for Semenya to compete at the World Championships in Doha in September.

Semenya thanked CAS for the ruling, saying: “I hope that following my appeal I will once again be able to run free.”

Dr Dorothee Schramm, Semenya’s Swiss lawyer, added: “This is an important case that will have fundamental implications for the human rights of female athletes.”

The IAAF has not released a statement yet, with the organisation’s spokesperson saying: “We have received no information from the Swiss Federal Court, so we cannot comment at this stage.”

Semenya’s next race is on June 13 in Oslo.

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FINAL REMINDER — The closing dates for the below positions are this Thursday 6 and Friday 7 June:

Following our recent announcement that Music Generation will expand into 5 new counties, applications are now being invited for the posts of Music Generation Development Officer in Kerry, Kildare, Longford, Meath and Tipperary. Closing date for applications: 12 noon, Thursday 6 June 2019. https://bit.ly/2JFvNVu

Applications are also invited for the role of Music Generation Development Officer, Sligo (re-advertisement). Closing date for applications: 12 noon, Friday 7 June 2019. https://bit.ly/2HsCTei

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Chernobyl Children International would formally like to express deepest gratitude to the cast, crew and commissioners of the 'Chernobyl' mini-series, which concludes tonight on Sky Atlantic.

This series has brought the truth to life about the world's worst nuclear accident, and has helped ensure that never again will public consciousness around Chernobyl fade.

For 33 years, keeping the memory of Chernobyl alive has been a near impossible task, however, this series has, with honour and compassion, lifted the mask on the truth, the secrecy and the devastation.

Children have been the most devastatingly affected since 1986. This devastation continues to this day and children are born every day with Chernobyl related illnesses and ailments.

To learn more about our ongoing work with Chernobyl's victims, please visit www.chernobyl-international.com

 

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0
HEALTH

3 headlines you should be reading in your morning newspaper (but aren’t)

24 May 2019 9:42AM UTC | By: KATIE RYAN

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Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

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The news has become predictable. When you open up your morning paper, you’re almost guaranteed to see headlines about politics (President Trump! Brexit! Tech giants!) and pop culture (Game of Thrones! Royal babies! Playoffs!). But what are we missing? We seem to have forgotten about some of the biggest health crises happening right now.

Quote-GX_1200-x-600.jpg2.7 million people are dying every year from AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. But it’s rare that we hear about these preventable deaths. As a result, many people think that AIDS is a crisis of the past. But it’s a crisis right now.

Here are three headlines you should have been reading in your paper this morning:

AIDS IS THE NUMBER 1 KILLER OF WOMEN UNDER 50.

Over 300,000 women die yearly from AIDS-related illnesses. More than ischaemic heart disease. More than maternal conditions. More than breast cancer. So why aren’t we talking about this?

MONEY PLEDGED AFTER NOTRE DAME FIRE COULD HELP SAVE 1+ MILLION LIVES.

Donors pledged US$995 million in the first 48 hours after the fire at Notre Dame. If the money pledged was invested in Global Fund-supported programs, the amount raised could help save over 1 million lives from AIDS, TB, and malaria.

INCREDIBLE FUND HELPS SAVE 27 MILLION LIVES SINCE 2002.

Since its creation in 2002, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malariahas helped save more than 27 million lives. Thanks to this innovative partnership, the number of people dying from AIDS, TB and malaria has been slashed by one-third since its founding in 2002. In 2017 alone, 17.5 million people were on antiretroviral therapy for HIV, 5 million people with TB were treated, and 197 million mosquito nets were distributed in countries where the Global Fund invests.

The first two headlines only begin to scratch the surface of the urgency of these epidemics. The third headlines brings hope: there is a solution.

The Global Fund

In October, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria will host its Sixth Replenishment. We’re asking world leaders and private investors to come together and help save 16 million lives between 2021 and 2023 by meeting their replenishment goal of at least US$14 billion. This investment is the bold ambition the world needs to get us back on track to stop the spread of these diseases.

To continue funding life-saving programs like this one, we need world leaders to #StepUpTheFight by fully financing the Global Fund.

Add your name now to tell world leaders they must back this bold initiative this year.

Sign now: we demand more action in the fight against AIDS

Dear government and business leaders,
We're urging you to show ambition in ending AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This is a fight we can win – but only if we all do our part. I’m in, are you? Please fully finance the Global Fund to help save another 16 million lives and bring us closer to eliminating these diseases for good.

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248
MEMBERS IN ACTION

Our 2019 ONE Champions in Nigeria are ready to fight for change

31 May 2019 12:31PM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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A big welcome to 50 new ONE Champions in Nigeria! Selected from nearly 3000 hopefuls, the new Champions kicked-off by learning all about ONE, the issues and how to drive social change.

ONE Champions arrive at the ONE office in Abuja, Nigeria.

ONE Champions arrive at the ONE office in Abuja, Nigeria.

Passionate about equality and sustainable development, many of the Champions have been working in their communities to drive positive change. By becoming a ONE Champion, they’re able to take their activism to the next level.

Melanie Tejiri Idehen

Melanie Tejiri Idehen

“I am super excited for this opportunity to be on the frontlines of ONE’s fight against extreme poverty and preventable diseases for the next one year… The ONE Champions training was a dynamic blend of empowering lectures, interaction with experienced activists, hands-on learning, unforgettable experiences and of course fun,” said Melanie Tejiri Idehen, ONE Champion, Edo State.

 

Knowledge is power

The Champions sharpened their campaigning skills, gained insights into grassroots mobilisation, got tips on using the media for campaigning and, brushed-up on their public speaking skills. They also picked-up pointers on social media campaigning from well-known Nigerian influencer Chioma Agwuebo.

ONE Champions Amina Mubarak (left) and Osaro Adamu (right) share their ideas.

ONE Champions Amina Mubarak (left) and Osaro Adamu (right) share their ideas.

“The training was a lifetime learning experience that will stay with me forever. I learnt so much about the issues facing young people in Nigeria and how we can strategically tackle our challenges if we are a team… Power belongs to the people, but the people don’t realise it and it is up to us all to take steps to build a collective and brighter future,” said Fausiat Modupe Bakare, ONE Champion, Lagos State.

ONE Champions debate the issues.

ONE Champions debate the issues.

They got a great insight into how Nigeria is governed by visiting the National Assembly and watched the House of Representatives in session.

Vice Chairman of the House Committee on Health, Hon. Muhammad Usman talks with ONE Champions at the Nigerian National Assembly.

Vice Chairman of the House Committee on Health, Hon. Muhammad Usman talks with ONE Champions at the Nigerian National Assembly.

And back at ONE Nigeria HQ, they heard from Senator-elect Ibrahim Oloriegbe, who supported ONE’s Make Naija Stronger campaign. He shared his insider knowledge of how ONE effectively campaigns and influences national policy.

Serah Makka-Ugbabe (left), ONE’s Country Director in Nigeria, and Dr. Ibrahim Oloriegben (right), Senator-elect, Kwara State.

Serah Makka-Ugbabe (left), ONE’s Country Director in Nigeria, and Dr. Ibrahim Oloriegben (right), Senator-elect, Kwara State.

Making connections

For many of the Champions, connecting with other grassroots activists was a big highlight. During a visit to YIAGA Africa — an organisation that promotes democracy, human rights and political participation — they shared ideas with Yiaga Programme Manager, Dr. Isaac Olufadewa

ONE Champion Dr. Isaac Olufadewa talks with Cynthia Mbalu, lawyer and Programme Manager, YIAGA Africa.

ONE Champion Dr. Isaac Olufadewa talks with Cynthia Mbalu, lawyer and Programme Manager, YIAGA Africa.

“I know many programs where you are told WHAT to do to change your community, but few programs talk about HOW to do it. The ONE Champions Advocacy training did both! The ONE training was a wonderful opportunity for me to learn, grow and network with influential leaders… I strongly believe now that the power of the people can influence the people in power,” said Isaac Olufadewa, ONE Champion, Oyo State.

Star quality

Singer Waje Iruobe and rapper/actor Banky W dropped by and stayed for dinner! They shared their experiences of campaigning with ONE. Banky W recently ran for the House of Representatives and was able to give a great insider view.

Singer Waje Iruobe (left) and rapper/actor Banky W (aka Bankole Wellington, right) with ONE’s Innocent Edache (middle).

Singer Waje Iruobe (left) and rapper/actor Banky W (aka Bankole Wellington, right) with ONE’s Innocent Edache (middle).

Ready to go…

Nwabuisi Gospel

Nwabuisi Gospel

“ONE’s training gave us the tools and strategies needed to be a voice in the fight against extreme poverty. With the best global hospitality, facilitators and staff we felt at home. Networking with other Champions, sharing our passions and experiences. I wish the induction didn’t end. We are the future and the future is now. I Am Proud to be a One Champion,” said Nwabuisi Gospel, ONE Champion, ABIA State.

 

ONE Champions with their Certificates after a full-on, but fun, three days.

ONE Champions with their certificates after a full-on, but fun, three days.

By the end of the induction, ONE Nigeria’s 50 new Champions were trained-up and raring to go. It’s going to be an exciting year!

  • Champions_slideshow5
ONE Champions Current SlideONE Champion Titilayo Ogunbambi asks a question during the Emotional Intelligence session. Current SlideONE Champions hard at work. Current SlideONE Champions hard at play enjoying the after party!Current Slide Current SlideONE ChampionsPrevious Slide◀︎Next Slide▶︎

Want to stay up to date with our Champions? Follow us on Facebook & Twitter!

ONE Champions hard at play enjoying the after party!

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