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The Action Thread Part Two

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Via ONE

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EDUCATION 90 influential figures have signed on to support girls’ education… and you’re next

 

13 January 2017 3:33PM UTC  | By: SAMANTHA URBAN
IF YOU CARE, ACT ADD YOUR NAME TODAY Take action NOW for girls' education.
 
  

All children deserve a good education. But because poverty is sexist, 130 million girls across the world are denied this basic right. That’s why ONE is organizing people across the country and around the world to help ensure that girls and women are at the heart of our poverty-fighting strategy by promoting their access to education.
Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Those 130 million girls have the potential to cure diseases or end wars, invent brilliant technology or revolutionize an industry… or simply access opportunity. When girls get an education, they are less likely to become child brides, less likely to contract HIV, and they have greater economic opportunities for the rest of their lives — which is good for everyone.

Join us on calling on world leaders to increase the number of girls in school by millions. It’s an ambitious goal, but it’s one the world needs to strive to reach.
Here’s our open letter:

A letter to leaders—

You couldn’t be where you are today without a good education.

But because poverty is sexist, 130 million girls across the world are denied this basic right. Indeed, if the number of girls out of school formed a country, it would be the tenth largest on the planet – bigger than Japan or Germany.

All children deserve a good education, but in the poorest countries girls are denied it more often than boys. Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Every additional year of school that a girl completes increases her future earnings, which is good for her family, her community and her country.

We cannot afford to squander the potential of 130 million girls to cure diseases or end wars, invent brilliant technology or revolutionize an industry… or simply to access opportunity.

We are coming together and uniting across our divides to get every girl into school and to make sure she gets a quality education once she’s there.

But we need you to do the same.

Your education helped you to get where you are today – and it is in your power to help millions of girls to get theirs. Please act now, with the right policies and the necessary funds.

Show us that politics can work for the people – starting with the people who need it most.

This letter has already been signed by influential figures across a number of fields: business, faith, technology, activism, entertainment, and more. They come from different backgrounds and hold different views, but they all agreed that this issue is vitally important. We sincerely thank each one of them for lending their influence to getting girls around the world the education they deserve:

Afrikan Boy, grime artist Alice Albright, Chief Executive Officer of the Global Partnership for Education’s Secretariat Alice Callahan Thompson, actress and activist Aliko Dangote, President/Chief Executive of the Dangote Group and Chairman of the Dangote Foundation Alyse Nelson, President and CEO, Vital Voices Global Partnership Amena Brown, spoken word artist Angelique Kidjo, Grammy Award-winning artist and activist Ariana Grande, performer Arianna Huffington, Co-founder and former editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post Asa, singer Ashley Graham, model Ashley Judd, actor and activist Banky W, singer Baroness Verma, former Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for International Development, and ministerial champion for tackling violence against women and girls overseas and political champion for women’s rights Blake Lively, actor Bob Geldof, activist and musician Bono, lead singer of U2 and co-founder of ONE and (RED) Bumi Thomas, singer-songwriter Carey Lowell, artist and actor Cathy Newman, presenter for Channel Four News, blogger for the Telegraph Charlize Theron, actor and founder of Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project Christina Lamb, Sunday Times Chief Foreign Correspondent and author Cindi Leive, Editor-in-Chief at Glamour Dan Haseltine, Blood:Water co-founder Danai Gurira, actor and award-winning playwright David Burtka, actor, chef David Oyelowo, actor Hon. Desmond Elliot, politician and former actor Diamond, singer Ertharin Cousin, Executive Director at World Food Programme George Stroumboulopoulos, TV and radio personality Guido Schmidt-Traub, Executive Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. Gwen Stefani, performer Helen Clark, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme Helene Gayle, CEO, McKinsey Social Initiative Helle Thorning-Schmidt, CEO, Save the Children International HHP, rapper Isla Fisher, actor Jane Mosbacher Morris, founder and CEO of TO THE MARKET Jessica Oyelowo, actor Jessica Sipos, actor Joe Cerrell, Managing Director, Global Policy & Advocacy, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation John Green, author and YouTuber Julia Gillard, Chair of the Board of Directors at the Global Partnership for Education, and former PM of Australia Karen Kornbluh, Executive Vice President, Nielsen Karen Walrond, NY Times best-selling author Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, UN Foundation Kobna Holdbrook-Smith, actor Lady Gaga Larry Summers, Harvard professor and former United States Treasury Secretary Laura Ling, journalist and host at Seeker Network Lauren Bush Lauren, CEO and founder of FEED Projects Leymah Gbowee, Liberian Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist Luvvie Ajayi, writer and Digital Strategist and Executive Director, The Red Pump Mabel van Oranje, initiator and Chair of Girls Not Brides Maria Russo, Executive Director, Humanity Unified International Marian Salzman, CEO, Havas PR Matt Maher, contemporary Christian artist Meghan Markle, actor and activist Michael Gerson, Senior Fellow at ONE Michael W. Smith, contemporary Christian artist Michele Sullivan, President, Caterpillar Foundation Montel Williams, TV personality Moriah Peters, singer-songwriter Morton H. Halperin, Senior Advisor, Open Society Foundations Muntu Valdo, musician Natalie Portman, actor Neil Patrick Harris, actor Paul Polman, CEO, Unilever Rachel Rudwall, explorer and television producer Rashida Jones, actor Robin Wright, actor Ryan Reynolds, actor Sacha Baron Cohen, actor Sarah Brown, Executive Chair of the Global Business Coalition for Education and co-founder of A World at School Selmor Mtukudzi, singer Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook Sheryl WuDunn, co-author, “A Path Appears” and “Half the Sky” Steve Taylor, singer-songwriter Susan A. Buffett, Chairwoman, The Sherwood Foundation and the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation Susan Markham, former USAID Senior Coordinator for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Susan Wojcicki, CEO, YouTube Tanya Burr, fashion and beauty vlogger Tina Brown, founder and CEO of Tina Brown Live Media Tom Brady, quarterback of the New England Patriots Toolz, radio presenter Vanessa Mdee, singer Victoria Kimani, singer Waje, singer Yemi Alade, singer

… And now it’s your turn. It’s in your power RIGHT NOW to help girls across the globe get access to an education in the next four years. If you care, ACT. Add your name to our letter, and we’ll deliver it in-person to leaders all around the world on International Women’s Day, March 8.

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Via Global Citizen

 
GIRLS & WOMEN Global Citizen’s Guide to the Women’s March on January 21

By Meghan Werft |

 Jan. 17, 2017

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

 

 

Hundreds of thousands of women will literally be watching, even standing outside the White House, if permitted, on President-elect Donald Trump’s first day in office. 

It’s all part of the Women’s March on Washington — and dozens of other cities — which is a peaceful demonstration to remind the new administration that “Women’s rights are human rights.” 

The march was borne out of a Facebook post from a retired attorney who wondered what would happen if women got together and marched in masses after Inauguration Day. It now about to become one of the largest political gatherings following a presidential change in history. 

Currently, between 200,000 and 400,000 people are expected to partake in the event in Washington, with “Sister Marches”, as they’re being called, also being held in six of seven continents around the world.

Here is everything you need to know for a peaceful, powerful advocation of women’s rights on Jan. 21. 

Read More: 100 Years Ago, Women Sat Silently Outside the White House for 6 Months in Protest

When is it?

The Women’s March in Washington begins at 10 a.m. ET and ends at 5 p.m. ET on Jan. 21, 2017. 

 

Where is it?

The march in Washington will start at Independence Avenue and Third Street SW, near the US Capitol. The route from there is not yet disclosed to the public. An ADA accessible entrance is located at 4th St. SW from C St. to Independence Ave. 

screen_shot_2017-01-17_at_33502_pm.png__Map sourced from Google Maps.

What should I wear? 

Warm layers. It’s January, in the Northwest, that means it’s cold. The weather forecast calls for rain on Jan. 20, Inauguration Day, and partly cloudy weather Jan. 21 currently. Temperatures are expected to be around 50 degrees Fahrenheit but this can change. Keep checking the forecast, make sure you’re warm and comfortable. 

 

What can I bring?

— A purse and/or small backpack but not larger bags.

— You can bring food. It must fit in a gallon-size bag. 

— Cardboard signs banners, and flags (but not on poles - see below).

 

What can’t I bring?

— Folding chairs.

— Bikes — there will not be bikes allowed along the march route. You can park your bike nearby.

— Anything that can be interpreted as a weapon, which includes flag poles.  

 

What will the Women's March provide?

— Bathrooms (Port-O-Potties)

— Breastfeeding stations

— Merchandise (You can order online, but you won’t receive your gear until after the march. Or visit the Pop-up shop in Washington before Saturday, it’s open 10a.m. to 10 p.m. All proceeds go to help fund the Women’s March.) 

 

Will there be traffic?

Yes. The Women’s March website recommends purchasing a SmartCard for the DC Metro system if you will be marching in Washington. Prepare to plan ahead for traffic entering and exiting the city over the weekend, too. Expect road blockades in major cities where marches are being held, and plan to take public transportation.

 

 

via GIPHY

 

How can I keep track of all this information?

Don’t worry, there’s an app for that. Download here

 

Is it just in Washington?

Nope. Sister Marches will take place in more than 600 cities around the world. Sister marches will take place on every continent except Antarctica. 

To learn more about a march near you, go here.

 

Who is going?

 

Thousands of women and men around the world are expected to attend. The Washington march is predicting 200,000 to 400,000 people alone. Some notable attendees include: Olivia Wilde, Katy Perry, Amy Schumer, Scarlett Johansson, Danai Gurira, America Ferrera, Zendaya, Samantha Bee, and more plan to attend. Chelsea Handler will be hosting a Sister March at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. 

In addition, over 1 million “sister marchers” are expected to stand strong with Washington. 

Read More: Chelsea Handler Did a Face-Plant in a Bowl of Spaghetti to Help End World Hunger

 

Are people marching against Trump?

No. The Women’s March is not actually anti-Trump. While it formed out of sexist, misogynist rhetoric that arose during the campaign, the demonstration’s mission is broader:

“The Women’s March on Washington will send a bold message to our new government on their first day in office, and to the world that women's rights are human rights. We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us...We will not rest until women have parity and equity at all levels of leadership in society. We work peacefully while recognizing there is no true peace without justice and equity for all.” 

 

 

A photo posted by Women's March (@womensmarch) on 

Jan 15, 2017 at 9:41am PST

 

  Tips for a Peaceful Protest:

Speaking of seeking justice through peaceful measures, here are a few tips for a successfully keeping the peace. 

Remember, the Women’s March is a peaceful demonstration, not a protest. 

Stay with a group, and/or friends if possible. 

Designate a meeting spot if you get lost or separated. 

Be nonviolent. Be an active bystander who intervenes peacefully, and learn what that means at this free training on conflict resolution Jan. 20. 

The Women’s March will have trained marshals, and legal observers (with additional immigration legal support), readily available.  

There is a legal hotline number for emergencies. The number is (202) 670-6866.  

Keep in mind the Unity Principles of the Women’s March. 

Read More: 7 of the Most Important Protests of 2016

 

What else can I do?

You can start by taking action to make the world a more equal place for girls and women. Through our Level the Law campaign in partnership with CHIME FOR CHANGE, and partners like Equality Now, Global Citizen is fighting to end child marriage, secure girls’ education, and prosecute war crimes like the genocide against the Yazidi people, that disproportionately affect girls and women. 

 

Take Action for Girls and Women: 

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Call for an end child marriage.

Tell the Tanzanian government to amend loopholes allowing child marriage. 

Call for justice for the Yazidi girls and women forced into sex slavery. 

Pledge support for women owned businesses.

Share the message that empowering women matters.

Tell the new UN Secretary General to support the Girl Agenda. 

For more resources ahead of the Women's March go here.

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
meghan-werft-author-profile-pic.jpg

Written by Meghan Werft 

 

Meghan is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. After studying International Political Economy at the University of Puget Sound she hopped coasts to New York. She is a firm believer that education and awareness on global issues has the power to create a more sustainable, equal world where poverty does not exist.

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AID AND DEVELOPMENT 6 inauguration speeches that highlight the ongoing fight against poverty

 

January 9 2017  | By: SAMANTHA URBAN
JOIN Join the fight against Extreme Poverty
 
  

With Inauguration Day coming up, let’s take a look back at a few inspirational inauguration addresses from Democrats and Republicans alike. We chose these particular quotes because they take aim at the issue of global poverty, a cause that ONE and its members have shared with many past presidents.

1. Dwight D. Eisenhower’s Second Inaugural Address, 1957

“In too much of the earth there is want, discord, danger… From the deserts of North Africa to the islands of the South Pacific, one third of all mankind has entered upon a historic struggle for a new freedom: freedom from grinding poverty. Across all continents, nearly a billion people seek, sometimes almost in desperation, for the skills and knowledge and assistance by which they may satisfy from their own resources, the material wants common to all mankind.”

2. John F. Kennedy’s Inaugural Address, 1961

kennedy-1024x777.png

“The world is very different now. For man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life… Now the trumpet summons us again—not as a call to bear arms, though arms we need; not as a call to battle, though embattled we are—but a call to bear the burden of a long twilight struggle, year in and year out, ‘rejoicing in hope, patient in tribulation’—a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself.”

3. Jimmy Carter’s Inaugural Address, 1977

” The world itself is now dominated by a new spirit. Peoples more numerous and more politically aware are craving and now demanding their place in the sun—not just for the benefit of their own physical condition, but for basic human rights. The passion for freedom is on the rise. Tapping this new spirit, there can be no nobler nor more ambitious task for America to undertake on this day of a new beginning than to help shape a just and peaceful world that is truly humane… We will be ever vigilant and never vulnerable, and we will fight our wars against poverty, ignorance, and injustice—for those are the enemies against which our forces can be honorably marshaled.”

4. Ronald Reagan’s Second Inaugural Address, 1985

Reagan_delivers_inaugural_address_1981.j

“People, worldwide, hunger for the right of self-determination, for those inalienable rights that make for human dignity and progress… It is the world’s only hope, to conquer poverty and preserve peace. Every blow we inflict against poverty will be a blow against its dark allies of oppression and war. Every victory for human freedom will be a victory for world peace.”

5. Bill Clinton’s First Inaugural Address, 1993

“To renew America, we must meet challenges abroad as well at home. There is no longer division between what is foreign and what is domestic—the world economy, the world environment, the world AIDS crisis, the world arms race—they affect us all.”

6. George W. Bush’s First Inaugural Address, 2001

Bush-un-darfur.jpg

“Many in our country do not know the pain of poverty, but we can listen to those who do. And I can pledge our nation to a goal: When we see that wounded traveler on the road to Jericho, we will not pass to the other side.”

 

Via ONE

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ENVIRONMENT

2016 Was Hottest Year Ever as Earth Undergoes ‘Big Changes’

By Joe McCarthy| Jan. 18, 2017

 

NOAA

For the third straight year, the Earth was hotter than any other year in recorded history. It’s the second time that the Earth broke temperature records for three consecutive years. To put a finer point on the trend, 16 of 17 hottest years on record happened after 2000.

“A single warm year is something of a curiosity,” said Deke Arndt, chief of global climate monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told The New York Times. “It’s really the trend, and the fact that we’re punching at the ceiling every year now, that is the real indicator that we’re undergoing big changes.”  

Global temperatures in 2015 and 2016 were intensified by a particularly strong El Niño storm, but long-term changes in atmospheric and environmental factors were the main forces behind the steady rise.  

"One could argue that about 75 percent of the warmth was due to human impact," Michael E. Mann, a climate scientist at Pennsylvania State University, told The Times. 

Read More: "Super" El Nino Finally Comes to an End

Tens of billions of tons of greenhouse gases from human activities are emitted into the atmosphere each year, where they trap heat from the sun. While global emissions levels are slowing, they have been rising ever since the modern era of global warming began in the 1970s. A lot of these emissions, especially carbon, and the ensuing heat is absorbed by the world’s oceans, which then warm up, causing the world’s ice to melt.   

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

 Follow

 NOAA ✔ @NOAA

2016 culminated a remarkable 3-year streak of record warm years for the globe says @NOAANCEIclimate http://go.usa.gov/x9mhH #StateOfClimate

4:47 PM - 18 Jan 2017

  235 235 Retweets   96 96 likes

As the world’s ice melts, less cold air is spread throughout the atmosphere, causing more ice to melt, and so on in a runaway feedback loop.

The starkest temperature change is happening in the Arctic, where ice is vanishing at a staggering rate. For stretches in 2016, temperatures in the region were more than 30 degrees hotter than normal.

Read More: Arctic Continues to Break Records — For All the Wrong Reasons

In the years ahead, scientists expect these increases to continue. After all, emissions are continuing to rise, and fossil fuels are still dominant.

But for the Paris climate agreement’s stated goal to be achieved — keeping global temperatures from going above 2 degrees Celsius from pre-industrial levels — then governments around the world have to substantially up their climate commitments.

Read More: Trump's EPA Pick Scott Pruitt May Be the Worst Thing Ever to Happen to Planet Earth

However, since climate change takes place on a delayed scale — today’s emissions will be felt in the coming decades — it’s hard to tell if this goal is still possible.

TAKE ACTION

Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heard

Get Involved

TOPICSGlobal warming, Temperature, Environment, Earth, Heat, Climate change, Hottest year on record, Current events, El Nino, Science, 2016

Joe McCarthy

Written by Joe McCarthy

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.

 

Via Global Citizen

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The lost city of Pripyat is the most radioactive city in the world. Once brimming with life, it is now deserted. Years after the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident one of the city’s exiled residents held a photo of the city before it was evacuated following the 1986 disaster. (Photo Gerd Ludwig)

 

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Via Chernobyl Children International

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Food As Medicine: It's Not Just A Fringe Idea Anymore





January 17, 201710:08 AM ET







DAVID GORN










foodmedicine_wide-84deb20ae494dc7f9046f0
 





Dr. Daniel Nadeau gives Allison Scott tips on getting kids to eat healthy at Ralph's Supermarket in Huntington Beach, Calif.




David Gorn


Several times a month, you can find a doctor in the aisles of Ralph's market in Huntington Beach, Calif., wearing a white coat and helping people learn about food. On one recent day, this doctor was Daniel Nadeau, wandering the cereal aisle with Allison Scott, giving her some ideas on how to feed kids who studiously avoid anything that tastes healthy.


"Have you thought about trying smoothies in the morning?" he asks her. "The frozen blueberries and raspberries are a little cheaper, and berries are really good for the brain."


Scott is delighted to get food advice from a physician who is program director of the nearby Mary and Dick Allen Diabetes Center, part of the St. Joseph Hoag Health alliance. The center's "Shop with Your Doc" program sends doctors to the grocery store to meet with any patients who sign up for the service, plus any other shoppers who happen by with questions.


Nadeau notices the macaroni-and-cheese boxes in Scott's shopping cart and suggests she switch to whole grain pasta and real cheese.



 
 

"So I'd have to make it?" she asks, her enthusiasm waning at the thought of how long that might take, just to have her kids reject it. "I'm not sure they'd eat it. They just won't eat it."


Nadeau says sugar and processed foods are big contributors to the rising diabetes rates among children.


"In America, over 50 percent of our food is processed food," Nadeau tells her. "And only 5 percent of our food is plant-based food. I think we should try to reverse that."


Scott agrees to try more smoothies for the kids and to make real macaroni and cheese. Rack up one point for the doctor, zero for diabetes.


A small revolution brewing


Nadeau is part of a small revolution brewing across California. The food-as-medicine movement has been around for decades, but it's making inroads as physicians and medical institutions make food a formal part of treatment, rather than relying solely on medications. By prescribing nutritional changes or launching programs such as "Shop with Your Doc," they're trying to prevent, limit or even reverse disease by changing what patients eat.


"There's no question people can take things a long way toward reversing diabetes, reversing hypertension, even preventing cancer by food choices," Nadeau says.


In the big picture, says Dr. Richard Afable, CEO and president of St. Joseph Hoag Health, medical institutions across the state are starting to make a philosophical switch to becoming a health organization, not just a health care organization.


That sentiment echoes the tenets of the Therapeutic Food Pantry program at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, which completed its pilot phase and is about to expand on an ongoing basis to five clinic sites throughout the city. The program will offer patients several bags of food prescribed for their condition, along with intensive training in how to cook it.


"We really want to link food and medicine, and not just give away food," says Dr. Rita Nguyen, the hospital's medical director of Healthy Food Initiatives. "We want people to understand what they're eating, how to prepare it, the role food plays in their lives."


In Southern California, Loma Linda University School of Medicine is offering specialized training for its resident physicians in Lifestyle Medicine — that's a formal subspecialty in using food to treat disease.


Research on the power of food to treat or reverse disease is beginning to accumulate, but that doesn't mean diet alone is always the solution, or that every illness can benefit substantially from dietary changes. Nonetheless, physicians say they look at the cumulative data and a clear picture emerges: that the salt, sugar, fat and processed foods in the American diet contribute to the nation's high rates of obesity, diabetes and heart disease. According to the World Health Organization, 80 percent of deaths from heart disease and stroke are caused by high blood pressure, tobacco use, elevated cholesterol and low consumption of fruits and vegetables.


"It's a different paradigm of how to treat disease," says Dr. Brenda Rea, who helps run the family and preventive medicine residency program at Loma Linda University School of Medicine.


Choosing which foods to prescribe


The lifestyle medicine subspecialty is designed to train doctors in how to prevent and treat disease, in part, by changing patients' nutritional habits. The medical center and school at Loma Linda also has a food pantry and kitchen for patients.


Many people don't know how to cook, Rea says; they only know how to heat things up. That means depending on packaged food with high salt and sugar content. So teaching people about which foods are nutritious and how to prepare them, she says, can actually transform a patient's life. And beyond that, it might transform the health and lives of that patient's family.


"What people eat can be medicine or poison," Rea says. "As a physician, nutrition is one of the most powerful things you can change to reverse the effects of chronic disease."


Studies have explored evidence that dietary changes can slow inflammation, for example, or make the body inhospitable to cancer cells.


In general, many lifestyle medicine physicians recommend a plant-based diet — particularly for people with diabetes or other inflammatory conditions.


"As what happened with tobacco, this will require a cultural shift, but that can happen," says Nguyen. "In the same way physicians used to smoke, and then stopped smoking and were able to talk to patients about it, I think physicians can have a bigger voice in it."


This story originally appeared on the website of member station KQED in California.


 


Via The Angiogenesis Foundation


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The first Saturday Night Live host under President Trump will be Aziz Ansari, a first-generation, Southern, brown-skinned, son of Muslim immigrants who taught us these important words: Treat. Yo. Self.

 

https://www.globalcitizen.org/en/content/why-aziz-ansari-is-the-best-possible-host-for-this/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_content=global&utm_campaign=general-content&linkId=33517855

 

Via Global Citizen

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"Taking part in leisure activities and hobbies in our free time is good for people.


As well as being fun it can help people to feel better about themselves, improve skills, feel part of a group or community and provide opportunities to meet new people and make friends.


However, many people with a learning disability may have limited opportunities to take part in the activities that they want."



That's why we're working with Kris, a researcher from Leeds Beckett University, to look into the benefits of befriending schemes like Mencap Sidekicks.


Read the rest of Kris's blog and find out more about the Sidekick scheme http://bit.ly/2jyUwO4


 


16112733_10154883381231354_1779595218780


 


Via Mencap


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GIRLS AND WOMEN 4 famous letters — and one we want YOU to sign

 

January 12 2017  | By: SAMANTHA URBAN
IF YOU CARE, ACT. ADD YOUR NAME TODAY International Womens Day 2017
 
  

Thanks to the ease of email, sitting down and hand-writing an actual letter has fallen out of style. But we have to admit there’s something truly powerful about putting pen to paper in an effort to change the world. Below you’ll find a list of some of our favorite correspondences and open letters… and one we hope you’ll add your name to, too!

1. Nellie Bly

Nellie_Bly_crop.jpg

Photo credit: Public domain/Wikimedia Commons

“Nellie Bly” was a pioneer of investigative journalism who would go on to write about the plight of working women, as well as a famous exposé on the brutal conditions at a New York women’s asylum. But Elizabeth Cochrane began her career under a different pseudonym: In response to a misogynistic article titled “What Girls Are Good For” in her local paper, Elizabeth sent in a blistering rebuttal under the name “Lonely Orphan Girl.” The paper’s editor was impressed and ran an ad trying to find her. When Cochrane arrived at the office and owned her letter, she was offered her first writing job.

2. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Civil_Rights_March_on_Washington_D.C._Dr

Photo credit: Public domain/Wikimedia Commons

A vital text of the Civil Rights Movement, this open letter was written by Martin Luther King, Jr. during his time in a Birmingham jail in 1963. He wrote it in the margins of a newspaper — the only paper he had available — and gave bits and pieces of it to his lawyers to take back to the movement’s headquarters to assemble. The letter defends nonviolent resistance to racism and includes the famous line, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.”

3. Nelson Mandela

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Photo credit: Mark Davey/Oxfam

During his more than 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela wrote many letters. Some, such as a call to arms against apartheid in 1980, were read aloud in public. Others were meant just for his family, such as the many letters to his wife and children. Mandela was released from prison in 1990, won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993, and was inaugurated as the first democratically elected president of South Africa in 1994. You can read many of his letters, as well as journal entries and collected doodlings, in his book, Conversations with Myself.

4. Eva Tolage

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Eva Tolage, right, reads her letter to the Tanzanian government to her District Commissioner. (Photo credit: Restless Development)

When we first met Tanzanian teen Eva Tolage, she had just written a letter to President Obama. Eva wrote about the challenge of hunger, water, electricity, and corruption. She wrote about the challenges of being a girl. At the UN Summit later that year, President Obama actually responded to Eva, saying “Today, I say to Eva and hundreds of millions like you, we see you. We hear you. I’ve read your letter and we commit ourselves as nations as one world to the urgent work that must be done.” But Eva didn’t stop there: She rallied her classmates at Mlowa school to write a letter to their local leaders last year, asking for water and sanitation facilities to be provided at their school. (And she’s even written another letter to President Obama!) What an amazing example for students and activists everywhere!

Mike-Turner-Photography-150430-075-1-102

Photo credit: Mike Turner/ONE

And now we have a letter that we’d like you to sign. It’s an open letter to world leaders, asking them to prioritize girls’ education. 130 million girls around the world are out of school — that is unacceptable. When girls get an education, they are less likely to become child brides, less likely to contract HIV, and they have greater economic opportunities for the rest of their lives — which is good for everyone. On March 8, ONE members will deliver this open letter to their representatives and senators to let them know we want them to prioritize girls’ education. Stand with ONE and add your name here.

 

 

Via ONE

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Via ONE

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AID AND DEVELOPMENT Looking back on 10 years of global leadership from UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon

 

December 21 2016  | By: UNITED NATIONS FOUNDATION
JOIN Join the fight against Extreme Poverty
 
  

This post has been adapted from a blog post that ran on the UN Foundation blog..

At the end of this year, Ban Ki-moon’s time as Secretary-General of the United Nations will come to a close and António Guterres will begin his tenure in 2017. Here’s a look at the legacy of Secretary-General Ban’s ten years of service as the world’s top diplomat.

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UN Photo/Mark Garten

Improving women’s and children’s health:

The Secretary-General helped bring more resources, awareness, and action to women’s and children’s health issues through the launch of the Every Woman Every Child movement and the Global Strategy for Women’s and Children’s Health. Last year, the Secretary-General helped launch an updated Global Strategy on Women’s, Children’s, and Adolescents’ Health for the era of the Sustainable Development Goals.

Ushering in a new era of sustainable development:

Under the Secretary-General’s leadership, in September 2015, 193 world leaders gathered at the UN and adopted the Sustainable Development Goals — a set of global goals to follow the Millennium Development Goals. The Sustainable Development Goals provide a blueprint to end poverty, fight inequality, and tackle climate change by 2030.

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UN Photo/Mark Garten

Promoting human rights:

Secretary-General Ban has been an outspoken leader for the rights of all people, saying, “We declare that human rights are for all of us, all the time.” During his time as Secretary-General, he launched the “Human Rights Up Front” initiative and championed the UN Human Rights Office’s “Free & Equal” campaign, a global public education effort for LGBT equality.

Empowering girls and women:

From advocating for the creation of UN Women to launching efforts to help end violence against women, economically empower women, and engage men in the fight for gender equality, Secretary-General Ban has promoted the rights and well-being of girls and women around the world.

Screen-Shot-2016-12-19-at-4.52.37-PM.png

UN Photo/Eskinder Debebe

Helping the most vulnerable:

Conflict and disaster have left nearly 130 million people in need around the world, and the Secretary-General has been an advocate for helping the world’s most vulnerable people. From supporting refugees to hosting the first-ever World Humanitarian Summit to addressing peace and security situations, the Secretary-General has worked to focus the world on how we can collectively increase and improve humanitarian response efforts and create a safer world for all.

Engaging young people:

Recognizing the importance of engaging the largest youth generation in history, Secretary-General Ban made it a top priority to work with and for young people, including appointing an Envoy on Youth and supporting 17 “UN Young Leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals.”

Screen-Shot-2016-12-19-at-4.54.00-PM.png

UN Photo/Mark Garten

Text and photos from United Nations Foundation. Learn more about their work here.

Let’s accomplish the Global Goals together: Join ONE today to help fight poverty and preventable disease.

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Via Global Citizen

 
CITIZENSHIP Cloud Shaped Like Winnie the Pooh Delights the Internet

By Cassie Carothers|

 July 28, 2016
 

The internet went wild Thursday over a photo of a cloud resembling Winnie the Pooh.

The photo was taken during an outdoor children’s charity event in Dorset, England, for a group called Children’s Heart Surgery Fund. The group is a charity that gives support to children and adults born with Congenital Heart Defects and their families. It provides equipment, resources, and research.

Publications from all over the world wrote stories about the bear-shaped cloud. Tweets and other social media posts went viral.

Is it Photoshopped? Who knows. And it doesn't really matter. It's a magical sight that is bringing people joy.

And no, it doesn't have much to do with extreme poverty. But part of being a Global Citizen is recognizing that while yes, there’s lots of bad stuff in this world, there’s also a lot of good, and when you see something that makes you smile, you share it with your friends. Especially if those friends are Christopher Robin, Eeyore, and Tigger.

Ta ta for now!

More feel-good stories from GlobalCitizen.org:

10 Stories That Show the World Is Not Going to Hell

Black Lives Matter Protest Turns Into BBQ With Police Officers

Sikh Bikers Ride 7,000 Miles to Raise $100K for Cancer

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
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Written by Cassie Carothers

 

Cassie Carothers is the Editorial Director of Global Citizen. She has more than 10 years experience covering national and international news as a digital journalist, having worked at Fox News, the New York Post, and Yahoo News. She grew up in Ohio and graduated from Miami University after studying journalism, politics, and marketing. She’s been a vegetarian for 18 years, and believes strongly that a diet is a key part of sustainable living.

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https://www.facebook.com/Mr.JamesCorden/videos/vb.11042097011/10154746189737012/?type=2&theater

 

You and I are running out of time. It’s our LAST chance to join up and do a Carpool Karaoke together! It’s all to help (RED) deliver an AIDS FREE GENERATION, so ENTER: http://bit.ly/LastChance-CarpoolKaraoke

 

Via (RED)

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GIRLS & WOMEN Popular British TV Drama to Feature Female Genital Mutilation Plotline

 

Jan. 18, 2017

Brought to you by: Thomson Reuters Foundation

By Emma Batha

LONDON, Jan 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Popular British period drama "Call the Midwife" is to feature female genital mutilation (FGM) in a storyline about a pregnant Somali woman living in east London in the 1960s.

Campaigners against FGM welcomed the news, saying the mainstream show would help boost awareness of the widely condemned practice which has long been shrouded in secrecy.

"I'm over the moon. It's amazing," said British activist Hibo Wardere whose FGM prevention work includes training medical staff.

"Five years ago no one wanted to talk about FGM but everyone is waking up now and finally seeing this as child abuse," added Wardere who nearly died when she was cut as a child in Somalia.

A 2014 study estimated 137,000 women and girls in England and Wales have undergone FGM and 60,000 girls are at risk.

The ritual, which involves the partial or total removal of the external genitalia, often causes serious physical and psychological problems and can lead to childbirth complications.

"Call the Midwife", which is broadcast by the BBC, returns for a sixth series this weekend and is likely to air on PBS in America.

Creator Heidi Thomas said the story would not "impose a modern mindset", but would reflect the 1960s setting.

"I thought this would be a fascinating story, as it would be the first time our midwives would have seen this process (FGM)", she told the Radio Times magazine.

"It would provide a very interesting crunch point between two cultures, and of course it is now a very hot topic, quite rightly."

The episode will not treat FGM as a form of child abuse. "We are a medical drama, not a moral drama," she added.

FGM has previously featured in storylines in medical drama "Casualty" and crime series "Law & Order: UK".

"People know more about (FGM) now because it has been on TV and it's great to use these shows to expand on the conversation," said Leyla Hussein, co-founder of anti-FGM charity Daughters of Eve.

"But it's key ... that the researchers don't just Google FGM, but talk to people affected."

Hussein, a psychotherapist who runs a counselling service for FGM survivors, also cautioned against portrayals that could reinforce the misperception that FGM is a Somali Muslim issue.

The ritual is practised by communities across a swathe of African countries and pockets of the Middle East and Asia.

Those affected by FGM in Britain include Sierra Leoneans, Eritreans, Sudanese and Egyptians among others.

Even though female genital mutilation has been a criminal offence in Britain since 1985, the authorities have yet to bring a successful prosecution for FGM.

However, there has been a major change in attitude in recent years with the government introducing initiatives to identify and protect girls at risk and improve specialist maternity care.

(Editing by Katie Nguyen. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, which covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org to see more stories.)

Global Citizen, in partnership with CHIME FOR CHANGE, is campaigning to Level the Law, and fight unjust laws that discriminate against girls and women. Learn more here.

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
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This Frankfurt Food Truck Is Fighting Food Waste, One Crooked Carrot at a Time

By Katrin Kausche|

 Jan. 16, 2017
sander_truck.jpg__1500x670_q85_crop_subsFoto zur Verfügung gestellt von Resteküche - Beste Küche

It sounds hard to imagine, but every year 88 million tonnes of food is wasted every year in the EU — the equivalent in weight of 15,000 African elephants. Yes, and this is while 1 in 9 people worldwide go to bed hungry every night. 

ShoutOutLoud, a German non-profit organization committed to environmental protection, sustainability and cultural exchange, is determined to fight this. Their project "Resteküche - Beste Küche" (which roughly translates to “waste kitchen, best kitchen.”) is simple and innovative: transform reclaimed organic produce into delicious street food. 

And their dream of a food truck is close at hand.

Read More: 11 Groups Fighting to End Food Waste and Feed the World

"We want to focus on the problem of food waste with the "Resteküche”. We don't want to preach to people, or take a moral high ground but simply sell good food that would otherwise have been neglected," said Daniel Anthes, who runs the Resteküche project and is deputy chairman of ShoutOutLoud, in an interview with Global Citizen.

restekuchephoto.jpg__1133x756_q85_crop_sImage: Resteküche-Beste Küche

And he is right. According to a WWF study, Germans throw away more than 18 million tonnes of food. In 2015, food waste cost the UK £13 billion. Some of this waste is simply because people buy too much food, or because expiry dates nudge people to throw away food while it’s still edible. But frequently, food never even reaches supermarket shelves, because it is simply too wonky, too crooked, or just too “ugly.” 

This is not only an immense waste of precious food, but a threat to the environment. 20% of the UK's greenhouse gas emissions are associated with food production, distribution and storage. Excess food production in industrialised countries adds to global carbon emission levels, wasting energy producing food that will in turn be wasted, only to emit methane as it piles up as landfill — a vicious cycle that needs to be broken.   

Read More: Guess What? The UK Spends More on Food Waste than Foreign Aid

It’s time for a rethink. And that is exactly where the food truck comes into play. Using foodstuffs that would otherwise be destined for the tip, they'll be selling vegetarian dishes like soups, sandwiches, pizza and quiche across markets in Frankfurt. Their mantra is: “No 'wonky' carrots, but good soup. No 'crooked' zucchini, but good sandwiches. No waste, but good food.”

 

 

 

The food truck will also act as a pop-up think tank, providing fun, interactive workshops to people who want to learn about sustainable solutions to food waste. 

The dream of the foodtruck is already close at hand. ShoutOutLoud is hoping to raise 50,000 euros via a crowdfunding campaign to launch the food truck — they have until 20 January 2017 to reach their target.

“If we hit our funding threshold of 30,000 Euros, we will be able to buy a food truck, design and rebuild it according to our needs, brand it and cover the first running costs (such as insurance, taxes, MOT and parking costs,” said Daniel. Reaching their ultimate funding goal of 50,000 euros will enable them to expand the project further.

“All our profits will be invested back into social or ecological initiatives within our partner network, including organisations that teach children about cooking and eating more sustainably.” 

Although a food truck alone can not save all the food in Frankfurt (and certainly not in the whole of Germany, or even Europe), it’s through local initiatives like this that we can begin to chip away at a problem that seems insurmountable — If food waste were a mountain, it would be two miles wide, and 8,000 feet high.

Read More: 32 Tips for Reducing Food Waste Each Day

"Once you understand how much everyone — from the producer to the end user — is part of of the problem,” said Daniel, ”you understand that you can be part of the solution.” Too true. 

Daniel's Resteküche Food Waste Tip: 

 

Layered desserts are one of my all time favourites and they are very simple to make: 

 

First Layer: Use  left-over dairy like yoghurt, whipped cream or curd flavoured as you like, e.g. with cinnamon or vanilla. 

 

Second Layer: Add mashed or chopped overripe fruits like apples, sweetened to taste — we prefer it rather sour to balance the other layers.

 

Third Layer: Top it off with something sweet like leftover croissants, cake, brioche or biscuits (chopped).

 

Finish with some cinnamon powder and enjoy! 

 

Donate to Resteküche's crowdfunding campaign here

 
TAKE ACTIONSend petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
katrinkausche.jpg

Written by Katrin Kausche

 

Katrin is a Content Writer for Global Citizen. Being born and bred in Cologne (Germany), she decided to see the world before starting university in Munich. During her travels, she became particularly interested in global issues and decided to become a teacher so that she can share her gained knowledge with a younger generation. She now resides in London where you can usually find her on a bench along the Thames being absorbed in a book or two (that is, if the sun shines, of course!).

 

Via Global Citizen

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6 guys who believe girls are going to change the world

 

10 October 2016 9:41AM UTC  | By: GUEST BLOGGER
JOIN Join the fight against Extreme Poverty
 
  

Today’s guest blogger is James Nardella, Executive Director of  Lwala Community Alliance

Traditionally, men have been on the sidelines in the struggle to advance the rights of girls and women around the world. 

That’s why the #HeforShe movement – which calls on men to be activists and allies in addressing the disproportionate hurdles girls face – was a huge wake up call for activists around the world. It showed us that gender inequality is a burden on all of humanity, and men too have a key role to play in addressing this injustice.

In honour of #HeforShe, ONE’s #PovertyisSexist campaign, and International Day of the Girl (October 11) we asked 6 guys – guys who work in the humanitarian and aid community why they stand with women and girls for gender equality. Here’s what they said: 

1. Kennedy Odede

Founder and CEO, Shining Hope for Communities

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“Growing up in the Kibera slum in Nairobi, Kenya, I witnessed the structural and daily violence that exists against girls and women. My own mother is a survivor. I got to a point where I could not sit back and watch my sisters in Kibera be victimised one day longer. I knew I had to do something.

As a man, I cannot speak for girls and women, but I can speak for justice, and as long as there is rampant violence and inequality of opportunity facing girls and women, there is no justice.”

2. Gary Cohen

Executive VP, Global Health and Development at BD and Founder of Together for Girls

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“The humanity of any society is determined by how it treats its vulnerable populations. The treatment of girls throughout the world indicates that humanity is failing in far too many societies. Redressing this problem requires girls to be protected, educated and empowered, and men to take a lead role in redressing societal norms that are conducive to violent behaviors.”

3. Dr. Gary Darmstadt

Senior Fellow for Global Development, Gates Foundation

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“My perspective changed while visiting an ‘untouchable’ slum in Kanpur, India. The program we supported had enabled the women in the village to access family planning information, services and contraceptives. Sona, a 10-year-old girl seized the opportunity of my visit to transform hope into a new reality. As we walked through the village, she was there, making her case: ‘I want to go to school.’ ‘We need a teacher.’ ‘Can you please help us get a school and a teacher?’ She changed my own understanding of the power of a girl – the power of a voice – the power of hope.”

4. Dr. Milton Ocheing’

Co-founder of Lwala Community Alliance

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“The success of my whole life is due to the investment in a girl child. Because my grandparents sent my mother Margaret to school as a child, she gained an education, became a teacher, and instilled the importance and value of education in her own children – so my education in medicine and my profession as a doctor were only possible because a girl child was given opportunity.”

5. Conrad Person

Director of Corporate Contributions, Johnson and Johnson

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“In my office hangs a poster drawn by a Tanzanian girl with a picture of herself proudly walking down the path to school.  All around her are the things that can pull her away her from the path.  She depicts sugar daddies, chores at home, and alcohol.

I visited her school and learned that most girls also lacked basic sanitary towels.  This universally needed item was seriously impacting girl’s school attendance and therefore their ability to compete for educational opportunities.  Johnson & Johnson is proud to support Lwala Community Alliance in mentoring school-aged girls to become agents of their own safety and providing girls with locally made sanitary towels.”

6. Bradley Broder

Executive Director, Kenya Education Fund

BradleyB.png

“Through my work with the Kenya Education Fund, I have come to know hundreds of girls who have been raised in traditional Maasai culture, in which many girls undergo female genital mutilation, are forced into early marriage and are often pregnant by age 14. I also see how girls who succeed are able to model a different future.

In 2008, Kenya Education Fund identified a bright girl from the Maasai community and gave her a scholarship to one of the best high schools in Kenya. She excelled academically, and in 2013, was accepted to Harvard as its first-ever undergraduate Maasai girl. This girl’s remarkable journey is helping spread the feminist mantle to many Maasai fathers, who now see greater value in their daughters’ diplomas than in their dowries.”

Your turn: Guys, how will you raise YOUR voices for the safety and security of girls? Tell us in a comment below.

James Nardella is the Executive Director of Lwala Community Alliance, an indigenously founded, nonprofit health, education, and development organisation that is working to increase child survival, reduce the burden of HIV, and achieve gender equity in a rural population with acute needs in western Kenya. 

 

Via ONE

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CITIZENSHIP

Billboard of 2 Muslim Girls Celebrating Australia Day Taken Down Amid Backlash

By Marnie Cunningham| Jan. 18, 2017

 

news.com.au

On Australia Day 2016 two young girls were celebrating in Melbourne with their families. The two friends had their picture taken and the photo was used for billboards to promote Australia Day celebrations for 2017.

The pair happen to be Muslim and are wearing hjabs in the image; their photo was chosen as a way to celebrate the diversity of Australia. However, sadly the billboard was met with a wave of islamophobia and threats of violence until it was taken down. On social media there were hateful outcries about how the photo was “un-Australian”.

Members of far-right social media groups posted things such as: “Those hijabs are offensive to me because of what they stand for.” Another commented: “They deserve abuse & threats.”

View image on Twitter

View image on Twitter

 Follow

 Kim Vuga @Kimmaree13

#Australia Day Billboard pulled down! 

 

A win! 

 

Australia has spoken! 

 

This is Australia NOT Saudi Arabia!

 

#SENDTHEMBACK 

#Auspol

3:39 AM - 17 Jan 2017

  105 105 Retweets   169 169 likes

 Follow

 Big Bill @TenezLeDroit

Left-wing ratbags conveniently forget we celebrate Australia Day, not Muslim Day. http://www.theage.co...118-gttkdp.html… via @DailyLifeAU

9:55 AM - 18 Jan 2017

Photo published for Anti-racism campaigners want to put Australian Muslim girls back on a billboard for Australia Day

Anti-racism campaigners want to put Australian Muslim girls back on a billboard for Australia Day

An Australia Day billboard featuring two girls in hijab was removed after backlash, but campaigners are crowdfunding to get it back up.

theage.com.au

  Retweets   likes

The families of the girls are now concerned about keeping their identity a secret and fear for their safety, reports The Guardian.. The girls are very much aware of the fuss their photo has caused but can’t quite understand why it was taken down.

In response to the dismantlement of the billboards, advertising agency Campaign Edge have launched a crowdfunding campaign to #putthembackup.

 

 Follow

 ABC News 24 ✔ @ABCNews24

Campaign to reinstate 'controversial' #AustraliaDay billboard featuring #Muslim girls in hijabs raises nearly $60,000 in 7 hours @deemadigan

8:24 AM - 18 Jan 2017

  146 146 Retweets   246 246 likes

The money raised will go to placing a full page press ad and a billboard. Although by the looks of things they may be able to purchase more than one billboard! The team behind the campaign are donating their time and any leftover funds will be donated to the Asylum Seeker Resource Centre.

 Follow

 Richard Di Natale ✔ @RichardDiNatale

I'm disgusted by campaign to take down Australia Day sign featuring Muslim women. Racism has no place in our society https://www.theguard...d-after-threats

3:43 AM - 17 Jan 2017

Photo published for Australia Day billboard featuring women in hijabs removed after threats

Australia Day billboard featuring women in hijabs removed after threats

Digital sign in Melbourne showing two Muslim women in front of the Australian flag sparks furious social media debate and threats to company

theguardian.com

  257 257 Retweets   402 402 likes

 Follow

 Robin Scott @RobinScottMP

I support these ads. #OzDay is about celebrating not only our differences but the things we share: ie love for Aust! https://www.theguard...MP=share_btn_tw

2:54 AM - 17 Jan 2017

Photo published for Australia Day billboard featuring women in hijabs removed after threats

Australia Day billboard featuring women in hijabs removed after threats

Digital sign in Melbourne showing two Muslim women in front of the Australian flag sparks furious social media debate and threats to company

theguardian.com

  6 6 Retweets   14 14 likes

A group in the local council where the billboard was first put up started a petition to have the billboards reinstated. The petition that states “Muslims are Australians too! We demand the reinstatement of the Cranbourne billboard featuring two girls wearing hijabs,” attracted over 4,000 signatures in less than 24 hours. A crowdfunding campaign hit its goal of raising $50,000 blew through its goal in just 7 hours, and went on to raise more than $100,000, according to The Guardian.

For Australians to be true global citizens, Australia Day needs to be an inclusive celebration of the country’s diversity.

TOPICSMuslim, Diversity, Australia, #Girls and Women, Australia Day, #putthembackup, Hjab

Marnie Cunningham

Written by Marnie Cunningham

Marnie Cunningham is a content creator for Global Citizen. With a background in media, photography and international development she has worked in Tanzania, Vanuatu and her hometown of Melbourne, Australia. Marnie is passionate about the environment and runs a sustainable business of her own - seasonal floral and botanical design for weddings and events.

 

Via Global Citizen

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In this wonderful video the U.S. Embassy Dublin and the people of Ireland pay tribute to Ambassador Kevin O'Malley.

We are so grateful to Ambassador O'Malley for the terrific opportunities he offered to Music Generation during his term as American Ambassador to Ireland, in particular the many inspirational performance opportunities afforded to the children and young people with whom we work, and the chances for these young people to meet world-class American artists as part of the Creative Minds series, which he inaugurated.

We wish Ambassador O'Malley and his family every success for the future!


 

Via Music Generation

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EDUCATION 95 influential figures have signed on to support girls’ education… and you’re next

 

13 January 2017 3:33PM UTC  | By: SAMANTHA URBAN
IF YOU CARE, ACT ADD YOUR NAME TODAY Take action NOW for girls' education.
 
  

All children deserve a good education. But because poverty is sexist, 130 million girls across the world are denied this basic right. That’s why ONE is organizing people across the country and around the world to help ensure that girls and women are at the heart of our poverty-fighting strategy by promoting their access to education.
Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Those 130 million girls have the potential to cure diseases or end wars, invent brilliant technology or revolutionize an industry… or simply access opportunity. When girls get an education, they are less likely to become child brides, less likely to contract HIV, and they have greater economic opportunities for the rest of their lives — which is good for everyone.

Join us on calling on world leaders to increase the number of girls in school by millions. It’s an ambitious goal, but it’s one the world needs to strive to reach.
Here’s our open letter:

A letter to leaders—

You couldn’t be where you are today without a good education.

But because poverty is sexist, 130 million girls across the world are denied this basic right. Indeed, if the number of girls out of school formed a country, it would be the tenth largest on the planet – bigger than Japan or Germany.

All children deserve a good education, but in the poorest countries girls are denied it more often than boys. Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Every additional year of school that a girl completes increases her future earnings, which is good for her family, her community and her country.

We cannot afford to squander the potential of 130 million girls to cure diseases or end wars, invent brilliant technology or revolutionize an industry… or simply to access opportunity.

We are coming together and uniting across our divides to get every girl into school and to make sure she gets a quality education once she’s there.

But we need you to do the same.

Your education helped you to get where you are today – and it is in your power to help millions of girls to get theirs. Please act now, with the right policies and the necessary funds.

Show us that politics can work for the people – starting with the people who need it most.

This letter has already been signed by influential figures across a number of fields: business, faith, technology, activism, entertainment, and more. They come from different backgrounds and hold different views, but they all agreed that this issue is vitally important. We sincerely thank each one of them for lending their influence to getting girls around the world the education they deserve:

Afrikan Boy, grime artist Alice Albright, Chief Executive Officer of the Global Partnership for Education’s Secretariat Alice Callahan Thompson, actress and activist Aliko Dangote, President/Chief Executive of the Dangote Group and Chairman of the Dangote Foundation Alyse Nelson, President and CEO, Vital Voices Global Partnership Amena Brown, spoken word artist Angelique Kidjo, Grammy Award-winning artist and activist Anne-Birgitte Albrectsen, CEO, Plan International Ariana Grande, performer Arianna Huffington, Co-founder and former editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post Asa, singer Ashley Graham, model Ashley Judd, actor and activist Aziz Ansari, actor, comedian, author Banky W, singer Baroness Verma, former Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for International Development, and ministerial champion for tackling violence against women and girls overseas and political champion for women’s rights Blake Lively, actor Bob Geldof, activist and musician Bono, lead singer of U2 and co-founder of ONE and (RED) Bumi Thomas, singer-songwriter Carey Lowell, artist and actor Cathy Newman, presenter for Channel Four News, blogger for the Telegraph Charlize Theron, actor and founder of Charlize Theron Africa Outreach Project Christina Lamb, Sunday Times Chief Foreign Correspondent and author Cindi Leive, Editor-in-Chief at Glamour Dan Haseltine, Blood:Water co-founder Danai Gurira, actor and award-winning playwright David Burtka, actor, chef David Oyelowo, actor Hon. Desmond Elliot, politician and former actor Diamond, singer Ertharin Cousin, Executive Director at World Food Programme George Stroumboulopoulos, TV and radio personality Guido Schmidt-Traub, Executive Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network. Gwen Stefani, performer Helen Clark, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme Helene Gayle, CEO, McKinsey Social Initiative Helle Thorning-Schmidt, CEO, Save the Children International HHP, rapper Isla Fisher, actor Jane Mosbacher Morris, founder and CEO of TO THE MARKET Jessica Oyelowo, actor Jessica Sipos, actor Joe Cerrell, Managing Director, Global Policy & Advocacy, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation John Green, author and YouTuber Julia Gillard, Chair of the Board of Directors at the Global Partnership for Education, and former PM of Australia Julia Roberts, actor and producer Karen Kornbluh, Executive Vice President, Nielsen Karen Walrond, NY Times best-selling author Kathy Calvin, President and CEO, UN Foundation Katja Iversen, CEO, Women Deliver Kevin Sheekey, Global Head of Communications, Government Relations and Marketing for Bloomberg L.P. Kobna Holdbrook-Smith, actor Lady Gaga Larry Summers, Harvard professor and former United States Treasury Secretary Laura Ling, journalist and host at Seeker Network Lauren Bush Lauren, CEO and founder of FEED Projects Leymah Gbowee, Liberian Nobel Peace Prize-winning activist Luvvie Ajayi, writer and Digital Strategist and Executive Director, The Red Pump Mabel van Oranje, initiator and Chair of Girls Not Brides Maria Russo, Executive Director, Humanity Unified International Marian Salzman, CEO, Havas PR Matt Maher, contemporary Christian artist Meghan Markle, actor and activist Michael Gerson, Senior Fellow at ONE Michael W. Smith, contemporary Christian artist Michele Sullivan, President, Caterpillar Foundation Montel Williams, TV personality Moriah Peters, singer-songwriter Morton H. Halperin, Senior Advisor, Open Society Foundations Muntu Valdo, musician Natalie Portman, actor Neil Patrick Harris, actor Paul Polman, CEO, Unilever Rachel Rudwall, explorer and television producer Rashida Jones, actor Robin Wright, actor Ryan Reynolds, actor Sacha Baron Cohen, actor Sarah Brown, Executive Chair of the Global Business Coalition for Education and co-founder of A World at School Selmor Mtukudzi, singer Sheryl Sandberg, COO, Facebook Sheryl WuDunn, co-author, “A Path Appears” and “Half the Sky” Steve Taylor, singer-songwriter Susan A. Buffett, Chairwoman, The Sherwood Foundation and the Susan Thompson Buffett Foundation Susan Markham, former USAID Senior Coordinator for Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment Susan Wojcicki, CEO, YouTube Tanya Burr, fashion and beauty vlogger Tina Brown, founder and CEO of Tina Brown Live Media Tom Brady, quarterback of the New England Patriots Toolz, radio presenter Vanessa Mdee, singer Victoria Kimani, singer Waje, singer Yemi Alade, singer

… And now it’s your turn. It’s in your power RIGHT NOW to help girls across the globe get access to an education in the next four years. If you care, ACT. Add your name to our letter, and we’ll deliver it in-person to leaders all around the world on International Women’s Day, March 8.

 

Via ONE

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