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Aung San Suu Kyi

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That was the original message; One would think with her personal experiences of repression and suffering, that since her release #Aung San Suu Kyi would lead her country to a peaceful future.


2017. 
Unfortunately this not appear to be the case
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8JNeFKqyWI

 

One message for peace; stop the assault and killing of any and all people.

 

Give yourselves the freedom to redeem the flower you hold so tight.
Show a little care, let it breath, step back, let in a little light, its gonna be alright, no need to fight.
An open hand could pave the way to something that is easier to embrace, a part of you could come through, a kinder face to break the chains that bring you pain.
讓自己的自由兌換花您擁有如此緊張。查看一點照顧,讓它呼吸,讓我們在一個小燈,這是公鹿好了,沒有必要打仗。一個開放一方面可以鋪平道路的東西更容易擁抱你的一部分可以通過友好面臨打破鏈,使你的痛苦 
दो तुम इतना कसकर पकड़ फूलों के पाप से मुक्त करने के लिए अपने आप को स्वतंत्रता., यह साँस दो, एक छोटी सी रोशनी में दो थोड़ा ध्यान दिखाना, यह ठीक है, कोई ज़रूरत नहीं लड़ने के लिए होने वाला है. एक खुले हाथ कि आसान है कुछ करने का मार्ग प्रशस्त कर सकता एक kinder चेहरे के माध्यम से कि तुम दर्द लाने की जंजीरों को तोड़ने के लिए आ सकता है आप में से एक हिस्सा गले लगाना
تعطي نفسك الحرية في استرداد زهرة تشغلونه تضيق حتى اعرض قليلا من الرعاية ، والسماح لها التنفس ، اسمحوا قليلا في ضوء ذلك ، ان يكون gonna يرام ، ولا حاجة للقتال. مفتوح من جهة ويمكن أن يمهد الطريق إلى ما هو أسهل ليشمل جزءا من يمكن أن يأتي عن طريق رياض الأطفال ، وجها لكسر السلاسل التي تجلب لك الألم

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XWsolSCl_S8

 

StopKilling.jpg

 

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XWsolSCl_S8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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I'm very concerned about this as a topic and how it's being handled by fans an media.

Please correct me if I'm wrong (and I very well maybe), but wasn't this a crisis she originally sought advice from other international leaders on (and there appeared to be little). Again - if I dis-remember that correct me, I could easily be wrong.

But, in any event, isn't this an issue of the military / generals again? You know - the people who imprisoned her? Her acting as a governmental leader maybe be on a figurehead basis while the military really is in control again.

I'm not seeing reporting on choices she's facing. I'm not seeing reporting indicating collusion with the generals in this matter, and she truly may not have the ability to stop it. How would you proceed? Call on the UN maybe?

Basically all I'm seeing is calls to take away her awards and diminish her image on the international stage, which would potentially remove any leverage she might have from her, and play exactly into the generals hands.

Again, someone point me to some decent reporting that truly makes the case that she should be the target of the international community's ire. I'll believe it if it's there, but I haven't heard any yet, and am not inclined to condemn her personally from what I've seen so far.

And please do not confuse this as prioritizing her personally above a genocide, they are separate issues, both can be addressed, but I'm most concerned that if there's international pressure that it be properly placed.

 

 

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My video is zil.

From what I've gathered this is a real crisis of genocide against the Rohinga people.

As far as politics & personal responsibility, anyone who enters into a political candidacy must surely know its a rats nest. 

Being in denial is not helpful unless it makes you feel better. 

Its painful & dissapointing, this betrayal, whether there are underlying reasons.

I've never been very good at "follow the leader", I strive to remain issues oriented in politics. Trusting anyone is a risk, so holding someone to their word, who is in a leadership position, seems essential.

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On 13/10/2017 at 12:37 AM, Koke-dera said:

I'm very concerned about this as a topic and how it's being handled by fans an media.

Please correct me if I'm wrong (and I very well maybe), but wasn't this a crisis she originally sought advice from other international leaders on (and there appeared to be little). Again - if I dis-remember that correct me, I could easily be wrong.

But, in any event, isn't this an issue of the military / generals again? You know - the people who imprisoned her? Her acting as a governmental leader maybe be on a figurehead basis while the military really is in control again.

I'm not seeing reporting on choices she's facing. I'm not seeing reporting indicating collusion with the generals in this matter, and she truly may not have the ability to stop it. How would you proceed? Call on the UN maybe?

Basically all I'm seeing is calls to take away her awards and diminish her image on the international stage, which would potentially remove any leverage she might have from her, and play exactly into the generals hands.

Again, someone point me to some decent reporting that truly makes the case that she should be the target of the international community's ire. I'll believe it if it's there, but I haven't heard any yet, and am not inclined to condemn her personally from what I've seen so far.

And please do not confuse this as prioritizing her personally above a genocide, they are separate issues, both can be addressed, but I'm most concerned that if there's international pressure that it be properly placed.

The fact is that she is turning a blind eye to the problem, rather than speaking out about it. That is not acceptable considering what she went through to get where she is.

Aung San Suu Kyi should be standing up for the Rohingya not ignoring their suffering.

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Why has Bono gone quiet about he appalling huminatarian crisis in Myanmar and the disgraceful behaviour of Aung San Sui Kyi who is pretending it's not happening and completely ignoring it? It's time he made it clear that her behaviour is unacceptable. Why is he now saying nothing when he should be condemning her?

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On 10/18/2017 at 10:11 PM, Mark Bentman said:

Why has Bono gone quiet about he appalling huminatarian crisis in Myanmar and the disgraceful behaviour of Aung San Sui Kyi who is pretending it's not happening and completely ignoring it? It's time he made it clear that her behaviour is unacceptable. Why is he now saying nothing when he should be condemning her?

Could not agree more. His ranting about this woman pretty much ruined most of the 360 shows and the stunt with the face masks was just creepy. For one person to take up so much attention at a U2 concert is unforgivable, as is Bono's silence now that she has turned out to be a rather unpleasant individual.

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http://www.u2.com/news/title/myanmar-open-letter-to-un/news/ 

"In response to queries from U2 fans, who campaigned along with the band and Amnesty International for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi, as regards the situation in Myanmar, we would like you to know that the band are deeply alarmed by the continuing crisis and devastating reports about what is happening to the Rohingya people. Bono has signed the open letter to the UN Security Council calling for urgent action, text below, and has been speaking to Amnesty International, the UN and people close to the ground in Myanmar where 600,000 Rohingya have been displaced. He has a call in with Aung San Suu Kyi this week and next week will report back with more on this catastrophe.” 
 
AN OPEN LETTER TO UN SECURITY COUNCIL TO INTERVENE TO END THE HUMAN CRISIS IN RAKHINE, MYANMAR
 
Date: 13 September, 2017
 
Dear President and Members of the Security Council,
 
Thank you for holding the UNSC meeting on Rohingya crisis most likely on September 13.
 
The human tragedy and crimes against humanity unfolding in the Arakan region of Myanmar need your immediate intervention. This is one of the moments when bold and decisive actions are needed.
 
According to different organizations, recent military offensive by the Myanmar Army in Rakhine State has led to the killing of hundreds of Rohingya people. Hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced. Complete villages have been burned, women raped, many civilians arbitrarily arrested, and children killed. Crucially, humanitarian aid organisations have been almost completely denied access, creating an appalling humanitarian crisis in an area already extremely poor. According to UN sources, around 300,000 people have fled to Bangladesh during the last two weeks. Human misery created by such massive displacement of men, women and children under the threat of death is getting worse every day.
 
Some of us denounced the previous spate of violence late last year and wrote to you to intervene. However, the situation has not improved. We urge you to take decisive actions to stop the violence against innocent civilians and bring permanent peace in Rakhine state. 
 
We call on UNSC to intervene immediately by using all available means. We request you to take immediate action for cessation of indiscriminate military attack on innocent civilians that is forcing them to leave their home and flee country to turn into stateless people.
 
The arguments that the Myanmar government is using to deny Rohingyas their citizenship are ludicrous, to say the least.  At independence of Burma from the British in 1948 and under successive governments, Burma recognized the people of all ethnicities within its border, including the Rohingyas, as full citizens, having representation in the parliament.
 
The military juntas in the 1980s decided that Rohingyas are not Burmese. Accordingly, they stripped the Rohingyas of their citizenship. They used military and political means to make sure that the Rohingyas leave the country. Systematic persecution aiming at ethnic and religious cleansing began.
 
We join the Secretary General of the United Nations in re-emphasizing that, "The grievances and unresolved plight of the Rohingya have festered for far too long and are becoming an undeniable factor in regional destabilization. The authorities in Myanmar must take determined action to put an end to this vicious cycle of violence and to provide security and assistance to all those in need.”
 
We urge you to persuade Myanmar government to take immediate steps to implement the recommendations of the Rakhine Advisory Commission which the Myanmar government established in 2016 under the pressure of international community. The Commission, mostly comprised of Myanmar citizens, chaired by Kofi Annan, recommended providing citizenship to the Rohingyas, to allow them freedom of movement, rights and equality before the law, to ensure communal representation, lack of which affects Muslims disproportionately, to facilitate UN assistance in ensuring safety and security of returning people. The fear became reality through the attack on Myanmar security forces by the militants. Unless, constructive effort to build lasting peace is taken, the situation will get worse which in turn may pose serious security threat to the neighbouring countries.
 
To implement the Commission recommendations we suggest the following preparatory steps:
 
Reappoint the Commission members immediately to constitute an Implementation Committee to oversee the implementation of the recommendations,
Take immediate steps to stop the outflow of refugees,
Invite international observers to visit vulnerable areas on a regular basis,
Invite back the refugees who already left the country,
Build camps within Myanmar for the returning refugees to facilitate their rehabilitation with  UN financing and supervision,
Give them the citizenship as prescribed in the Commission Report under the exclusive authority of the Implementation Committee and
Ensure political freedom and freedom of movement.
A bold change in approach is needed by United Nations and the international community if there is to be an end to the cycle of violence against the Rohingyas. The government of Myanmar needs to be told that international support and finance is conditional on a major change in policy towards the Rohingya. Propaganda and incitement of hatred and all violence, particularly state violence against Rohingyas must stop, discriminatory laws and policies must go, the recommendations of Kofi Annan's commission must be implemented immediately.
 
The world is anxiously waiting to see that UNSC is playing its role to bring end to a humanitarian catastrophe and build peace in the region.
 
Sincerely yours,
 
Professor Muhammad Yunus - 2006 Nobel Peace Laureate
Máiread Maguire - 1976 Nobel Peace Laureate
Betty Williams - 1976 Nobel Peace Laureate
Archbishop Desmond Tutu - 1984 Nobel Peace Laureate
Oscar Arias - 1987 Nobel Peace Laureate
Jody Williams - 1997 Nobel Peace Laureate
Shirin Ebadi- 2003 Nobel Peace Laureate
Leymah Gbowee - 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate
Tawakkol Karman - 2011 Nobel Peace Laureate
Malala Yousafzai - 2014 Nobel Peace Laureate
Sir Richard J. Roberts - 1993 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine
Elizabeth Blackburn - 2009 Nobel Laureate in Physiology or Medicine
Javed Akhtar - Poet and Lyricist 
Syed Hamid Albar - Former Malaysian Minister for Foreign Affairs
Shabana Azmi - Actor and Activist
Emma Bonino - Former Italian Foreign Minister
Bono - Musician and Activist
Sir Richard Branson - Business Leader and Philanthropist
Gro Harlem Brundtland - Former Prime Minister of Norway
Richard Curtis - Film Director, SDG Advocate
Mo Ibrahim - Entrepreneur and Philanthropist
Asma Jahangir - Former Chair Human Rights Commission of Pakistan
Kerry Kennedy - Human Rights Activist
Salman Khan
Educationist - Alaa Murabit
Voice of Libyan Women, SDG Advocate
Narayana Murthy - Business Leader
Kasit Piromya - Former Thai Foreign Minister
Surin Pitsuwan
Former Secretary-General of ASEAN
Paul Polman - Business Leader, SDG Advocate
Mary Robinson - Former President of Ireland
Jeffrey D. Sachs - Director of the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network
Forest Whitaker - Actor and SDG Advocate
Jochen Zeitz  - Business Leader and Philanthropist

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Another update from the band. Apparently Bono was meant to speak to hear this week but it looks like she's not responding to anyone. 

http://www.u2.com/news/title/this-we-never-imagined 

We first started campaigning for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi nearly two decades ago.

We did it as long-time Amnesty International supporters and, like so many others, because we were horrified by the brutality of the military and their repressions of basic freedoms.

U2's audience are known for their strong views and impatience for injustice, but this issue seemed off the charts in terms of fan involvement.  We did what we could from the stage to raise awareness, but so many of you jumped on this campaign and took it with you wherever you went… To your colleges, your homes, your friends, your governments.

When Aung San Suu Kyi was released, we punched the air.

When she came to Dublin to thank Ireland and Amnesty International, we Irish could not have been more proud.

When her party the NLD won a landslide in the elections and she stood her ground to become de-facto head of the country, an impossible journey seemed to be reaching its destination. We wanted to breathe a sigh of relief, but instead held our breath. She had built her reputation on her refusal to compromise her beliefs (as well as on the personal sacrifice that entailed), but forming a government requires a certain amount of pragmatism.  We feared the military's brutality would be quick to show itself again if she overstepped the mark, and while hopeful for progress, we wondered if we would find ourselves once again campaigning for her release.

But what has happened this year, and in particular these past months – this, we never imagined.

Who could have predicted that if more than 600,000 people were fleeing from a brutal army for fear of their lives, the woman who many of us believed would have the clearest and loudest voice on the crisis would go quiet. For these atrocities against the Rohingya people to be happening on her watch blows our minds and breaks our hearts.

On behalf of our audience who campaigned so hard for her, we reached out several times to speak to Aung San Suu Kyi directly about the crisis in her country and the inhumanity being directed at the Rohingya people. We expected to speak to her this week, but it appears this call will now not happen.

So we say to you now what we would have said to her: the violence and terror being visited on the Rohingya people are appalling atrocities and must stop. Aung San Suu Kyi's silence is starting to look a lot like assent. As Martin Luther King said: "The ultimate tragedy is not the oppression and cruelty by the bad people but the silence over that by the good people." The time has long passed for her to stand up and speak out.

We know that Aung San Suu Kyi has in front of her real complexities that the outside world cannot understand -- but nor should we have to. The complexity of the situation in Myanmar she inherited from her father did not sway her to compromise her ideals back in 1998, nor should it now.  At some point, a fragile balancing act becomes a Faustian pact.

We also believe we can't direct our anger solely in her direction. That plays right into the hands of those who are carrying out the violence. Min Aung Hlaing is not a widely recognised name outside Myanmar - it should be. This man is the Commander General in Chief of the Defence Services who answers to no-one when a security threat is declared.  While this in no way excuses her silence, Aung San Suu Kyi has no control, constitutional or otherwise, over his actions, and it is he who has authorised and overseen the terrorization of the Rohingya people under the guise of protecting Myanmar from terrorism. Condemning her and ignoring him is a mistake. If this horror of human rights abuses is to stop, and if the long-term conditions for resettlement of the Rohingya people are to ever occur, General Min Aung Hlaing and his military must be just as much the focus of international action and pressure as Aung San Suu Kyi and her civilian government. 

The band wanted to thank all of you who have taken action on behalf of Aung San Suu Kyi and Myanmar in the past.  We campaigned together for her release in good faith. If you want to campaign again for peace and democracy in Myanmar, and take action to support the Rohingyas, please support Amnesty International's action here.

Adam, Bono, Edge, Larry.

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It's good the band posted this statement and clarifies its position in regard to Aung San Suu Kyi and what happens to the Rohingyas in Myanmar.

http://www.u2.com/news/title/this-we-never-imagined/news/

A week ago they published an open letter to the UN Security council

http://www.u2.com/news/title/myanmar-open-letter-to-un/news/

 

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On 10/18/2017 at 4:43 AM, Frankaz said:

The fact is that she is turning a blind eye to the problem, rather than speaking out about it. That is not acceptable considering what she went through to get where she is.

I'm glad the Bono attempted to make contact, though it's unfortunate the call was cancelled. I'm mostly aligned with the band view, but really want more info. The speech she made saying human rights would be respected did sound like her signalling her position, but that she was on a short leash. Much to pay attention to. Handful of articles:

http://daily-sun.com/post/267835/Aung-San-Suu-Kyi-expresses-willingness-to-solve-Rohingya-crisis-in-Trudeau-meeting

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/11/02/suu-kyi-visits-myanmar-region-torn-rohingya-conflict/824362001/

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/13/aung-san-suu-kyi-unveils-relief-plans-for-rohingya-muslims-myanmar

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/oct/11/rohingya-refugees-myanmar-aung-san-suu-kyi-un-report

Here's an older one - the situation here tied to her election

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/27/suu-kyi-asylum-burma-australia-rohingya

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-22681192

https://www.yahoo.com/news/suu-kyi-visit-myanmar-refugees-thailand-234617888.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-18979410

Basically, she's always been speaking about it but guardedly in combination with a hope to bring rule of law (which I read as a something to shift to and away from military rule), which sounds like a political tight rope.  It's a conflict that long proceeded her and their status is problematic in part because of a law. That may give her particular difficulties if she's trying to bring rule of law - she'd have to get the law removed, and if you look at that last bbc article that sort of appears to be what she was trying to do democratically from the start. In which case, in any other democracy the pressure belongs on those that didn't back such change, but even then it's not clear rule of law exists in a way that would stop the military in a short amount of time. In other words that democratic government is probably the wrong lever to bring any sort of immediate end to the genocide. It's tragic. Should she speak more directly? I think she should, but that it will end her political career. Does that bring with it the downfall of democracy and hope for rule of law and thereby any real hope of reigning in and bringing rights to the Rohingya? I think no, but it may be her sense of it and might explain why the political speak around the subject and the seemingly horrid balancing of so many lives against her political career.

 

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