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Ticket Prices

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29 minutes ago, andybrock said:

Its amazing isn't it?

Unfortunately the band has exploited every revenue stream and that has been reflected fully on the fans.

From the crooks at TM with outrageous fees's,the third party re-sellers which the ticket agencies actively encourage (and own in some cases) to the shambolic presale with the "lottery" of a code to long term subscribers.

From a band who preach politics and human right issues it really is beyond a joke.

From a European perspective hopefully we will not be involved in the disgrace which is "Verified Fan"

 

 

 

Well said 

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I don't even think the listings give an accurate idea of how expensive the tour actually is.

Almost all of the lower level tickets are in the $330 price range - all of the seats lining the sides of the area from the main stage to the e-stage.  Then, all of the upper level sections above those lower level sections are also priced at $330 at least through row 12.  The upper level seats higher than row 12 are priced at $175.

Additionally, a larger percentage of the tickets in the first two price levels are being "scalped" by the band and Ticketmaster by designating them as "VIP packages".  These "packages" have a tremendous upcharge - the $175 tickets are sold for about $325 in the package, and the $330 tickets are sold for $650 in the package.  For this extra fee, fans are given some token gift like a framed photo or lanyard, and perhaps get "free" parking at the venue.  In no way does the monetary value of those perks come close to equaling the added premium being charged.  The tickets chosen to be categorized as "VIP" are often the best seats in that particular section. 

To me, this is sort of like deceptive advertising, because you see the Ticketmaster page and the list of prices and sections, and you think to yourself, "If I select the $330 price, I'll get the best seats in the building" - but it turns out that's not really true.

I just wish there was more transparency, and that one didn't have to figure all of these things out sorting through seating charts and presale pages and the like.  I remember before the Elevation tour began, which was the first tour where the band used tiered pricing rather than a flat rate for all seats, and fan club members were sent a printed letter listing what the prices were and what areas were available at the different price levels.  I feel like we were treated with more respect because we were given all of the information in advance and had the opportunity to better plan for purchasing and had a better opportunity to make an informed purchase.

I also don't mind the $330 charge so much as I mind what a large percentage of the venue is being sold at that price.  If you could tell me that I could spend $330 for a ticket and have a seat that was in the top 5% or even top 10% of all the seating, I'd say that while that was very expensive, you were getting a premium product for a premium price.  Spending $330 for a ticket better than 90% or 95% of everyone else's ticket, that's a reasonable deal in my view.  But the problem is, it appears that over 50% of the tickets are being sold at that price point, which means that the request for $330 a ticket isn't a premium fee for a premium seat, it's a premium fee for what's an ordinary seat in many cases.  I'd be willing to pay $330 for one night to have a ticket that was both close to the main stage and came with a great view of the screen.  I would not be willing to pay $330 for an upper level seat, that was ten or twelve rows up and far away from the main stage.  But, as far as Ticketmaster and the band are concerned, both of those seats are completely equal in value.  That's what I object to.  It would be as bad if they charged Red Zone prices for all regular GA tickets.

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1 hour ago, vertigojds said:

I don't even think the listings give an accurate idea of how expensive the tour actually is.

Almost all of the lower level tickets are in the $330 price range - all of the seats lining the sides of the area from the main stage to the e-stage.  Then, all of the upper level sections above those lower level sections are also priced at $330 at least through row 12.  The upper level seats higher than row 12 are priced at $175.

Additionally, a larger percentage of the tickets in the first two price levels are being "scalped" by the band and Ticketmaster by designating them as "VIP packages".  These "packages" have a tremendous upcharge - the $175 tickets are sold for about $325 in the package, and the $330 tickets are sold for $650 in the package.  For this extra fee, fans are given some token gift like a framed photo or lanyard, and perhaps get "free" parking at the venue.  In no way does the monetary value of those perks come close to equaling the added premium being charged.  The tickets chosen to be categorized as "VIP" are often the best seats in that particular section. 

To me, this is sort of like deceptive advertising, because you see the Ticketmaster page and the list of prices and sections, and you think to yourself, "If I select the $330 price, I'll get the best seats in the building" - but it turns out that's not really true.

I just wish there was more transparency, and that one didn't have to figure all of these things out sorting through seating charts and presale pages and the like.  I remember before the Elevation tour began, which was the first tour where the band used tiered pricing rather than a flat rate for all seats, and fan club members were sent a printed letter listing what the prices were and what areas were available at the different price levels.  I feel like we were treated with more respect because we were given all of the information in advance and had the opportunity to better plan for purchasing and had a better opportunity to make an informed purchase.

I also don't mind the $330 charge so much as I mind what a large percentage of the venue is being sold at that price.  If you could tell me that I could spend $330 for a ticket and have a seat that was in the top 5% or even top 10% of all the seating, I'd say that while that was very expensive, you were getting a premium product for a premium price.  Spending $330 for a ticket better than 90% or 95% of everyone else's ticket, that's a reasonable deal in my view.  But the problem is, it appears that over 50% of the tickets are being sold at that price point, which means that the request for $330 a ticket isn't a premium fee for a premium seat, it's a premium fee for what's an ordinary seat in many cases.  I'd be willing to pay $330 for one night to have a ticket that was both close to the main stage and came with a great view of the screen.  I would not be willing to pay $330 for an upper level seat, that was ten or twelve rows up and far away from the main stage.  But, as far as Ticketmaster and the band are concerned, both of those seats are completely equal in value.  That's what I object to.  It would be as bad if they charged Red Zone prices for all regular GA tickets.

Great post as usual.

I agree with the entirety of this post and I wanted to piggyback off your comment regarding planning.

I try to do GA as often as I can but sometimes I get seats with my mom or friends that can't/wont do GA. It would be nice to have some idea what I'm buying beforehand. Especially now that artists are offering so many different "packages". Additionally, how ridiculous is it that between all of the different options there's no continuity even when using the same platform, ie. Ticketmaster on desktop vs. mobile vs. iPad etc.

The best available is nonsense as well. Seat maps. Just show me the venue. Show me the seats. Put a dollar amount on it.

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they need to stop preaching the "music and concerts are bigger than money" bullshit.  it doesn't work when you siphon the fans for every last penny you can get from them...  because guess what, it is all about the $$$$.

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26 minutes ago, Synj said:

The best available is nonsense as well. Seat maps. Just show me the venue. Show me the seats. Put a dollar amount on it.

Even when pricing is given, it's not accurate - like check out this seating chart with prices from Atlanta, direct from the venue's official site - I've seen similar charts for some other venues as well:

 

18-05-28-U2-b824816339.png

 

I saw this chart and went "OK, the $330 is probably a little much for me, but hey, my mom only sees one show a tour so maybe for the night I go with her -- at least the $330 tickets will be close to one of the two stages and the screen".  Or, as a backup, I thought I'd be willing to spend $175 for a low row in the upper level.  However, when the tickets actually went onsale, it turns out that the "green" sections above the red sections, which are listed as being $175, are also $330 for the first 12 rows or so.  I might have been willing to spend $330 a ticket for sections 106, 107, 116, and 117.  I was not willing to spend $330 for row 11 of section 204.  And I wasn't willing to spend $175 for the last rows of section 204. 

Inaccurate charts like this make it seem that the pricing is more reasonable than it is.  And it really messes with you when you only have a moment to enter your selections in the Ticketmaster page.  According to this chart, there should be no tickets in the upper level at the $330 price, but in actuality, it seems a large quantity and possibly a majority of tickets in the upper level are also priced at that level.

I wish seat prices and locations were accurately disclosed beforehand.  I think at least half of my frustration is coming from the shock of these charts not being accurate.  I just don't think it's reasonable to say that row 1 of section 107 is worth the same as row 20 of section 204, but according to U2, they are.

I also thought about buying a pair of tickets for the Boston show to go with a friend - my friend is in a situation where there's not a lot of money right now, but was perfectly willing to sit in the $40 limited view seats and miss the screen.  When I put in a request for two tickets at that price on Ticketmaster, it actually found some and I got to the checkout page... where the pair of tickets for $80 turned into about $125 after fees.  That's just not right.  A $40 ticket actually costs over $60, because tickets aren't available at the box office for presales or the first day a show goes onsale, so you have to go through Ticketmaster and pay the fees.  It would be much more helpful if Ticketmaster just posted the final price when choosing tickets instead of adding them later when it's too late to change your selection.  My pair of $175 tickets for Nassau Coliseum, which should have been $350 total, actually came to $420.  $70 is a huge amount for an unavoidable hidden fee.  That means those tickets were actually $210 each, not $175.  I would have selected a lower price level had I know it would be that bad.  The consumer gets none of this information ahead of time, and has no choice but to suck it up and pay it, or stay home.

In a sense, this is larger than just a U2 problem.  It's a concert industry / Live Nation / Ticketmaster problem across the boards in that I don't believe consumers are being treated fairly.  It's the only industry where it seems perfectly legitimate to not disclose prices or to provide inaccurate prices, to amend hidden and unavoidable fees to every purchase, and to refuse to provide refunds or exchanges, even when the product being sold was not accurately advertised.  That can't be all on U2, but it would probably take all of the bands at U2's level getting together to affect any kind of change, along with all of the fans collectively staying home in protest - and neither of those things seems likely to happen.

 

Edited by vertigojds

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7 hours ago, vertigojds said:

Even when pricing is given, it's not accurate - like check out this seating chart with prices from Atlanta, direct from the venue's official site - I've seen similar charts for some other venues as well:

 

18-05-28-U2-b824816339.png

 

I saw this chart and went "OK, the $330 is probably a little much for me, but hey, my mom only sees one show a tour so maybe for the night I go with her -- at least the $330 tickets will be close to one of the two stages and the screen".  Or, as a backup, I thought I'd be willing to spend $175 for a low row in the upper level.  However, when the tickets actually went onsale, it turns out that the "green" sections above the red sections, which are listed as being $175, are also $330 for the first 12 rows or so.  I might have been willing to spend $330 a ticket for sections 106, 107, 116, and 117.  I was not willing to spend $330 for row 11 of section 204.  And I wasn't willing to spend $175 for the last rows of section 204. 

Inaccurate charts like this make it seem that the pricing is more reasonable than it is.  And it really messes with you when you only have a moment to enter your selections in the Ticketmaster page.  According to this chart, there should be no tickets in the upper level at the $330 price, but in actuality, it seems a large quantity and possibly a majority of tickets in the upper level are also priced at that level.

I wish seat prices and locations were accurately disclosed beforehand.  I think at least half of my frustration is coming from the shock of these charts not being accurate.  I just don't think it's reasonable to say that row 1 of section 107 is worth the same as row 20 of section 204, but according to U2, they are.

I also thought about buying a pair of tickets for the Boston show to go with a friend - my friend is in a situation where there's not a lot of money right now, but was perfectly willing to sit in the $40 limited view seats and miss the screen.  When I put in a request for two tickets at that price on Ticketmaster, it actually found some and I got to the checkout page... where the pair of tickets for $80 turned into about $125 after fees.  That's just not right.  A $40 ticket actually costs over $60, because tickets aren't available at the box office for presales or the first day a show goes onsale, so you have to go through Ticketmaster and pay the fees.  It would be much more helpful if Ticketmaster just posted the final price when choosing tickets instead of adding them later when it's too late to change your selection.  My pair of $175 tickets for Nassau Coliseum, which should have been $350 total, actually came to $420.  $70 is a huge amount for an unavoidable hidden fee.  That means those tickets were actually $210 each, not $175.  I would have selected a lower price level had I know it would be that bad.  The consumer gets none of this information ahead of time, and has no choice but to suck it up and pay it, or stay home.

In a sense, this is larger than just a U2 problem.  It's a concert industry / Live Nation / Ticketmaster problem across the boards in that I don't believe consumers are being treated fairly.  It's the only industry where it seems perfectly legitimate to not disclose prices or to provide inaccurate prices, to amend hidden and unavoidable fees to every purchase, and to refuse to provide refunds or exchanges, even when the product being sold was not accurately advertised.  That can't be all on U2, but it would probably take all of the bands at U2's level getting together to affect any kind of change, along with all of the fans collectively staying home in protest - and neither of those things seems likely to happen.

 

Man it's funny how similar our situations and thinking are. Exact same deal with me and my mom. I wanted some tickets close and mid court. $800 for 2 tickets is expensive, but I'd expect that my two criteria could be met for that much money. Nope, I was being offered VIP Party Package, right sections but Row R for $635/each! Uh, no thank you.

Same as you, I looked at other options and my mom and I both felt that for the quality of the seats, it was too much. We would and have paid good money for good seats. But I'm not paying ridiculous money for average/mediocre seats.

To the point about the seating chart, I'd consider paying for the party package for front row but only for front row. Not 20 rows back. There's nowhere near enough of a value add to justify paying those prices. I can find my own dinner thanks.

Despite all my concern, I was VERY lucky to get GAs the next day during the Citi presale and my mom is going to venture down there with me, even if it just means hanging out in the back of the crowd it will still be a good spot and she gets around well enough that I think she'll be okay.

Just crazy how stressful this whole process has become. I want to enjoy myself and not have to plan like I'm invading the beaches of Normandy. This shouldn't be this hard.

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Yeah man, if we weren't on opposite coasts, I'm sure we'd have a blast attending the show, casually griping about the prices and presale process along with more interesting topics of discussion, and then all grievances forgotten once the band launch into something great onstage :)


For the show with my mom, I settled on $175 lower levels to the side of the stage.  Based on the seating chart and my experience with similar seats during the 2015 tour, I think we'll have a fantastic view of the band on the main stage, a decent view of the screen (particularly the half closer to the main stage), and when they're on the e-stage they'll be a little far but oh well.  It seemed better to me to be low and close to the band for most of the show than to be really high up with an even view of everything but so far away.  Hopefully that'll work out.  I often sit in the same area for Billy Joel - he doesn't do the big production thing so it's an incredible seat for his show.

 

Edited by vertigojds
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Must admit that I haven't had the opportunity to read every detail in this thread, but I have noticed a few things that I wanted to comment on.

Although I agree that prices are exorbitant, as someone else stated this is an industry problem and not one specific to the band.  The answer is simple.  Don't buy.  It's a supply and demand thing, folks.  Truly, if the shows don't sell out, ticket prices will drop.  Live Nation is not going to let these shows happen with empty seats.  For the "package" seats in particular, if they don't sell at the $500-$600+ amounts they're priced at, these seats will reprice to lower amounts as the show dates approach.  Patience can be a virtue if you're willing to risk it.

Keep an eye on the resale market, too.  If demand doesn't match supply, prices there will drop.  Even below face value if that's all the market will bear.  Trust me on this.  Not in Boston and LA and NYC, where there is huge demand because of the populations in those areas.  But Oklahoma, St. Louis, Nashville (yes, even though it's a Saturday I'm guessing even my own market will see prices drop for the pricey seats within two weeks of the show)?  Yeah, I'm pretty sure tickets below "face value" will be available for the pricey areas on Stubhub and whatnot.  Watch and see.  We're almost six months out for these shows right now.  Why is Live Nation selling tickets so far in advance?  Because they want to see if we'll buy them.  If there's marketplace push back and unsold inventory, they'll have lots of time to adjust ticket prices downward if necessary.

Someone commented that they can't believe how much more expensive these seats are being priced as compared to last year's tour.  Again, supply and demand.  Those were stadium shows, these are in arenas.  Much lower supplies available, at least on a "per show" basis.

Also, someone else mentioned not wanting to stand for hours in the GA line and then stand for the show.  No need.  With the staging eating up pretty much the whole middle of the floor, there are absolutely no bad spots in GA as long as you're on the sides (and if you're down at the B stage, yeah you can't see the screens well but you get a few songs with the band very close to you, so take your pick).  No need to stand in line for hours and then wait inside for another two hours once the doors open.  Seriously, if you can snag GA for one of these shows you are golden.  Walk in just before showtime.  There are maybe 2,000 tickets for the floor at each show.  You're close to the action if you're on the floor.  Same set up as 2015.

Finally, the production costs on this tour, like 2015's, are huge.  Think back.  They played only a few cities in the states (less than 20, right?) for multiple nights in each city.  Looks like they may not be doing that this time around, as they're playing some smaller markets (as I mentioned above) and may well wind up doing single nights in those markets.  Hauling this set around sure ain't cheap, never mind the capital investment that went into it in the first place.  Covering those production costs with single nights in buildings is going to be tough.  Thus the high prices in an attempt to cover those costs.

Good luck to everyone for finding what they want.  It may take some patience, but in some markets the opportunities will present themselves.  Happy hunting!

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9 hours ago, cmooreNC said:

Must admit that I haven't had the opportunity to read every detail in this thread, but I have noticed a few things that I wanted to comment on.

Although I agree that prices are exorbitant, as someone else stated this is an industry problem and not one specific to the band.  The answer is simple.  Don't buy.  It's a supply and demand thing, folks.  Truly, if the shows don't sell out, ticket prices will drop.  Live Nation is not going to let these shows happen with empty seats.  For the "package" seats in particular, if they don't sell at the $500-$600+ amounts they're priced at, these seats will reprice to lower amounts as the show dates approach.  Patience can be a virtue if you're willing to risk it.

Keep an eye on the resale market, too.  If demand doesn't match supply, prices there will drop.  Even below face value if that's all the market will bear.  Trust me on this.  Not in Boston and LA and NYC, where there is huge demand because of the populations in those areas.  But Oklahoma, St. Louis, Nashville (yes, even though it's a Saturday I'm guessing even my own market will see prices drop for the pricey seats within two weeks of the show)?  Yeah, I'm pretty sure tickets below "face value" will be available for the pricey areas on Stubhub and whatnot.  Watch and see.  We're almost six months out for these shows right now.  Why is Live Nation selling tickets so far in advance?  Because they want to see if we'll buy them.  If there's marketplace push back and unsold inventory, they'll have lots of time to adjust ticket prices downward if necessary.

Someone commented that they can't believe how much more expensive these seats are being priced as compared to last year's tour.  Again, supply and demand.  Those were stadium shows, these are in arenas.  Much lower supplies available, at least on a "per show" basis.

Also, someone else mentioned not wanting to stand for hours in the GA line and then stand for the show.  No need.  With the staging eating up pretty much the whole middle of the floor, there are absolutely no bad spots in GA as long as you're on the sides (and if you're down at the B stage, yeah you can't see the screens well but you get a few songs with the band very close to you, so take your pick).  No need to stand in line for hours and then wait inside for another two hours once the doors open.  Seriously, if you can snag GA for one of these shows you are golden.  Walk in just before showtime.  There are maybe 2,000 tickets for the floor at each show.  You're close to the action if you're on the floor.  Same set up as 2015.

Finally, the production costs on this tour, like 2015's, are huge.  Think back.  They played only a few cities in the states (less than 20, right?) for multiple nights in each city.  Looks like they may not be doing that this time around, as they're playing some smaller markets (as I mentioned above) and may well wind up doing single nights in those markets.  Hauling this set around sure ain't cheap, never mind the capital investment that went into it in the first place.  Covering those production costs with single nights in buildings is going to be tough.  Thus the high prices in an attempt to cover those costs.

Good luck to everyone for finding what they want.  It may take some patience, but in some markets the opportunities will present themselves.  Happy hunting!

Well to me U2 don't need these huge stage settings.  They could just stripe the stage down as they did years ago. Go back to great music they made years ago. Go back to the format that made them. This would cut down some of the high ticket prices. I don't want to hear the excuses of the staging, the hauling the staging from city to city. That is no excuse. They didnt start their careers out that way. Just so sick of high prices, and the huge arse staging in which they dont need. 

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these prices are too much, i can afford to go but to get others to jump in at $300 tickets for upper area is asking a bit much. Thats crazy for the upper bowl

 

All I can find is $300 seats too now in NY

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26 minutes ago, Clear31 said:

these prices are too much, i can afford to go but to get others to jump in at $300 tickets for upper area is asking a bit much. Thats crazy for the upper bowl

 

All I can find is $300 seats too now in NY

Yup, lots of great seats available for $330.  What does that tell you?  I sure hope most of those seats remain unsold and the band and tour promoters realize that the loyal fans are willing to buy tickets, but they also place a value on buying groceries.

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14 minutes ago, afg said:

Yup, lots of great seats available for $330.  What does that tell you?  I sure hope most of those seats remain unsold and the band and tour promoters realize that the loyal fans are willing to buy tickets, but they also place a value on buying groceries.

It's insane, i'm fortunate that I can afford it but not everyone is in that boat. My same group that I went to Joshua Tree with was expecting to enjoy another night out which doesn't happen often due to children. So asking new parents to drop $300 isn't happening

U2, ticketmaster, promoters, etc should be ashamed with these prices. I've seen many shows at MSG for far less including U2

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3 minutes ago, Clear31 said:

It's insane, i'm fortunate that I can afford it but not everyone is in that boat. My same group that I went to Joshua Tree with was expecting to enjoy another night out which doesn't happen often due to children. So asking new parents to drop $300 isn't happening

U2, ticketmaster, promoters, etc should be ashamed with these prices. I've seen many shows at MSG for far less including U2

Understood.  It's one thing if someone only had to buy a single $330 ticket for themselves.  But these days U2 fans are buying multiple tickets for their family and friends.  So spending over $1,000 on a concert isn't affordable for many people, nor is it worth it, even to see a band like U2.

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Hello,

Does anyone knows the price range for Lisbon show? I'm not sure what is the difference range between tickets and packages.

Thank you

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