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How much would you pay for a concert meet and greet ticket? A lot of bands are doing this now. 

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I am so thankful U2 doesn't do this. I think my feelings toward them would change if they commercialized and profited off fans' desires to meet them. They have always talked about how they know that they owe their privileged lives to the fans who have been there for them year after year, and I just think it would feel icky. One of the things I love so much about these four men is that they sure don't have to, but they often stop their vehicles on the way in to soundcheck and come out and shake hands, sign things, and pose for pictures. And I have never in my life heard of a fan running into them anywhere and encountering any rudeness. I have been lucky and have met Edge twice, Larry once, and Adam once (kind of twice, as he went around the crowd and then came back to me a second time and posed for the picture that is my profile pic here), all outside gigs.  I've made eye contact with and waved to Bono and shouted "I love you!" to him, a few feet away, LOL.  So...I can't even think about paying to do a meet and greet.  

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I’d pay, not sure on cost but 1000 at the most. It would be a difficult argument with the wife but I would do it

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Id rather meet them because they want to meet fans. Not because Im paying them to. HUGE difference in experience. Ive met some bands. The experiences I truly enjoyed were the ones where they love their fans & want to meet them when they are able to. The ones you pay for, they are doing it for the money & its not always an enjoyable experience. I wont pay for meet & greets anymore. Im greatful for the enjoyable experiences I have had. Fan expectation is high & its disheartening & even heartbreaking to see, hear of, or have a negative experience. 

That said, I can count on one hand the bands I would make an exception for. They have withstood the test of time with me & earned my respect & admiration. They also don't charge their fans to meet them. If they ever did, say for charity, Id do it. In a heartbeat.

U2 famously dont charge for this. Frankly, I have way more respect for bands who don't charge. U2 have a great rapport with fans. They truly love & enjoy meeting fans. I was lucky enough to meet Edge. It was a fantastic experience. Ive experienced “drive bys” with the band. All memorable experiences. What made them great, was the band does it because they want to. 

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I have to add a P.S. here - there are bands who do paid Meet & Greets where all the money goes to charity (e.g., Metallica). THAT I approve of.

If U2 did that, I'm still not sure I would do it (you still have to have the expendable income to be able to supply a proper-sized donation, and I'm not sure I'm in the league to afford that), but I wouldn't hold it against them for doing so. All in all, I still think Red Zone tickets at shows are a better way to go.

 

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Posted (edited)
On 3/8/2018 at 1:03 PM, JCF said:

One of the things I love so much about these four men is that they sure don't have to, but they often stop their vehicles on the way in to soundcheck and come out and shake hands, sign things, and pose for pictures

A friend of mine saw Bono in the Orlando airport and texted me.  'He's just sitting here sipping coffee.  He's not disguised and he's in the middle of the terminal sitting as though he's flying coach.  Nobody has noticed him.'.  A few minutes later he texted me and told me that Bono was noticed and a mob of people went up to him.  My friend said that Bono did not shy away from any of it; quite the opposite.  He talked to everyone and signed things. My friend said someone eventually got Bono out of there and to wherever Bono goes when noticed in the Orlando airport.  I fly from Orlando to home quite often. My family lives in Florida.  I hate flying home because kids are crying now that Mickey is gone and their parents are quite crabby. Can you imagine looking away from that and seeing Bono casually sitting while sipping cafe?  I did not believe him until he laughed and showed me a picture he snapped because he knew I would doubt his story.  I still wonder if he somehow photoshopped it. He assures me he did not.  My friend had previously told me he thought Bono was a bit of an ass-#@$#.  He quickly changed his tune after seeing how Bono was humble and gracious to the fans.  He won't pay to see them live, but he did admit that maybe Bono is not such a jerk after all.  Ha.  Eat that, U2 foe! 

Edited by Manohlive
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I am of the opinion that I wish they would do this at least just once. Not everyone has the time to wait all day outside of a stadium for them to pass by. That is a chance meeting. Id pay some $$ for a guarantee that I can shake hands and take a pic.

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, nyru2 said:

I am of the opinion that I wish they would do this at least just once. Not everyone has the time to wait all day outside of a stadium for them to pass by. That is a chance meeting. Id pay some $$ for a guarantee that I can shake hands and take a pic.

The meet and greets of other bands which I've noticed are almost always well over a thousand dollars; including a ticket.  Most are $1,500-$1,800.  Those are the ones I remember.   I'm wondering how much would be too much for someone who is willing to pay for meet and greets.  I can easily understand your reasoning. How much would be too much?  I think it was the 360 tour where Bono and The Edge came out by the trucks at the loading dock of the venues, and it was usually about 2 in the afternoon.  I could be wrong.  I do remember reading posts where people discussed them being out by the trucks, at roughly the same time and it was one of their tours. My questions are curiosity and not meant to impose an opinion.  I think most people who waited and met them out back, or wherever, were standing in the GA line and afforded the time.  I love signed books.  I love signed U2 memorabilia when I see peoples' pictures on this site.  I love seeing peoples' pics with the band and one can see the excitement in the eyes of the fans.

 

Edited by Manohlive

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20 hours ago, Manohlive said:

A friend of mine saw Bono in the Orlando airport and texted me.  'He's just sitting here sipping coffee.  He's not disguised and he's in the middle of the terminal sitting as though he's flying coach.  Nobody has noticed him.'.  A few minutes later he texted me and told me that Bono was noticed and a mob of people went up to him.  My friend said that Bono did not shy away from any of it; quite the opposite.  He talked to everyone and signed things. My friend said someone eventually got Bono out of there and to wherever Bono goes when noticed in the Orlando airport.  I fly from Orlando to home quite often. My family lives in Florida.  I hate flying home because kids are crying now that Mickey is gone and their parents are quite crabby. Can you imagine looking away from that and seeing Bono casually sitting while sipping cafe?  I did not believe him until he laughed and showed me a picture he snapped because he knew I would doubt his story.  I still wonder if he somehow photoshopped it. He assures me he did not.  My friend had previously told me he thought Bono was a bit of an ass-#@$#.  He quickly changed his tune after seeing how Bono was humble and gracious to the fans.  He won't pay to see them live, but he did admit that maybe Bono is not such a jerk after all.  Ha.  Eat that, U2 foe! 

That is phenomenal!  And totally sounds like Bono! I just love it. Yes I can imagine how awesome that would be in the midst of the cranky Orlando airport atmosphere.  I believe the story b/c of how gracious he was with his mob of fans - he's always like that!  I remember one of his drive-by's outside the Boston Garden, he stopped his van and got out and addressed the crowd and actually *apologized* to us that he didn't have the time come around and shake everyone's hands that day.  I have also heard Larry apologize to the crowd that he didn't have time to come around to every single person. They are true gentlemen, they really are.  

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On ‎3‎/‎15‎/‎2018 at 12:05 AM, Manohlive said:

A friend of mine saw Bono in the Orlando airport and texted me.  'He's just sitting here sipping coffee.  He's not disguised and he's in the middle of the terminal sitting as though he's flying coach.  Nobody has noticed him.'.  A few minutes later he texted me and told me that Bono was noticed and a mob of people went up to him.  My friend said that Bono did not shy away from any of it; quite the opposite.  He talked to everyone and signed things. My friend said someone eventually got Bono out of there and to wherever Bono goes when noticed in the Orlando airport.  I fly from Orlando to home quite often. My family lives in Florida.  I hate flying home because kids are crying now that Mickey is gone and their parents are quite crabby. Can you imagine looking away from that and seeing Bono casually sitting while sipping cafe?  I did not believe him until he laughed and showed me a picture he snapped because he knew I would doubt his story.  I still wonder if he somehow photoshopped it. He assures me he did not.  My friend had previously told me he thought Bono was a bit of an ass-#@$#.  He quickly changed his tune after seeing how Bono was humble and gracious to the fans.  He won't pay to see them live, but he did admit that maybe Bono is not such a jerk after all.  Ha.  Eat that, U2 foe! 

happened to me in the Orlando airport also, but it wasn't Bono, it was Dan Rather.  Just sitting there reading. He took a phone call and it was a bit surreal to hear his voice live.

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I think there's something a little icky about those types of paid meet-and-greet experiences.  (With the exception of ones that are clearly charity fundraisers.)

I remember when I was a kid, I used to go to Star Trek conventions - not all the time, but I did probably two or three.  They were super fun, and it was great to meet fellow fans, as well as having the chance to hear the actors and writers and producers talk about their work.  Some of the actors would do autographs, and there was never a charge for it, you'd just have to wait on a line, and the lines were often long.  Some of the actors were very friendly and would take time to personalize autographs and take photos and chat; some of the actors would sign things more robot-like and just keep the line moving.  A couple years ago, the Star Trek franchise celebrated its 50th birthday and there was a big convention for that, so for the first time in ages, I went.  It was amazing how things changed.  Now, if you wanted an autograph, you had to pay a fee for that.  If you wanted a picture, there was an even higher fee for that.  As a kid, I was perfectly happy to wait an hour or longer in line if it meant a chance to briefly interact with my TV idols.  As an adult, I couldn't justify spending $50 or $100 or $250 to wait on line for that same experience.  Though I didn't do it, I noticed the fine print to the form you had to fill out to sign up for those autographs and photo ops.  They guaranteed that you'd have up to five seconds with the person.  Five seconds!  You get walked into the room on the left side, you take the picture or get the autographed signed in the center of the room, and then exit out the right side as the next person is walking in.  There's absolutely nothing personal about the experience.  And because the actors were now looking at this as "work" rather than a fun way to connect with fans, people I know who did spend the money felt that it was a very transactional experience.  The actors smiled and nodded and took the picture or signed the autograph, but they weren't connecting with anyone, didn't really seem to be listening or making eye contact.  How could they in that short amount of time?

So in addition to not wanting to see that kind of exchange monetized, I also don't think you'd really get the kind of experience that you'd hope for. 

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I"m really glad they don't do this.  It just seems dehumanizing to all involved.  Charity things are okay though.

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14 hours ago, vertigojds said:

I think there's something a little icky about those types of paid meet-and-greet experiences.  (With the exception of ones that are clearly charity fundraisers.)

I remember when I was a kid, I used to go to Star Trek conventions - not all the time, but I did probably two or three.  They were super fun, and it was great to meet fellow fans, as well as having the chance to hear the actors and writers and producers talk about their work.  Some of the actors would do autographs, and there was never a charge for it, you'd just have to wait on a line, and the lines were often long.  Some of the actors were very friendly and would take time to personalize autographs and take photos and chat; some of the actors would sign things more robot-like and just keep the line moving.  A couple years ago, the Star Trek franchise celebrated its 50th birthday and there was a big convention for that, so for the first time in ages, I went.  It was amazing how things changed.  Now, if you wanted an autograph, you had to pay a fee for that.  If you wanted a picture, there was an even higher fee for that.  As a kid, I was perfectly happy to wait an hour or longer in line if it meant a chance to briefly interact with my TV idols.  As an adult, I couldn't justify spending $50 or $100 or $250 to wait on line for that same experience.  Though I didn't do it, I noticed the fine print to the form you had to fill out to sign up for those autographs and photo ops.  They guaranteed that you'd have up to five seconds with the person.  Five seconds!  You get walked into the room on the left side, you take the picture or get the autographed signed in the center of the room, and then exit out the right side as the next person is walking in.  There's absolutely nothing personal about the experience.  And because the actors were now looking at this as "work" rather than a fun way to connect with fans, people I know who did spend the money felt that it was a very transactional experience.  The actors smiled and nodded and took the picture or signed the autograph, but they weren't connecting with anyone, didn't really seem to be listening or making eye contact.  How could they in that short amount of time?

So in addition to not wanting to see that kind of exchange monetized, I also don't think you'd really get the kind of experience that you'd hope for. 

I agree. I have a friend who has loved Heart since the very early 80s. She paid for a meet and greet with them a few years ago and it was heartbreaking for her. As you said, ushered her in one door, 5 seconds with Ann and Nancy Wilson, picture taken, but with their camera (she couldn’t even get them to take a picture with her camera or phone) and picture mailed to her, and out another door. It definitely changed her opinion of them and their music. 

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8 minutes ago, mich40 said:

I agree. I have a friend who has loved Heart since the very early 80s. She paid for a meet and greet with them a few years ago and it was heartbreaking for her. As you said, ushered her in one door, 5 seconds with Ann and Nancy Wilson, picture taken, but with their camera (she couldn’t even get them to take a picture with her camera or phone) and picture mailed to her, and out another door. It definitely changed her opinion of them and their music. 

Oh, that is really disappointing! Did your friend get the impression that the Wilson sisters themselves wanted it this way or the band's management (or possibly both)? If the sisters approved of this short shrift treatment, then, yes, this was just a naked money-grab, and she would be fully justified for thinking less of them for it.

I've also heard that some people come away from such experiences with mixed opinions - i.e., happy that they did it, sad because it turned out to be less special than they thought it would. Sometimes a peek behind the curtain reveals that the wizard is not the wizard (or at least less magical than previously thought)...

Fortunately, I have been able to meet bands because they have simply chosen to stay after a show specifically to hang out and mingle with their fans. Obviously, bands can become too big to do this - e.g., if U2 did this, they would have to forgo sleeping and eating and stay multiple days in each town just to begin to satisfy the demand. I'd love to meet them someday, but, if it never happened, I've already met them countless times in their albums and their concerts (live and recorded). B)

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1 hour ago, dmway said:

Oh, that is really disappointing! Did your friend get the impression that the Wilson sisters themselves wanted it this way or the band's management (or possibly both)? If the sisters approved of this short shrift treatment, then, yes, this was just a naked money-grab, and she would be fully justified for thinking less of them for it.

I've also heard that some people come away from such experiences with mixed opinions - i.e., happy that they did it, sad because it turned out to be less special than they thought it would. Sometimes a peek behind the curtain reveals that the wizard is not the wizard (or at least less magical than previously thought)...

Fortunately, I have been able to meet bands because they have simply chosen to stay after a show specifically to hang out and mingle with their fans. Obviously, bands can become too big to do this - e.g., if U2 did this, they would have to forgo sleeping and eating and stay multiple days in each town just to begin to satisfy the demand. I'd love to meet them someday, but, if it never happened, I've already met them countless times in their albums and their concerts (live and recorded). B)

If I remember correctly, she wasn’t allowed to even talk to them. I’ll have to see if I can find her post about it. 

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1 hour ago, mich40 said:

If I remember correctly, she wasn’t allowed to even talk to them. I’ll have to see if I can find her post about it. 

I was a huge Heart fan.  To be up front and see Ann Wilson belt out those notes was a truly phonemonal experience.  I won't go see them any longer.  The sound is awful.  They played Led Zep songs for half the show the last one I attended.  I saw them way, way back when it was the original line up and all tours since.  They are awful now.  They will not play many of the 80s hits because they hate that part of their careers.  They put out the music, got very wealthy and enjoyed immense success.  If you sold yourselves out then deal with it.  I don't care if some bastard director poofed your hair in the 80s and was sexist.  Ya should've smacked him then and not deny many fans what they most want to hear now. I feel bad for people who pay to go see them now.  They are not Heart. Seeing Ann Wilson sing Baracuda when it was at the top of the charts was incredible.  

How can one meet and greet a fellow human being in five seconds? 

 

Edited by Manohlive

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1 hour ago, mich40 said:

If I remember correctly, she wasn’t allowed to even talk to them. I’ll have to see if I can find her post about it. 

This is common for the paid meet & greets. It's rare to talk to them. IMHO It's a money grab...

That said, I've done it once. I only ever paid to meet 1 band, The Fray. I was lucky. They were the exception. I was curious about the experience & thought they would be an excellent choice to see how it is without having a traumatic experience. I was right. I actually had a nice yet short conversation, hugs, photos. They were awesome. The rest were by chance or radio contests/opportunities. Nearly all were enjoyable. 1 not but they weren't a band I follow really & I didn't care. 

I've heard of many many others where it's as Mich described. I personally would never pay again unless it was for charity. I think The Fray were awesome but it's not something I'd pay for again.

Honestly I think the only band I really want to meet is U2. As for the rest....I enjoy a lot of music but am now of the opinion that it's best to just enjoy the music and keep your distance. Finding out one of your favorite bands or artists is a jerk isn't something I care to experience again. 

But hey, to each their own.

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The only paid meet & greet that we have done was for Stonesour, it was not expensive & they were all very cool guys especially Corey Taylor.

Would I pay to meet U2? I suspect that if they did start offering it as part of VIP packages that the cost would be so prohibitive that I would probably not do it.

I've been very lucky to have met Bono & The Edge, Bono was very rushed & a bit chaotic outside The Clarence a couple of days after a show at Croke Park on the Vertigo tour, he looked like he was still drunk from the night before & I had to help him into his car but he did say thanks & I got a handshake so I was stoked.

I met The Edge at JFK airport a few years ago, we were on our way back to London but via Dublin so were flying Aer Lingus.

We were in the business class lounge waiting for our flight & I'd gone to the restroom, as I was washing my hands a guy walked up to the sink next to the one I was using, he said hello & we exchanged a few words & ended up walking out at the same time, I kept thinking to myself that I knew him but I couldn't think from where.

When I finally realised who it was I laughed & told him that I'd finally figured out who he was & that I was a big fan, we chatted for a while longer & I got his autograph, he was really down to earth, no security, he was travelling with what I assume was his P.A. 

He ended up sitting a couple of rows behind us when we boarded & was escorted off the plane when we landed in Dublin.

He was virtually anonymous, unless you were looking for him, you could have been sitting next to him & would probably not have realised who it was. 

 

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A few years ago Arnold Schwarzenegger was over here giving a talk about business. After the seminar, a few had paid about  $10,000 each to have dinner with him. Apparently he wasn't there very long (didn't even finish his meal iirc) before one of his people ushered him away for something else. The people who coughed up 10k for it weren't impressed.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/3/2018 at 8:42 AM, J.Robb said:

Would I pay to meet U2? I suspect that if they did start offering it as part of VIP packages that the cost would be so prohibitive that I would probably not do it.

I don't think a band with the equivalent stature to U2 have offered one of these packages yet - if Paul McCartney, the Rolling Stones, or Bruce Springsteen had offered one, we might have an idea for price, but to the best of my knowledge, they haven't done it.  But other top selling artists from today like Justin Bieber and Taylor Swift, who are among the top selling live draws today, charge over $1000 per ticket for this privilege (and often in ticket packages that must be purchased in pairs).

You have to figure that if individual celebrities can get $250-500 for a photo op at a Comic-Con type convention, and if younger bands can get $1000, and if U2 themselves charge $650 a ticket for their top "party package" (which does not include a meet and greet), that anything that did involving the band could easily cost well over $1000.  If they had a package that involved meeting the band, I wouldn't be surprised to see it offered for $2500.  Afterall, it's currently $1300 for a non-meet and greet VIP package for two.

Edited by vertigojds

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I paid 2x to meet Imagine Dragons for my son. Both times tickets were $500 each. I would imagine U2 would be triple that at least. I would pay it though. You only live once. 

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Rush always did Meet and Greets before shows. They were free. Drawn from entries on their website.

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Counting Crows had a ticket perk that I gave serious consideration to paying for.  For $800, you could sit on the stage just to the side of the band and watch the show as it happened.  That's a little outside my budget, but the idea that they'd only sell a handful of those tickets and that you could have the experience of basically standing right next to them as they performed seemed like a pretty cool perk.  I think there was a meet and greet before the performance included as well.  Ultimately, it was just too much for my budget when I was able to buy seats within the first ten rows for about $80 each, but it did seem like a pretty neat idea.  I think the people who did elect to purchase this perk were seated right next to the band's monitor mixing station immediately to the side of the stage, so it's not as if they had to worry about being on parade for the audience.

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Posted (edited)
On 4/2/2018 at 4:31 PM, Shannon387 said:

This is common for the paid meet & greets. It's rare to talk to them. IMHO It's a money grab...

I've seen where a few bands are very gracious to their fans with paid meet and greets.  Rush was one.  Alex Lifeson and Geddy Lee were very personable and actually engaged in conversations.  Neil Peart did not because he thought it was weird.  Fans shook hands and spoke with them for a while and many even hugged them.  I had some negative things to say about meet and greets and what I've seen.  I wanted to say something positive.  Also-I realize my above comments about the status of Heart were off topic.  Pardon me.  I'm still trying and aware of the need to stay on topic in threads.

Edited by Manohlive

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Posted (edited)
On 4/7/2018 at 7:03 PM, vertigojds said:

Counting Crows had a ticket perk that I gave serious consideration to paying for.  For $800, you could sit on the stage just to the side of the band and watch the show as it happened.  That's a little outside my budget, but the idea that they'd only sell a handful of those tickets and that you could have the experience of basically standing right next to them as they performed seemed like a pretty cool perk.  I think there was a meet and greet before the performance included as well.  Ultimately, it was just too much for my budget when I was able to buy seats within the first ten rows for about $80 each, but it did seem like a pretty neat idea.  I think the people who did elect to purchase this perk were seated right next to the band's monitor mixing station immediately to the side of the stage, so it's not as if they had to worry about being on parade for the audience.

We have a huge music festival in Milwaukee called Summerfest.  It's the forgotten great music festival.  It goes for 11-12 days.  It's incredible.  Buddies of mine did the spotlights and such.  One got me backstage passes for quite a few of the smaller shows (Midnight Oil, Los Lobos, Flogging Molly, The Head and the Heart three times now, O.A.R.)  I find being backstage, from a theatrical point of view, fascinating.  As far as being around the bands-I find it very uncomfortable.  Standing to the side of the stage is the last place I'd choose from which to see a show.  The sound is terrible.  You can't really see the show as a whole.  The best part for me was free beer as it is Milwaukee.  I always went out and stood in the crowd.  It's a much more pleasant concert experience.  I did get to talk to a couple of my favorite songwriters about writing.  That was cool.  If it was just an exchange of pleasantries-I never found it very fulfilling.  
The lead singer of O.A.R. always sneaks behind stage and checks out the crowd shorty before the show.  They have a thing with Summerfest.  It was really cool to watch him do that because he looked like a little kid at Christmas when he'd see the crowd.  He'd go the whole way across the stage, hiding from veiw, and get the biggest grin on his face as he did.  That was cool to see.  Save that-being backstage is more about staying out of the way than anything else; at least for me.  I hate seeing shows from the side of the stage.   If need be, I'd rather stand way in back because the sound is much better.  I must admit it's pretty cool to walk around with a backstage pass on my shirt.  That I kinda got off on and I feel guilty as I'm not better; just fortunate.

Edited by Manohlive

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