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  2. padawanbeck84

    Have to Count - the new and improved one :P

    44, 898 - Educated counting after a day of staff training.
  3. Today
  4. illumination70

    What Good Thing Happened To You Today (Continued)

    I made some cookies using a different recipe which is the kind they use at Double-tree hotels.
  5. pain_18_

    u2 song of the day

    Cedars of Lebanon
  6. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    197 CULTURE You should add this Rwandan documentary to your watchlist 10 December 2018 10:43AM UTC | By: ONE SIGN THE PLEDGE Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS EmailAdd your name Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Written by ONE Campus Zaza Rising is a short documentary film narrated by Christine, an entrepreneur, teacher and mother who runs an all-female bakery in Zaza, Rwanda. In the film, Christine speaks about the role gender plays in her community. It’s often assumed that girls aren’t capable of work, and Christine shares how her parents used to cry because they never bore a son. To challenge the stigma around gender, Christine worked hard to sell produce and earn an income that could support her through college to get a degree in economics. After graduating she was still confronted by the ways that stigma and poverty affect the women in her community. So she decided to further challenge these myths about women and work by hiring ten HIV-positive single mothers from her community to run a bakery. Together, the women bake bread in a safe-space cultivated by Christine that encourages the women to openly share with each other and also enables them to make economic achievements as a unit. She emphasizes that when you work together, you have a higher power. Despite Christine’s efforts to be a role model and to offer her employees opportunities for growth, issues like the health of her employees threaten the success of her business. To date, the bakery has lost three of its employees to AIDS and paid for the funeral costs because the women’s families had rejected them due to their health status. Moments like these are still too common in many places around the world, which is why ONE’s work towards ending extreme poverty includes treating preventable diseases through actions such as ensuring that world leaders maintain their funding commitments to the Global Fund. So what does Christine need to ensure the success of her business and the future of the women who run it? Her solution is education and we can’t agree more. Lack of access to quality education, especially among girls, is preventing millions of people from escaping the cycle of extreme poverty. Christine’s bakery moves beyond selling bread — now, its goal is to raise enough funds for its seven employees to go through an intensive business education program. Interested? Learn more about Christine, the bakery and her work here! Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS This World AIDS Day, we are turning our outrage into action and putting our leaders on notice: AIDS isn’t done. And neither are we. We’re committed to joining the global fight against AIDS and we’ll do what it takes to end the epidemic for good.
  7. spongebob

    REDZONE TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE

    Thanks for that, good to hear you got a decent resolution to your problem, I think customer service in America means a lot more, they sound like they go out of their way to help it seems and are willing to look into complaints unbiasedly. Customer service at Manchester arena seems to consist of one woman who thinks she is some sort of shield , blocking any complaints from going further, I'm not great on the phone and would have probably lost the plot if I spoke to her but my wife did eventually get through and she repeated the same rubbish intoxicated blah blah . She had obviously never looked into the complaint other than maybe looking at some journal that security must write up for refusing people entry. God forbid checking into it with other security or even cctv and seeing she was wrong. I feel it's a total stitch up she wont let it go further and wont give us the emails of anyone senior to her. I have even asked her for the head of security email for SMG Europe (the owners of the arena) It's a big cover up to either to protect a power crazed security woman, or to protect their security being made to look bad, Not entirely sure why but customer service has failed too so as you say that's two instances where they have not provided decent service. I wouldn't mind but I'm not even expecting a refund or anything, a simple apology..... and maybe a promise that they will look into retraining certain staff so this doesn't happen to others.........................and my tickets that i paid for sent to me ( i collect them) Although I know now I will never see these 😢
  8. CorkVegan

    u2 song of the day

  9. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Today is the day! 🚛🚑 A special humanitarian aid truck will leave Kilkenny today bound for vulnerable children and families in the Chernobyl affected regions of Belarus lead by volunteer extraordinaire, Jim Kavanagh of the Chernobyl Kilkenny Outreach Group. The aid delivery has been collected and co-ordinated by our Kilkenny Outreach Group, with support from our Cork Outreach Group. They will be accompanied by our Dental Team, pioneered by the 2017 National Volunteers of the Year Mary and George Sugrue from Tralee chernobyl children Int outreach as well as Roscommon Rose 2018 - Eimear Reynolds...who is returning to volunteer less than 2 months after initial volunteering with CCI and Rose of Tralee International Festival! The team will travel through nine European countries before arriving at its final destination in Belarus.. Safe journey to this incredible volunteer team and we look forward to seeing the impact of your incredible contributions once again! Thank you for everything!
  10. ardy_beld

    U2 cartoon

    A new U2 cartoon by Ardy Beld (PLEASE DO NOT ADD PERSONAL INFORMATION SUCH AS EMAIL OR PHONE NUMBERS-Mod Edit). For more band cartoons visit: http://bandcartoons.com/
  11. CorkVegan

    Favourite tour of the last 4 years?

    I been thinking about this and for me it has to be I+E in 2015. That was such a freewheeling tour with an ever changing set list. Sure there was a solid framework of songs that were constant but otherwise they could play anything. Then the surprise of the songs they chose... "Two Hearts Beat As One," "October," "In God's Country," "The Crystal Ballroom," and so on. Add to this the surprise guests who would come onstage... Bruce, Gaga, Jimmy Fallon, The Roots, Panti Bliss, Imelda May. You didn't know what the night would bring. But having said all that the E+I show in Newark 2018 really stands out for me and is up there with the original JT 1987 show as best I've seen U2. But we're talking about entire tours here so I'll stick with I+E for the reasons stated above.
  12. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    And off they go! You can follow them on their journey on this link https://cargodefenders.server93.com:443/…/v3/single_gmap.ht…
  13. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    'More than one million children continue to live in contaminated zones'. As we approach the 33rd Anniversary of Chernobyl and the 3rd 'Naciones Unidas Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day' on 26 April, we must remember those who continue to live in Chernobyl's deadly shadow and pay the highest price. #UNChernobylDay #IWillNotForgetYou
  14. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    EDUCATION Millions of Girls in Pakistan Aren’t Attending School In a new report, Human Rights Watch says the country lacks facilities to educate them. Why Global Citizens Should Care Education is a basic human right, but 130 million girls around the world currently can’t attend school. Human Rights Watch is urging the Pakistani government to help young girls receive an education in a new report. You can join us in taking action here. The Pakistani government isn’t providing children living in poverty with the facilities they need to learn, according to a new Human Rights Watch (HRW) report published Monday. Millions of girls are especially at risk, and HRW is calling on the government to step up for their futures, the Guardian reports. Take Action: Urge the G20 to Prioritize Girls’ Education and Help Them to Face the Future According to the report, titled Shall I Feed my Daughter or Educate Her?, more than one-third of Pakistani girls are not attending primary school, compared to 21% of boys. Only 13% of girls are still in school by the 9th grade. As of 2018, 22.5 million children in the country are not in school, according to Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan’s party manifesto. But in Balochistan, Pakistan’s largest province, for example, the gender disparity is stark— 81% of girls did not finish primary school in 2014, compared to 52% of boys, HRW reported. In 2013, UNICEF found literacy rates are 20% higher for boys than girls. 63 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy “Many of the girls we interviewed are desperate to study, but instead are growing up without the education that would help them have options for their future,” HRW Women’s Rights Director Liesl Gerntholtz told the Guardian. In Pakistan, young girls miss school partly because of the Sunni Islamic militant group the Taliban. The group claims educating women goes against Islam. In 2012, Nobel Peace Prize winner and activist Malala Yousafzai was shot by the Taliban after advocating for girls' education using a pen name, bringing global attention to the group’s violent threat on the nation’s young women. But according to the report, Pakistan’s school system is primarily responsible for the country’s education barriers. The government hasn’t invested enough in schools, especially ones for girls, HRW says. Unaffordable school fees, corporal punishment, low-quality public and private schools, corruption, and lenient regulation also contribute to the country’s education crisis. “The government recognizes that education reform is desperately needed and promises to make this a priority, especially for girls — a positive step,” Gerntholtz told the Guardian. Read More: Malala Relaxes From the Stress of Freshman Year by Building a Girls’ School in Pakistan For many young girls in Pakistan, receiving an education is their only hope for avoiding child marriage. It is estimated that 21% of girls in Pakistan are married before the age of 18, according to the organization Girls Not Brides. Child brides who stop attending school are more likely to experience an early pregnancy, malnourishment, domestic violence, and pregnancy complications. While the Pakistani government has acknowledged its poor education system, the HRW says it’s not enough. The country doesn’t make an effort to enforce its law that requires all children between the ages of five and 16 receive an education, the organization argues. As a result, unregulated private schools open, leaving families living in poverty to send their children to the cheapest option, which isn’t always of the highest quality. “We hope that our findings will help the government to diagnose the problems and identify solutions that will give every Pakistani girl a bright future,” Gerntholtz said. With 130 million girls around the world missing school because they live in poverty, lack resources, or are surrounded by violence and conflict, every effort counts. Supporting girls’ education strengthens economies, stabilizes communities, and protects the planet. What’s there to lose? TOPICSEducationWomen & GirlsPakistanGirls EduationTaliban COMMENTS
  15. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    👏🏾👏🏾 #WednesdayWisdom
  16. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    4.9k GIRLS AND WOMEN Now is the time to stand in solidarity with women everywhere 5 March 2019 9:00PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER ADD YOUR NAME Take action for women everywhere EmailSign Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email 108 years. That’s how long ago the first International Women’s Day took place. On March 19, 1911, over a million people worldwide rallied for equal rights. They demanded that women have the right to work, receive vocational training, hold public office, and vote. A lot has changed in 108 years, but we’ve still got a long way to go. Across the globe, women are still legally prevented from having the same economic opportunities as men. In some places, women are barred from having a bank account, or can’t own the land that they farm. 1,000 young women are still infected with HIV every single day, and millions of girls are still out of school. These are some of the realities that make it harder for women to escape global poverty. If we don’t speed things up, it will take 108 years more to achieve gender equality. That means inequality could likely outlive every single person who reads this. Every girl born this year may face inequality throughout her whole life. This is unacceptable. This year cannot be a halfway point. If we want equality, we need to step up now and demand real progress for women everywhere. Luckily, no one is fighting this fight alone. We contacted 45 activists from across the African continent who are leading the charge fighting for gender equality. We asked them to share their vision for gender equality and what world leaders need to do to achieve it. Despite their different focuses and various fields of work, they all shared a common sentiment: we need to create a world where everyone has the same opportunities. Their responses came together in a powerful open letter. They are urging world leaders to make real progress towards ending inequality. But, this letter isn’t just about the activists who wrote it and the leaders who are acting on it – it’s about you. You, reading this right now, have the opportunity to stand with them. You have the chance to join a global movement and stand in solidarity, with the women who contributed to this letter, and with every woman. None of us are equal until all of us are equal. No matter where you live or what gender you are, you have a voice in this fight. Now is the time for you to use it and make sure we leave no woman behind. Sign this open letter to stand with women and girls everywhere: ADD YOUR NAME Dear World Leaders, We are the women at the frontlines of the fight against gender inequality and global poverty. Every day we see the determination and dignity of girls and women facing down the toughest challenges. We see real advances and the power of people to achieve change. We won’t surrender this fight, but we need you to play your part. You promised to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls by 2030, but at the current rate of progress, this will take 108 years. This is unacceptable. We need genuine progress, not grand promises. We want implementation and accountability at every level – from this year’s G7 Summit to the Global Fund Replenishment; from our African Union leaders to our community leaders. We will be looking for your actions not your words; for funding to follow promises; and policy to turn into practice. It’s both the right and the smart thing to do for everyone. To accelerate progress men must demand change with us so that we rise united not divided. And women must have a seat at the decision-making table – because you can’t change what you don’t see. We’re not looking for your sympathy, we’re demanding your action. Because none of us are equal until all of us are equal. Yours,
  17. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    160 HEALTH There’s a health care revolution in the DRC 4 March 2019 10:25AM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Vaccines don’t just stop us from getting sick, they keep us healthy too, which means we can take advantage of all the opportunities that life has to offer. For many of us, getting vaccinations is pretty easy – we just arrange an appointment at our local health centre. For others, it’s a lot harder. Victor is a health worker in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) capital city. Delivering healthcare in communities affected by extreme poverty is hard enough, but without a working fridge to store and transport vaccines, it is even harder for Victor to vaccinate children who need it. Health worker Victor, DRC. “We were only doing two or three vaccination sessions per month. We had to take the cooler back and forth to pick up the vaccines – a distance of four kilometres between here and the central office. The only mode of transport, the motorbike, cost CF2000 (US$ 1.25) for each journey. That cost us a lot.” Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC. Keeping cool Vaccines need to be kept at stable, low temperatures. If not, they stop working. So, cold-chain equipment such as fridges and cool boxes are essential to keep vaccines chilled. This hasn’t been an easy feat to achieve in the DRC – an equatorial country with a tropical climate. Until now, health centres have used petrol-fuelled fridges to keep vaccines cool, but they are unreliable, often breakdown and fuel is hard to get and transport. What makes transportation even harder, is that the DRC is a big country – the size of Western Europe, much of which is covered by dense forest without good roads. “The distances here are too large to supply some areas with vaccines,” said Didier Maundé, Head of Logistics for the DRC’s Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI). “Sometimes fuel was nowhere to be found either, or was too expensive. The cold-chain was at risk, and it was having a negative impact on vaccination.” Despite some recent progress, the DRC still has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Every year nearly two million children miss out on a full course of vaccines, contributing to almost one in ten Congolese children not surviving to see their fifth birthday. Now the good bit… In October 2018, the Ministry of Health, working closely with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners, launched a plan to increase immunisation by 15% by 2020. If successful, an additional 220,000 children could be immunised. Crucial to the success of the Ministry’s plan is improved cold-chain equipment. With more reliable equipment and better methods of transportation to cover the country’s huge distances, children in the DRC will be able to reap the benefits of life-saving vaccinations. Almost 5,000 new solar-powered fridges have been delivered to the DRC and more are on the way! Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year. Victor, who received his solar fridge last year, said “This has reduced the cost for us and increased the number of [vaccination] sessions. I think we are at ten sessions per month now. We are very happy to have this.” Supersizing Meanwhile, another quiet revolution is also taking place that will improve healthcare in DRC: the creation of Central Africa’s largest vaccine storage hub. The hub (funded by Gavi) recently opened in Kinkole, just outside central Kinshasa. It can safely store more than 200 million vaccine doses and other medical supplies before they are distributed to health centres. The state of the art facility is also equipped with all kinds of transportation, including 150 canoes and boats powered by outboard motors to help deliver vaccines around the country. For a nation that currently uses aeroplanes to deliver 80% of its vaccines to the provinces, the use of boats is expected to deliver massive long-term savings. Excitingly, two more major regional hubs are planned. “The impact is visible,” said Didier Maundé. “More and more vaccines are available in the field. The cold chain is now reliable, and long distances are less of a problem.” A big thank you to Gavi for providing the story. Gavi is a global Vaccine Alliance that brings together public and private organisations with a shared goal — to make vaccines more available, accessible and affordable to children who need them the most. Incredibly, Gavi has so far supported some of the world’s poorest countries to immunise 700 million children, averting 10 million future deaths that would be lost to vaccine-preventable diseases.
  18. paoladegliesposti

    u2 song of the day

  19. Manohlive

    REDZONE TERRIBLE EXPERIENCE

    To be honest, if it still bugged me, I'd pursue it. The lady who will not give you her superior's number may be bullying as well. I once got two free tickets to see Coldplay because it rained and almost washed away Soldier Field in Chicago. (bad) I got confused and could not find will call. Someone either turned around the signs or they got turned in the storm. (or I was confused) TM and LN said no. (Eight hours I called and called) The next day, I found the name of the head of customer relations at SF and she gave me two tickets for any show I wanted to see the next season. "David,. I'd be happy to comp you...", were her exact words. All I did was leave a message. She called and gave me the comps. Everyone told me no yet she said yes. Coldplay returned and she put us right up front. . It never hurts to try if it is still bothering you. Plus, you can at least address the fool who harassed you and ask that the venue make sure it doesn't happen to anyone else. They are much more responsive if I call, and they hear my voice, than they would be in email. I never expect anything but often get comp'd (or something) if I had a bad experience at a show's venue. (I usually have great experiences) Different countries but people in box offices/up higher at venues are, by and large, very decent people where I live. I'd find out who is the head of customer relations, get his or her number and call. Usually I get voicemail which is a great way of introducing what happened and how it affected me. People in those positions are often happy to help. They generally have the ability to assist and offer compensation, where initial contacts do not, screen calls and say no. I remember reading your post about this situation when it originally happened. Perhaps calling and at least talking to someone might grant peace to what should have been a wonderful and stress free evening. You did pay for it. The venue has responsibility to at least listen to what you have to say. give you a reasonable response, and offer some type of resolution. (I hope I'm not coming off as preachy or telling you what to do). If it bothered me as it seems to bother you-I'd call and call until I got the correct person. Oh-use the fact that the person in the email would not give you her superior's contact info. That falls on the venue too. "I would have addressed this sooner but I didn't now how...it's really been bothering me...." You're not lying plus the venue now has two instances where they have not provided you decent service. I wouldn't point that out but the person in charge will be thinking it when you speak on the phone. (I'm going by my experiences and people I know who manage box offices or work at venues) You paid a lot of money for those tickets. It's not your fault that lady wouldn't give you the name of whom you should next contact. It's obviously bothering you. I'd gently keep pushing for resolution if I felt what you've expressed. (this got really long-please pardon me) It would bother me too. I hope you find peace and resolution so the good part of the show far exceeds the dummy who caused the mess in the first place. I was confusing bad customer service and people who buy red zone thinking they should be royalty. That's why I got a bit harsh but was wrong. Good luck!
  20. Manohlive

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Going to see The Church on Easter Weekend? 😀
  21. Manohlive

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Nice. I remember the first time I heard Under The Milky Way. It's a definitive 1980's musical memory. Dance the night away, Mich.
  22. dmway

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Have fun! I know you have been looking forward to it!
  23. mich40

    What concert are you seeing next?

    Going to see The Church this weekend. They are performing the entire Starfish album, which happens to be one of my top 10 desert island albums.
  24. dmway

    What concert are you seeing next?

    ...and the first of my two Nick Mason shows is tomorrow at the Beacon Theater on the glorious Upper West Side of Manhattan! 😎 I am spending the day in NYC - so, I’ll be able to see the “Play It Loud - The Instruments of Rock and Roll” exhibit at The Metropolitan Museum of Art beforehand. (I’ll get pictures, of course - esp. if there are any contributions by U2.) I wonder if Nick and his band might pop in themselves. Not impossible, I guess. Show report later.
  25. OB

    2019 Subscription - Subscribers Gift

    I am fine waiting for them to create a great product (CD/Print). With that said, they could have release all the tracks as "download only" by now. I would think by this time all the audio production would be finalized. Anyway, I am just glad they are giving a solid gift for members at this time and not some of the old weak gifts of years past.
  26. Yesterday
  27. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    GIRLS & WOMEN Malaysia's Book Investigation Prompts Outrage Among Muslim Women's Rights Activists This seems to follow the ongoing effort to regulate women's attires. By Beh Lih Yi KUALA LUMPUR, April 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — Malaysia's religious authorities on Wednesday said they were investigating a book about Muslim women who choose not to wear a hijab, prompting a backlash among women's rights groups. The probe is the latest in a series of incidents that have led to women's rights activists accusing authorities of acting like "fashion police" by trying to control women's attire in the Muslim-majority nation. It came after a government minister called for a probe into the launch of the book Unveiling Choice last weekend, which featured Muslim women who discussed why they had stopped wearing a headscarf. Take Action: Share Your Message About Why World Leaders Must Act to Create A World Where #SheIsEqual Actúa: Call Now 5 puntos United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe "It's just a sharing of experience, nothing more than that," said Maryam Lee, author of the book, which she hopes will show that the hijab can be "both liberating and oppressive." "[Some] say this is something to promote 'de-hijabbing' — that's not true. It's a book about experience," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, referring to the removing of the headscarf. Lee said officers from the Islamic affairs department in the central state of Selangor had obtained copies of the book from the publisher's office on Tuesday. A spokeswoman from the department when contacted said it was "looking into the matter" but declined to give further details. Its director Haris Kasim did not respond to requests for comment. Religious Affairs Minister Mujahid Yusof Rawa said in a statement that he viewed the matter seriously and called for a "fair" investigation. It was unclear what offenses or laws the book was being investigated over. Muslim women who do not wear the headscarf are a common sight in Malaysia, and include notable figures like the wife and daughter of Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. Read More: Yet Another Malaysian Teen Married Off to Man Nearly Three Times Her Age Other prominent personalities such as former trade minister Rafidah Aziz and ex-central bank governor Zeti Akhtar Aziz also do not wear the hijab. More than 60% of Malaysia's 32 million population are Muslims, but it is also home to a large number of ethnic and religious minorities who openly practice their religion. "It's really disappointing," said Sumitra Visvanathan, executive director of the nonprofit Women's Aid Organisation. "I would tell the government to butt out of our private lives and how we choose to dress is our business. There is no law in Malaysia that stipulates a woman should or should not wear the headscarf." Last year, Mujahid said that the government was planning to introduce a dress code for Muslim women in the workplace, sparking a large public outcry. (Reporting by Beh Lih Yi @behlihyi. Editing by Michael Taylor. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, property rights, and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org
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