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  1. Today
  2. Feeling depressed over the "Birthday blues".
  3. Thanks for the advice!! Will check it out right away!
  4. If you did not know, until now, that you did ordered the double cd, are you aware that you can download 14 of the tracks now? The download link is under our main account info-not the store. FYI Pardon me if you already have them.
  5. I forgot about this joke. 😆. Props to the Mods for every day since the presales as well. I reckon it takes a fair amount of patience to do what they do. 😑
  6. This dude keeps staring at me...but i must admit , I like his style. Wonder if he can sing.
  7. Yesterday
  8. I am late posting, but wanted to add my thanks as well.
  9. 45, 179 - Sunday counting. It'll be a bumper F1 highlights programme as they had to run both qualifying and the race today due to the typhoon.
  10. Here's What Pregnancy Looks Like Around Sub-Saharan Africa Authors: Jackie Marchildon and Olivia Kestin Paolo Patruno Health Nov. 20, 2018 45 Why Global Citizens Should Care Every day, hundreds of women and girls die from preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. But there’s a movement of countries, companies, and charities attempting to fight for their lives. Take action here to protect vulnerable women and children around the world. An estimated 130 million babies are born every year around the world. That’s about 356,000 per day. Sadly, with all that new life comes a vast number of maternal deaths. About 830 women die from pregnancy- or childbirth-related complications every day — 99% of these deaths occur in developing countries, with more than half of them in sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). Paolo Patruno, 46, is a social documentary photographer based in Bologna, Italy. In 2011, he started a long-term project called “Birth is a Dream,” a photo series that seeks to shed light on maternal health in sub-Saharan Africa. Take Action: The UK Pledged to Help Save 35 Million Lives! Let’s Celebrate — and Ask the Government to Keep It Up Patruno was working as a project manager for an NGO in Malawi when he met Rachel MacLeod, a senior clinical midwife who worked in the labor ward of the Bwaila Hospital, in Lilongwe, Malawi’s capital city. MacLeod introduced him to the issue of maternal health in Africa, and his series came to life. Patruno didn’t just want to snap a few photos — he became invested in raising awareness on what he considers to be an underreported topic. “The main issues that are behind this matter are the same [no matter where you are in Africa],” Patruno told Global Citizen. A midwife listens to a fetal heartbeat using a pinard horn while visiting a pregnant woman in Chankhungu health center. Chankhungu, Malawi Image: Paolo Patruno He said that circumstances — like rural versus city living — can play large roles in maternal care, but that when it came to maternal health issues, they remained the same across the African countries he visited. “What I realized is that this is really a social issue, rather than a health issue,” he said. The maternal mortality rate in developing countries was 239 per 100,000 live births in 2015, compared to just 12 in developed countries, according to the WHO’s most recent data. Africa has the world’s highest rate of adolescent pregnancy. Many girls in small villages drop out of school early, having had sexual relationships with young boys, and getting pregnant before the age of 18. Bakumba, Cameroon Image: Paolo Patruno Poverty, distance to health centres, lack of education, lack of services, and cultural practices all play roles in these statistics. “I think that the main root of this problem is not just the lack of doctors, the lack of hospitals or health centres,” Patruno said. “It’s mainly something that is coming from a cultural approach, tradition.” He gave the example of women being unable to leave their homes for a long period time. In rural areas, women need to be away from their homes for a few weeks if they choose to give birth in a health centre — it takes a number of days for them to reach health centres in the first place, and then they need to deliver and recover before heading back. A mother holds her new baby after a gruelling childbirth and several hours of labor. Bukavu, DRC Image: Paolo Patruno For many women, this is just not possible as they are the primary caregivers at home and many also tend to their family’s agricultural needs. He also explained that some men don’t want their partners to deliver with male health workers, which poses a big problem as many doctors are men. Many women therefore avoid visiting health centres to deliver their babies, which increases the chances of maternal or infant mortality. Women giving birth in rural villages are most at risk. Since women have to take care of home duties and other children, they sometimes decide to have home deliveries, rather than going to hospitals or health centers. Chibabel, Mozambique Image: Paolo Patruno In other cases, women do visit health centres but they have negative experiences, and so they choose not to return for their next pregnancies. Given that women in developing countries have more children on average, their lifetime risk of death due to pregnancy is much higher, and so a decision not to return to a health facility for future pregnancies could have dire results. In Uganda, for example, Patruno said he followed a traditional birth attendant (TBA) and one of her patients was a midwife who opted to have a home birth instead of giving birth in the hospital where she worked. Pregnant women have to work, taking care of house and family duties almost until the day of delivery — providing water and carrying heavy cans. Kampala, Uganda Image: Paolo Patruno It’s difficult to improve maternal health issues, according to Patruno. He said many organizations try to tackle this from the wrong angle, relying too much on a medical or health-based approach when it’s much more complex than that. The Global Financing Facility (GFF) essentially aims to avoid doing just that. By working with governments and on-the-ground initiatives, the GFF helps prioritize interventions across the full health spectrum, but by addressing areas like nutrition, education, social protection, and gender, rather than just looking for the most obvious answer. “The education approach is mainly the best way, because if you can educate a girl, maybe you are able to educate a woman after — and even a family,” the photographer said. “It’s much more easier to say, ‘OK, we provided an ambulance, we provided ... an incubator, we built a new unit, we provided beds — rather than to approach the problem … To educate … To go to the local community …” Midwife Mestwote takes the blood blood pressure of a pregnant woman through an outreach program in a rural area. Jinka, Ethiopia Image: Paolo Patruno Patruno has seen firsthand the limits of financial or technical support. In one health centre in Ethiopia, the workers couldn’t use the modern ambulances they had been provided because they had broken down and the staff didn’t have the means to fix them. In another, health workers relied on bulb lamps instead of incubators because they were broken, too. “I wanted to use my photography as a tool,” he said. “I wanted to focus on this project to let people know … this is a problem. Women are dying.” Patruno referenced maternal mortality rates — more than 300,000 women die every year in Africa due to childbirth and pregnancy-related issues. “That is much more than a war, that is much more than [terrorism] … but people don’t know and so that’s why I was very interested to focus on this matter,” he said. “The problem is not solved.” Sign Now: No Woman Should Suffer From Diseases We Know How to Treat or Prevent TAKE ACTION
  11. By Joe McCarthy JULY 13, 2017 56 ENVIRONMENT Jimmy Carter Now Powers Half of His Hometown With Solar Panels Carter’s known for his commitment to human rights. Youtube/AP; Flickr/ricketyus Jimmy Carter was the first US president to put solar panels on the White House in 1979. Back then, it was a symbolic gesture, a hope that this strange alternative energy would one day pan out. “It can be just a small part of one of the greatest and most exciting adventures ever undertaken by the American people,” he said at the time. Nearly four decades later, the promise of solar energy has arrived and Carter is taking full advantage of its potential. Take Action: Tell Congress not to Slash Foreign Aid Earlier this year, he commissioned SolAmerica to create a solar farm on 10 acres of his land in his hometown of Plains, Georgia. Today, that farm is supplying half of his town’s electricity needs. It’s expected to supply the 1.3 megawatts of electricity annually, the equivalent of burning 3,600 tons of coal. And that’s not all. Carter went ahead and had 324 solar panels installed on the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library, which will provide about 7% of the library’s energy. Read More: Tesla’s Solar Roofs Are Officially For Sale – And They Look So Good “Distributed, clean energy generation is critical to meeting growing energy needs around the world while fighting the effects of climate change,” Carter said in a press release. “I am encouraged by the tremendous progress that solar and other clean energy solutions have made in recent years and expect those trends to continue." Carter’s projects won’t power the world, but they show that individuals can invest in small ways to generate energy. Collectively, these individual projects have the potential to transform energy grids around the world. The New Yorker recently reported on how decentralized solar grids in Sub-Saharan Africa are bringing electricity to millions of people and allowing the region to “leap-frog” fossil fuels, similar to how developing countries are using mobile phones to “leap-frog” telecommunications infrastructure. Solar installations throughout the US, however, have recently stalled in the face of market saturation, financial difficulties among top distributors, and a powerful lobbying effort by utilities companies that are determined to slow down the pace of renewable energy because its less profitable than fossil fuels, according to The New York Times. Read More: Renewable Energy Could Add 4M Jobs to US Economy: Report Many renewable advocates also worry that subsidies for renewable energy will be phased out, leading to higher prices. Despite these setbacks, renewable energy remains a significant force in the US, employing people 12 times faster than the rest of the economy. President Carter is known for his dedication to human rights throughout the world. His embrace of solar power is ultimately part of that same commitment. TOPICSEnvironmentclimate changeCurrent eventsRenewablesRenewable energyJimmy CarterSolar powerSolar energySolar panelSolar farmPresident Jimmy Carter COMMENTS
  12. Amazing performance by Olek. Thank you for joining the fight to #endAIDS with (RED) in Lyon, France. Conservatoire national supérieur musique et danse de Lyon Jeune Ballet du CNSMD de Lyon
  13. By Joe McCarthy JULY 13, 2017 56 ENVIRONMENT Jimmy Carter Now Powers Half of His Hometown With Solar Panels Carter’s known for his commitment to human rights. Youtube/AP; Flickr/ricketyus Jimmy Carter was the first US president to put solar panels on the White House in 1979. Back then, it was a symbolic gesture, a hope that this strange alternative energy would one day pan out. “It can be just a small part of one of the greatest and most exciting adventures ever undertaken by the American people,” he said at the time. Nearly four decades later, the promise of solar energy has arrived and Carter is taking full advantage of its potential. Take Action: Tell Congress not to Slash Foreign Aid Earlier this year, he commissioned SolAmerica to create a solar farm on 10 acres of his land in his hometown of Plains, Georgia. Today, that farm is supplying half of his town’s electricity needs. It’s expected to supply the 1.3 megawatts of electricity annually, the equivalent of burning 3,600 tons of coal. And that’s not all. Carter went ahead and had 324 solar panels installed on the Jimmy Carter Presidential Library, which will provide about 7% of the library’s energy. Read More: Tesla’s Solar Roofs Are Officially For Sale – And They Look So Good “Distributed, clean energy generation is critical to meeting growing energy needs around the world while fighting the effects of climate change,” Carter said in a press release. “I am encouraged by the tremendous progress that solar and other clean energy solutions have made in recent years and expect those trends to continue." Carter’s projects won’t power the world, but they show that individuals can invest in small ways to generate energy. Collectively, these individual projects have the potential to transform energy grids around the world. The New Yorker recently reported on how decentralized solar grids in Sub-Saharan Africa are bringing electricity to millions of people and allowing the region to “leap-frog” fossil fuels, similar to how developing countries are using mobile phones to “leap-frog” telecommunications infrastructure. Solar installations throughout the US, however, have recently stalled in the face of market saturation, financial difficulties among top distributors, and a powerful lobbying effort by utilities companies that are determined to slow down the pace of renewable energy because its less profitable than fossil fuels, according to The New York Times. Read More: Renewable Energy Could Add 4M Jobs to US Economy: Report Many renewable advocates also worry that subsidies for renewable energy will be phased out, leading to higher prices. Despite these setbacks, renewable energy remains a significant force in the US, employing people 12 times faster than the rest of the economy. President Carter is known for his dedication to human rights throughout the world. His embrace of solar power is ultimately part of that same commitment. TOPICSEnvironmentclimate changeCurrent eventsRenewablesRenewable energyJimmy CarterSolar powerSolar energySolar panelSolar farmPresident Jimmy Carter COMMENTS
  14. Happy Sunday! We hope you're all getting out and about in the lovely weather today. It's definitely a day for the park! Here's a throw back to this summer's Rest and Recuperation trip where over a hundred children from Belarus visited Ireland for a health-boosting trip. These mini breaks can literally cut the radiation in these children's bodies by half and add years to their young lives. The children also get to enjoy the fantastic amenities that we have for kids here in Ireland. Only a few more weeks to go until the next Rest and Recuperation trip. We're counting down the days!
  15. Lyon, France turned @RED to #endAIDS. #paintRED Musée des Confluences Métropole de Lyon Ville de Lyon
  16. Today marks 13 years since Oprah Winfrey & Bono kicked off (RED)'s fight to #endAIDS, helping impact over 140 MILLION lives!
  17. 0 GIRLS AND WOMEN Activists write to the past in powerful new docu-series 10 October 2019 9:20PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email If you could say anything to yourself as a kid, what would you say? That’s the question behind ONE’s new documentary series, Yours in Power. Three activists working to create gender equality have written to themselves as young girls, offering advice and insights for the road ahead. Their inspiring words prove the power of a strong voice and an unwavering determination to create an equal world. Any activist knows that changing the world can involve a lot of letters. Whether it be addressed to politicians, world leaders, or fellow advocates, there’s no doubt that words have immense power in sparking action. Now, these three powerful women are using that power to reflect on their own journeys as advocates and show that anyone, anywhere, can change the world. The first of three documentaries will be released on October 29, followed by the next two in November and December. Before you hear their powerful stories, get to know a bit about the three activists we’re highlighting: Melene Rossouw Melene Rossow grew up on the Cape Flats of South Africa. Inspired by her mother’s fight for gender equality, she became determined to fight for the rights of women and girls through elevating their voices. In 2009, she became an Attorney in the High Court of South Africa. She is also the founder of the Women Lead Movement, where she runs seminars to teach women about human rights, leadership, campaigning, and democratic power. Her goal is to empower women to be leaders for change in their communities and hold governments accountable to protect and secure women’s rights. She sees the tough road to equality ahead. Luckily, she is up for the challenge: “Restructuring our world so that women may flourish is going to be a tough job. But you will fight because you believe that gender equality and justice must be achieved.” Look out for Melene’s Yours in Power film on October 29. Dr. Joannie Marlene Bewa As a young girl, Dr. Joannie Bewa experienced the fear and challenge of medical issues first-hand when she almost died from an asthma attack. Now, inspired by the doctor who treated her as a child, she views that experience as the beginning of her journey to becoming an award-winning physician. From her home in the Benin Republic, she is advocating for every woman to have access to health services. She founded the Young Beninese Leaders Association (YBLA), which has provided over 10,000 youth with HIV/AIDS awareness. YBLA has also trained more than 3,000 girls and women on sexual and reproductive health, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Ultimately, she hopes to create “a world where no woman will die while giving birth. A world where every woman has access to health services and quality education.” Look out for Joannie’s Yours in Power film on November 12. Wadi Ben-Hirki Wadi Ben-Hirki, like many young girls, grew up being told that she should be “seen and not heard.” The gender discrimination she faced as a kid became the source of her strength, inspiring her to take action and advocate for equality. She founded the Wadi Ben-Hirki Foundation at only 17 years old. Her foundation educates marginalized communities, including women and youths, on how to be advocates for the issues that affect them. On top of her work with the foundation, she collaborates with other youth advocates as a ONE Champion. Her fight against poverty, illiteracy, and child marriage aims to create a society of equal opportunities for all. She hopes that her activism and her story will enable others to achieve their goals and live freely. Look out for Wadi’s Yours in Power film on December 3. If you could say anything to your past self, what would it be? On October 11, International Day of the Girl, join us on Facebook and Twitter to leave a message for your younger self. And be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel so that you catch each documentary as soon as it drops!
  18. 0 MEMBERS IN ACTION Here’s how ONE activists helped the Global Fund break records 11 October 2019 4:27PM UTC | By: ONE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has secured US$14 billion in pledges for its life-saving work over the next three years — the largest replenishment of a multilateral health organization in history. We’ve been campaigning in support of the Global Fund over the past year to make sure world leaders were committed to stepping up the fight ahead of the 2019 replenishment in Lyon. And thanks to these efforts, every market where we campaigned reached — or exceeded — their target pledges. Like every ONE campaign, we rely on our staff, volunteers and members, and every win we achieve is the result of a team effort among our activists. Here’s a look at our global efforts over the past year to secure $14 billion to tackle three of the world’s deadliest diseases. France In replenishment host country France, our activists worked hard right up to the moment the $14 billion was announced. Starting over the summer, our Youth Ambassadors raised awareness at five summer festivals, urging festival-goers to take our quiz to raise awareness for the three diseases, sign the petition, and write postcards to French President Emmanuel Macron. In the lead up to the replenishment in Lyon, French Youth Ambassadors attended three events in different French cities, where other NGOs also made their voices heard with a clear objective: gather as many petition signatures as possible. French Youth Ambassadors and ONE Champions from Nigeria and Mali took their voices to the streets of Lyon ahead of the replenishment conference. They visited (RED) street murals, and met (RED) ambassador and activist Connie Mudenda, who shared her inspiring fight against AIDS and her story of how she raised her healthy daughter, with needed treatments, thanks to the Global Fund. Our activists gathered dozens people to form a giant human red ribbon, and they ran a booth with our superhero quiz outside in the Palais des Congrès, the location of the replenishment. The day before the replenishment, they attended a dinner where big companies were encouraged to increase their pledges for the Global Fund. And they led discussions with our co-founder Bono, philanthropist Bill Gates and President Macron to ask them to be ambitious in the fight against these three deadly diseases. Youth Ambassadors made their voices heard until the last minute in Lyon, handing in our global petition to the French Minister of Health Agnès Buzyn. And they were there to celebrate when our goal of raising $14 billion was realized. — Anais Martinon, France Campaigns Coordinator Canada We kicked off campaigning earlier this year with postcards to Minister Maryam Monsef. Our members stepped up and sent THOUSANDS of postcards — followed with hundreds of emails to the minister, over 1,000 Canada Day emails to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, hundreds of tweets and dozens of letters to their local newspaper. We worked closely with Loyce Maturu from the Global Fund Advocates Network, whose op-ed in The Globe and Mail turned up the heat. ONE members in London, Abuja and Dakar all visited Canadian embassies to encourage Canada to step up the fight. The campaign reached a high point at Pride Montréal, where we worked with HIV/AIDS organizations from Québec to share the message that any investment less than CA$925 million was not enough. ONE volunteers from Montréal took advantage of Prime Minister Trudeau attending the parade to share thousands of rainbow-coloured stickers with a clear message that Canada can help end AIDS by 2030. Finally, after eight months of constant pressure, and less than a week after our activities in Montréal, Minister Monsef announced CA$930 million during an event in Toronto. In response, our members thanked Prime Minister Trudeau and Minister Monsef, and we continued the celebration at the pride parade in Ottawa. — Paul Galipeau, Canada Campaigns Manager Ireland Ireland delivered an early pledge, before our global campaign officially kicked off, and ONE Youth Ambassadors were quick to congratulate the government on Twitter. After hearing the good news, we reached out to our members and Youth Ambassadors to gather messages for a thank you card that was hand delivered to the government representative and Minister for Youth Affairs Katherine Zappone at the Youth Ambassador launch in Dublin. — Jasmine Wakeel, U.K. Campaigns Coordinator United Kingdom Following dedicated months of campaigning, we were delighted to receive a bold pledge from the U.K. government that will help save up to 2 million lives. We had so many exciting campaign activities from kick off until the pledge announcement, including handing our petition to No.10 Downing Street, a health heros event in the House of Commons, lobby days in Parliament and community action. We even had support from a famous face: actor and advocate Michael Sheen helped us get even more crucial MP supporters on board with our Global Fund campaigning. — Jasmine Wakeel, U.K. Campaigns Coordinator Germany In the run-up to the G7 Summit in France, where Germany’s Global Fund pledge was officially announced, we started a petition to convince German politicians to engage in the fight against AIDS. To back up this action, our supporters wrote letters to German Minister for Development Gerd Müller. Our amazing Youth Ambassadors even went to his constituency to deliver the letter personally and to talk to locals about the action. Our Youth Ambassador Janice met Mr. Müller to hand over the petition and discuss the importance of the Global Fund. After hearing the good news about Germany’s commitment to the Global Fund, we are sending thank you messages to Prime Minister Angela Merkel, who made the announcement in Biarritz. — ONE’s team in Germany United States U.S. volunteers spent the past year campaigning to secure a strong pledge to meet the United States’ historic one-third commitment to the Global Fund. Volunteers started by gathering 4,800 postcards to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo last fall to try to influence the Trump administration’s budget request. Then in February, volunteers traveled to Capitol Hill for more than 200 meetings with Congress, urging them to step up the fight. U.S. volunteers spent the rest of 2019 rallying their communities — everywhere from small gatherings in coffee shops and churches, to huge music festivals like Bonnaroo and Lollapalooza. They got creative with (RED), taking action with a Truff hot sauce challenge twist, got mindful and limber with some Yoga activism at Wanderlust festivals, and helped paint the world (RED) through street art to draw attention to the fight against AIDS. U.S. volunteers even became human billboards in support of the Global Fund at the Congressional Softball and Baseball games in Washington, DC. After tens of thousands of advocacy actions — including handwritten letters, tweets, emails, media published in local papers, and local engagements with congressional members — we saw over half of the U.S. Congress (285 representatives and senators) go on the record publicly in support of the Global Fund, sending a strong signal to the rest of the world ahead of the replenishment conference in Lyon. — Charlie Harris, Associate Director, Membership Mobilization Italy Despite a government crisis in Italy, our Italian Youth Ambassadors and members continued the fight to secure a pledge for the Global Fund. We mass-tweeted at Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte while he was on his way to the G7 Summit with a simple message: Italy’s leadership in the fight against three of the deadliest diseases is key. And those efforts were crucial to securing a pledge from Italy. Prime Minister Conte received hundreds of emails and tweets, Youth Ambassadors delivered 400+ handwritten postcards to the international development minister, and there were over 100 media mentions of the Youth Ambassadors’ awareness-raising activities in their communities. — Caterina Scuderi, Italy Campaigns Coordinator EU We also worked hard to make sure the European Union was committed to the Global Fund. Félicitas, a medical student and German Youth Ambassador in Belgium, wrote a letter to European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, with other YAs in Europe also co-signing the letter. Félicitas attended the Friends of Global Fund Meeting and pushed European Commissioner for Development Neven Mimica to make an early commitment to the fund. Youth Ambassadors then took to Twitter to ask Juncker to take Felicita’s letter into account, and our members urged Juncker to act against AIDS. To put some final pressure during the summer, our YAs sent handwritten postcards to Mr. Juncker and EU Council President Donald Tusk about the importance of investing €580 million to the Global Fund. During the G7 Summit, they also dressed up as superheroes and sent several tweets and messages urging them to make concrete commitments. — Guadalupe de la Casas, Media Manager A Global Success The new funding will help to save 16 million lives and move forward the fight to end the AIDS, TB and malaria epidemics by 2030. This record-breaking replenishment saw the biggest ever investment from private sector donors and renewed pledges from the U.S., U.K., Canada, Germany, the EU and Italy — which all increased their commitment by over 15% — and from France, which increased its contribution by more than 20%.
  19. This year, we asked world leaders to take action to end AIDS. And they did.
  20. GIRLS AND WOMEN 6 quotes that will inspire your fight for gender equality 11 October 2019 2:46PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Every child has the potential to achieve astounding things. But for girls everywhere, that potential is cut short by discrimination and inequality. This International Day of the Girl, we’re looking to activists who have faced these hurdles and overcome them. We asked gender equality activists what they would say to their younger selves. Their words of advice and encouragement are sure to empower anyone in the fight for equality. Here are six powerful quotes to inspire the next generation of activists: “Find your identity, your true self and live your mission … Your power is your radical self. Find it.” — Aya Chebbi Aya Chebbi is a pan-African feminist and world-renowned blogger. She’s passionate about empowering youth to fight for change, which she does as an African Union Youth Envoy. She’s also the founder of the Youth Programme of Holistic Empowerment Mentoring (Y-PHEM), Afrika Youth Movement (AYM), and Afresist, a youth leadership program. Earlier this year, she took her skills to the Women7 Summit in Paris to advocate for women and girls on the global stage. She shared her thoughts on the only way we can fight injustice. “If you believe in your idea of change and are willing to work hard, sooner or later that dream will be a reality.” — Naomi Tulay Solanke Naomi Tulay Solanke is the Founder and Executive Director of Community Health Initiative, which provides reusable and affordable health products for women and girls. She also launched PADS4GIRLS, which trains women to produce sanitary pads. Both of these programs aim to empower girls to take control of their reproductive and menstrual health. Naomi explains the importance of menstrual health in this inspiring TEDTalk: “An undying spirit is the primary source of help because it is within you.” — Fridah Githuku Fridah Githuku is the Executive Director of GROOTS Kenya, a national grassroots movement, which gives women visibility and decision-making power in their communities. GROOTS has invested in nearly 3,500 women-led groups across Kenya, sparking local, human-led change. Fridah is passionate about the role of land rights in achieving gender equality, which she advocates for as a partner with Equal Measures 2030. Fridah’s work led to her being named one of our Women of the Year in 2018! “Being a young African girl is not a hurdle to overcome, but a force to be reckoned with.” — Dr. Joannie Marlene Bewa Dr. Joannie Marlene Bewa is an accomplished HIV/AIDS advocate and founder of the Young Beninese Leaders Association. This youth and women-led program has trained more than 3,000 girls and women on sexual and reproductive health, leadership, and entrepreneurship. She is also a “Goalkeeper for the Goals” for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Dr. Joannie Marlene Bewa was also one of our 2018 Women of the Year for her outstanding work on women’s health. “You will often feel as if you don’t fit, but it has never been your destiny to fit in. You were born to stand out.” — Melene Rossouw Melene Rossouw is an Attorney in the High Court of South Africa. She is also the founder of the Women Lead Movement, where she runs seminars to teach women about human rights, leadership, campaigning, and democratic power. She wants to empower women as leaders for change in their communities and hold governments accountable to protect and secure women’s rights. Back in March, Melene met with comedian and best-selling novelist Phoebe Robinson to talk about her work. You can find the entire Q&A on our Instagram. “Life doesn’t always give us what we deserve, but rather, what we demand. And so you must continue to push harder than any other person in the room.” — Wadi Ben-Hirki At 17 years old, Wadi Ben-Hirki founded the Wadi Ben-Hirki Foundation, which seeks to impact marginalised communities through humanitarianism and activism, particularly in Northern Nigeria. She also serves on the African Leadership Institute Youth Advisory Board and was the special guest from Africa at the 2018 Y20 Summit. On top of all that, she’s a ONE Champion! Earlier this year, she and other ONE Champions met with Vice President Professor Yemi Osinbajo to demand a better future for Nigeria’s youths. The empowering messages don’t stop here. We want to hear your messages to your younger selves. Visit our Facebook and Twitter on IDG to leave your message and inspire future generations! Looking for more inspiration? Check out the trailer for our new docu-series, Yours in Power, premiering on October 29!
  21. Last week
  22. Cheers Ric, I wanted to get to the cavern but clashed with kids stuff. Looked good with the Irish fan club over! Went to U243 at church and that was great. Will try for April at the Cavern. I’ve had a listen a few times on mixlr and enjoyed it. In fact, I met you in RZ at Twickenham in 2017 and at Claridges the day before! Hope the rest of the years gigs go good 👍
  23. Thanks, I found it. I ordered the double cd and i+e live. The shipping info in this topic is about that gift?
  24. HI, Does anybody knows where the band will stay in Tokyo ?
  25. My list of contacts for a fanzine I wanted to do some decades ago. Paul McGuinness told me that U2 would now only do US press. But I did get to interview Gavin Friday/Virgin Prunes, and Colin Newman/Wire, and Eyeless in Gaza, and had some brief contact with Robert Smith/Cure.
  26. Love Zooropa and U2UK - good friends of ours. Be great to see you at a U2Baby gig soon Jonno77, the fan meet at the Cavern in Liverpool was amazing - theres a couple there in 2020 and 2021... also remaining October and November gigs below - more dates out to end 2020 at http://www.theu2tributeuk.com/tours Sat 19/10/19 U2Baby Gig: Barons Quay Social, Northwich BAND ON STAGE AT TBC FREE ENTRY Sat 02/11/19 U2Baby Gig: Half Moon, Putney DOORS 7:30PM >>>>> CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS Sat 09/11/19 U2Baby Gig: MK11, Milton Keynes DOORS 8:00PM >>>>> CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS Sat 23/11/19 U2Baby Gig: Scandic Meyergarden, Norway BAND ON STAGE AT 22:00 >>>>> CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS
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