tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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  1. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    197 CULTURE You should add this Rwandan documentary to your watchlist 10 December 2018 10:43AM UTC | By: ONE SIGN THE PLEDGE Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS EmailAdd your name Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Written by ONE Campus Zaza Rising is a short documentary film narrated by Christine, an entrepreneur, teacher and mother who runs an all-female bakery in Zaza, Rwanda. In the film, Christine speaks about the role gender plays in her community. It’s often assumed that girls aren’t capable of work, and Christine shares how her parents used to cry because they never bore a son. To challenge the stigma around gender, Christine worked hard to sell produce and earn an income that could support her through college to get a degree in economics. After graduating she was still confronted by the ways that stigma and poverty affect the women in her community. So she decided to further challenge these myths about women and work by hiring ten HIV-positive single mothers from her community to run a bakery. Together, the women bake bread in a safe-space cultivated by Christine that encourages the women to openly share with each other and also enables them to make economic achievements as a unit. She emphasizes that when you work together, you have a higher power. Despite Christine’s efforts to be a role model and to offer her employees opportunities for growth, issues like the health of her employees threaten the success of her business. To date, the bakery has lost three of its employees to AIDS and paid for the funeral costs because the women’s families had rejected them due to their health status. Moments like these are still too common in many places around the world, which is why ONE’s work towards ending extreme poverty includes treating preventable diseases through actions such as ensuring that world leaders maintain their funding commitments to the Global Fund. So what does Christine need to ensure the success of her business and the future of the women who run it? Her solution is education and we can’t agree more. Lack of access to quality education, especially among girls, is preventing millions of people from escaping the cycle of extreme poverty. Christine’s bakery moves beyond selling bread — now, its goal is to raise enough funds for its seven employees to go through an intensive business education program. Interested? Learn more about Christine, the bakery and her work here! Sign the pledge: We’ll do whatever it takes to end AIDS This World AIDS Day, we are turning our outrage into action and putting our leaders on notice: AIDS isn’t done. And neither are we. We’re committed to joining the global fight against AIDS and we’ll do what it takes to end the epidemic for good.
  2. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Today is the day! 🚛🚑 A special humanitarian aid truck will leave Kilkenny today bound for vulnerable children and families in the Chernobyl affected regions of Belarus lead by volunteer extraordinaire, Jim Kavanagh of the Chernobyl Kilkenny Outreach Group. The aid delivery has been collected and co-ordinated by our Kilkenny Outreach Group, with support from our Cork Outreach Group. They will be accompanied by our Dental Team, pioneered by the 2017 National Volunteers of the Year Mary and George Sugrue from Tralee chernobyl children Int outreach as well as Roscommon Rose 2018 - Eimear Reynolds...who is returning to volunteer less than 2 months after initial volunteering with CCI and Rose of Tralee International Festival! The team will travel through nine European countries before arriving at its final destination in Belarus.. Safe journey to this incredible volunteer team and we look forward to seeing the impact of your incredible contributions once again! Thank you for everything!
  3. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    And off they go! You can follow them on their journey on this link https://cargodefenders.server93.com:443/…/v3/single_gmap.ht…
  4. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    'More than one million children continue to live in contaminated zones'. As we approach the 33rd Anniversary of Chernobyl and the 3rd 'Naciones Unidas Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day' on 26 April, we must remember those who continue to live in Chernobyl's deadly shadow and pay the highest price. #UNChernobylDay #IWillNotForgetYou
  5. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    EDUCATION Millions of Girls in Pakistan Aren’t Attending School In a new report, Human Rights Watch says the country lacks facilities to educate them. Why Global Citizens Should Care Education is a basic human right, but 130 million girls around the world currently can’t attend school. Human Rights Watch is urging the Pakistani government to help young girls receive an education in a new report. You can join us in taking action here. The Pakistani government isn’t providing children living in poverty with the facilities they need to learn, according to a new Human Rights Watch (HRW) report published Monday. Millions of girls are especially at risk, and HRW is calling on the government to step up for their futures, the Guardian reports. Take Action: Urge the G20 to Prioritize Girls’ Education and Help Them to Face the Future According to the report, titled Shall I Feed my Daughter or Educate Her?, more than one-third of Pakistani girls are not attending primary school, compared to 21% of boys. Only 13% of girls are still in school by the 9th grade. As of 2018, 22.5 million children in the country are not in school, according to Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan’s party manifesto. But in Balochistan, Pakistan’s largest province, for example, the gender disparity is stark— 81% of girls did not finish primary school in 2014, compared to 52% of boys, HRW reported. In 2013, UNICEF found literacy rates are 20% higher for boys than girls. 63 people are talking about this Twitter Ads info and privacy “Many of the girls we interviewed are desperate to study, but instead are growing up without the education that would help them have options for their future,” HRW Women’s Rights Director Liesl Gerntholtz told the Guardian. In Pakistan, young girls miss school partly because of the Sunni Islamic militant group the Taliban. The group claims educating women goes against Islam. In 2012, Nobel Peace Prize winner and activist Malala Yousafzai was shot by the Taliban after advocating for girls' education using a pen name, bringing global attention to the group’s violent threat on the nation’s young women. But according to the report, Pakistan’s school system is primarily responsible for the country’s education barriers. The government hasn’t invested enough in schools, especially ones for girls, HRW says. Unaffordable school fees, corporal punishment, low-quality public and private schools, corruption, and lenient regulation also contribute to the country’s education crisis. “The government recognizes that education reform is desperately needed and promises to make this a priority, especially for girls — a positive step,” Gerntholtz told the Guardian. Read More: Malala Relaxes From the Stress of Freshman Year by Building a Girls’ School in Pakistan For many young girls in Pakistan, receiving an education is their only hope for avoiding child marriage. It is estimated that 21% of girls in Pakistan are married before the age of 18, according to the organization Girls Not Brides. Child brides who stop attending school are more likely to experience an early pregnancy, malnourishment, domestic violence, and pregnancy complications. While the Pakistani government has acknowledged its poor education system, the HRW says it’s not enough. The country doesn’t make an effort to enforce its law that requires all children between the ages of five and 16 receive an education, the organization argues. As a result, unregulated private schools open, leaving families living in poverty to send their children to the cheapest option, which isn’t always of the highest quality. “We hope that our findings will help the government to diagnose the problems and identify solutions that will give every Pakistani girl a bright future,” Gerntholtz said. With 130 million girls around the world missing school because they live in poverty, lack resources, or are surrounded by violence and conflict, every effort counts. Supporting girls’ education strengthens economies, stabilizes communities, and protects the planet. What’s there to lose? TOPICSEducationWomen & GirlsPakistanGirls EduationTaliban COMMENTS
  6. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    👏🏾👏🏾 #WednesdayWisdom
  7. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    4.9k GIRLS AND WOMEN Now is the time to stand in solidarity with women everywhere 5 March 2019 9:00PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER ADD YOUR NAME Take action for women everywhere EmailSign Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email 108 years. That’s how long ago the first International Women’s Day took place. On March 19, 1911, over a million people worldwide rallied for equal rights. They demanded that women have the right to work, receive vocational training, hold public office, and vote. A lot has changed in 108 years, but we’ve still got a long way to go. Across the globe, women are still legally prevented from having the same economic opportunities as men. In some places, women are barred from having a bank account, or can’t own the land that they farm. 1,000 young women are still infected with HIV every single day, and millions of girls are still out of school. These are some of the realities that make it harder for women to escape global poverty. If we don’t speed things up, it will take 108 years more to achieve gender equality. That means inequality could likely outlive every single person who reads this. Every girl born this year may face inequality throughout her whole life. This is unacceptable. This year cannot be a halfway point. If we want equality, we need to step up now and demand real progress for women everywhere. Luckily, no one is fighting this fight alone. We contacted 45 activists from across the African continent who are leading the charge fighting for gender equality. We asked them to share their vision for gender equality and what world leaders need to do to achieve it. Despite their different focuses and various fields of work, they all shared a common sentiment: we need to create a world where everyone has the same opportunities. Their responses came together in a powerful open letter. They are urging world leaders to make real progress towards ending inequality. But, this letter isn’t just about the activists who wrote it and the leaders who are acting on it – it’s about you. You, reading this right now, have the opportunity to stand with them. You have the chance to join a global movement and stand in solidarity, with the women who contributed to this letter, and with every woman. None of us are equal until all of us are equal. No matter where you live or what gender you are, you have a voice in this fight. Now is the time for you to use it and make sure we leave no woman behind. Sign this open letter to stand with women and girls everywhere: ADD YOUR NAME Dear World Leaders, We are the women at the frontlines of the fight against gender inequality and global poverty. Every day we see the determination and dignity of girls and women facing down the toughest challenges. We see real advances and the power of people to achieve change. We won’t surrender this fight, but we need you to play your part. You promised to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls by 2030, but at the current rate of progress, this will take 108 years. This is unacceptable. We need genuine progress, not grand promises. We want implementation and accountability at every level – from this year’s G7 Summit to the Global Fund Replenishment; from our African Union leaders to our community leaders. We will be looking for your actions not your words; for funding to follow promises; and policy to turn into practice. It’s both the right and the smart thing to do for everyone. To accelerate progress men must demand change with us so that we rise united not divided. And women must have a seat at the decision-making table – because you can’t change what you don’t see. We’re not looking for your sympathy, we’re demanding your action. Because none of us are equal until all of us are equal. Yours,
  8. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    160 HEALTH There’s a health care revolution in the DRC 4 March 2019 10:25AM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Vaccines don’t just stop us from getting sick, they keep us healthy too, which means we can take advantage of all the opportunities that life has to offer. For many of us, getting vaccinations is pretty easy – we just arrange an appointment at our local health centre. For others, it’s a lot harder. Victor is a health worker in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) capital city. Delivering healthcare in communities affected by extreme poverty is hard enough, but without a working fridge to store and transport vaccines, it is even harder for Victor to vaccinate children who need it. Health worker Victor, DRC. “We were only doing two or three vaccination sessions per month. We had to take the cooler back and forth to pick up the vaccines – a distance of four kilometres between here and the central office. The only mode of transport, the motorbike, cost CF2000 (US$ 1.25) for each journey. That cost us a lot.” Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC. Keeping cool Vaccines need to be kept at stable, low temperatures. If not, they stop working. So, cold-chain equipment such as fridges and cool boxes are essential to keep vaccines chilled. This hasn’t been an easy feat to achieve in the DRC – an equatorial country with a tropical climate. Until now, health centres have used petrol-fuelled fridges to keep vaccines cool, but they are unreliable, often breakdown and fuel is hard to get and transport. What makes transportation even harder, is that the DRC is a big country – the size of Western Europe, much of which is covered by dense forest without good roads. “The distances here are too large to supply some areas with vaccines,” said Didier Maundé, Head of Logistics for the DRC’s Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI). “Sometimes fuel was nowhere to be found either, or was too expensive. The cold-chain was at risk, and it was having a negative impact on vaccination.” Despite some recent progress, the DRC still has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Every year nearly two million children miss out on a full course of vaccines, contributing to almost one in ten Congolese children not surviving to see their fifth birthday. Now the good bit… In October 2018, the Ministry of Health, working closely with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners, launched a plan to increase immunisation by 15% by 2020. If successful, an additional 220,000 children could be immunised. Crucial to the success of the Ministry’s plan is improved cold-chain equipment. With more reliable equipment and better methods of transportation to cover the country’s huge distances, children in the DRC will be able to reap the benefits of life-saving vaccinations. Almost 5,000 new solar-powered fridges have been delivered to the DRC and more are on the way! Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year. Victor, who received his solar fridge last year, said “This has reduced the cost for us and increased the number of [vaccination] sessions. I think we are at ten sessions per month now. We are very happy to have this.” Supersizing Meanwhile, another quiet revolution is also taking place that will improve healthcare in DRC: the creation of Central Africa’s largest vaccine storage hub. The hub (funded by Gavi) recently opened in Kinkole, just outside central Kinshasa. It can safely store more than 200 million vaccine doses and other medical supplies before they are distributed to health centres. The state of the art facility is also equipped with all kinds of transportation, including 150 canoes and boats powered by outboard motors to help deliver vaccines around the country. For a nation that currently uses aeroplanes to deliver 80% of its vaccines to the provinces, the use of boats is expected to deliver massive long-term savings. Excitingly, two more major regional hubs are planned. “The impact is visible,” said Didier Maundé. “More and more vaccines are available in the field. The cold chain is now reliable, and long distances are less of a problem.” A big thank you to Gavi for providing the story. Gavi is a global Vaccine Alliance that brings together public and private organisations with a shared goal — to make vaccines more available, accessible and affordable to children who need them the most. Incredibly, Gavi has so far supported some of the world’s poorest countries to immunise 700 million children, averting 10 million future deaths that would be lost to vaccine-preventable diseases.
  9. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    GIRLS & WOMEN Malaysia's Book Investigation Prompts Outrage Among Muslim Women's Rights Activists This seems to follow the ongoing effort to regulate women's attires. By Beh Lih Yi KUALA LUMPUR, April 17 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) — Malaysia's religious authorities on Wednesday said they were investigating a book about Muslim women who choose not to wear a hijab, prompting a backlash among women's rights groups. The probe is the latest in a series of incidents that have led to women's rights activists accusing authorities of acting like "fashion police" by trying to control women's attire in the Muslim-majority nation. It came after a government minister called for a probe into the launch of the book Unveiling Choice last weekend, which featured Muslim women who discussed why they had stopped wearing a headscarf. Take Action: Share Your Message About Why World Leaders Must Act to Create A World Where #SheIsEqual Actúa: Call Now 5 puntos United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe "It's just a sharing of experience, nothing more than that," said Maryam Lee, author of the book, which she hopes will show that the hijab can be "both liberating and oppressive." "[Some] say this is something to promote 'de-hijabbing' — that's not true. It's a book about experience," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation, referring to the removing of the headscarf. Lee said officers from the Islamic affairs department in the central state of Selangor had obtained copies of the book from the publisher's office on Tuesday. A spokeswoman from the department when contacted said it was "looking into the matter" but declined to give further details. Its director Haris Kasim did not respond to requests for comment. Religious Affairs Minister Mujahid Yusof Rawa said in a statement that he viewed the matter seriously and called for a "fair" investigation. It was unclear what offenses or laws the book was being investigated over. Muslim women who do not wear the headscarf are a common sight in Malaysia, and include notable figures like the wife and daughter of Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. Read More: Yet Another Malaysian Teen Married Off to Man Nearly Three Times Her Age Other prominent personalities such as former trade minister Rafidah Aziz and ex-central bank governor Zeti Akhtar Aziz also do not wear the hijab. More than 60% of Malaysia's 32 million population are Muslims, but it is also home to a large number of ethnic and religious minorities who openly practice their religion. "It's really disappointing," said Sumitra Visvanathan, executive director of the nonprofit Women's Aid Organisation. "I would tell the government to butt out of our private lives and how we choose to dress is our business. There is no law in Malaysia that stipulates a woman should or should not wear the headscarf." Last year, Mujahid said that the government was planning to introduce a dress code for Muslim women in the workplace, sparking a large public outcry. (Reporting by Beh Lih Yi @behlihyi. Editing by Michael Taylor. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's and LGBT+ rights, human trafficking, property rights, and climate change. Visit http://news.trust.org
  10. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Por Erica Sanchez y Sushmita Roy 16 DE ABRIL DE 2019 5 MEDIO AMBIENTE El último video sobre cambio climático de The Weather Channel te transportará a un aterrador 2100 Un momento que algunos niños vivirán para ver. Por qué es importante para los Global Citizens El cambio climático está alterando drásticamente los ecosistemas. Los países de todo el mundo lidian con desastres naturales que se ven empeorados por el cambio climático, y ahora el Weather Channel ofrece una mirada aterradora sobre el futuro del planeta. Puedes tomar medidas aquí para asegurar un futuro saludable para el planeta. El nuevo video de The Weather Channel sobre el cambio climático se parece mucho a uno de juegos de aventura en 3D de Disneyland. Pero en lugar de volar sobre el río Na'vi de Avatar, la meteoróloga Jen Carfagno viaja al año 2100, en Charleston, Carolina del Sur, que se inunda permanentemente. "La gente acude a nosotros para obtener pronósticos, especialmente si hay un gran evento climático extremo, pero todo esto se está modificando muy lentamente y de forma gradual por el cambio climático", dijo a The VergeMatthew Sitkowski, productor ejecutivo de clima de The Weather Channel. Actúa: Firma 1 punto United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe En asociación con: Flow Alkaline Spring Water "Mira a tu alrededor; Es el año 2100 y un planeta que se ha calentado para siempre ha cambiado las ciudades de Estados Unidos”, narra Carfagno en el video, que utiliza la tecnología de realidad inmersiva y mixta para crear efectos de sonido dramáticos y gráficos casi realistas. La horrible descripción de Charleston apunta a un problema importante al que se enfrenta la zona. Los estados a lo largo de la costa se ven afectados drásticamente por el calentamiento de los océanos, el aumento del nivel del mar y el aumento de las temperaturas globales. Un informe publicado por la Casa Blanca el año pasado advirtió que las inundaciones costeras podrían aumentar hasta un 1.500% y que las Carolinas podrían enfrentar olas de calor sin precedentes. Otra ciudad de Estados Unidos que aparece en el video que enfrenta las graves consecuencias del cambio climático es Norfolk, Virginia, que ha sufrido nueve inundaciones importantes en la última década. "Solo una brisa constante en la costa y la marea alta pueden llevar a carreteras y casas inundadas", dijo Carfagno sobre Norfolk, la ciudad que alberga numerosos astilleros navales del país. Usando movimientos rápidos de cámara y sonidos envolventes de fondo, el video luego transporta al espectador al "Ártico, el área de calentamiento más rápido en la Tierra" y al glaciar Jakobshavn en Groenlandia. Usando una tecnología similar a la de los videojuegos, el clip presenta sonidos intensificados de derrumbe de hielo, vientos acelerados y una rota que salpica agua. Si bien el glaciar en sí ha ganado hielo durante el último año, la tendencia general muestra que Groenlandia perdió alrededor de 739 gigatoneladas de hielo, con el glaciar Jakobshavn y otros cuatro que representan aproximadamente el 30% de esas pérdidas. El video termina con un mensaje poderoso, mientras Carfagno cambia a un tono más urgente. "Los glaciares como este están desapareciendo en todo el mundo", dijo. "Está sucediendo ahora: las temperaturas están aumentando, el hielo se está derritiendo, los niveles del mar están aumentando y esto empeorará a lo largo de nuestra vida". TEMASClimate changecambio climaticoFloodsinundacionesadapting to climate changeGlobal Warmingcalentamiento globalArctic Ice Disappearingderretimiento del hielo COMENTARIOS
  11. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    It’s time for the 2019 #TIME100! Congrats to (RED) supporters Rami Malek Lady Gaga Chrissy Teigen and Gayle King on making this year’s list. http://time.com/collection/100-most-influential-people-2019/?fbclid=IwAR3mWNyL_9EEn79k3IIcB95C4g5CzTF7P8X4XpTEBQHfjYluhAmG1XQK8vg
  12. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    PARTNERGIRLS & WOMEN This Inspiring 23-Year-Old Isn't Waiting to Empower Young Women "We don't have to wait to make change. We can make change right now." Why Global Citizens Should Care Gender inequality stops women from achieving financial independence. We need to empower women in the workplace to end poverty. You can join us and take action here. Global citizen Jadayah Spencer realized she wanted to give back to her community at a young age. In high school, the native New Yorker took a “life-changing” educational trip to Tanzania throughthe nonprofit organization International Youth Leadership Institute (IYLI). The experience exposed her to opportunities she didn’t even know were possible, she says. Now 23, Spencer works to improve access to opportunities that enhance the lives of youth, women, people of African descent, and Indigenous people worldwide as IYLI’s executive director. Recognized as one of 40 Under 40 Rising Stars in the NYC Nonprofit Sector by New York Nonprofit Media, Spencer’s impact has only just begun. “Youth have to understand, we don’t have to wait to make change, we can make change right now,” she told Life and Money by Citi in a video launched ahead of International Women’s Day. Since 1990, IYLI has made it possible for more than 500 high school students like Spencer to travel and study in 17 countries. IYLI’s mission is to cultivate critical thinkers and leaders by educating high school students of color on history, culture, and geography, providing them with opportunities they don’t always get through the education system. In almost all major American cities, most students of color attend public schools where a majority of the student body are deemed low-income and where a lack of funding and resources impacts the quality of education. Related StoriesAug. 7, 2018CitiCiti Progress Makers: Malala Fund Spencer is devoted to supporting young black girls, who are twice as likely to attend under-resourced schools and disproportionately receive discipline that harms their academic achievement. Born and raised in Brooklyn’s Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood, she sits on Girls for Gender Equity's New York City Young Women’s Advisory Council, which addresses policy issues that directly affect young women of color in the city and helps them fight for institutional reform. The gender wage gap persists in New York City and is magnified by race. Asian, black, and Latina women earn 63, 55, and 46 cents to every dollar earned by a white man, respectively, making it difficult to succeed in the competitive workforce and achieve economic independence. Spencer can’t end forms of gender inequality like the pay gap alone. She’s determined to motivate others to follow in her footsteps every chance she gets. As the United Nations Department of Public Information NGO Youth Representative Program co-chair, she encourages young people to get involved with NGOs that work on issues they care about. “It opens your mind to global issues,” she said of her position, “and reminds you how important it is to uplift the voices of people who might not be heard so readily.” TOPICSEducationWomen & GirlsFemale EmpowermentInternational Women's DayCitibikeWomen's Economic Empowerment COMMENTS
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    The Action Thread Part Two

    966 POLICY Which human rights are the most important? 22 September 2017 11:54AM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email This is a guest post by Frank Pichel, CEO of the Cadasta Foundation. Which human rights are the most important? Ask this question in a developed economy and you will likely hear: the right to freedom of speech, religious freedom, or the right to freedom from discrimination and so on. Rarely, if ever, will this list include land and property rights — even though this right is the foundation of the Western economic system and so critical that US founding father James Madison once said, “Government is instituted no less for the protection of the property than of the person.” Women make up half the agriculture workforce in sub-Saharan Africa but own just 2% of the land. (Photo Credit: Landesa) Land and property rights often don’t make it into lists of top ten rights or even consciousness in developed economies not because they aren’t valued, but — in part — because they are usually so secure and secured so long ago that they are taken for granted (with the notable exceptions of indigenous groups). Without secure property rights, you could leave for work in the morning and come home to find that someone had changed the lock on your home and moved in. Or someone could claim your vegetable garden just as you were preparing to harvest your sugar snap peas and lettuce. For most people in Europe, North America, and some parts of Asia, this is so beyond the realm of possibility that we don’t give secure land and property rights much thought. But ask any farmer, indigenous community, or resident in a shanty town in an emerging economy — where the World Bank maintains that the vast majority of property rights are undocumented and land governance systems are either non-existent or non-functional — what rights they need to climb out of poverty and you will hear a resounding: secure land and property rights. Indeed, land rights — particularly the lack of secure land rights — continue to capture headlines across emerging economies. Just last week, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf told the African Green Revolution Forum that the continent would continue to be stalked by poverty, hunger, and famine until governments strengthened smallholder farmers land rights and finally gave them the security and opportunity they need to invest in their land and improve their harvests and their lives. Research around the world supports this view of land rights as the foundation for development. Secure land rights have been found to increase productivity by as much as 50 percent, double the rate of high-school graduation, and increase conservation. The impact is even more pronounced when women gain secure rights to land. Study after study shows that economically empowering women starts with land rights. In Tanzania, women with secure rights to land have three times more income. In Nepal, children whose mothers have secure rights to land are one-third less likely to be malnourished. In India, where 40 percent of people believe wife beating to be sometimes justifiable, women who own land are 8 times less likely to experience domestic violence. Despite this clear evidence, women’s rights to land and property continue to be undermined by discriminatory laws and practices in more than half the countries on the planet. This not only frustrates women’s ability to climb out of poverty but also leaves their children and community less resilient and poorer. A new interactive survey is now helping to illustrate the gap between those who have secure property rights and those who do not. Take the 10 question survey developed by Habitat for Humanity’s Solid Ground Campaign and Cadasta Foundation and explore the gap between the haves and the have-nots with regard to land rights. ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.
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    The Action Thread Part Two

    We're thrilled to share the story of the development of the Music Generation South Dublin strings programme in St Ronan's National School, Deansrath. Music Generation South Dublin is part of Music Generation, Ireland's national music education programme initiated by Music Network, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds, the Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships. Locally Music Generation South Dublin is led by South Dublin County Council with support from Dublin and Dun Laoghaire Education and Training Board and Dublin West Education Centre.
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    The Action Thread Part Two

    2 YOUTH AMBASSADORS Our 2019 Youth Ambassadors are fired up and ready to go 15 April 2019 1:51PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Every spring we look forward to something exciting: meeting our brand new cohort of ONE Youth Ambassadors! 2019 marks the 7th year we’ve run our YA programme and we’re thrilled to have 300+ enthusiastic and dedicated volunteers working with us to keep fighting extreme poverty this year. To kick the year off, our volunteers gathered in Paris, Dublin, Rome, Amsterdam, Berlin, Brussels and London and hit the ground running. They’re already hearing back from their country leaders, speaking with their local media outlets, attending events and meeting with their representatives to fight for foreign aid and equality everywhere. Keep reading below to find out what the incredible #ONEYouth19 have already accomplished! ITALY 40 Italian YAs met in Rome to join ONE in doing all we can to raise awareness about the injustice of extreme poverty. After a full day of training and team building activities, this fantastic group went out to meet Italian policy makers under the Italian sun and the beauty of the city — yes, the Colosseum still never ceases to amaze us! They had the chance to have a fruitful discussion with the Prime Minister’s diplomatic advisor and G7 Sherpa, Piero Benassi, delivered 300+ postcards on the Multiannual Financial Framework campaign and talked about all they want the government to achieve in 2019. And guess what? The Prime Minister himself responded to our YAs with a very inspiring letter. This will push our YAs to pursue their fight against extreme poverty with even stronger determination, knowing that the Italian government is listening! GERMANY Team Germany welcomed our YAs for three exciting days in Berlin. To start, our 50 change-makers had the honour to receive the State Secretary of the Finance Ministry, Bettina Hagedorn. The following day, we met with the Foreign Minister, Heiko Mass, and discussed the global fight against extreme poverty. All in all, these were three days full of motivation, learning, sharing and mutual support in the fight against poverty. Our YA Nina summarised our mission best: “Convince political leaders: Africa’s challenges are Europe’s challenges.” BELGIUM This year we welcomed 57 YAs — representing more than 24 different nationalities — to Brussels for an exciting and engaging launch! We also kicked off our ONE Vote 2019 campaign with stimulating discussions with MEPs Judith Sargentini, Arne Lietz and Linda McAvan on the importance of development aid, the EU’s commitments and future priorities. They also gave our YAs insider tips on how to successfully advocate politicians. Finally, the YAs were successful in their aim to have the MEPs sign our ONE Vote pledge, starting the campaign off on the right foot! FRANCE Team France welcomed 50 new YAs to Paris and got to meet an amazing, diverse group of people that are determined to make their voices heard. This year, our YAs are high-schoolers, college students, professors and computer scientists, to name a few. Plus they hail from Europe, Africa, and South America! At the launch, they learned all about the upcoming EU elections and our ONE Vote campaign, as well as the G7 Summit and Global Fund replenishment, both happening in France this year. Fully prepared and ready to rock, they had their first advocacy meeting with a MEP candidate from the Green Party who even gave them the opportunity to go to their headquarters where they could gather 10 signatures in total! The YAs in France also met with their 2019 godmother, Deborah François, a Belgian actress who signed our open letter in 2018 and 2019. They had a very open discussion around gender equality issues and how she could support them throughout the year. NETHERLANDS Our new Dutch YAs kicked off the year by getting the first ONE Vote pledge signer: MEP Kati Piri! They also hit the streets to collect signatures for our Open Letter to World Leaders, and enthusiastically brainstormed about other actions that they will take this year. There were many training sessions and fun team-building exercises which made the launch a wonderful start to the year! UNITED KINGDOM More than 50 Youth Ambassadors from across the UK joined us in London to launch our programme. Day 1 included campaigns training and a ‘how-to’ session from Francis Dearnley that gave our YAs the inside track on how to hold a successful meeting with your MP. The day ended with a meeting with MPs across varying political parties: Bim Afolami, the new DFID PPS, Dame Eleanor Laing, Deputy Speaker of the House, Dr. Paul Williams, a medic who previously worked in Uganda, and Mhairi Black, the youngest person to be elected to UK Parliament. On day 2, our YAs tried out their campaigning skills by gathering petition signatures for our Global Fund petition on the streets of London before rounding off the day with media and Twitter sessions. See Chimdi's other Tweets Twitter Ads info and privacy IRELAND Our launch in Ireland — with just over 30 Youth Ambassadors — kicked off with an intense day of campaigns training! On the second day, our YAs were treated to a host of fantastic guest speakers. Craig Dwyer, a social media specialist, spoke about his work on the Yes Equality campaign and Laura Harmon from the National Women’s Council of Ireland (NWCI) shared her brilliant insights into how we can all help achieve gender equality. Senator Neale Richmond gave an enlightening look at how YAs can influence EU politics in the upcoming elections. Finally, Minister Katherine Zappone accepted a card filled with messages from ONE members showing their support for Ireland’s early (and 50% increased!) pledge to the Global Fund. You don’t have to be a Youth Ambassador to get involved! Become a ONE Member by signing up here.