tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Everything posted by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

  1. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Our 300+ ONE Youth Ambassadors are on a mission to fight for a better world this year! ✊🏽
  2. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Hi everyone!! The Action Thread was locked today, so here's where it will continue! The first one was open from 8th April 2014 to 11th January 2017, and it had 416 pages and 8303 posts of action. Here's a link to it: http://zootopia.u2.com/topic/28388-the-action-thread/ Cheers !! (which nothing was wrong other than the thread was getting rather long and that was causing problems. Unfortunately, we are going to have to do the same with a few others also. ~mich)
  3. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Our goal: to fight extreme poverty. Are you with us?
  4. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    2.5k CULTURE 5 podcast episodes every activist needs April 30 2019 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Chances are, you know someone who’s obsessed with podcasts. You might even be that person. Podcasts have exploded into popularity in recent years. In fact, there’s over 500,000 on Apple Podcasts alone! Whether you’re a long-time listener, or looking for a place to start, we’ve got a great list of podcast episodes for you. What makes it so great? Each one of these episodes covers an important issue, so you can learn something new while you listen! Sooo Many White Guys Phoebe, Javier Muñoz, and Gayle Smith Fight the Good Fight! In case it wasn’t clear, we love Phoebe Robinson. The best-selling author, podcast queen, and ONE and (RED) ambassador uses her influence to talk about important issues, always mixing in a few laughs. She began her podcast Sooo Many White Guys as a way to push back against the predominance of white men in comedy. Her podcast often features guests who are women and/or people of color talking about race, feminism, and social issues. Her most recent episode features none other than our own CEO, Gayle Smith, and actor Javier Munoz, who’s also a (RED) ambassador! They discuss how Gayle and Javier got to where they are today, and give some important insights into the HIV/AIDS crisis. African Tech RoundUp Wajenzi’s Alain Nkurukiye on Galvanising Diasporans to Back Economic Growth in Africa African Tech RoundUp covers everything digital, technological, and innovative coming out of Africa. This organization, based in Johannesburg, produces podcasts, op-eds, media projects, and more. Their podcasts dive deep into the growing tech scene with guests who are working in the industry. This episode features guest Alain Nkurukiye, the founder of tech startup Wajenzi. When he worked in the Netherlands, he wanted to give back to his home in Burundi. Now, his mission is to give the African diaspora a way to invest in entrepreneurs in their home nations. Sincerely, Hueman 2018 Year End Special (Part 2) Sincerely, Hueman tells stories about everyday people who are changing communities. Each episode features leaders that spark social good through local and global movements. They share a diverse array of stories, showing that everyone has the ability to create positive change for people worldwide. The second part of their 2018 end-of-year special features Ashaba Faridah. Ashaba, one of the few female pilots in Uganda, is the founder of Bambino Life Foundation. Her organization encourages girls to get an education, creates awareness for children living with disability, and donates needed items to orphanages. The Guilty Feminist Period Poverty with Gemma Cairney, Amika George, Grace Campbell The Guilty Feminist is a comedy podcast that balances hilarious wit with smart discussion. Hosts Deborah Frances-White and Sofie Hagen invite guests to go in-depth on all things feminism. This episode is about period poverty. Their guests are activists who tackle period taboos and work to make sanitary products accessible. The discussion highlights the global issue of period poverty and how we can stop it. Of course, some tongue-in-cheek comedy about menstruation is also in the mix. Pod Save the World The Worst Humanitarian Crisis since WWII There’s tons of political podcasts out there, but few can break down big issues like Pod Save the World does. This foreign policy podcast makes global issues relatable and easy to understand. They also focus on how people can get involved. This episode dives deep into the current refugee crisis, how it happened, and how it affects us all. The guest, David Miliband, highlights how the circumstances for displacement are often man-made. But, there is a silver lining – everyone, particularly young people, can help solve this crisis.
  5. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    APRIL 26, 2018 14 HEALTH How a Woman on a Bike Is Helping Vaccinate Hundreds of Rural Kids in Himanchal Geeta Verma got recognition from WHO for her heroic spirit! Geeta Verma rose to fame after a picture of her carrying MR vaccine box on a bike went viral.(Facebook) For few people a motorcycle ride in the Himalayas would be a matter of leisure, for others another item on their bucket list, but for Geeta Verma it is a matter of life and death. Life of not one, two, but thousands of kids in rural Himanchal who do not have easy access to vaccines. Braving all the obstacles put in front of her by the treacherous roads and uncertain circumstamces in the Seraj valley, Himanchal Pradesh, Geeta manages to carry the measles rubella MR vaccine box to the remotest corners of her assigned blocks. Read More: How Frontline Health Workers Are Writing India's Immunization Success Story Deployed at the Shakardehra health sub-centre in Jhanjeli block of Mandi, Geeta has been relentlessly working on making the immunization campaign for kids in the remotest areas of her assigned district a veritable success. It is one motorcycle ride of Geeta that gives the children of shepherds and Gurjar community in remote villages like Raygarh, a life without miseries and measles. Geeta's relentless efforts caught the eye of World Health Organisation and she was featured in the WHO calendar of 2018. For Jai Ram Thakur, the chief minister of Himachal Pradesh, it was a proud moment as a woman health worker from Himanchal Pradesh was featured in a WHO publication. Thakur also felicitated Geeta for her brilliant work in ensuring complete coverage in the remotest regions and making measles and rubella vaccines accesible to all. Read More: What the Eradication of Smallpox Taught Us About Vaccines India, with the help of World Health Organisation, launched one of the world's largest vaccination campaigns against measles and rubella on February 5, 2017. Both measles and rubella are a major threat to child health and claimed over 90000 lives in 2016 alone. The campaign aims to vaccinate more than 35 million children in the age group of 9 months to 15 years with the combined MR (measles and rubella) vaccine. It is frontline health workers like Geeta who exemplify the undying spirit of selflessness and protect children from life-threatening health conditions like measles and rubella. We salute the spirit of such brave saviours! Global Citizen India and For Child Health support UN Sustainable Development Goal of ensuring healthy lives and well being of all people. Take action here with Global Citizen and For Child Health to make sure everyone can get the health services they need no matter who they are, where they live, or what their income TOPICSIndiavaccinesHealth WorkersWorld Immunization Week COMMENTS
  6. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Thinking of our ambassador Kit Harington on what will be an end of an era for him tonight/tomorrow morning. 💭We bend the knee to you sir. 👌Crossed fingers for an appropriately honourable ending for the much loved Jon Snow. ❤#GOT #GameOfThrones
  7. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Thinking about the future can be hard. 😟 We have information to help you make the best choices for you and your family. Find out more: https://bit.ly/2SA6dTB #LearningDisability
  8. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    YOU have the power to change the world for the better. — con Fernando Lux.
  9. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    https://www.red.org/reditorial/six-myths-about-hiv-aids-and-why-not-true?fbclid=IwAR0uk_PvkZLVDj95oR1mOjYZOr9eS8QNdG8YUIPXnl9uo02jh-EwI5Y_7-k We’re here to set the record straight and answer questions you may be wondering—or are too afraid to ask.
  10. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    👏🏾👏🏾 Girls with at least six years of school education are more likely to be able to protect themselves from HIV & other illnesses.
  11. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    End of an era. Tag your #GoT squad. #GameofThronesFinale
  12. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    GIRLS AND WOMEN Download these exclusive gender equality wallpapers! 12 March 2019 3:37PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER ADD YOUR NAME Take action for women everywhere EmailSign Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Every day, women and girls experiencing extreme poverty face unique obstacles. And every day, they fight against them with determination. Right now, it will still take 108 years to achieve gender equality. This is unacceptable. 45 women activists from across the African continent contributed to a bold open letter. They’re telling world leaders that we need genuine progress, not grand promises. You can take action by signing their open letter here. Want to show your support even more? Download one of these exclusive wallpapers, inspired by the letter’s cosigners and their incredible fight! Desktop丨Mobile Desktop丨Mobile Desktop丨Mobile Take action for women everywhere Dear World Leaders, We are the women at the frontlines of the fight against gender inequality and global poverty. Every day we see the determination and dignity of girls and women facing down the toughest challenges. We see real advances and the power of people to achieve change. We won’t surrender this fight, but we need you to play your part. You promised to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls by 2030, but at the current rate of progress, this will take 108 years. This is unacceptable. We need genuine progress, not grand promises. We want implementation and accountability at every level - from this year’s G7 Summit to the Global Fund Replenishment; from our African Union leaders to our community leaders. We will be looking for your actions not your words; for funding to follow promises; and policy to turn into practice. It’s both the right and the smart thing to do for everyone. To accelerate progress men must demand change with us so that we rise united not divided. And women must have a seat at the decision-making table – because you can’t change what you don’t see. We’re not looking for your sympathy, we’re demanding your action. Because none of us are equal until all of us are equal. Yours,
  13. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Por Erica Sanchez y Leah Rodriguez 10 DE MAYO DE 2019 9 NIÑAS Y MUJERES Estos son los 10 países más feministas En Suecia, el 46% de las personas se consideran feministas. Por qué es importante para los Global Citizen Lograr la igualdad de género es clave para ponerle fin a la pobreza extrema. Las feministas creen que los hombres y las mujeres deben ser política, económica y socialmente iguales. YouGov lanzó recientemente una encuesta que muestra los lugares del mundo donde la mayoría de las personas se identifican con el término. Puedes unirte a nosotros para tomar medidas sobre este tema aquí. Las personas que viven en países que están más avanzados en sus logros de igualdad de género, no necesariamente se consideran feministas, según una nueva encuesta. El Proyecto global de YouGov-Cambridge encuestó a 25,000 personas en 23 países, según informó The Guardian. Para evaluar las actitudes hacia el género, la igualdad de derechos y el movimiento #MeToo, los participantes respondieron preguntas sobre si se consideran feministas o no, y si consideran aceptable el acoso callejero. Aquellos países en los que las personas se consideran feministas viven en Suecia, Francia, Italia, Gran Bretaña, Australia, Estados Unidos, Turquía, Dinamarca, México y Alemania. En Suecia, el 46% de las personas que respondió a la encuesta se consideran feministas, con Francia detrás con casi el 30% y más del 25% en Italia y Gran Bretaña. Suecia se usa a menudo como un ejemplo de un país cercano al logro de la igualdad de género, debido a la igualdad en la atención de la salud pública, la educación, las oportunidades laborales y las generosas políticas de licencia parental. Además, Suecia ha cerrado prácticamente su brecha salarial entre hombres y mujeres (las mujeres obtienen el 88% del salario de los hombres). En contraste, a pesar de estar clasificado como el mejor país para mujeres en 2016, la vecina Dinamarca se ubicó como una de las naciones menos feministas del mundo desarrollado. Según la encuesta, las mujeres danesas no tienen problema con el acoso callejero y el 35% desaprueba el movimiento #MeToo. Solo un tercio de las mujeres danesas dicen que el acoso callejero es aceptable, el número más alto de mujeres que en cualquier otro país después de Nigeria. Antonia Kirkland, líder mundial en igualdad legal y acceso a la justicia en la organización Equality Now, le dijo a Global Citizen que estaba realmente sorprendida de ver a Dinamarca tan abajo en la lista. "Teniendo en cuenta que Dinamarca es una de las seis economías del mundo, según datos del Banco Mundial, en que mujeres y hombres tienen los mismos derechos legales, tal vez no sea tan sorprendente después de todo", explicó Kirkland. "Tal vez, hay una menor urgencia en Dinamarca por un movimiento feminista que en un lugar como Estados Unidos que carece incluso de una garantía básica de igualdad en su constitución y las feministas todavía tienen que movilizarse por una Enmienda de Igualdad de Derechos", dijo Kirkland. Los daneses pueden tolerar el acoso sexual a niveles bajos pero creen que el comportamiento debe ser justificado, dijo a The Guardian Rikke Andreassen, profesor de estudios de comunicación en la Universidad de Roskilde. Andreassen realizó una investigación sobre el movimiento #MeToo y descubrió que los medios de comunicación daneses cubrieron el tema en los medios de comunicación en las secciones de cultura y opinión, con muy pocos hombres acusados. Hay muchas otras razones por las cuales las personas que viven en países que están cerca de lograr plena igualdad de género todavía no pueden identificarse como feministas. La BBC publicó un informe sobre el tema en febrero por la Dra. Christina Scharff, profesora principal de cultura, medios de comunicación e industrias creativas en el King's College de Londres. Scharff descubrió que en Europa y en los Estados Unidos, donde recientemente se ha prestado mayor atención a los movimientos feministas, algunas mujeres no se sienten identificadas con el término "feminista". Los estereotipos anticuados sobre el feminismo podrían ser uno de los motivos por los que muchas personas no se sienten identificadas con el término. La raza también juega un papel importante. Shcarff señaló que tres cuartas partes de todas las mujeres en una encuesta dijeron que el movimiento feminista ha hecho "mucho" para mejorar las vidas de las mujeres blancas, lo que podría impedir que las mujeres no blancas se identifiquen con el término. Es probable que el feminismo también atraiga a las mujeres de clase trabajadora, aunque las personas de bajos ingresos tienen la misma probabilidad de apoyar la igualdad de derechos. Los 10 principales países donde las personas se identifican como feministas: Suecia Francia Italia Gran Bretaña Australia Estados Unidos Turquía Dinamarca Mexico Alemania Los cinco principales países donde las personas desaprueban el Movimiento #MeToo: Dinamarca Suecia Francia Australia Alemania Los 10 principales países donde la gente considera aceptable el acoso callejero: Dinamarca Alemania Gran Bretaña Australia Suecia Italia Estados Unidos Francia Mexico Turquía TEMASGender EqualityFeminismPollfeminismoigualdad de generoGirls and womenlos paises mas feministas del mundo COMENTARIOS
  14. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    By Leah Rodriguez and Carmen Singer JAN. 14, 2019 10 GIRLS & WOMEN Nepal Officials Reaffirm Goal to Destroy Deadly 'Period Huts' Punishment for forcing women to live in poor conditions while menstruating is becoming more severe. Why Global Citizens Should Care Societies around the world attach shame to menstruation. Nepal is tightening its laws around menstrual huts to protect women from life threatening gender discrimination. You can join us in taking action on this issue here. Nepal’s government is going to great lengths to protect women and girls of reproductive age. The country is implementing new tactics to stop ”chhaupadi,” a long-standing tradition that banishes women and girls to huts while they’re menstruating, the Guardian reports. Take Action: Urge Leaders to Step Up for Women’s Rights and Health The country’s Supreme Court first criminalized the act in 2005, and in 2017, it became punishable with three months in prison and a 3,000 rupee fine. But many Nepalese families continue to take the risk out of fear that women who experience the bodily function are impure and bad luck. Just last week, 35-year-old mother Amba Bohara and her two sons were found dead in a menstrual hut in Western Nepal’s Bajura province — a reminder of the country’s ongoing issue. “It’s been a year and we are trying to make people aware about chhaupadi,” Janak Bhandari, ward president for Bhandari’s village in Achham district toldthe Guardian of the newly enforced fines. The government is also cutting off state support services for anyone who is caught honoring the tradition. One Nepalese woman named Dilu Bhandari told the Guardian she was outraged to learn the news, but since destroying her menstrual hut can now safely stay in her home during her period. Read More: A Nepalese Mother and Her 2 Children Suffocated in a 'Menstrual Hut' Bhandari reported 20% fewer women are putting their lives at risk by sleeping in menstrual huts since the country tightened up its laws. But advocacy groups say progress is moving slower than authorities are letting on. Pasupati Kunwar, president of the women’s rights advocacy group Sama Bikash Nepal, told the Guardian chhaupadi has only declined among 60% of the country’s population, versus 95% when she first started campaigning against it 10 years ago. See She's the First's other Tweets “People who make policy and run programs — and even human rights advocates — often don’t fully understand the impact a woman’s monthly period may have on her ability to go about her life if she doesn’t have what she needs to manage it,” Amanda Klasing, senior women’s rights researcher at Human Rights Watch, said on the obstacles facing menstrual hygiene. Communities around the country are trying to find their own solutions. Ramaroshan, a rural municipality in Achham district, built a temple to create a safe space for worship that allows women and girls to stay home while menstruating. However, this fix doesn’t destigmatize menstruation and further perpetuates the cultural norms that stop women from participating in their society. Between 10% and 20% of girls around the world stay home from school because they lack the ability to manage their periods safely, according to the World Bank. “This ill-practice has to end soon and we are working on this,” Kaushila Bhatta, a Dadeldhura district chairperson, told the Guardian. TOPICSWomen & GirlsMenstrual Hygiene ManagementNepalMenstrual HutsWomen's Health COMMENTS
  15. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    If you missed our Voluntary Ambassador, Anna Gabriel on RTÉ Todaywith Maura and Daithi, don't forget you can catch up on RTÉ Player! https://www.rte.ie/player/onnow?fbclid=IwAR3tMdvaWdevccxJftondYAXwJ9WvAmHuifxon5-1dtMBi6tqEvy-mNMmII
  16. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    As it is Saturday, have you got three minutes? ⏰ Fancy nominating us to win a £1,000? 🙏 All you need to do is visit 👉 https://bit.ly/2W27h4g Search for our charity number - 222377 🔎 Say why you would like to nominate us. ✍️ We would really appreciate a cheeky share of this post too! 😉 Thanks for your kind support. ❤️ #MovementForGood
  17. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Listen, we get it. There's so much happening, all the time, EVERYWHERE. That's why we're introducing "Sam Gives a Damn," highlighting important info about the fight against AIDS, amazing people who are leading the charge, & how YOU can get involved. https://www.red.org/reditorial/introducing-sam-gives-a-damn?fbclid=IwAR3W7WWOF8qPRBfjfuhZ-Fdi6Kme1CuSWCcV249wnC_6C99d-h9DzLEjn74
  18. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Coffee?! We see a (RED) iPhone... #GoT
  19. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 GIRLS AND WOMEN This South African pilot started a camp to inspire young girls 6 December 2018 4:57PM UTC | By: SADOF ALEXANDER ADD YOUR NAME Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement EmailSign Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email The “Zulu Sierra – Papa Whiskey Whiskey” (ZS-PWW) may look like any other plane but this aircraft is special. It’s carrying bright young minds to an exceptional future. The plane is owned by Refilwe Ledwaba — the first black woman to fly for the South Africa Police Service and the first black woman to be a helicopter pilot in South Africa! Refilwe grew up in Lenyenye, a small township in the Limpopo region of South Africa. Originally, she wanted to become a doctor, but everything changed on a flight from Johannesburg to Cape Town. That fateful flight had a female pilot who inspired her to take to the skies. To achieve her goal, she wrote to over 200 South African companies asking them to help fund her education. The South Africa Police Service responded, offering to pay for her training and help her get a commercial pilot license. image via Girl Fly Programme in Africa Foundation Since then, she’s founded the Girls Fly Programme in Africa Foundation (GFPA) — a non-profit that has set-up a training programme and an annual flying camp for teenage girls — giving a head start to the next generation of women aviation and space leaders in Africa. The camp (run with Women and Aviation) teaches girls from South Africa, Botswana and Cameroon all about aviation. Camp attendees spend their days learning about computer coding, building robots and completing flight simulations. They also get an opportunity to take a flying lesson on board the ZS-PWW, where they learn the basics of flying. image via Girl Fly Programme in Africa Foundation The girls come from different backgrounds, from townships to private schools, but all achieve high scores in math and science at their schools. GFPA gives them the opportunity to meet professionals working in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM), and learn about the exciting and hugely varied career opportunities for them in these fields. “I think STEM is very important because, on a personal note, it opened a lot of doors for me,” says Refilwe. “So if you’re not going to prepare women for those jobs in the future, then we’re lost.” Refilwe made history in South Africa. Now, she’s paving the way for a new generation of girls to do the same. Every girl deserves the opportunity to reach the skies. If you want to support girls worldwide, join the Poverty is Sexistmovement! Poverty is Sexist: Join the movement Nowhere on earth do women have as many opportunities as men. Nowhere. But for girls and women in the poorest countries, that inequality is amplified. Poverty is sexist, so I’m adding my voice to ONE’s global movement of more than 9 million people calling for change.
  20. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 HEALTH There’s a health care revolution in the DRC 4 March 2019 10:25AM UTC | By: MELANIE RHODES JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Vaccines don’t just stop us from getting sick, they keep us healthy too, which means we can take advantage of all the opportunities that life has to offer. For many of us, getting vaccinations is pretty easy – we just arrange an appointment at our local health centre. For others, it’s a lot harder. Victor is a health worker in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, the Democratic Republic of Congo’s (DRC) capital city. Delivering healthcare in communities affected by extreme poverty is hard enough, but without a working fridge to store and transport vaccines, it is even harder for Victor to vaccinate children who need it. Health worker Victor, DRC. “We were only doing two or three vaccination sessions per month. We had to take the cooler back and forth to pick up the vaccines – a distance of four kilometres between here and the central office. The only mode of transport, the motorbike, cost CF2000 (US$ 1.25) for each journey. That cost us a lot.” Delivering vaccines by motorbike in the rural outskirts of Kinshasa, DRC. Keeping cool Vaccines need to be kept at stable, low temperatures. If not, they stop working. So, cold-chain equipment such as fridges and cool boxes are essential to keep vaccines chilled. This hasn’t been an easy feat to achieve in the DRC – an equatorial country with a tropical climate. Until now, health centres have used petrol-fuelled fridges to keep vaccines cool, but they are unreliable, often breakdown and fuel is hard to get and transport. What makes transportation even harder, is that the DRC is a big country – the size of Western Europe, much of which is covered by dense forest without good roads. “The distances here are too large to supply some areas with vaccines,” said Didier Maundé, Head of Logistics for the DRC’s Expanded Programme of Immunisation (EPI). “Sometimes fuel was nowhere to be found either, or was too expensive. The cold-chain was at risk, and it was having a negative impact on vaccination.” Despite some recent progress, the DRC still has one of the highest child mortality rates in the world. Every year nearly two million children miss out on a full course of vaccines, contributing to almost one in ten Congolese children not surviving to see their fifth birthday. Now the good bit… In October 2018, the Ministry of Health, working closely with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and other partners, launched a plan to increase immunisation by 15% by 2020. If successful, an additional 220,000 children could be immunised. Crucial to the success of the Ministry’s plan is improved cold-chain equipment. With more reliable equipment and better methods of transportation to cover the country’s huge distances, children in the DRC will be able to reap the benefits of life-saving vaccinations. Almost 5,000 new solar-powered fridges have been delivered to the DRC and more are on the way! Health worker Victor received a solar fridge to store vaccines last year. Victor, who received his solar fridge last year, said “This has reduced the cost for us and increased the number of [vaccination] sessions. I think we are at ten sessions per month now. We are very happy to have this.” Supersizing Meanwhile, another quiet revolution is also taking place that will improve healthcare in DRC: the creation of Central Africa’s largest vaccine storage hub. The hub (funded by Gavi) recently opened in Kinkole, just outside central Kinshasa. It can safely store more than 200 million vaccine doses and other medical supplies before they are distributed to health centres. The state of the art facility is also equipped with all kinds of transportation, including 150 canoes and boats powered by outboard motors to help deliver vaccines around the country. For a nation that currently uses aeroplanes to deliver 80% of its vaccines to the provinces, the use of boats is expected to deliver massive long-term savings. Excitingly, two more major regional hubs are planned. “The impact is visible,” said Didier Maundé. “More and more vaccines are available in the field. The cold chain is now reliable, and long distances are less of a problem.” A big thank you to Gavi for providing the story. Gavi is a global Vaccine Alliance that brings together public and private organisations with a shared goal — to make vaccines more available, accessible and affordable to children who need them the most. Incredibly, Gavi has so far supported some of the world’s poorest countries to immunise 700 million children, averting 10 million future deaths that would be lost to vaccine-preventable diseases.
  21. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Good News: We already have the tools we need to change this. But, to be *most effective* in the fight against AIDS, we need our leaders to#StepUpTheFight. Tell them it's time to take action NOW:bit.ly/2WOHFIz
  22. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 MEMBERS IN ACTION 5 ONE in America activists you oughta know for our 15th anniversary May 15 2019 | By: SUZANNE GRANVILLE JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email ONE members come from every walk of life and from across the political spectrum. They’re artists and activists, faith and business leaders, students and scientists. ONE members take action day in, day out — organizing, mobilizing, educating, and advocating so that people will have the chance not just to survive, but to thrive. They all give their time and talents to ONE for the same reason — a commitment to ending extreme poverty and preventable diseases. They know that you don’t need to agree on everything if the one thing you agree on is important enough. This has been a guiding principle for ONE since it was founded in Philadelphia 15 years ago. Today, we’re taking the time to celebrate some of these amazing activists who make up ONE. Barb Barrar – Magnolia, NJ Barb Barrar is a CDL from Magnolia, NJ. Barb has been with us almost since the beginning. She jumped onto the ONE bandwagon at the Philadelphia kick-off event in 2004 and helped sign up some of our very first supporters! Today Barb organizes ONE members in her community as a Congressional District Leader (CDL). Do you remember the exact action, issue, or campaign and what or who convinced you to take it? I first became interested in the fight against extreme poverty during the Jubilee 2000/Drop The Debt Campaign which led to the creation of D.A.T.A. , which then became ONE. Andrew Gyimah – Indianapolis, IN Andrew Gyimah from Indianapolis, IN joined ONE in 2017. Andrew joined ONE in 2017 when he made a call to urge his congressmen to support the BUILD Act. What motivated you to join ONE? As an activist from my country, Liberia, I have always yearned to be a part of a global advocacy group that sees all mankind as equal. So after meeting with the ONE team and taking part in a Power Summit, I was convinced that there’s no better place to join the fight than ONE. Campaigns like the BUILD Act, the Global Fragility Act, and ONE’s support of the Global Fund are why my support to ONE is unwavering. Matt Staniz – Chesterbrook, PA Matt Staniz and his family have been supporters of ONE for a decade. Matt has been a supporter of ONE for over 10 years! As a pastor in suburban Philadelphia, he hopes of seeing his congregation live their lives in ways that actively build a world that reflects the love that their faith professes. What do you hope the future holds for ONE factivists? A better world for all people because ONE volunteers are leading the way when it comes to informed, civil, and compassionate political action. I hope ONE’s commitment to non-partisan and action-driven advocacy will be recognized as the model for advocacy around the world. Ali Escalante – Boise, ID Ali Escalante is a CDL from Boise, ID Ali has been a member of ONE since 2005, doing online actions and volunteering. She was a CDL in 2012, first in Florida and now she represents ONE in Idaho. Tell us about your proudest moment as a ONE leader? Having Senator Risch tweet a photo of our ONE group with him in Washington and going on the record in support of The Global Fund. What do you hope the future holds for ONE factivists? I hope we will continue to add more and more factivists to our ranks so our collective voice is so loud that we cannot be ignored. Kamryn Ronca – University of Wisconsin, Lacrosse Kamryn joined ONE through the ONE Campus chapter at her university. Kamryn joined ONE as a sophomore in college. She saw the ONE banner during our Involvement Fest and recognized it from her parents and their love of U2 and signed up! Favorite part of being a volunteer leader with ONE? All of the learning opportunities! I feel so lucky to have joined ONE and then to be able to go on and hold a leadership role on my campus. What is your favorite ONE Campaign slogan? Actions Speak Louder. It’s been 15 years since ONE was founded, but we still have a lot of work to do. If you’re inspired by these amazing activists and want to help them bring ONE to your senators and representatives, click here to join or start a local team!
  23. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    0 CULTURE Poverty may not actually mean what you think October 16 2018 | By: SADOF ALEXANDER JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty EmailJoin Share on Facebook Save on Facebook Share on Twitter Share by Email Around the world, there are over 9 million people who are united by the same cause. From different walks of life, across ages and nations, careers and faiths, these 9 million people are all ONE members. Each of them working towards the same goal: ending extreme poverty. There’s no question, this is an important cause. But if we asked some people to explain poverty, chances are they would say different things. That’s because poverty is complicated. It looks different depending on where you are, and there are lots of reasons why it happens. We’ve put together a quick explainer on poverty, why it matters, and what you can do to help eradicate it. The Definitions Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines poverty as “the state of one who lacks a usual or socially acceptable amount of money or material possessions.” On definition alone, the concept of poverty is pretty vague. That’s why there are different ways of measuring poverty. Two of the most frequent ways of defining poverty are absolute and relative. Absolute poverty means that you don’t have enough money for basic needs, like food and housing. Relative poverty compares your circumstances to other people. Since this measurement is based on societal norms, being in relative poverty can lead to social exclusion Then, there’s extreme poverty, which is ONE’s focus. This is defined as living on less than US$1.90 a day. As of 2015, about 10% of the world’s population was experiencing extreme poverty. Of these people, more than half were in sub-Saharan Africa. These are some of the most common ways of defining poverty, but this isn’t all of them. It’s important to be aware of which measurements a source is using. The Causes Just as there are a ton of different definitions of poverty, there are a ton of different causes. There’s an obvious cause that comes to mind: income. Food, shelter, health, and education are all affected by a person’s wages. However, poverty is about a lot more than just income. Access to land, financial services, medical services, social participation, and safe living conditions are all contributing factors. These causes affect some people more than others, meaning that discrimination plays a role. That’s why we say poverty is sexist. There is nowhere in the world where women have the same opportunities as men (and here are 25 facts to prove it). But for girls living in extreme poverty, sexism can be a death sentence. This is unacceptable. Future Potential Behind the definitions and causes of poverty, we must remember that we’re talking about people. We’re talking about girls who are forced into marriage, children who can’t get an education, sick people who can’t get better, and countless others facing difficult situations because of poverty. Even though defining poverty can be difficult, there’s a simple truth: it doesn’t have to be this way. The first Sustainable Development Goal is to end poverty in all its forms by 2030. If we achieve this, people all over the world will be free to reach their potential. Ending poverty is not only possible, but necessary. Together, we can all create an equal, poverty-free world. Are you ready to join the fight against extreme poverty? Become a ONE member today!
  24. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    👭 👬 👫 with profound and multiple learning disabilities (PMLD) are, like everyone else, unique individuals! ✨ We want to ensure that 👫 👬 👭 with PMLD are fully included in society. 🌎 Like if you agree! 👍 Find out more: http://bit.ly/2wdCFjI 👈
  25. tan_lejos_tan_cerca

    The Action Thread Part Two

    Congratulations to all the students and schools that took part in last week's Waltons Music For Schools Competition Finalists Concert, and to the team at Waltons New School of Music for bringing so many fantastic groups to the stage of the National Concert Hall, Dublin, Ireland.