zooropamofo

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About zooropamofo

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  1. Good perspective and insight!
  2. It doesn't cost anything to think, and I was pondering this last night: Something that U2 could consider for future tours, when playing during the spring/summer/fall months. Based on fan feedback from the experience, innocence and Citi presales, a significant portion of U2's devoted fan base simply wants access to great rock 'n roll with GA admission. This concept runs counter to an arena style tour, simply due to the fact that you can't fit 15,000-20,000 people on a hockey arena floor. What about a companion event? Example: the band books the arena tour. We all know that corporate "ins", season ticket holders, venue and promotional holdbacks etc, etc. impact the supply of tickets that are available in US/Canadian arenas. So fine, proceed with the arena dates that they want to have, let's say for the sake of argument 2 shows per arena. But for each city, they could also do a mostly GA concert at a location such as the Hippodrome in Montreal, Trafalgar Square in London (I know this would require approvals and planning for some spots), Central Park in NYC (again, approvals) etc. etc. Don't worry about intricate and costly conceptual staging...just two large video screens and a simple, effective festival style stage. Sure, they could offer a bit of expensive VIP side-stage seating at these "GA" shows for the people who want to feel special about themselves (like we do in Ottawa, ON for Bluesfest) but for the most part it would be one, simple affordable price (say $100.00 per GA ticket, all fees/taxes in). This would take care of four requirements: 1-It would increase the supply of U2 GA tickets in a given market for those who wish to see a U2 show from that vantage point, thereby impacting the pricing that scalpers can charge: More supply = less demand = lower prices. 2-It would still allow U2 to play arenas with their tour-specific conceptual staging, and stay profitable. Remember, the staging/setup for the GA larger venue/field show would be far less intricate and costly to setup, tear down, and run. 3-It would satisfy those who wish to see the tour in the arena as it is currently, have the disposable income for premium ticket prices, while also offering some GA options and sensible pricing in the arena for those who are lucky enough to score the seats. 4-It would give the band an opportunity on the GA specific show to deviate from static set lists, play new tracks, b-sides etc. since a larger proportion of that audience is likely to be of a die-hard, longtime fan type. I think without a rigid structure to adhere to, U2 could really do some amazing things and let the music speak for itself....maybe re-discover the "Slack Alice" sound, as Bono once said. I know that you can't please everyone, and unfortunately, the current model being employed doesn't seem to be pleasing anyone. Bottom line, as a concept, this would produce a show that a lot of die hard GA loving U2 fans would probably appreciate, and make more GA's available to the general public. If the power of technology can weed out scalpers, the power of technology could also go a long way to making such shows special...think of a live Twitter fan vote for a segment of songs to be played during the show. Personally, I love all of U2's work, would go to all types of shows, and I am not a huge fan of GA. My wife is 4' 11" tall, and I'm 5' 7". So unless it's a stadium show, GA is useless to me because someone taller than me always blocks my view. Therefore, I tend to spring for the seats, or Red Zone on this tour. I'm lucky in that I am ok with paying for the VIP Gold or Silver seats. I don't spend on much else unless it's guitars, U2, Bruce Springsteen or Eric Church, and I know the days for which I'll be able to see Bruce or U2 perform are numbered. So though I think ticket prices have gone up significantly, I realize that supply and demand sets the market and I cut back on other expenses where I can to subsidize my concert fix. Anyways, YMMV, just some thoughts, I realize that some of these ideas may run counter to the basic concept of economics.....coincidently, so did the ZooTV tour ;-)
  3. "Limited View"

    I'll actually be quite happy when this whole I&E / E&I staging setup is retired for good. I find it to be obtrusive and divisive to a great concert experience. Some of the best shows I have ever seen were from the opposite end of the arena from the stage (Vertigo, Toronto 2005) where you get to really take in the entire perspective, Streets alone from that vantage point is amazing. On this tour, those seats have been reduced to limited view and wasted. The sound on this tour will be excellent, through their recent advances, but I really hope they take a step back and exercise a sober second thought about that screen down the centre. The cons far outweigh the pros IMHO.
  4. The Toronto Maple Leafs won't go that deep into the playoffs, so plenty of opportunity exists for E&I shows at the Air Canada Centre ;-) Having said that, I snagged Montreal with my experience code, and I'll wait to see what shows/cities are added later.
  5. Montreal is going to ROCK June 5th!

    2 Redzones for the missus and I. I didn't have any issues during the experience presale. Was in & out in 4 minutes. I also think we are lucky to have been through Evenko, sounds like TM was a disaster.
  6. American Soul or The Blackout as openers?

    The Blackout would be a killer opener for sure, followed up by The Electric Co!
  7. Stage Set Up / Seat Layouts

    That Nassau plan really doesn't appear correct. The staging is a rehash of the I&E stage, according to every other link. It won't be revised for a single show. The mix control section is where the B-stage goes, and there are no red zones indicated.
  8. Last tour for a while?

    Look up the recent interview at the end of the Joshua Tree 2017 tour with Dutch interviewer Ruud De Wild on Youtube. 2 parts. Bono & The Edge seem pretty optimistic about the future for U2 and seem to look at this upcoming album as another era for the band, where the songwriting is about to get really interesting and the band feels that they can really tap a well to sustain them for a long time to come. Interesting stuff.
  9. Montreal

    Easily got 2 Red Zone for Adam's side in Montreal. Spent about 2 mins in virtual waiting room. I used my desktop as Evenko doesn't have an app, and I was leery about being redirected from TM to Evenko.
  10. Smoothest presale ever

    Very easy for me with Montreal. Got 2 Red Zone on Adam's side. Happy fan here!
  11. You're The Best Thing About Me (New Single)

    It's a bit of a grower for me...can't say I love it, but it's not bad. Any time new U2 music comes into the world, that's a good thing. Now, The Blackout on the other hand....I loved that tune right from the first few notes. That vibe really has me excited and I hope the new album leans more toward that vein than Best Thing. The second half of Little Things.....brilliant as well. Lyrically, just as revealing as Mofo.
  12. Joshua Tree Bono 2017 versus Joshua Tree Bono 1987

    Ummm....have you watched Bad from I&E Live in Paris? RTSS from the Vertigo Tour DVD? In all honesty, while I appreciate the 1987 period, I find that Bono was over-singing some of those songs at that time. His more nuanced delivery from AB forward is more pleasing IMO. His lower register has never sounded better than The Troubles from SOI I have a will for survival So you can hurt me And then hurt me some more I can live with denial But you’re not my troubles anymore There are some songs that give him fits these days....With Or Without You is one of them...but I think he will deliver a strong set of shows this year.
  13. I would love them to OPEN with 'Streets' ! (MERGED)

    I appreciate your argument, but Springsteen handled his River 2016 shows in a slightly different method than you submit. For The River 2016 arena shows, that formed the crux of the actual original announced tour in the US in the winter of 2016, Bruce played The River in its entirety, in sequence, after opening with Meet Me In The City. He knew that the majority of those shows would have hardcore fans coming out in the dead of winter, especially in the northeastern US, and therefore the crowd would be more receptive to this type of performance. It was only when the tour expanded to stadiums overseas, and then back to football stadiums in the US on later legs that he steered away from the original structure and made it a looser setlist, again, as he noted on SiriusXM that the type of crowd a stadium typically draws might not be as receptive to such a rigid structure, and he might be pulling in some more casual fans, which would result in a tweaking of the setlist. But to characterize Bruce as "getting bored" with the River concept in its entirety goes against everything that he was on record as saying during his last tour. The tour was extended, and the setlists got looser as it went along, necessitated by its growth into stadiums. I've seen Bruce play approx. 53 times, including 5 on the River 2016 tour, and the original structured shows from the start of the tour were some of the most transcendent I have ever seen him play. The E Street Band was tight as well, given the structure they had in place. My favorite U2 album is Achtung Baby, but I really think the theme of this tour needs to focus away from that period, if it's going to make sense. I agree with you 100%, I say open with Streets, and don't look back.
  14. Nervous For The New Tour?

    U2 has always had a little brother/big brother relationship with Bruce Springsteen. I'm a huge U2 fan, and a huge Bruce fan, so I feel I can offer a perspective on both artists simultaneously. Just over a year ago, Bruce announced The River Tour 2016 in celebration of The Ties That Bind/River boxed set. A lot of his fanbase was skeptical about their hero touring behind a retrospective boxed set, feeling that he had run out of new ideas, etc. Being 36 years old currently, I missed out on Bruce in the eighties, my first chance to see him was the 1999/2000 reunion tour, and I've seen him multiple times on every tour since. This past run of The River-in-its-entirety shows were among the very best I have seen him and the E Street Band play. They honoured the material, while injecting new life into the songs, despite sticking to original arrangements and keeping things tight. Plus the remaining songs within the show that were played after the River portion was completed only served to add to the concept of the show as a whole. Critical reviews were positive, and the response from the fan base was great once the tour got rolling and people could appreciate the tour for what it was....a celebration of some f@cking great rock 'n roll, and something that Bruce identified as his first album where he moved from dream-based rock 'n roll to actual characters, and how those characters and stories chose to use the finite amount of time within their adult lives to move forward. Bono has gone on record multiple times stating that U2 has looked to Bruce for inspiration over the years. I think they considered the success of Bruce's tour last year when evaluating the potential of a Joshua Tree tour this year, and are looking to build public interest for an upcoming release of new material, so they are playing their trump card (excuse the pun). The other night, I saw a TV commercial for The Joshua Tree tour....when was the last time we saw a commercial for a U2 concert in TV prime time (other than their NLOTH/360 Comcast bit with the Super Bowl a few years ago?). Make no mistake, the true measure of an artist is their ability to release engaging material until they reach their final act, but I have no problems with U2 revisiting The Joshua Tree and using it as a touchstone, a reset. Like it or not, and despite the fact that they are the biggest band on the planet, U2 is no longer the flashpoint band they were from 1986-1993. I would argue that POP was their victory lap for that period, ATYCLB/Vertigo was a renaissance for the band whose catalyst was fueled by the unplanned link between ATYCLB and the events of Sept. 11th/2001 (not implying that the band tried to cash in on Sept 11th, at all, just simply acknowledging that after Sept 11th, a lot of people REALLY took ATYCLB to heart, its songs, its messages, its theme). Since that period, the band has been searching for.....something. The biggest, most engaging live show? Yes for sure. But the fuel that fires the creative aspect of the band? They have not been able to find it, that theme, that arc. The Joshua Tree 2017 tour will put U2 back in the realm of public awareness, it's too important of an album not to. In my opinion, given the band's age and collective inertia, this is their last chance to bring in the masses who may have tuned out over the years, to re-introduce them to the band, and offer something new for the future. Not saying that it's their last chance to be a great band, they already are and always will be. But if they are searching for that cultural relevance that they so desire, it very well is, IMO. The only way to play these shows is to start them off full throttle with Streets, play the full JT album with fire, then move into the rest of their repertoire that defines the BEST themes of U2. No high art concepts, just searing & smoldering rock 'n roll. Not saying greatest hits, just their BEST work. They know what it is. Don't get cold feet, don't play JT backwards, don't dodge RHMT...play it as 4 men in 2017 would play it. If they do that well, and round out the show with all killer, no filler, this could be one of their most memorable tours. I am looking forward to it.
  15. Just keep in mind that some of the GA labeling can be misleading via Ticketmaster or the venue sites, main thing to keep in mind that GA for U2 is always standing only....I've seen every tour since Elevation, and I have never seen any seats on the floor for GA during any of U2's shows.