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The Action Thread Part Two


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#741 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 08:55 PM

Via ONE

158
EDUCATION More than a data point: Making sure every girl counts

 

March 13 2017  | By: MEGAN O'DONNELL
GIRLS COUNT Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

Data, calculations, statistics: words that may not exactly make you burst with excitement. But when we talk about eliminating extreme poverty or HIV/AIDS, getting girls into school and keeping them safe from violence and discrimination, or improving the lives of billions struggling to get by across the world, data all of a sudden becomes intensely personal—and extremely necessary.

That’s because—more often than not—every data point represents a person. When we’re making progress according to the numbers, that means a girl is going to school, a mom is having a healthy baby, or a person is receiving treatment for AIDS. Other times data reflects a girl who was married too young, a teenager who has become infected with HIV, or a child who has died from a mosquito bite—this is where we know we need to double down.

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Students from Nyange Secondary School, Kilombero Region, Tanzania. (Photo credit: Sam Vox/ONE)

So data needs to be the foundation for the decisions we make when seeking to save lives, improve the quality of education, increase incomes and stabilize societies. Policymaking around these issues is complex; you can’t do it on a hunch. But we currently face a sexist data crisis where traditional data collection methods have not allowed us to focus on the issues most relevant to women and girls’ lives. When it comes to tackling the world’s development challenges, especially for women and girls, we need more and better data to answer three key questions:

1. What’s the problem?

Data, and especially data that is disaggregated (or separated out by sex, age, income level, and a variety of other characteristics), allows us to understand the different conditions and constraints people face.

What groups of people are less likely to have access to a healthcare facility, school or high-quality job? Who is more likely to use a bank account, get a loan, or travel freely outside of their homes and communities?

Regularly collecting and disseminating disaggregated data is the only way to answer these questions, and this data will shed light on the problems we need to tackle – the fact, for example, that girls in the poorest countries are less likely to finish school, and women worldwide are less likely to be in the workforce.

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Students at Nyange Secondary School, Kilombero Region, Tanzania. (Photo credit: Sam Vox/ONE)

2. Are we making progress?

Especially with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) front and center on the development agenda, we need a way to make sure that new policies and investments are leading to progress – and leaving no one behind in the process. Data captured by the SDG indicators will allow us to see if we’re making progress in improving girls’ and women’s lives through 2030 (and beyond).

3. What’s working (and not working)?

In many ways, these are the hardest questions to answer—and where efforts to improve data have the farthest to go. We still have improvements to make with regard to data collection on problems and progress, especially around disaggregation, to be sure, but we have even more work to do to generate the data that tells us whether the projects and interventions we invest in are effective—and for whom.

To improve data enabling us to answer all of these questions, and to ensure that data gets in the hands of the advocates and policymakers that need it to inform decision-making, ONE is partnering on a new initiative: Equal Measures 2030. To fight the sexist data crisis, we’ve joined forces with Arrow, Data2X, FEMNET, the Gates Foundation, IWHC, KPMG, Plan International and Women Deliver to track progress for women and girls under the SDGs and bridge the gap between data and advocacy to improve their lives.

Learn more about Equal Measures 2030 on Twitter or by visiting the website, where you can learn more about our mission and weigh in on the data we’re focusing on.



#742 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 19 March 2017 - 09:45 PM

Some nice Sunday listening as SoundOUT tutor Graham McCarthy is interviewed as Dave Mac's local legend on Corks RedFM 104-106 after Cillian Mc Sweeney and Circles EP launch. Here's the podcast - scroll to March 3rd!

 

http://www.redfm.ie/on-air/podcasts/dave-macs-local-legend/

 

Via Music Generation



#743 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:13 PM

writing_image.jpg?itok=aWb3v6Tt
Launch of Music Writer Mentoring Scheme for Galway and Clare
Scheme seeking applications from new and emerging music writers in Galway City and Clare County.

The Journal of Music, in partnership with the arts offices of Galway City Council and Clare County Council, has today (13 March 2017) announced two exciting mentoring schemes to encourage the next generation of music writers in the West of Ireland.

‘Next Generation Music Writers’ – a 12-month scheme dedicated to discovering new and emerging music writers –  is now seeking applications from writers in County Clare and Galway City.

The scheme has been developed by Toner Quinn, Editor of The Journal of Music, in collaboration with Siobhán Mulcahy, Arts Officer with Clare County Council, and James Harrold, Arts Officer with Galway City Council.

Commenting on the scheme, Ms Mulcahy said:

Clare County Council is delighted to initiate this scheme with The Journal of Music and welcomes the focus it will bring to music events happening in the county over the next twelve months. The Journal of Music has a huge national and international following which offers opportunities for wide and varied exposure to Clare events and musicians in the coming year. The professional development of writers interested in covering such activities is welcomed, as investment in creative discourse, particularly in rural areas, is key in the further development of music as an artform. 

Mr Harrold commented: 

Galway City Council is pleased to co-develop the project as a mentoring programme for emerging music writers who will engage with the city’s thriving music scene, in genres from traditional to metal, from classical to jazz, punk and the full range of contemporary sounds. As Galway gears up for European Capital of Culture our west coast arts writers will have a lot to write about!  

The two schemes are separate and five writers are being sought for each. Over 12 months, the writers will work with the editorial team of The Journal of Music, developing their writing and working towards publication. 

The Journal of Music has previously won an international editorial award for arts coverage, and, since 2008, Quinn has been a lecturer on the MAin Literature and Publishing at NUI Galway. 

Toner Quinn commented, 

Writing about music is not like dancing about architecture, as the cliché goes. The writing about a music can actually affect the fortunes of a music. I believe this mentoring scheme is a terrific opportunity to contribute to musical life in Galway City and Clare County and I’m very much looking forward to working with the writers.

For a PDF containing full details on how to apply, please send an email tosubmissions@journalofmusic com stating which scheme you are interested in, Galway City or Clare County. The deadline for applications is 14 April 2017 at 5pm.

The Journal of Music is supported by the Arts Council.

Published on 13 March 2017

 

Via Music Generation



#744 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 12:26 PM

Marketing and Communications Officer

BY IAYO · MARCH 6, 2017

 

The Irish Association of Youth Orchestras is recruiting for a Marketing and Communications Officer to work at their office in Cork City. This is a new role in the company and an opportunity for the position-holder to contribute to the development of youth orchestras and youth music throughout Ireland with a wide, but manageable, portfolio of activity to a variety of stakeholders and the general public.

Role Title: Marketing and Communications Officer

Location: Civic Trust House, 50 Pope’s Quay, Cork.

Contract: Permanent full-time (37.5 hours per week). There is a 6-month probationary period. Annual leave of 25 days per annum. Some weekend work may be required for which time-off-in-lieu will be given as per the IAYO Employee Handbook. There is currently no pension scheme operated by IAYO – employees will be facilitated in a PRSA.

Salary: €28k-€30k depending on skills and experience.

Application Deadline: Monday, 27 March 2017 at 10am

Interviews: Interviews will take place on Friday 21 April 2017 at the IAYO Offices in Cork (subject to confirmation). Online interviews may be offered to candidates resident outside of the Republic of Ireland.

How to Apply: Application for the post is by application form and cover letter.

Downloads

IAYO Marketing and Communications Officer Application Pack (.pdf)

IAYO Application Form (Microsoft Word)

IAYO Application Form (OpenDocument Text or OpenOffice / LibreOffice)

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Via Music Generation



#745 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:27 PM

77
EDUCATION #GirlsCount: ONE’s new campaign for girls’ education

 

March 5 2017  | By: MEAGAN BOND
JOIN THE COUNT Girls Count

130 million girls didn’t go to school today. Not because they didn’t want to, but because they weren’t given the chance.

 
 
  

130 million girls didn’t go to school today.

Not because they didn’t want to, but because they weren’t given the chance.

They are denied an education for a variety of reasons, from cultural norms and costs, to violence and extremism. The result is that these 130 million girls don’t have a fair chance to live a decent and productive life, and the entire world misses out by not benefitting from their potential.

This is a global crisis—we need to sound the alarm to our elected officials. It’s up to us to push them to mobilize resources and support key policy reforms that get these girls in school.

130 million is a big number. But this isn’t about numbers: It’s about real girls with hopes and dreams being denied the fair chance of a future.

So on March 8—International Women’s Day—we’re going to make the world pay attention to these girls by counting them.

One by one.

Out loud.

All the way to 130 million.

One number for every girl denied an education.

We’re asking you to join us in creating something that can’t be ignored. If one person did this alone it would take them more than five years, so we’re going to come together across all our divides to get this done.

This will take as little as five minutes of your time. People of all countries, faiths, races, genders, and political ideologies are welcome. Everyone will take the same action: Claim a number and film yourself counting it out loud for our elected officials to hear and see.

If you believe ALL #GirlsCount, choose your number. Join the count. Fight for girls’ education.
International Womens Day 2017

A Letter to Leaders You couldn't be where you are today without a good education. But because poverty is sexist, 130 million girls across the world are denied this basic right. Indeed, if the number of girls out of school formed a country, it would be the tenth largest on the planet - bigger than Japan or Germany. All children deserve a good education, but in the poorest countries girls are denied it more often than boys. Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Every additional year of school that a girl completes increases her future earnings, which is good for her family, her community and her country. We cannot afford to squander the potential of 130 million girls to cure diseases or end wars, invent brilliant technology or revolutionize an industry...or simply to access opportunity. We are coming together and uniting across our divides to get every girl into school and to make sure she gets a quality education once she's there. But we need you to do the same. Your education helped you to get where you are today - and it's in your power to help millions of girls to get theirs. Please act now, with the right policies and the necessary funds. Show us that politics can work for the people - starting with the people who need it most.


Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca, 20 March 2017 - 11:28 PM.


#746 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:37 PM

Via Global Citizen

 
ENVIRONMENT Meet Tia Hatton, a Global Citizen of America Who's Suing Trump Over Climate Change

By Joe McCarthy|

 March 17, 2017

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

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Environmentalists have called on the world to abandon fossil fuels for decades, yet emissions keep rising and climate change gets worse each year.

For Our Children's Trust, this lack of meaningful action by those in power hasn't led to fatigue. Instead, it's emboldened them to try new tactics.

Their relentless outlook led to the historic Juliana et Al. V United States lawsuit in August, 2015, a case waged by 21 young people aged 9-20 who are suing the federal government for violating the constitutional rights of future generations by failing to regulate the environment. 

In 2016, an appeals court ruled in their favor, sending shockwaves throughout the legal system and setting the stage for a monumental legal battle. US District Judge Ann Aiken wrote at the time, “Exercising my ‘reasoned judgment,’ I have no doubt that the right to a climate system capable of sustaining human life is fundamental to a free and ordered society.” 

Read More: The Great Barrier Reef Is on Death’s Door, Thanks to Climate Change

Tia Hatton is one of the 21 plaintiffs in the lawsuit, and she's part of a broader group of youth advocates called the Earth Guardians

The lawsuit was Hatton's first experience of activism and it plunged her into the uphill battle of environmental advocacy.

She's from Bend, Oregon, where she developed an abiding passion for nature, and now she's studying environmental and international studies at the University of Oregon. 

"Activism is both fighting to change what one doesn’t like in the system, and working within this system to make active change."

Her advocacy has imbued in her a deep sense of global citizenship. After all, few issues are as global in scope and encompassing as climate change. 

Recently, Hatton answered a few questions via email for Global Citizen about her journey and why she's a global citizen. 

How did you get involved in this movement?

 

After a bad year of snow in Bend during my senior year of high school, I wanted to know how I could get involved in the movement. The law professor Mary Wood came to speak to high schoolers in Bend about the work that youth in Eugene were doing.

Youth in Eugene, including some of my fellow plaintiffs on the federal case, had gone to city council meetings repeatedly asking for a climate action plan to be passed. The other high schoolers and I were interested in doing the same thing in Bend. Since I would soon move to Eugene to start school at the University of Oregon, I wanted to see how I could get involved with Our Children’s Trust in Eugene.

screen_shot_2017-03-16_at_110821_pm.png_Tia Hatton

Kelsey Juliana, the lead plaintiff on our case, emailed me in early summer 2015 presenting the opportunity to become a part of a special lawsuit taking meaningful action against climate change: suing Obama and his administration for violating our constitutional rights. I agreed, after asking my parent’s permission.

Read More: Global Warming Is Heating Earth’s Oceans Much Faster Than Previously Believed

The lawsuit for me was my first big step in climate action. I have learned so much since becoming a part of the suit, both about the injustices of climate change, and also about the government’s long-standing knowledge [of the issue].

Are there any specific sub-issues that climate change encompasses that particularly motivate you? 

 

I’m particularly worried about the fact that many low-lying nations are abruptly feeling the impacts of climate change. There’s no doubt who the largest emitters are, yet developed countries have more resources to fight the outcomes of climate change. Those feeling the worst impacts have less resources to deal with the problem, and this is a huge environmental justice issue.

From a very personal aspect, I am saddened and motivated by changing weather patterns and increasing temperatures that are decreasing snow levels. When there is low snow in the Cascade Mountain Range (the main mountain range in Oregon) both Bend and Eugene see hits toward their summer water levels. It’s troublesome.

"The costs and burdens of climate change fall on us youth, and even more on future generations."

From a recreational standpoint I love to Nordic and downhill ski, snowshoe, and just play in the snow! It’s was such a huge part of winters growing up, and it’s part of my story. To think that my future kids may not be able to experience winter the same way I did is saddening. This applies to anyone’s favorite natural recreational areas: how will they be affected? Will water be available to support necessary life in these areas?

Simply put, climate change isn’t fair to a lot of people, including future generations.

screen_shot_2017-03-16_at_110836_pm.png_Tia Hatton

How has this experience helped you to better understand the challenges and opportunities of activism?

 

Growing up, I didn’t really understand the political system as it is today. When you take part in activism, or even just education, you realize the complexities of the political system. I am a firm believer that climate change shouldn’t be a political issue, but it is.

In activism, one challenge is that there are these political divides within issues that shouldn't have any. Activism is both fighting to change what one doesn’t like in the system, and working within this system to make active change. There’s a balance to be found.

Read More: Norway Just Proved That a Future With 100% Renewable Energy Cars Is Possible

Activism is also extremely empowering and effective. A few years ago, I didn’t realize how simple it was to get your voice heard. Sending a letter to a representative is a simple and easy was to participate.

Why is it important for young people like you to be leading this fight?

 

I believe giving young people the opportunity to get their voice heard is very important. I didn’t realize my capacity to be heard in the political system growing up, and I assumed the government had my best interest in mind. This is not always the case, and I wish I had known sooner what I could have done. Giving young people these tools gives them the ability to be leaders from an early age.

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Specifically concerning our federal lawsuit, the other plaintiffs and I know we are going to be disproportionately affected by climate change. The people making our energy and infrastructure decisions (within the Trump administration) will not be alive to feel the worst impacts. The costs and burdens of climate change fall on us youth, and even more on future generations. For much of history, governments felt they had an inherent duty to protect resources: called the Public Trust. The public trust is part of the basis of our lawsuit.

Why is a lawsuit the right channel for change?

 

The courts, the 3rd branch of government, have the ability to make the other branches do their jobs when they are failing. There has been decades of research done by the government into the “apocalyptic” effects of climate change, yet little to no action by our government. The issue is riddled with special interests, and the courts are largely away from this political show we have in the United States.

Read More: Trump's Travel Ban Just Suffered a Second Blow, Thanks to These States

With 21 plaintiffs of diverse backgrounds, is there a sense of global citizenship woven throughout what you're doing?

 

I’ve been able to learn a lot from the other plaintiffs about the impacts of climate change and its effects on various places and cultures. The plaintiffs live across the United States, from Hawaii, to Alaska, to Florida, and New York. Some have Native American heritage and their sacred lands and cultures are being threatened from the impacts. Some have farms that are essential to their stories as people.

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
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Written by Joe McCarthy

 

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.



#747 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:43 PM

Manchester Mayoral hustings
20 March 2017

Ahead of the Manchester Mayoral elections on 4 May, Jonathan and Teddy quizzed the main candidates about the issues that matter to them - including housing and cuts to local services

claire.jpgClaire Tritton
Breadcrumb

Tell us a bit about yourselves

Teddy O’Neill

Teddy%20copy%20350x350_0.pngI live in a supported living service. I am 30 years old. I recently did some volunteering for Mencap that led me to be a part of the ‘Step-Up’ programme, which is an employability course to help people get into work. As a result, I have gained paid employment, working for Mencap as a support worker. I have lots of hobbies including theatrical arts. I like to do my own acting and blogging that I post to my YouTube channel.

Jonathan Shaw

Jonathan%20350x350_0.pngI’m a volunteer for Golden Lane Housing and like to keep busy with lots of other activities in my spare time.  I also swim and compete for a disabled swimming club. I won a gold medal last year and a trophy and I want to carry on improving. I like going on holiday with my friends, we're planning to go to Centre Parcs in May and I'm having a family holiday later this year.

What are the important issues for you as a person with a learning disability?

Teddy: Helping people in local services. More support for people to get out and about and into the community. There needs to be more funding to keep local centres and community places open for people with a learning disability, because lots of places have been closed down due to lack of funding.

Jonathan: Housing and health. I live in my own flat and am supported by Leonard Cheshire. I like being independent. Last year I was ill and had to have a stay in hospital. I was lucky that I received good treatment but I know lots of people don't. My parents were fantastic and stayed with me at the hospital but lots of people don't have that kind of support. I have a really close family and we all stick together. 

Did the candidates have answer for the issues that were important to you?

Jonathan: Yes, I think they understood the issues, especially about the accessible toilets. They talked a lot though, so I kept having to give them 1 minute warnings.

Teddy: It was okay. They dealt with issues that were spoken about but often its things that I’ve already heard before. They all seemed energetic and want to do thing to help but cuts to funding always cause issues. There are always cuts.

Did you think the answers they gave were accessible / easy to understand?

Teddy: Yes, in a way, for the people here today. But it was done in quite a casual form.

Jonathan: Yes they explained things well. I felt that they gave thorough answers and I hope that they will keep their promises.

What would you like the next mayor of Manchester to do to make the city a better place for people with a learning disability?

Teddy: We want the city to be more accessible to people with disabilities. Maybe there could be improvements to access such as fire exits, toilets and access for people to get around. A lot has been invested into the bus network but they are very narrow buses if you have a wheelchair. Sometimes people cannot get on the bus because they are overcrowded. So maybe there needs to be an option for a community bus for people who have a disability, or maybe there should be more buses so they aren't so busy.

Jonathan: I'd like them to create more job opportunities, I think it's so difficult to get a job. I volunteer but I'd like to get a paid job in an office. I'd like something near to home. I'd need support to get a job and I'd need support at work.

If you were mayor for the day, what would you like to do for people with a learning disability?

Teddy: Book a holiday! Only joking. I would listen to the issues of people with a learning disability. I would also want to make paths and roads more accessible. But there is too much to do in one day!

Jonathan: I would like to change how the city runs, I'd want to make sure people with a learning disability have the same rights, can use public transport and feel safe. A lot of the buses now use ticket machines and I struggle to use my bus pass. This creates a barrier for me when using buses that are operated by certain companies. There needs to be more funding for services and activities for people with a learning disability.

What are your hopes for the future?

Teddy: To work for Mencap and to do what I can to support people. I'd like to grow in self-confidence. I'd also like for Greater Manchester to have fewer cuts to services and for there to be more activities for people with a learning disability. I'd like there to be more funding for charities working in the local community.

Jonathan: I would like to keep improving myself, learn new skills and get a paid job near to home. I am realistic about what I want and would like an admin job that pays enough to cover my bills. I run an activity club for Leonard Cheshire the first Tuesday of every month for people with a learning disability.

 

Via Mencap



#748 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:44 PM

Isn't it annoying when you miss out on something everyone else is enjoying? When a great opportunity is out there, but you just don't know it at the time?

Don't miss out when it comes to your health. If you have a learning disability, tell your doctor. They can make changes to the care you get and make things a bit easier. You could also get a free health check every year.

Be healthy, be happy, don't miss out. Find out more atwww.mencap.org.uk/dontmissout

 

 

Via Mencap



#749 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:46 PM

Do you support someone who has a learning disability and poor eyesight? SeeAbility want to improve access to eye care for people with a learning disability, and to do so they want to hear from you!

Have you, or someone you support, found it hard to get eye care because of a learning disability? Have you been put off by costs of sight tests or glasses?

Share you story by emailing s.kill@seeability.org

 

 

17358909_10155070462251354_7266358694222

 

 

Via Mencap



#750 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:48 PM

The first day of spring is making us extra happy today. #internationaldayofhappiness

 

17264904_10155292220888714_3930002079762

 

Via (RED)



#751 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 11:51 PM

MARCH 15, 2017 HOW MY DAUGHTER TAUGHT ME TO DREAM

 

This is a Guest Blog Post by (RED) Ambassador Constance Mudenda

It’s a milestone like no other: your child’s first day of school.

It’s a dream most moms and dads around the world have for their children – that one day, they’ll watch their little ones head off to school. But not for me. It’s something I never even dreamed of because My first-born child died one week before her first day of school. I lost all three of my children to AIDS before treatment was available in my home country of Zambia.

That was then, and this is now. Today I’m a proud mom to my daughter Lubona – born HIV free in 2012. She brings so much joy and happiness into my life. Seeing her going to school in her tiny little uniform every morning makes me want to continue sleeping so that I don’t wake up from this beautiful dream…but it’s not a dream. It is real. She is alive, she is healthy and she is HIV free.

Every day she comes home from school and teaches me something new. The other day she came home and said to me, “let’s go outside and play hop scotch!” WHAT? I had no idea what she was talking about, but then she showed me how.

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

I am the student; she is my teacher. She’s the most important teacher I’ve ever had in my life.

Every day she brings new lessons into my life. I’m learning more than ever before, even when I was in school. One thing I love about her is that she is a quick learner. She never forgets what the teacher tells her. She has even learned to write her name (although she only goes halfway with her surname because she claims that it is too long. She writes Mwachi instead of Mwanachilenga. No amount of persuasion will make her go beyond that!) She can also write 1 through to 50 without my help. I want her to reach 100 before the term ends, and I know she can.

She the top student in her class and has not swayed away from her dream: to be a doctor. She’s tired of treating her dolls, she tells me. She wants to treat real people now.

What do I dream for my daughter? That she continues working hard at school so that one day, she will see her dream come true.

 

 
Via (RED)


#752 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:08 AM

The woman teaching Ghana’s kids to code

 

7 January 2016 12:35PM UTC  | By: JOY ELLIOTT
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This week we’ve had the honour of speaking to Ghana Code Club founder Ernestina Edem Appiah about her rise from IT secretary to kick-ass coder, business owner, NGO founder and spearhead of coding in Ghanaian schools!

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Photo credit: Ghana Code Club

Thanks for chatting with us Ernestina! Can you tell us what the Ghana Code Club is about?

Technology is reinventing the world. Kids need new skills to prepare them for a successful career in the future but the current ICT (Information Communications Technology) curriculum does not include them which is quite alarming. This is where Ghana Code Club comes in. It is a volunteer led, after-school digital fun club that equips children between the ages of 8-17 years with coding skills. We have piloted with five schools and are ready to be launched into the majority of schools in Ghana during the first quarter of 2016.

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Photo credit: Ghana Code Club

What events in your life & career led you to create the Ghana Code Club?

I always dreamed of leading a team of IT professionals in creating cutting-edge solutions for Africa. This passion emerged when I worked for an IT firm in Accra back in 2000 as a secretary. I admired the IT consultants so much, especially the only lady among them. I remember I took home only about 10% of what the IT professionals earned at the time. I wanted to enroll on an HTML course (HTML is the standard coding language used to create webpages) but the little money I earned I used to take care of my siblings. Instead of waiting forever, I decided to teach myself any way I could. I got in touch with a web designer who for a small fee introduced me to the basics of HTML. I practiced any time I got the chance and within weeks, I was designing my own websites.

Eventually, with more confidence in my skills, I took out a  classified ad promoting myself as a virtual assistant and took on four clients, including one web-based telecom company in the USA. In 2004 I was able to resign as a secretary, rent an office and eventually hire people to provide additional support.

A mere company’s secretary who was almost not noticed turned it around to become a business owner with international clients, paying employee salaries, mentoring people, assisting start-ups financially in my own small way, paying for college education fees for not less than five people – all because of that small change I made in my life and the new skills I learned!

I was so grateful and so happy with my progress that I wanted to do something to empower others with the kind of skill set that got me this far. I registered the NGO, Healthy Career Initiative in 2007 with the objective of empowering students with the skill set they will need to thrive in the 21st century but unfortunately it remained relatively inactive due to my heavy workload. Then I got married and had children and things slowed down even further as  I realized I needed to work from home and be there for my kids when they needed me.

One day, when my boy was 5, I was searching the internet for a simple programming platform to start teaching him and came across a blog about kids learning to code in the UK and the kind of things they were building that triggered my enthusiasm for my inactive NGO. All of a sudden, I wanted Ghanaian kids to create the same exciting digital stuff kids in the developed world were creating. Things like interactive stories, websites, games and animation. Immediately, I put plans together and Ghana Code Club was born.

What is the best part of your job?

The best part of my job is being in the classroom with the kids feeling empowered that they have created things that can be used by another person from any part of the world. The smiles on their faces make me feel wonderful and hopeful that these kids will go on to develop the digital footprint of Ghana and Africa and impact the world as a whole.

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Photo credit: Ghana Code Club

Do you think Ghana needs to place more importance on technology & connectivity? How would this change the country?

Technology is the catalyst to development in every country so Ghana also needs to emphasise its importance and steer resources towards technological advancement.

Every home should have access to a computer and the internet. Then if kids can get trained in the right skills, the country will breed more entrepreneurs, innovators and problem solvers who are needed in every ministry to develop logical thinking, persist at tasks and learn to collaborate to develop the nation and the world.

What are your aims for 2016?

We aim to launch into 20 or more schools within the first quarter of 2016 reaching not less than 20,000 children. We also hope to organise an inter-school competition to see the impact of creativity, problem-solving and collaborative skills within our code club members. We then hope to establish a training centre that will assist deprived children who in one way or another wish to participate in our code clubs but are unable to. We are always looking for support and donations to carry out our plans successfully!

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Photo credit: Ghana Code Club

If, like Ernestina, you believe connectivity is key to achieving humankind’s Global Goals – head to our Connect the World page to pledge your support!

Via ONE



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Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:11 AM

Poverty is Sexist: Why educating every girl is good for everyone

 

March 5 2017

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Life is harsh for almost everyone in the world’s poorest countries, but life is tougher for women and girls. They are less likely to be in school, less likely to have the same opportunities for work and less likely to have a say in their own lives than their brothers. But while the gender gap appears to be entrenched and intractable, there is one intervention that would go a long way toward improving these circumstances if there is the political will to support it.

Education is one of the most powerful weapons in the fight against extreme poverty. Its centrality to achieving the wider set of Sustainable Development Goals is clear. There is a wealth of evidence to show that an educated country is one that is healthier, wealthier and more stable – and that universal, quality education is one of the best antidotes to poverty. To put it bluntly, we won’t end extreme poverty without prioritising education, particularly for girls.

ONE’s Poverty is Sexist report aims to draw attention to the crisis – and opportunity – around girls’ education and demonstrate why educating girls is a smart investment. This report exposes how educating a girl for a day costs less than a loaf of bread or a daily newspaper. Yet this is one of the best bets we can make. Educating every girl to secondary level in sub-Saharan Africa could help save the lives of 1.2 million children. Educating girls to the same level as boys could benefit developing countries to the tune of at least $112 billion a year. It also helps stabilise societies that are vulnerable to extremism. Failing to make such an impactful and cost effective investment now amounts to an emergency that we cannot ignore.

The report calls on leaders in government, civil society and business to respond to this crisis and seize the opportunity with a bold plan for ensuring every girl has an education.

DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT (PDF format)

###

About ONE
ONE is a campaigning and advocacy organization of more than 7 million people taking action to end extreme poverty and preventable disease, particularly in Africa. Not politically partisan, we raise public awareness and press political leaders to combat AIDS and preventable diseases, increase investments in agriculture and nutrition, and demand greater transparency in poverty-fighting programs.

 

Via ONE



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Posted 21 March 2017 - 12:25 AM

Via ONE

312
TECHNOLOGY Gender data solutions go local: 6 innovative projects from Côte d’Ivoire

 

February 3 2017  | By: GUEST BLOGGER
JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty
 
  

This post by Katy Johnson, Data2X Consultant, originally appeared on Millennium Challenge Corporation’s blog.

An app that connects pregnant women with health providers. Jewelry that stores medical information. A web program that lays out career trajectories for girls. These are not typical solutions to gaps in gender data.

Indeed, most conversations about solutions to gender data gaps revolve around partnerships and broad coalitions that bring together governments, international agencies, and philanthropic organizations. Most of these conversations do not take place at the local level, with the people who are most affected by the gaps in data.

Enter TechMousso.

TechMousso, the first of its kind gender data competition, was created precisely to respond to the need for locally driven, innovative solutions to gaps in gender data. A joint initiative between Data2X, the World Wide Web Foundation, MCC, and several dozen organizations and ministries in Côte d’Ivoire, the competition paired the local tech community with civil society organizations working on women’s issues. In so doing, TechMousso put the task of solving gender data challenges directly into the hands of the people who are often disproportionately affected by gender data gaps themselves.

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The first place winners at the TechMousso competition in Abidjan hold up their $10,000 prize check. The team developed an app that helps women schedule medical appointments during pregnancy, which allows health institutions to better coordinate staff time and equipment such as hospital beds. (Photo credit: Charly Kodjo/Instant2Vie Studio)

Out of a group of 80 original teams, 20 finalists pitched gender data gap solutions to a panel of judges in July 2016 after a several month planning period. Judges awarded a total $25,000 across the top 10 winning teams to fund continuing work on their proposed solutions.

Here are six TechMousso projects — the three winners, and three additional promising projects — that demonstrate the potential of collaborative, local-level initiatives in data advocacy and use.

1. Mafubo is an app to register pregnant women, communicate with them throughout pregnancy via SMS, provide information on maternity facilities, and enable them to make appointments with physicians. The app will provide data on women’s health and mortality rates to relevant government departments, and will help hospitals and clinics better coordinate labor and delivery hospital beds for women, a critical issue in Côte d’Ivoire. Following the completion of TechMousso, Team Mafubo has actively pursued funding opportunities and is in conversation with the Côte d’Ivoire Ministry for Women, Protection, Family, and Child to continue development of the app.

2. Health Pass + Mousso is a piece of jewelry that stores its wearer’s medical information, such as medications and emergency contacts, transforming an accessory into an easily accessible digital medical record. Physicians can use a quick response code scanner to quickly access their patients’ records, not only speeding up the provision of medical care, but also paving the way for potential anonymized data use in public health policy.

3. Citizens can report gender-based violence (GBV) incidents via web, app, and SMS, and decision-makers can access the anonymous data via the platform Dblamou. By compiling anonymous, user-submitted reports of gender-based violence, Dblamou generates a map which displays statistics about rates of different types of violence by region or city. Authorities in the legal, medical, educational and social services fields can use this information to better understand the scope of gender-based violence across the country and the needed application of resources. The platform is already operational, and the team is working with the Ministry for Women, Protection, Family, and Child to continue the app’s development.

4. Agro.Gender is an app that collects and analyzes sex-disaggregated agricultural data for Côte d’Ivoire, needed for planning and development in rural and agricultural zones. Côte d’Ivoire suffers a significant gap in sex-disaggregated agricultural data; filling this gap is critical to identify and address inequalities in the agricultural value chain. Agro.Gender was awarded a prize at the 22nd session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention in Marrakech last year.

5. Kalanda is an app that provides sexual and reproductive health information to women through SMS technology. Through the SMS platform, women can ask reproductive health and sexuality questions and receive reliable answers from specialists at Kalanda. Policymakers can use this data to identify women’s priority concerns and to guide policy on reproductive health education, based on queries from app users. The app is already functioning with 13,300 registered participants.

6. SuperAya is a web application that helps girls understand how to reach their dream jobs. The app connects the searcher with successful women in their career path of interest, using data from LinkedIn, Twitter, and, if possible, the databases of the youth employment agency and the National Institute of Statistics in Côte d’Ivoire. For example, if a user searches for “telecom,” the application will tell her how many women work in that sector, the most common schools and experiences that led to jobs in that industry, and other qualifications necessary to work in their desired career field.

TechMousso demonstrated that community-driven, locally inspired gender data challenges can draw robust support from government and civil society leaders, meaningfully engage women in science, technology, engineering, and math projects, and generate creative solutions to fill gender data gaps. Individuals at the local level are well placed to develop projects with community impact, and Côte d’Ivoire’s example shows promise for future initiatives of this kind.



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Posted 22 March 2017 - 12:57 AM

30 million girls didn’t go to school today. Are you ready to change that? #GirlsCount

 

https://girlscount.one.org/?utm_source=facebook&source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_content=GCGraphics&utm_campaign=poverty-is-sexist

 

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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:12 AM

https://www.one.org/...mpaign=refugees

 

These women are joining together to build a different kind of support system, fighting for peace instead of power or resources.

 

Via ONE



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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:13 AM

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669
EDUCATION How soccer is changing the lives of girls in Kenya

 

February 23 2017  | By: MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO
GIRLS COUNT Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

“Discovering football is the best thing that ever happened to me,” says Claris Akinyi, sitting behind her tidy desk in the principal’s office in Kibera Girls Soccer Academy (KGSA).

When she was 11, Claris spent her days looking after her sick mother and helping run her family’s boiled maize stand. When she became a member of the Kibera Girls soccer team, her life changed overnight.

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“I used to stay indoors all the time, but the soccer team gave me the opportunity to go out and meet people,” she says. “We also got to watch videos about sex education, so I became very aware of issues like early pregnancies and gender-based violence, which are common here. Soccer helped me stay focused.”

Set up by Abdul Kassim in 2002, KGSA occupies a small plot of land in the heart of Kibera, one of the biggest slums in Kenya. It has since grown from a soccer academy into a successful tuition-free secondary school.

Abdul, who was born in Kibera and brought up by a single mother, started the academy to address the gender disparities he had observed growing up.

“I noticed that the girls were finishing primary school and then doing nothing,” he says. “They were being married off at very young ages and pregnancies were rampant. So I used soccer to engage them, and to send a message about gender equality to the Kibera community.”

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But early on in the program, as the girls finished primary school, they began dropping out of the club.

“I wanted to know why, so I went to their houses to talk to them,” says Abdul. “Most could not afford high school, and many had left their homes because of family problems or were married off.”

Spurred on by what he saw — and encouraged by many of the girls in the soccer club — Abdul decided to turn the soccer program into a free high school for girls, so that they could finish their education and fulfill their potential.

“When the school started, some of the girls who were in the original football club decided to go back and finish their studies, even though they were already in their 20s,” says Claris, who had already gone on to graduate high school. Claris also returned to KSGA, but as a teacher.

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Claris, sitting at her desk at KGSA.

“When I finished school, I knew I wanted to give back to the community, so I became a volunteer teacher,” she says. “It was a great feeling to be teaching some of my old teammates.”

After three years of volunteering at the school, KGSA supported Claris through university, where she studied education and counselling. Now, as a fully-registered educator and KGSA’s head teacher, she continues to support the girls in her community. She’s also been able to buy land and build a house for her mother.

“I feel like giving back is very important,” she says. “That’s why I am still here.”

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It is with the determination and goodwill of Claris, Abdul, and other dedicated staff members that the school continues to grow, and has earned international recognition for its creative approach to education.

“We wanted to provide a mechanism for girls to explore their interests and develop skills for their adult life,” says Abdul, talking about the various life-skills classes and extracurricular activities offered by the school, which include journalism, business, and computer classes.

And, of course, soccer – and sports, generally – is still a main focus at KGSA.

In addition to being a member of several of KGSA’s after-school vcubs, 18-year-old Khadija Ishikara plays on the soccer team that won a league trophy last year.

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“Soccer is my favorite hobby, because it keeps me active and fit,” she says.

Khadija’s mother still thinks it’s strange for girls to play football, but she is growing increasingly supportive of her daughter’s choice of sport. As for Khadija, it’s hard to imagine her giving up soccer anytime soon: “Anyway,” she says with a wry smile, “anything boys do, girls can do better.”

International Womens Day 2017

A Letter to Leaders You couldn't be where you are today without a good education. But because poverty is sexist, 130 million girls across the world are denied this basic right. Indeed, if the number of girls out of school formed a country, it would be the tenth largest on the planet - bigger than Japan or Germany. All children deserve a good education, but in the poorest countries girls are denied it more often than boys. Education is vital for moving out of poverty. Every additional year of school that a girl completes increases her future earnings, which is good for her family, her community and her country. We cannot afford to squander the potential of 130 million girls to cure diseases or end wars, invent brilliant technology or revolutionize an industry...or simply to access opportunity. We are coming together and uniting across our divides to get every girl into school and to make sure she gets a quality education once she's there. But we need you to do the same. Your education helped you to get where you are today - and it's in your power to help millions of girls to get theirs. Please act now, with the right policies and the necessary funds. Show us that politics can work for the people - starting with the people who need it most.



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Posted 22 March 2017 - 01:19 AM

Bursary opportunity for young musicians, composers and singers living in South Dublin!

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Young musicians living in the South Dublin area are invited to submit applications for the annual Annette Halpin Memorial Music Award.

The closing date for submissions is Friday 31 March, 2017 at 1pm.

The Annette Halpin Memorial Music Award aims to support music education, music development and performance opportunities for young musicians, composers and singers living in South Dublin County Council's Administrative Area. The bursary may be used to cover the costs of a range of development opportunities including – but not limited to – master classes, purchase of instruments, recording or travel.

There are two strands to the award:

In the case of the €1000 award contributed by Music Generation South Dublin, the applicant is required to submit a sample of their work on CD as well as to prepare a live performance for the assigned judging panel. Proposals should demonstrate development in the context of the applicant’s work. 

Further details about the Award, terms and conditions, guidelines for submission and an application form are available online on the South Dublin County Council website

You can also click here to download a copy of the application form.

The Annette Halpin Memorial Music Award is supported by South Dublin County Council, The Halpin Family and Music Generation South Dublin.

For further information about this and other initiatives and events at Music Generation South Dublin contact:

Aideen McLaughlin, Music Development Officer
Music Generation South Dublin, South Dublin County Library, Unit 1, The Square Industrial Complex, Tallaght, Dublin 24

t: 01 4149000 (ext. 6682)
e: info@musicgeneration.ie
www.musicgenerationsouthdublin.ie

Music Generation South Dublin is managed by South Dublin Music Education Partnership, led by South Dublin County Council in partnership with Dublin and Dún Laoghaire Education and Training Board, South Dublin County Libraries and Dublin West Education Centre.

 

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Posted 23 March 2017 - 11:13 PM

 
CITIZENSHIP
These Are the Heroes Who Rushed to Defend London Amid Westminster Attacks
By Yosola Olorunshola| March 23, 2017
Embed from Getty Images
 
In the aftermath of a serious terror attack in Westminster, Brendan Cox, widower of the murdered MP Jo Cox, shared a powerful message of hope: “Yesterday was characterised by one act of extremism and hatred, and thousands of acts of love and kindness.” 
Read More: Britain Defined By Kindness, Not Hate, Says Brendan Cox After Westminster Attack
It’s true. In the midst of confusion and fear, ordinary citizens rushed to respond to the crisis and help those in need. Here’s a list of some of the “heroes” that we all have to thank.
P.C Keith Palmer
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 Follow
 Metropolitan Police ✔ @metpoliceuk
Tributes from family and colleagues of PC Keith Palmer #WeRemember #WestminsterAttack http://news.met.poli...h-palmer-230175
5:04 PM - 23 Mar 2017
  180 180 Retweets   368 368 likes
 
The unarmed police officer, who was killed after being stabbed by an unnamed attacker as he stood guard outside Parliament, was a 48-year-old husband and father. He had served in the Metropolitan Police for 15 years, and was a member of the forces’ parliamentary and diplomatic protection command. In a tribute delivered to the House of Commons, Prime Minister May described him as “every inch a hero.” Conservative MP James Cleverly, who had served alongside Palmer in the army, also addressed the Commons to pay homage to his friend and colleague. 
 “I’ve known Keith for 25 years. We served together in the Royal Artillery before he became a copper. A lovely man, a friend. I’m heartbroken. My thoughts are with the family, friends and colleagues of PC Keith Palmer. A brave man.”
Read More: 'Terror Attack' in London — What We Know So Far
Embed from Getty Images
 
PC Palmer's family released a moving statement today:  "Keith will be remembered as a wonderful dad and husband. A loving son, brother and uncle. A long-time supporter of Charlton FC. Dedicated to his job and proud to be a police officer, brave and courageous."
A JustGiving page has been set up to raise money for PC Palmer’s family and has already raised more than £150,000. 
MP Tobias Ellwood 
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 BBC News (UK) ✔ @BBCNews
MP @Tobias_Ellwood called a "hero" after giving first aid to victim of #Westminster terror attack http://bbc.in/2nSVqoC 
10:19 PM - 22 Mar 2017
  681 681 Retweets   1,963 1,963 likes
Conservative MP and Foreign Officer Minister Tobias Ellwood rushed to the aid of the stabbed police officer. A former Army officer, he attempted to staunch the flow of blood, and provide CPR and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Photographs show him with blood on his face and his hand. 
Ellwood is no stranger to the impact of terrorism, having lost his brother in a terrorist bombing in Bali in 2002. 
His actions have drawn praise from many. BBC Security Correspondent Frank Gardner tweeted: 
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 Frank Gardner ✔ @FrankRGardner
Huge respect for my friend @Tobias_Ellwood MP who tried to save the stabbed policeman, and staunch blood from multiple stab wounds. In vain.
6:47 PM - 22 Mar 2017
  827 827 Retweets   2,373 2,373 likes
Read More: London's Muslim Community Raised £10,000 for Westminster Victims — And They're Not Finished Yet
Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn said: “Our thanks and gratitude go to the police and emergency services who responded so bravely, and to those – including the MP Tobias Ellwood – who went to the aid of the injured and dying." 
Ellwood’s mother spoke to the Telegraph to explain why she was more than proud of her son: 
“I am very proud of my son. But what he did was only what I would have expected him to do. I don’t think he was particularly a hero."
"Every single other person who was there as well was also a hero — the nurses, medical teams and politicians and police officers. If you are going to talk about heroes then you need to talk about all of these people.”
 
Dr Jeeves Wijesuriya
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 GPonline.com @GPonlinenews
BMA junior doctors chair and GP trainee @AskJeevesWij was among first to respond in #Westminster yesterday http://www.gponline....article/1428355… #GPnews
12:12 PM - 23 Mar 2017
  5 5 Retweets   6 6 likes
 
Dr. Jeeves Wijesuriya was the first doctor to rush to assist the injured. The Chair of the British Medical Association’s Junior Doctors Committee was off-duty at the time, and being interviewed nearby for the BBC when he became aware of the tumult. After hearing screams, he raced to the scene, where he was granted access to the police cordon to assist PC Palmer and another victim.
He told Buzzfeed News: "I heard the screaming so ran to help and the police ran me in. Hems [helicopter emergency services], paramedics and police were incredible as we tried to save both the officer and the assailant.” 
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 Simon Fleming @OrthopodReg
.@AskJeevesWij,Chairman of the #juniordoctors committee,doing his job, as a 1st responder;patients first!#Proud #PrayForLondon #Parliament
6:11 PM - 22 Mar 2017
  256 256 Retweets   417 417 likes
 
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 Reena Aggarwal @drraggarwal
just like 7/7 & today @TheBMA off duty doctors provided first response. #london so proud of @AskJeevesWij running to danger instead of away
11:13 PM - 22 Mar 2017 · Cambridge, MA
  11 11 Retweets   17 17 likes
Those hailed as heroes have eschewed praise, pointing to the collective response instead of their own individual efforts. The unnamed doctors and nurses who ran on their feet from St. Thomas’s hospital to to tend the wounded, the paramedics who rushed to the scene, and the passersby who stopped to help the injured on Westminster bridge, all prove that it's citizens like these that that keep the city moving.
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 NHS Million @NHSMillion
Please RT to say thank you to all the emergency services who acted so bravely in Westminster today. You are all heroes.
9:11 PM - 22 Mar 2017
  33,185 33,185 Retweets   20,775 20,775 likes
And in the aftermath, people are coming together to drown out hate — from the Muslim-led campaign that has raised more than £10,000 and counting for the victims’ families in less than 24-hours, to those preparing to rally in Trafalgar Square.
In dark and complicated times, these are the actions that matter most. 
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 Ruby blu @Rubyblugifts
Have a safe and beautiful day, put a spring in your step and a smile on Someone's face. #lifeisbeautiful #WeStandTogether
7:56 AM - 23 Mar 2017
  136 136 Retweets   255 255 likes
TOPICSWestminster Attack, Compassion, Citizenship, Terrorism, UK Parliament, London
Yosola Olorunshola
Written by Yosola Olorunshola
Yosola Olorunshola is a Communications Officer for Global Citizen. She studied History and French at Oxford University before completing a Masters in Creative Writing. Now based in London, in her spare time she writes fiction and runs a podcast called Diaspora Philes.


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Posted 23 March 2017 - 11:15 PM

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ENVIRONMENT The Arctic Has Already Had 3 Heatwaves in 2017: Report

By Joe McCarthy|

 March 23, 2017
 

Embed from Getty Images

 

The Arctic helps guide the world’s climates, cooling and warming vast jet streams that travel the globe, bringing icy weather to the Northern US in winter and a bit of relief to countries near the equator.

But with climate change rapidly melting ice — 620,000 square miles of winter sea ice cover since 1979 — this cycle is being unraveled and turning into something different and more unstable.

The past three years have all broke global temperature records and 2017 is on pace to continue that trend.

Read More: How 13.1 Million US homes Could Be Washed Away

The acceleration of climate change is leading to an era of extremes, according to the World Meteorological Organization.

“With levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere consistently breaking new records, the influence of human activities on the climate system has become more and more evident,” said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas in a statement.

So far this year, the Arctic has been hit by three heat waves, halting an essential ice refreezing period. As a result, Canada and the US were hit with unusually warm winters and North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula faced unusually cold spells.  

These shifts are confusing to environments everywhere. In the Northeast, for instance, “early springs” have disrupted intricate and highly regulated plant and animal cycles.  

Throughout 2016 and into 2017, heatwaves bludgeoned the world with record-breaking temperatures, according to WMO.

Read More: 15 Adorable Pictures of Polar Bears to Remind You That the Ice Caps Are Melting

Oceans are warming as well, cooking the world’s coral reefs which are sensitive to even minor temperature changes. Huge stretches of the Great Barrier Reef, for example, have been killed in recent years.

Precipitation patterns are also being pushed to the extremes. Parts of Southern Africa have been in the grip of severe drought, while China experienced its wettest year on record in 2016, according to the WMO report.

Sea levels are rising everywhere, eroding low-lying coastal regions that are struggling to adapt.

Climate change has historically been a story of simmering changes, of turmoil on the horizon. But increasingly it seems as if tipping points have been crossed or are about to be crossed.

Read More: 9 Ways the World Might Look Different by 2100

In the words of World Climate Research Programme Director David Carlson:

“Even without a strong El Niño in 2017, we are seeing other remarkable changes across the planet that are challenging the limits of our understanding of the climate system. We are now in truly uncharted territory.”

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Written by Joe McCarthy

 

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.

 

Via Global Citizen