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The Action Thread Part Two


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#981 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:13 PM

GIRLS AND WOMEN These women’s rights activists inspire us to fight for equality

 

February 9 2017  | By: SAMANTHA URBAN
JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty
 
  

Right now, our newsfeeds are packed with incredible stories of women taking action. To honor the persistence and drive of those women, we’re taking a look at some truly influential women’s rights activists:

Suffragists around the world

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A 1915 photograph of large crowd of suffragists on Capitol steps, some with banners, one with American flag, some in academic gowns, overseen by two uniformed policemen. (Photo credit: Public domain/Wikimedia Commons)

Suffrage has been a worldwide movement with countless determined activists organizing for the right to vote in their respective countries. (See the timeline of women’s suffrage here.)For example, activists like Millicent Fawcett and Emmeline Pankhurst in the United Kingdom and Alice Paul and Lucy Burns in the United States organized marches and demonstrations in order to fight for the right of women to vote in their respective countries.

Lillian Ngoyi (1911 – 1980)

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This anti-apartheid activist in South Africa organized marches for women’s rights, including one with 20,000 women to the Union Buildings of Pretoria in protest against the apartheid government requiring women to carry passbooks. A President of the Women’s League, she went on to be the first woman elected to the executive committee of the African National Congress, and helped launch the Federation of South African Women.

Elizabeth “Betita” Martinez (1925 – )

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(Photo credit: Jerome Rainey/Wikimedia Commons)

The first Latina student to graduate from Swarthmore College, Elizabeth worked as a researcher in the United Nations Secretariat in the 1950s, and as a coordinator for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee during the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. (She was one of only two Latina women who worked for the SNCC.) Since moving to California in 1976, Martínez has organized around Latino community issues, taught Women’s Studies, conducted anti-racist training workshops, and worked with youth groups — she even ran for governor in 1982.

Manasi Pradhan (1962 – )

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Women’s rights activist Manasi Pradhan with social activist Padma Vibhushan. (Photo credit: Sravanimohanty/Wikimedia Commons)

Known as one of the pioneers of the 21st century global feminist movement, Manasi founded two major organizations: OYSS Women, which aimed to help female students achieve higher education and develop them as future leaders in the society, and the Honour for Women National Campaign, a nationwide movement to end violence against women in India.

Malala Yousafsai (1997 – )

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As part of WOW 2014, Malala Yousafzai talked about the systemic nature of gender inequality and bringing about change. (Photo credit: Southbank Centre/Wikimedia Commons)

This inspirational Pakistani woman was attacked by the Taliban because she was a vocal advocate for girls’ education. Today, she continues to campaign for women’s rights and is the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate.

ONE members (2004 – )

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While the above list of women show the power that just one person has to make a huge difference, our members remind us of the power we have in numbers, as well. For more than 10 years, our members have been campaigning and organizing to fight poverty and preventable disease. Together, they have stood together and told world leaders that poverty is sexist. This year, they’ll keep fighting for the rights of girls around the world to get the education they deserve. Join them today.

Did we leave out your favorite activist? Tell us about them in the comments!

 

Via ONE



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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:22 PM

CULTURE Kenya’s Mercy Juma wins the Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling

 

April 19 2017  | By: SAMANTHA URBAN
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Congratulations to Kenyan broadcast journalist Mercy Juma, who’s been named the inaugural winner of the Michael Elliott Award for Excellence in African Storytelling!

The prestigious award is given by the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ) in partnership with ONE and the Elliott family. A jury selected Mercy out of 354 amazing applicants for the prize, which aims to advance the work of an emerging journalist covering Africa who strives to strengthen people’s voices and improve their well-being.

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On air in Nairobi: The award-winning journalist stands out for her sensitive storytelling.

Until recently, Mercy was a senior health and science reporter at the Daily Nation newspaper and NTV, its sister station. This month, she started a new job as a broadcast journalist at BBC Africa! Her past reporting brings to life the stories of often-voiceless Kenyans who face difficult human challenges and aim to overcome them. Many of her stories shed light on sensitive topics, such as unwed teen mothers living in Muslim communities.

Mercy will be given the award and a cash prize at an event in New York on May 31. She also will spend time in U.S. newsrooms to learn new skills and share knowledge in a program run by ICFJ. The goal? To help to deepen future reporting that engages and empowers Africans.

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In the field: Mercy has reported on vital health issues in rural Kenya.

This award was established in honor of the late Michael Elliott, who was ONE’s former CEO, as well as an outstanding editor whose life was a testament to the power of storytelling to bear witness to and improve the human condition. Before working at ONE, Michael served as editor of both TIME International and Newsweek International, a board member of the International Center for Journalists (ICFJ), and as Political Editor and Washington Bureau Chief of The Economist. Michael was passionate about using storytelling to unravel complex issues and shine a light on global development issues—and the people at their center.

“Mike would be so pleased by the quality of entries for this award, illustrating the power and potential of journalism coming out of Africa,” says Emma Oxford, Michael’s widow. “He would be delighted that the jury selected Mercy Juma for her moving storytelling of health issues in isolated Kenyan communities that deserve attention.”

Congratulations, Mercy! We can’t wait to see what you do next!

 

Via ONE



#983 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:39 PM

GIRLS AND WOMEN My exclusive interview with Malala Yousafzai

 

19 April 2017 1:47PM UTC  | By: GUEST BLOGGER
GIRLS COUNT Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

By Hannah Alper, Canadian activist, youth blogger, speaker, and ONE member

On April 12, 2017, I was proud to attend Malala Yousafzai’s official ceremony where she received her Honourary Canadian Citizenship from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. She is the youngest person to receive this honor and has been my role model for many years now.

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Malala recently joined in ONE’s #GirlsCount initiative and is “number one” in the organization’s effort to count all 130 million girls who are out of school. She reminds me that I am never too young to change the world, and inspires me to be brave and be a change maker just like her.

After receiving her distinction, I had the opportunity to sit down with Malala and have a conversation about youth empowerment, equality, education and more. Here are some of the highlights of our interview:

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On the potential of girls:
“I soon realized that a girl’s voice is powerful and it can bring change in the community.”

On youth:
“I think people often say that youth is [are] the future, and that their education and their well-being will affect each and every one of us. I think considering youth as the future is one side, but also accepting them as the present.”

On education:
“There are many children across the world – more than 130 million girls who can’t go to school – and if we do not speak out for them, they will be a generation lost. They will never get this opportunity and this is something we should consider an emergency. We should not ignore it. This is the time that we speak out for it now. We tell our leaders – we tell our local politicians – that we want you to focus on education.”

Watch the full video below and stay tuned until the end where Malala and I have a fun surprise!

See more of Hannah’s work at Call Me Hannah! You can follow her on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

 

Via ONE

 

 



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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:47 PM

Via ONE

35
GIRLS AND WOMEN Kenya court rules that one-third of MPs must be women

 

10 April 2017 4:48PM UTC  | By: GUEST BLOGGER
JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty
 
  

This story originally appeared on Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Kenyan activists on Monday (3rd of April 2017) welcomed a High Court ruling giving parliament 60 days to ensure a third of lawmakers are women or face dissolution.

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Protesters at the Women’s March in Kenya. Photo Credit: Women’s March on Nairobi Facebook Page

The ruling follows a lengthy struggle to increase women’s political representation in the patriarchal society. Kenya’s 2010 constitution guarantees women a third of seats in parliament, but its male-dominated assembly has repeatedly frustrated efforts to pass legislation needed to enact the quota.

“The ruling is good for women who, because of patriarchal cultural backgrounds, cannot effectively compete with men,” Josephine Mongare, chairwoman of the Federation of Women Lawyers in Kenya (FIDA), told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“This is the nearest we have come to the two-thirds constitutional requirement.”

Women vying for office in Kenya frequently face violence and intimidation in a country where women in politics are frowned upon. They also often lack the political clout and money to get nominated by the major parties. Kenya, which heads to the polls in August, has East Africa’s lowest representation of women in parliament at 19 percent, compared to 61 percent in Rwanda and 38 percent in Ethiopia, the Geneva-based International Parliamentary Union says.

Three previous attempts to get the bill passed have failed, with male lawmakers walking out of the chamber in May when it was time to vote. Last week’s High Court ruling came after several rights groups sued Kenya’s parliamentary speakers and attorney general for missing a 2016 deadline to implement the law.

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Sign from the Women’s March in Kenya. Photo Credit: Women’s March on Nairobi Facebook Group.

“It is disheartening that none of the political players is taking any action,” said Patricia Nyaundi, chief executive of the state-funded Kenya National Commission on Human Rights, one of the groups behind the case.

“One would hope that the president and the leader of opposition would prevail upon their members to enact the law,” she added.

But Nairobi-based constitutional lawyer Patrick Wanyama said the court victory may be too late to make a difference. The 60-day ultimatum expires in late May, just over a month before parliament dissolves for August elections.

“We are trying to solve a political problem using the law,” he said, as male politicians remain steadfastly opposed to the quota for women. “Sometimes this does not work.”

(Reporting by Daniel Wesangula; Editing by Katy Migiro and Emma Batha. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women’s rights, trafficking, property rights and climate change. Visit news.trust.org to see more stories.)



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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:52 PM

Via ONE Girls and Women

Smart Girl Kaya Thomas Combines Technology, Books and Representation A senior at Dartmouth is already changing the world with her innovative ideas towards championing diversity and her determination for inclusivity
 
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Kaya Thomas website

Last year Dartmouth student Kaya Thomas was named one of Glamour Magazine’s College Women of the Year and she continues to set the world on fire in 2017. An app she created that originally launched in 2014 has increasingly grown in popularity and downloads, demonstrating how her innovation is filling a much-needed space for inclusivity and representation in literature for people of color.

The app is called “We Read Too” and is designed specifically to offer hundreds of options for books which feature main characters that are Black, Latinx, Asian, Indigenous, and other non-white ethnicities. The concept is also twofold in that the books listed are all written by people of color as well. The app is free, the directory has an easy to use search function and there’s also a place where users can suggest other titles and authors for Kaya to consider adding.

As Kaya told Bustle in an interview:

I was inspired to create We Read Too because I’ve always loved reading but I felt a lack of representation in the characters that I was being exposed to. When I was a teen it made me feel like stories about girls like me didn’t matter or that no one cared to write them. I didn’t realize that there were books that existed with characters like myself [and] I just wasn’t exposed to them. I created We Read Too so other young people of color could be exposed to literature where they see themselves reflected, written by authors like them. Also, so that everyone can see that these stories exist and should be read [and] celebrated.”

Kaya has already interned for places like Apple, Intuit and Time Inc. and while in high school she co-founded a STEM camp for girls. Her accomplishments in coding, teaching and mentorship are incredibly inspirational for any Smart Girl to see, and we cannot wait to see what she comes up with next.

For more info about We Read Too, you can check out the recently launched Indiegogo campaign which aims to increase the offerings from the current 600+ titles to over a thousand as well as for Kaya to hire a developer to create an Android version of the app.



#986 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:57 PM

Make some noise! Brass Off brings together the next generation of Brass and Wind musicians

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100+ young brass and wind musicians and 15 leading professionals from Carlow, Cork City and Mayo came together to create a cross-county big band at the first ever Brass Off event in Cork City earlier this week.

Brass Off was a Music Generation National Partnership Project, developed in collaboration between Music Generation Cork City, Music Generation Carlow and Music Generation Mayo.

This major musical jamboree took place over three days from Monday 10 to Wednesday 12 April at CIT – Cork School of Music. The initiative offered young musicians an opportunity to explore technique and develop their skills under the guidance of 15 musician-tutors from the three counties.

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The young musicians, ranging in age from 9 to 17, had each been rehearsing a selected repertoire in their local areas in advance of this national brass and wind gathering. The event in Cork City presented a chance to rehearse and workshop the repertoire in small and whole ensemble sessions, rounding off the three days at a grand finale public showcase concert on Wednesday afternoon.

And what does a Music Generation big band sound like? Take a look at a snippet of the closing concert in this brilliant video of the full ensemble performance of 'Superheroes R Us'!



The ensemble from Cork City includes members of the Barrack Street Band and Cork Academy of Music. Their group was led by Shauna McCullough of Cork City’s Barrack Street Band. Those from Carlow are students at Carlow Vocational School and Carlow College of Music, and work on a weekly basis with tutor Gavin Barr. The Mayo group included young members of Foxford Brass and Reed Band, and were accompanied at Brass Off by their tutor, musician Laurie Barrett. The 15-strong musician team was led jointly by Shauna, Gavin and Laurie.

Listen back to Shauna explaining a little more about what was involved in this major project on Red FM:



For more information about this and other programmes at Music Generation contact: 

Music Generation National Development Office
National Concert Hall Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2.

einfo@musicgeneration.ie 
t: +353 1 475 8454
musicgeneration.ie

 

Via Music Generation


Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca, 19 April 2017 - 10:57 PM.


#987 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 19 April 2017 - 10:59 PM

Limerick and Clare ETB is now inviting applications for the post of Music Development Officer at Music Generation Clare.

For further information visit http://limerickclare.etb.ie/, or click on the link below.

The closing date for applications is 12 noon, Friday 21 April

 

 

http://limerickclare.etb.ie/

 

Via Music Generation



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Posted 19 April 2017 - 11:49 PM

Via Global Citizen

 
GIRLS & WOMEN Why Chelsea Clinton Wants to Talk About Periods & Breastfeeding

By Colleen Curry|

 April 19, 2017

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

chelsea_clinton_ap.jpg__1500x670_q85_cro(AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Chelsea Clinton knows how awkward it can be to talk about topics like menstruation or breastfeeding — after all, she was a teenager once, embarrassed to carry tampons into the bathroom stall with her and dragging her whole backpack with her instead.

“Remember how awkward you felt in school each time you carried a tampon or pad to the bathroom?” Clinton writes in a new essay for Well+Good on removing the stigma surrounding women’s bodies.

“Far too many girls and boys alike are socialized to think these are shameful topics — only to be discussed with our family and doctors, and we’re certainly not supposed to let anyone else see us dealing with them,” she writes.

Read More: Principal Fired After Forcing 70 Girls to Strip, Proving They’re Not Menstruating

Clinton, the famous first daughter of former US President Bill Clinton and Hillary Clinton, is an ardent advocate for gender equality. She says that a key component to girls’ success around the globe is removing the cultural stigma around topics like menstruation and breastfeeding.

In many parts of the world, she said, girls can’t disappear into bathroom stalls — even with their backpacks — when they are menstruating because there are no clean bathroom stalls where they are, and often no pads or tampons either. For girls that are too embarrassed to deal with menstruation publicly, or don’t have a clean way to do so, they often miss school for days every single month. The piece notes that one out of every 10 girls in Africa misses school when she’s menstruating, according to UNICEF.

Read More: Girls in the UK Are Skipping School Because They Can’t Afford Menstrual Products. In 2017.

“Menstruation shouldn’t stop education — and with access to safe period products and clean water, girls would have one less barrier to gender equality,” she writes.

Even girls in the US face a barrier when it comes to menstruation: pads and tampons aren’t covered by government food vouchers, which means that girls may struggle to pay for the supplies they need to attend to school. Even worse, these supplies are subjected to sales tax in many US states..

Clinton’s also familiar with the discomfort and stigma that can come with breastfeeding. As a mom of two, she’s had to pump milk and breastfeed in airport bathrooms and hidden by buildings outdoors when there was nowhere else to find privacy.

“Sometimes I mistimed feeding or pumping and I could feel the milk leak out and soak the pads in my bra—and yes, I was lucky because I could afford disposable pads so I could at least know the leakage wouldn’t be visible as I was standing on a stage,” she wrote. “Do you feel awkward reading this? I hope not—and if you do, I hope you’ll think about why.”

Read More: Nepali Teen Dies in Menstruation Hut After Starting Fire to Stay Warm

Clinton was breastfeeding as she campaigned on behalf of her mom last year during the presidential campaign, she wrote, and was happy she didn’t have any embarrassing leaks while doing so. But women who cannot afford pads or breast pumps aren’t so lucky, and don’t have private places at work or flexible schedules to accommodate their breastfeeding and pumping needs.

So long as women and girls are missing work and school because their bodies are merely functioning as they’re meant to, gender equality cannot be achieved, Clinton writes.

Laws around the world, including the US, need to account for these topics that are tough to talk about: women should be given access to privacy and flexibility for breastfeeding at work and in public, and menstrual supplies should be treated as necessity items and not taxed as luxuries.

Global Citizen and CHIME FOR CHANGE campaign for countries around the world to change their laws to give women equal treatment; you can support the #LevelTheLaw campaign by lending your voice to the cause.

Read More: Periods Are a Pain — But They Shouldn’t Stop a Girl’s Education in India

“We need to change the conversation, the practices, and the policies that too often punish women for being women—and prevent mothers from being the moms they want to be for their kids,” Clinton said in her essay.

“We shouldn’t be embarrassed by breastfeeding or menstruation, but we should be ashamed that women are suffering in silence because too many people refuse to speak out.”

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
 

Written by Colleen Curry

 

Colleen Curry is a senior editor at Global Citizen. She has covered domestic and international news for outlets including ABC News, VICE News, and The New York Times, with a particular focus on women's issues, criminal justice, and LGBT rights. She is also pursuing her Master's in Creative Writing, and has had nonfiction published by Sports Illustrated and Marie Claire.



#989 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 08:00 PM

Via ONE

11
FOOD AND NUTRITION 6 organizations working to fight famine

 

April 20 2017  | By: RACHEL TILLMAN
TAKE ACTION The President's proposed budget cuts would drastically cut food aid in the middle of a famine.

Now more than ever, every senator and representative should hear from constituents like YOU about the importance of funding life-saving programs.

 
  

A famine has been declared in South Sudan for two months now — the first time such an event has been announced anywhere in the world in the past six years. Nearly 100,000 people face starvation. Meanwhile, the people of Somalia, Nigeria, and Yemen are on the brink of famine as well, with nearly 20 million people total lacking access to enough food and water to survive.

This is a humanitarian crisis of catastrophic proportions. But there are many organizations working to help the people affected by famine receive the nutrients they deserve. Here are a few of the organizations working to fight this crisis:

United Nations World Food Programme

World Food Programme (WFP) is the leading global organization fighting hunger and organizing logistics in humanitarian emergencies. Many organizations working on the ground in hunger emergencies actually work for WFP.  They deliver food assistance and work with communities to improve nutrition. Already in 2017, World Food Programme has provided food distributions and digital cash cards to nearly a million people in Somalia, and is in the process of raising $1.5 billion to combat food insecurity in Nigeria.

On April 12, WFP announced its plans for emergency operations in Yemen: To provide food assistance to nearly seven million people classified as severely food insecure; secure nutrition support to prevent or treat malnutrition among 2.2 million children; and assist breastfeeding and pregnant mothers with specialized nutritious foods. You can click here to see and share their appeal for food access, and here to read their joint statement with the United Nations Childrens’ Fund (UNICEF) and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization on famine in South Sudan.

UNICEF

UNICEF operates across 190 countries and territories, advocating specifically with and for children through fundraising, advocacy, and education. UNICEF has outlined a three-pronged approach responding to the food crises in Africa: to aid 13.1 million children suffering from famine conditions in these four countries, to treat 1 million children under the age of 5 for serious acute malnutrition, and to raise $712 million in 2017 to fund these projects. UNICEF has been a leader in bringing direct and innovative solutions to food crises in the region, like their ready-to-use therapeutic food initiative in South Sudan.

Mercy Corps

Mercy Corps is an organization that aims to “alleviate suffering, poverty, and oppression by helping people build secure, productive and just communities.” Their mission is to increase accountability and participation within their partner countries by providing not only aid and supplies but on-the-ground assistance as well. They’re all about working from within to create change! Right now, Mercy Corps has members on the ground in Africa to help families get the food, water, and supplies they need in order to survive. Click here to find out more.

Action Against Hunger

Action Against Hunger is a global humanitarian organization that targets both the causes and effects of hunger. Their primary target areas are Nutrition & Health, Water & Sanitation, and Food Security & Livelihoods. They also have an Emergency Response branch, which evaluates crises in order to best serve the affected communities. Currently, they have a program focused specifically on the impending famine in Somalia, as well as a broader campaign targeting famine in South Sudan, Yemen, and Nigeria.

CARE

CARE works across multiple platforms around the world to defeat poverty and empower communities. They have projects in 94 countries and reach over 80 million people through their work! This past March, CARE denounced the proposed budget cuts to foreign aid, as it would directly affect more than 20 million people already facing famine conditions in Africa. Find out more about their message and their efforts to end global hunger here.

Oxfam

For more than 70 years, Oxfam has been working to end poverty by tackling issues that keep people poor: inequality, discrimination, and unequal access to resources. They work with local and national organizations to help communities facilitate the change they want to see. Oxfam is launching a huge effort to reach people facing hunger crises in Ethiopia, Yemen, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, and Kenya through food vouchers, direct access to clean water, and sanitation services. Oxfam has opportunities for you to take action through letters, volunteering, hosting an event, responding to emergencies, and more! Click here to find out about how Oxfam is working to end hunger and famine.



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Posted 20 April 2017 - 08:09 PM

Women are achieving financial independence!

 

https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish/videos/944525845688923/?hc_ref=PAGES_TIMELINE

 

Via ONE



#991 tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Posted 20 April 2017 - 11:31 PM

Via ONE

9
GIRLS AND WOMEN 12 African game-changers you need to know

 

April 20 2017  | By: ROBYN DETORO
JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty
 
  

Who is changing the game in Africa? That’s the question NewAfricanWoman magazine put to the public as they prepared to host the New African Woman Awards 2017 – an annual ceremony that honors and celebrates Africa’s most influential and impactful women. After weeks of nominations a special panel of judges took on the tough task of narrowing the candidates down to just twelve winners. Here are this year’s winners:

New African Woman of the Year: Fatoumata Jallow-Tambajan, Gambia
Vice-President of the Gambia, Minister of Women Affairs and a fierce human rights activist she’s rightfully claimed this award for her key contributions to the ouster of Gambia’s former long-term leader, Yahya Jammeh.

New African Woman in Civil Society: Chief Theresa Kachindamoto, Malawi
With over 300 child marriage annulments under her belt, you can bet Chief Kachindamoto is a force to be reckoned with. A strong advocate against the practice, she played a major role in influencing the Malawian government to outlaw child marriage altogether earlier this year.

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic1.jpgNew African Women in Health, Science and Technology: Dr. Helena Ndume, Namibia
We can’t think of a doctor more deserving of a win. Dr. Helena Ndume is a game changing ophthalmologist and cataract surgeon who’s provided vision restoring surgery to over 35,000 Namibians for free.

New African Woman on the Rise (The Next Generation): Vivian Onano, Kenya
This avid youth activist (and ONE Member!) has called for improved girls rights and strongly encourages men to get involved in the fight for equal rights. As a UN Women Youth Advisor, it’s clear that she’s on the path to achieve her goals.

New African Woman in Politics and Public Office: Amina J. Mohammed, Nigeria
Years of experience have earned Amina a key position with the United Nations as its Deputy Secretary-General. The former Nigerian Minister of Environment played a big role in assessing how the Sustainable Development Goals and Millennium Development Goals would impact African women across the continent.

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic2.jpgNew African Woman in Arts and Culture: Joan Okorodudu, Nigeria
Joan Okorodudu is the brains and force behind one of Africa’s fastest growing modeling agencies and is credited with raising the profile of Nigerian fashion to a global level.

New African Woman Award in Education: Tsitsi Masiyiwa, Zimbabwe
We know educating young girls and boys is one of the best ways to equip them for success in life. As the founder of the Higherlife Foundation, a non-profit organisation that provides vulnerable and orphaned children with scholarships which has already benefitted over 250,000 children, it’s clear Tsitsi Masiyiwa knows this too!

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic4.jpgNew African Woman in Finance: Binta Touré Ndoye, Mali
Competition for this award was high, but Binta’s game changing work with Oragroup – a Malian banking enterprise – earned her the top spot.

New African Woman in Media: Amira Yahyaoui, Tunisia
This blogger and political activist is a brazen advocate for human rights, transparency and public accountability. Amira’s goal is to empower citizens to participate in civil society and to encourage governments to establish good governance and political ethics.

New African Woman in Agriculture: Tumusiime Rhoda Peace, Uganda
The former African Union Commissioner of Agriculture and Rural Development played a key role in promoting the importance of food security across the continent. Throughout her career she has championed women’s empowerment and poverty eradication.AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic3.jpgNew African woman Award in Business: Salwa Idrissi Akhannouch, Morocco
She’s one of Africa’s most successful businesswomen. Heading up the Akwa Group franchise group Askal landed her 68th place on Forbes Middle East’s 100 Most Powerful Arab Businesswomen.

New African Woman in Sport: Fatma Samoura, Senegal
Fatma’s not only the first female Secretary General of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), she is also the first non-European to hold the role!

Congratulations to all of the well-deserving winners and nominees!



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 05:05 PM

Don't forget to pick up your tickets to 'A Night For Chernobyl'. With a line up including Bell X1 frontman Paul Noonan andGavin Glass, it looks to be a night to remember.

Tickets available from www.set.ie

 

 

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Via Chernobyl Children International



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 05:11 PM

https://www.facebook...f=page_internal

 

This tiny village in Alaska is putting up a big fight against climate change.

 

Via Global Citizen



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 07:48 PM

Via Global Citizen

 
GIRLS & WOMEN Melinda Gates Is Fighting Trump’s Proposed Foreign Aid Cuts

By Colleen Curry|

 April 20, 2017

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

melinda_gates_ap.jpg__1500x670_q85_crop_(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

One of the most influential women in the world and the cofounder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has a message for lawmakers in Washington, D.C., this week: Do not cut foreign aid.

Melinda Gates, who today was named to TIME magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World list, is spending the week in the US capitol explaining to lawmakers why foreign aid from the US to other countries is one of the most vital parts of the federal budget.

President Donald Trump has proposed slashing foreign aid to the other countries for next year’s budget. Congress will ultimately decide whether to enact Trump’s proposals, and Gates is hoping she can convince lawmakers to reject the cuts.

Read More: Millions of Lives at Risk With Global Gag Rule, Bill and Melinda Gates Say

“One of the first lessons we learned when we started our foundation was a humbling one: Our resources are only a drop in the bucket compared with the needs around the world, and only a small percentage of what governments spend each year to help meet those needs,” Gates wrote in an op-ed on CNN.com.

She said that much of her time as head of her foundation is spent working with government officials to try and get more money devoted to fighting poverty, disease, and inequality.

“[That] is why I am deeply concerned about the White House announcement that its budget proposal includes cuts to US foreign aid that would threaten the very progress so many are working so hard to achieve,” she writes.

Read More: This Clever Video Shows How the Pill Can Break the Cycle of Poverty

Gates cites all of the achievements that foreign aid has sparked in recent years: in one generation, foreign aid has helped curb polio and HIV/AIDS epidemics (nearly eradicating polio), helping save 122 million children’s lives; cut extreme poverty in half; stabilize foreign governments; contain the Ebola epidemic; and created new markets for US goods.

In fact, 11 of the top 15 markets for US goods are former foreign recipients, she said.

In essence, foreign aid helps lift other countries up out of poverty so they can be better partners to the US in the future.

“Far from locking countries in cycles of dependency, smart aid investments actually help countries unlock virtuous cycles of growth,” she said.

Before Gates helped launch the foundation with her husband, Microsoft founder Bill Gates, she also had an accomplished career inside Microsoft, launching some of the company’s best-known products. And she’s used that professional achievement to stress how important education and careers are for women, along with the choice about when and how to raise families.

“Another US investment that yields enormous returns for the global economy is contraceptives. When women have access to the tools they need to plan and space their pregnancies, the results are transformative for societies,” she writes in her op-ed.

Read More: 8 Critical Numbers in Bill and Melinda Gates' Letter to Warren Buffett

When women can plan their families, they’re able to better provide health care, nutrition, and education to their children, which improve the potential of each child to get our poverty, she said.

“Contraceptives are simply one of the best antipoverty initiatives the world has ever seen,” she wrote.

Cutting aid to foreign countries will have a slew of negative consequences for the US and the world, she said, including increasing instability and poverty that could lead to extremism and more unnecessary deaths.  

“For all these reasons, I will spend my time in D.C. this week making the case that if we care about keeping America healthy, safe and prosperous, then we must prioritize foreign aid,” she said. “The cost of these cuts is far too great for our country — or our conscience — to bear.”

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
 

Written by Colleen Curry

 

Colleen Curry is a senior editor at Global Citizen. She has covered domestic and international news for outlets including ABC News, VICE News, and The New York Times, with a particular focus on women's issues, criminal justice, and LGBT rights. She is also pursuing her Master's in Creative Writing, and has had nonfiction published by Sports Illustrated and Marie Claire.



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:25 PM

Via Global Citizen

 

GIRLS & WOMEN This Women-Led Mosque Wants to End Gender Discrimination in Islam

By Joe McCarthy|

 April 19, 2017

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

screen_shot_2017-04-19_at_113042_am.png_Youtube / Mercury News

In most mosques, women have to sit in the back rows. Sometimes, they’re forced to sit in partitioned rooms, far behind the imam leading the service, where they have to pray separately from men.

For Rabi'a Keeble, this reminded her of what Rosa Parks, and all black people in the US for that matter, went through in the mid 20th century — an imposed inferiority, a second-class citizenship.

She also felt that there were all sorts of microaggressions within mosques that made women feel uncomfortable. For example, men would criticize the hijabs women wore and generally dismiss female participation.

So she decided to challenge this deep-seated gender disparity by starting her own mosque in Berkeley, California, one that would not only let women sit wherever they wanted, but one that would actively encourage gender equality.

At the top of that list: allowing female imams to lead the congregation.

Read More: Pakistan to Open First Transgender Mosque and Madrassa

"The primary idea of this is that women need women, especially women of color,” Keeble told NBC news. “If we don't support one another, we have failed.”

"Religion asks us to fight segregation and bigotry, for this is not how we are going to go forward," she added. "This is how we be Muslims — or non-Muslims — together."

Keeble, who has a master’s degree in religious leadership and social justice, began gathering support for the idea this past January. She was able to find a space in the Starr King School for the Ministry, part of the Graduate Theological Union.

It’s only the second women-led mosque in the US. She named the mosque ”Qal'bu Maryam," or the “Heart of Mary,” to honor the mother of Jesus Christ, a prophet in Islam, and the central figure in Christianity.

It had its first prayer session last week.

 

 

Around the world, the roles carved out for men and women within Islam are often seen as imbalanced and unfair. The most jarring example of this is in Saudi Arabia, where a woman can’t drive or even go into public without a male member of her family.

Read More: Saudi Arabian Woman Gets Breakfast Without a Hijab. Men Call for Her Death.

Keeble thinks that this doesn’t represent Islam, which she says is about peace.  

"We have a long history of being a sanctuary for people at the margins of their religion traditions and communities, [which] benefit when women are free to offer their gifts and wisdom, and are recognized for their contributions and efforts,” she told NBC.

To promote this idea of diversity and tolerance, she’s doing what she can to encourage interfaith dialogue by creating classes for people from different backgrounds.

Read More: A Hate Crime Happened Every 17 Minutes in the Days After the Election

Ultimately, she hopes her work will help to not only broaden the space for within Islam, but also change how outsiders view the religion.

"The thing that people often miss is that Islam is about social justice — this gets lost in the system of patriarchy, and we women have to put up with it," she said.

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved
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Written by Joe McCarthy

 

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.


Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca, 22 April 2017 - 08:25 PM.


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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:38 PM

GIRLS AND WOMEN 12 African game-changers you need to know

 

April 20 2017  | By: ROBYN DETORO
JOIN Join the fight against extreme poverty
 
  

Who is changing the game in Africa? That’s the question NewAfricanWoman magazine put to the public as they prepared to host the New African Woman Awards 2017 – an annual ceremony that honors and celebrates Africa’s most influential and impactful women. After weeks of nominations a special panel of judges took on the tough task of narrowing the candidates down to just twelve winners. Here are this year’s winners:

New African Woman of the Year: Fatoumata Jallow-Tambajan, Gambia
Vice-President of the Gambia, Minister of Women Affairs and a fierce human rights activist she’s rightfully claimed this award for her key contributions to the ouster of Gambia’s former long-term leader, Yahya Jammeh.

New African Woman in Civil Society: Chief Theresa Kachindamoto, Malawi
With over 300 child marriage annulments under her belt, you can bet Chief Kachindamoto is a force to be reckoned with. A strong advocate against the practice, she played a major role in influencing the Malawian government to outlaw child marriage altogether earlier this year.

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic1.jpgNew African Women in Health, Science and Technology: Dr. Helena Ndume, Namibia
We can’t think of a doctor more deserving of a win. Dr. Helena Ndume is a game changing ophthalmologist and cataract surgeon who’s provided vision restoring surgery to over 35,000 Namibians for free.

New African Woman on the Rise (The Next Generation): Vivian Onano, Kenya
This avid youth activist (and ONE Member!) has called for improved girls rights and strongly encourages men to get involved in the fight for equal rights. As a UN Women Youth Advisor, it’s clear that she’s on the path to achieve her goals.

New African Woman in Politics and Public Office: Amina J. Mohammed, Nigeria
Years of experience have earned Amina a key position with the United Nations as its Deputy Secretary-General. The former Nigerian Minister of Environment played a big role in assessing how the Sustainable Development Goals and Millennium Development Goals would impact African women across the continent.

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic2.jpgNew African Woman in Arts and Culture: Joan Okorodudu, Nigeria
Joan Okorodudu is the brains and force behind one of Africa’s fastest growing modeling agencies and is credited with raising the profile of Nigerian fashion to a global level.

New African Woman Award in Education: Tsitsi Masiyiwa, Zimbabwe
We know educating young girls and boys is one of the best ways to equip them for success in life. As the founder of the Higherlife Foundation, a non-profit organisation that provides vulnerable and orphaned children with scholarships which has already benefitted over 250,000 children, it’s clear Tsitsi Masiyiwa knows this too!

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic4.jpgNew African Woman in Finance: Binta Touré Ndoye, Mali
Competition for this award was high, but Binta’s game changing work with Oragroup – a Malian banking enterprise – earned her the top spot.

New African Woman in Media: Amira Yahyaoui, Tunisia
This blogger and political activist is a brazen advocate for human rights, transparency and public accountability. Amira’s goal is to empower citizens to participate in civil society and to encourage governments to establish good governance and political ethics.

New African Woman in Agriculture: Tumusiime Rhoda Peace, Uganda
The former African Union Commissioner of Agriculture and Rural Development played a key role in promoting the importance of food security across the continent. Throughout her career she has championed women’s empowerment and poverty eradication.AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic3.jpgNew African woman Award in Business: Salwa Idrissi Akhannouch, Morocco
She’s one of Africa’s most successful businesswomen. Heading up the Akwa Group franchise group Askal landed her 68th place on Forbes Middle East’s 100 Most Powerful Arab Businesswomen.

New African Woman in Sport: Fatma Samoura, Senegal
Fatma’s not only the first female Secretary General of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), she is also the first non-European to hold the role!

Congratulations to all of the well-deserving winners and nominees!

 

Via ONE



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:39 PM

1f30f.png 1f30d.png 1f30e.png
Happy Earth Day! Tell us in the comments below what you do to make the world a better place.

 

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Via ONE



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:54 PM

Via Global Citizen

 
ENVIRONMENT 8 ways to celebrate Earth Day

By Joe McCarthy|

 April 21, 2016
hero_earth_.jpg__1500x670_q85_crop_subsaThe earth seen from Apollo 17 
Wikigraphists

The first Earth Day (called May Day at the time) was held in 1970 in the US and it’s often considered the start of the modern environmental movement.

Since that initial march against environmental destruction, Earth Day has evolved into a globally celebrated event, with festivities occurring in more than 200 countries.

In its simplest form, it’s a day for people to step back, take a deep breath and appreciate Earth in all its splendor. But for many people Earth Day holds the potential to ignite broad environmental action.

As an internationally recognized holiday, Earth Day is guaranteed to attract the attention of an enormous amount of people. So figuring out how to harness and activate that attention toward sustained action is something activists work hard on.

Be on the lookout for all the environmental groups spreading awareness on April 22nd--they’ll have good advice! But in your free time, celebrate Earth Day by making a few easy changes the Earth will appreciate.

1) Get a recyclable water bottle

 

The US alone consumes 50 billion plastic water bottles annually. Most of these bottles are not recycled and end up in landfills, in oceans and elsewhere, which harms organisms and the environment. Just creating these bottles uses 17 million barrels of gasoline, which would be enough to power 1.3 million cars for a year. Even more energy is then spent transporting water bottles and then recycling them.

Ending society’s addiction to unnecessary water bottles would be greatly appreciated by Earth.

fullsizerenderhero.jpg__1500x630_q85_croImage: Gus Stahl

You can start your transition to an eco-friendly reusable bottle on Earth Day. Here are a few good list to choose from.

2) Start composting

 

Earth is the ultimate recycler--it reuses everything that it creates with a little help from the Sun. And everything that lives on the planet is cool with this system of recycling--everything except humans.

Humans are the only things that willfully don’t recycle what they create and use. And that means that a lot of nourishing substances that would otherwise feed wildlife and help it flourish end up in landfills or on strips of asphalt or somewhere else.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. Composting biodegradable food and materials is a great way to feed soil, organisms in the soil and plant life while reducing waste.

 

 

All you have to do is create a compost pile in your backyard or, if you’re a city slicker, store all your vegetable, fruit, and other natural scraps in a plastic bag in your freezer and then dump it when full at a compost collecting place.

3) Plant a garden

 

Plant some flowers and get a beautifully fragrant garden. And then plant some vegetables and get all the produce you need. Here’s a guide to starting a garden.

If you live in the city, check out this starter guide.

fire_escape_garden_edited.jpg__670x503_qImage: © Kristine Paulus/Flickr

4) Buy a tree certificate

 

Trees are amazing. But humans relentlessly chop and burn them down. So this Earth Day buy a certificate from Stand for Trees to protect a batch of trees somewhere in the world that’s at risk of deforestation.

16723659541_3a489ea268_z.jpg__640x427_q8Image: Flickr: Steve Corey

5) Build a birdhouse or start a bee farm

 

Building a birdhouse is definitely the easier option here. All you’ll need is a couple pieces of wood for birds to stand on and a place to put bird feed.

bird_eating_worm.jpg__1500x630_q85_crop_Image: Flickr: drbob97

Starting a bee farm is more complex. But here’s a handy guide that will help you beat back the decline of bees around the world.

6) Make your home energy efficient

 

Houses consume a lot of energy for electricity and heating. In fact, 40% of the energy consumed in the US goes to residential and commercial buildings. For the world to avoid the worst consequences of climate change, everyone would have to consume a set amount of energy annually. The average US household surpasses that amount in 2 weeks

Fortunately, there are many simple ways to cut down on this energy consumption.

From improving insulation to using LED lights to getting a water heater, improving a house’s energy efficiency both helps the environment and saves you a lot of money in the long-run. Here are a few pro tips.

7) Become a better grocery shopper

 

First, get a reusable grocery bag to limit all the plastic produced in the world.

Then try to buy fresh foods that you can carry in reusable containers. For example, fresh fruits and vegetables don’t come prepackaged. Also, nuts, lentils, coffee beans and many other dry goods can generally be purchased from bulk containers. By using reusable containers, you’re further reducing the amount of plastic in the world.

what-does-a-grocery-store-with-no-waste-Image: Flickr: storebukkebrute

Finally, try to buy local, ethical and environmentally sustainable products. If you can't go local, go ethical and sustainable.

8) Enjoy nature!

 

Make sure you set aside a lot of time to enjoy nature this Earth Day. Go for a hike, head to the beach or just sit in a park and appreciate the moment.

nature_greenhatters.jpg__670x400_q85_croImage: Wikimedia Commons- Margus Opp

The Earth is a truly marvelous place that provides all of us with life. As humans, we can surely do a better job taking care of it.

 
aaeaaqaaaaaaaarjaaaajdy2otu4zgm4ltyzmjat

Written by Joe McCarthy

 

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:55 PM

Happy #EarthDay

 

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Via (RED)



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Posted 22 April 2017 - 08:58 PM

 

CITIZENSHIP Chancellor Angela Merkel's Message for Global Citizens

 

April 18, 2017
 

 

 

As the G20 group of major economies — representing  85% of the world's gross domestic product and 80% of global trade — prepare to meet in Hamburg, Germany in July, hundreds of thousands of Global Citizens around the world are demanding that they deliver.

That’s why Global Citizen is calling on the G20 countries, starting with Germany, to outline their concrete commitments to deliver these goals, especially on refugees, education, health and development assistance.

Since Global Citizen began our G20 campaigning, over 400,000 actions have been taken, including almost 150,000 actions in Germany.

We are incredibly excited to receive and share with you this video message from German Chancellor Angela Merkel ahead of the Global Citizen Festival Hamburg, and the hundreds of thousands actions that have already been taken by citizens across Germany and around the world.

This video comes after thousands of Global Citizens called on the Chancellory asking for Mrs. Merkel’s support. In the message, Chancellor Merkel thanks Global Citizens for their actions and engagement, and notes that it is "only together that we will be able to overcome the major challenges of our times."

Join us and take action now to create a world where no one is left behind.

 

 
TAKE ACTION Send petitions, emails, or tweets to world leaders. Call governments or join rallies. We offer a variety of ways to make your voice heardGet Involved

  

Via Global Citizen


Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca, 22 April 2017 - 08:59 PM.