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edgeforpeace

Free Assange

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It's no worse than the news media outlying all the plans and locations of military and the plans in the event of attacks on global news where anyone can watch it.

 

 

At least Assange is being honest about doing that. He's a real life Bond villian.

 

Give me a F***ing break!  Do your homework!

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he released exactly where to hit the united states in order to bring her down...

 

this isnt free speech so much as it is careless disregard for human life.

 

shirley, do you want me to die?

 

this u2.com is a global community and a lot of your friends are americans...

 

what are you thinking?!

 

he is a lunatic!

 

where is batman?

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Why doesn't he go after his own Australian government and leak their crap.  He's going after our government, he's no impartial do gooder, don't be so freaking naive.  He's a slimey dirtbag!  This is only one example of his leaks, there are many more.

 

The website releases a secret 2009 cable listing sites worldwide that the U.S. considers critical to its national security. The locations cited in the diplomatic cable from U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton range from undersea communications lines to suppliers of food, medicine and manufacturing materials.  In the message, marked "secret," Clinton asked U.S. diplomatic posts to help update a list of sites around the world "which, if destroyed, disrupted or exploited, would likely have an immediate and deleterious effect on the United States."  The list was considered so confidential, the posts were advised to come up with it on their own: "Posts are not/not being asked to consult with host governments in respect to this request," Clinton wrote.

Attached to Clinton's message was a rundown of sites included in the 2008 "Critical Foreign Dependencies Initiative" list. Some of the sites, such as border crossings, hydroelectric dams and shipping lanes, could hardly be considered secret. But other locations, such as mines, manufacturers of components used in weapons systems, and vaccine and antivenom factories, likely were not widely known. The Associated Press has decided against publishing their names due to the sensitive nature of the information.

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He's a prat who's making a hell of a lot of money!

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WikiLeaks started out with the professed goal of bringing transparency to government actions by releasing classified documents it obtained through acts of espionage on the part of US military and other employees. 

One of the first releases was of a video tape from Afghanistan of Americans accidentally firing on and killing two Reuters journalists, whom were mistaken for insurgents.   A terrible event.

He then released a bevy of Defense and State Department cables--little of which revealed anything particularly compromising that anyone who follows the  news did not know anyway.  But the action undermined the air of confidentiality and the ability to speak openly that all diplomatic corps the world over rely on in order to conduct state business with one-another.  And they may have exposed individuals who help the US, to retaliation by their oppressive governments, terrorists, the Taliban and others.  Certainly people will think twice about risking their lives to help the US now.

I might not have liked what WikiLeaks was doing, but from a legal perspective and from the perspective of  "public's right to know," I could not make a completely sound case against his actions beyond denouncing them as flagrantly insensitive, profoundly naive and dangerously reckless.  

However, by releasing lists of sensitive sites and engaging in blackmail of the government by threatening  to release even more dangerous material if he were arrested, he has now exhibited a clear case of  malevolence, and I do hope the legal case against him for espionage will be worked out.

The sex-charges out of Sweden emerged after he began leaking the massive caches of sensitive documents, and many of his supporters claim it is a trumped-up charge made out of government retaliation.  As far as I am concerned, there is no longer a need to "trump-up" any charges, even if this was, allegedly, what was being done.

Here is an article from today that does a pretty good job encapsulating the affair, and also highlighting the criminal actions now being perpetrated on his behalf by online hack squads.  Like I said, go on and add your names to the list of his supporters....please.

Hackers strike at MasterCard to support WikiLeaks

By RAPHAEL G. SATTER and JILL LAWLESS, Associated Press â€“ 4 mins ago

LONDON – Hackers rushed to the defense of WikiLeaks on Wednesday, launching attacks on MasterCard, Swedish prosecutors, a Swiss bank and others who have acted against the site and its jailed founder Julian Assange.

Internet "hacktivists" operating under the label "Operation Payback" claimed responsibility in a Twitter message for causing severe technological problems at the website for MasterCard, which pulled the plug on its relationship with WikiLeaks a day ago.

MasterCard acknowledged "a service disruption" involving its Secure Code system for verifying online payments, but spokesman James Issokson said consumers could still use their credit cards for secure transactions.

The online attacks are part of a wave of support for WikiLeaks that is sweeping the Internet. Twitter was choked with messages of solidarity for the group, while the site's Facebook page hit 1 million fans.

Late Wednesday, Operation Payback itself appeared to run into problems, as many of its sites went down. It was unclear who was behind the counterattack.

MasterCard is the latest in a string of U.S.-based Internet companies — including Visa, Amazon.com, PayPal Inc. and EveryDNS — to cut ties to WikiLeaks in recent days amid intense U.S. government pressure. Visa or PayPal were not having problems Wednesday but PayPal said it faced "a dedicated denial-of-service attack" on Monday.

WikiLeaks' extensive releases of secret U.S. diplomatic cables have embarrassed U.S. allies, angered rivals, and reopened old wounds across the world. U.S. officials in Washington say other countries have curtailed their dealings with the U.S. government because of WikiLeaks' actions.

PayPal Vice President Osama Bedier said the company froze WikiLeaks' account after seeing a letter from the U.S. State Department to WikiLeaks saying that the group's activities "were deemed illegal in the United States."

Offline, WikiLeaks was under pressure on many fronts. Assange is in a British prison fighting extradition to Sweden over a sex crimes case. Recent moves by Swiss Postfinance, MasterCard, PayPal and others that cut the flow of donations to the group have impaired its ability to raise money.

Neither WikiLeaks nor Assange has been charged with any offense in the U.S., but the U.S. government is investigating whether Assange can be prosecuted for espionage or other offenses. Assange has not been charged with any offenses in Sweden either, but authorities there want to question him about the allegations of sex crimes.

Undeterred, WikiLeaks released more confidential U.S. cables Wednesday. The latest batch showed the British government feared a furious Libyan reaction if the convicted Lockerbie bomber wasn't set free and expressed relief when they learned he would be released in 2009 on compassionate grounds.

Another U.S. memo described German leader Angela Merkel as the "Teflon" chancellor, but she brushed it off as mere chatter at a party. American officials were also shown to be lobbying the Russian government to amend a financial bill they felt would disadvantage U.S. companies Visa and MasterCard.

The most surprising cable of the day came from a U.S. diplomat in Saudi Arabia after a night on the town.

"The underground nightlife of Jiddah's elite youth is thriving and throbbing," the memo said. "The full range of worldly temptations and vices are available — alcohol, drugs, sex — but all behind closed doors."

The pro-WikiLeaks vengeance campaign on Wednesday appeared to be taking the form of denial-of-service attacks in which computers are harnessed — sometimes surreptitiously — to jam target sites with mountains of requests for data, knocking them out of commission.

Per Hellqvist, a security specialist with the firm Symantec, said a network of web activists called Anonymous — to which Operation Payback is affiliated — appeared to be behind many of the attacks. The group, which has previously focused on the Church of Scientology and the music industry, is knocking offline websites seen as hostile to WikiLeaks.

"While we don't have much of an affiliation with WikiLeaks, we fight for the same reasons," the group said in a statement. "We want transparency and we counter censorship ... we intend to utilize our resources to raise awareness, attack those against and support those who are helping lead our world to freedom and democracy."

The website for Swedish lawyer Claes Borgstrom, who represents the two women at the center of Assange's sex crimes case, was unreachable Wednesday.

The Swiss postal system's financial arm, Postfinance, which shut down Assange's bank account on Monday, was also having trouble. Spokesman Alex Josty said the website buckled under a barrage of traffic Tuesday.

"Yesterday it was very, very difficult, then things improved overnight," he told the AP. "But it's still not entirely back to normal."

Ironically, the microblogging site Twitter — home of much WikiLeaks support — could become the next target. Operation Payback posted a statement claiming "Twitter you're next for censoring Wikileaks discussion."

Some WikiLeaks supporters accuse Twitter of preventing the term "WikiLeaks" from appearing as one of its popular "trending topics." Twitter denies censorship, saying the topics are determined by an algorithm.

Twitter's top trending topics are not the ones people are discussing the most overall, but those they are talking about more right now than they did previously, Twitter explained in an e-mail Wednesday. If tweets were ranked by volume alone, the weather or other mundane topics would dominate the trends.

WikiLeaks angered the U.S. government earlier this year when it posted a video showing U.S. troops on a helicopter gunning down two Reuters journalists in Iraq. Since then, the organization has leaked some 400,000 classified U.S. war files from Iraq and 76,000 from Afghanistan, which U.S. military officials say could put people's lives at risk. In the last few weeks, the group has begun leaking a massive trove of secret U.S. diplomatic cables.

U.S. officials have directed their anger at Assange, but others have begun to ask whether Washington shares the blame for the diplomatic uproar.

"The core of all this lies with the failure of the government of the United States to properly protect its own diplomatic communications," Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd said Wednesday, criticizing the fact that tens of thousands of U.S. government employees had access to the cables.

Assange, meanwhile, faces a new extradition hearing in London next week where his lawyers plan to reapply for bail. The 39-year-old Australian denies two women's allegations in Sweden of rape, molestation and unlawful coercion, and is fighting his extradition to Sweden.

In a Twitter message Wednesday, WikiLeaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson shrugged off the challenges.

"We will not be gagged, either by judicial action or corporate censorship ... WikiLeaks is still online," Hrafnsson said.

___

Malin Rising in Stockholm, Frank Jordans in Geneva, Jamey Keaten in Paris, Cassandra Vinograd in London, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Brian Murphy in Dubai, Tia Goldenberg in Jerusalem, Michelle Chapman, Peter Svensson and Barbara Ortutay in New York and Anne Flaherty in Washington contributed to this report.

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WikiLeaks started out with the professed goal of bringing transparency to government actions by releasing classified documents it obtained through acts of espionage on the part of US military and other employees. 

One of the first releases was of a video tape from Afghanistan of Americans accidentally firing on and killing two Reuters journalists, whom were mistaken for insurgents.   A terrible event.

He then released a bevy of Defense and State Department cables--little of which revealed anything particularly compromising that anyone who follows the  news did not know anyway.  But the action undermined the air of confidentiality and the ability to speak openly that all diplomatic corps the world over rely on in order to conduct state business with one-another.  And they may have exposed individuals who help the US, to retaliation by their oppressive governments, terrorists, the Taliban and others.  Certainly people will think twice about risking their lives to help the US now.

I might not have liked what WikiLeaks was doing, but from a legal perspective and from the perspective of  "public's right to know," I could not make a completely sound case against his actions beyond denouncing them as flagrantly insensitive, profoundly naive and dangerously reckless.  

However, by releasing lists of sensitive sites and engaging in blackmail of the government by threatening  to release even more dangerous material if he were arrested, he has now exhibited a clear case of  malevolence, and I do hope the legal case against him for espionage will be worked out.

The sex-charges out of Sweden emerged after he began leaking the massive caches of sensitive documents, and many of his supporters claim it is a trumped-up charge made out of government retaliation.  As far as I am concerned, there is no longer a need to "trump-up" any charges, even if this was, allegedly, what was being done.

Here is an article from today that does a pretty good job encapsulating the affair, and also highlighting the criminal actions now being perpetrated on his behalf by online hack squads.  Like I said, go on and add your names to the list of his supporters....please.

Hackers strike at MasterCard to support WikiLeaks

By RAPHAEL G. SATTER and JILL LAWLESS, Associated Press â€“ 4 mins ago

LONDON – Hackers rushed to the defense of WikiLeaks on Wednesday, launching attacks on MasterCard, Swedish prosecutors, a Swiss bank and others who have acted against the site and its jailed founder Julian Assange.

Internet "hacktivists" operating under the label "Operation Payback" claimed responsibility in a Twitter message for causing severe technological problems at the website for MasterCard, which pulled the plug on its relationship with WikiLeaks a day ago.

MasterCard acknowledged "a service disruption" involving its Secure Code system for verifying online payments, but spokesman James Issokson said consumers could still use their credit cards for secure transactions.

The online attacks are part of a wave of support for WikiLeaks that is sweeping the Internet. Twitter was choked with messages of solidarity for the group, while the site's Facebook page hit 1 million fans.

Late Wednesday, Operation Payback itself appeared to run into problems, as many of its sites went down. It was unclear who was behind the counterattack.

MasterCard is the latest in a string of U.S.-based Internet companies — including Visa, Amazon.com, PayPal Inc. and EveryDNS — to cut ties to WikiLeaks in recent days amid intense U.S. government pressure. Visa or PayPal were not having problems Wednesday but PayPal said it faced "a dedicated denial-of-service attack" on Monday.

WikiLeaks' extensive releases of secret U.S. diplomatic cables have embarrassed U.S. allies, angered rivals, and reopened old wounds across the world. U.S. officials in Washington say other countries have curtailed their dealings with the U.S. government because of WikiLeaks' actions.

PayPal Vice President Osama Bedier said the company froze WikiLeaks' account after seeing a letter from the U.S. State Department to WikiLeaks saying that the group's activities "were deemed illegal in the United States."

Offline, WikiLeaks was under pressure on many fronts. Assange is in a British prison fighting extradition to Sweden over a sex crimes case. Recent moves by Swiss Postfinance, MasterCard, PayPal and others that cut the flow of donations to the group have impaired its ability to raise money.

Neither WikiLeaks nor Assange has been charged with any offense in the U.S., but the U.S. government is investigating whether Assange can be prosecuted for espionage or other offenses. Assange has not been charged with any offenses in Sweden either, but authorities there want to question him about the allegations of sex crimes.

Undeterred, WikiLeaks released more confidential U.S. cables Wednesday. The latest batch showed the British government feared a furious Libyan reaction if the convicted Lockerbie bomber wasn't set free and expressed relief when they learned he would be released in 2009 on compassionate grounds.

Another U.S. memo described German leader Angela Merkel as the "Teflon" chancellor, but she brushed it off as mere chatter at a party. American officials were also shown to be lobbying the Russian government to amend a financial bill they felt would disadvantage U.S. companies Visa and MasterCard.

The most surprising cable of the day came from a U.S. diplomat in Saudi Arabia after a night on the town.

"The underground nightlife of Jiddah's elite youth is thriving and throbbing," the memo said. "The full range of worldly temptations and vices are available — alcohol, drugs, sex — but all behind closed doors."

The pro-WikiLeaks vengeance campaign on Wednesday appeared to be taking the form of denial-of-service attacks in which computers are harnessed — sometimes surreptitiously — to jam target sites with mountains of requests for data, knocking them out of commission.

Per Hellqvist, a security specialist with the firm Symantec, said a network of web activists called Anonymous — to which Operation Payback is affiliated — appeared to be behind many of the attacks. The group, which has previously focused on the Church of Scientology and the music industry, is knocking offline websites seen as hostile to WikiLeaks.

"While we don't have much of an affiliation with WikiLeaks, we fight for the same reasons," the group said in a statement. "We want transparency and we counter censorship ... we intend to utilize our resources to raise awareness, attack those against and support those who are helping lead our world to freedom and democracy."

The website for Swedish lawyer Claes Borgstrom, who represents the two women at the center of Assange's sex crimes case, was unreachable Wednesday.

The Swiss postal system's financial arm, Postfinance, which shut down Assange's bank account on Monday, was also having trouble. Spokesman Alex Josty said the website buckled under a barrage of traffic Tuesday.

"Yesterday it was very, very difficult, then things improved overnight," he told the AP. "But it's still not entirely back to normal."

Ironically, the microblogging site Twitter — home of much WikiLeaks support — could become the next target. Operation Payback posted a statement claiming "Twitter you're next for censoring Wikileaks discussion."

Some WikiLeaks supporters accuse Twitter of preventing the term "WikiLeaks" from appearing as one of its popular "trending topics." Twitter denies censorship, saying the topics are determined by an algorithm.

Twitter's top trending topics are not the ones people are discussing the most overall, but those they are talking about more right now than they did previously, Twitter explained in an e-mail Wednesday. If tweets were ranked by volume alone, the weather or other mundane topics would dominate the trends.

WikiLeaks angered the U.S. government earlier this year when it posted a video showing U.S. troops on a helicopter gunning down two Reuters journalists in Iraq. Since then, the organization has leaked some 400,000 classified U.S. war files from Iraq and 76,000 from Afghanistan, which U.S. military officials say could put people's lives at risk. In the last few weeks, the group has begun leaking a massive trove of secret U.S. diplomatic cables.

U.S. officials have directed their anger at Assange, but others have begun to ask whether Washington shares the blame for the diplomatic uproar.

"The core of all this lies with the failure of the government of the United States to properly protect its own diplomatic communications," Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd said Wednesday, criticizing the fact that tens of thousands of U.S. government employees had access to the cables.

Assange, meanwhile, faces a new extradition hearing in London next week where his lawyers plan to reapply for bail. The 39-year-old Australian denies two women's allegations in Sweden of rape, molestation and unlawful coercion, and is fighting his extradition to Sweden.

In a Twitter message Wednesday, WikiLeaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson shrugged off the challenges.

"We will not be gagged, either by judicial action or corporate censorship ... WikiLeaks is still online," Hrafnsson said.

___

Malin Rising in Stockholm, Frank Jordans in Geneva, Jamey Keaten in Paris, Cassandra Vinograd in London, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Brian Murphy in Dubai, Tia Goldenberg in Jerusalem, Michelle Chapman, Peter Svensson and Barbara Ortutay in New York and Anne Flaherty in Washington contributed to this report.

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WikiLeaks started out with the professed goal of bringing transparency to government actions by releasing classified documents it obtained through acts of espionage on the part of US military and other employees. 

One of the first releases was of a video tape from Afghanistan of Americans accidentally firing on and killing two Reuters journalists, whom were mistaken for insurgents.   A terrible event.

He then released a bevy of Defense and State Department cables--little of which revealed anything particularly compromising that anyone who follows the  news did not know anyway.  But the action undermined the air of confidentiality and the ability to speak openly that all diplomatic corps the world over rely on in order to conduct state business with one-another.  And they may have exposed individuals who help the US, to retaliation by their oppressive governments, terrorists, the Taliban and others.  Certainly people will think twice about risking their lives to help the US now.

I might not have liked what WikiLeaks was doing, but from a legal perspective and from the perspective of  "public's right to know," I could not make a completely sound case against his actions beyond denouncing them as flagrantly insensitive, profoundly naive and dangerously reckless.  

However, by releasing lists of sensitive sites and engaging in blackmail of the government by threatening  to release even more dangerous material if he were arrested, he has now exhibited a clear case of  malevolence, and I do hope the legal case against him for espionage will be worked out.

The sex-charges out of Sweden emerged after he began leaking the massive caches of sensitive documents, and many of his supporters claim it is a trumped-up charge made out of government retaliation.  As far as I am concerned, there is no longer a need to "trump-up" any charges, even if this was, allegedly, what was being done.

Here is an article from today that does a pretty good job encapsulating the affair, and also highlighting the criminal actions now being perpetrated on his behalf by online hack squads.  Like I said, go on and add your names to the list of his supporters....please.

Hackers strike at MasterCard to support WikiLeaks

By RAPHAEL G. SATTER and JILL LAWLESS, Associated Press â€“ 4 mins ago

LONDON – Hackers rushed to the defense of WikiLeaks on Wednesday, launching attacks on MasterCard, Swedish prosecutors, a Swiss bank and others who have acted against the site and its jailed founder Julian Assange.

Internet "hacktivists" operating under the label "Operation Payback" claimed responsibility in a Twitter message for causing severe technological problems at the website for MasterCard, which pulled the plug on its relationship with WikiLeaks a day ago.

MasterCard acknowledged "a service disruption" involving its Secure Code system for verifying online payments, but spokesman James Issokson said consumers could still use their credit cards for secure transactions.

The online attacks are part of a wave of support for WikiLeaks that is sweeping the Internet. Twitter was choked with messages of solidarity for the group, while the site's Facebook page hit 1 million fans.

Late Wednesday, Operation Payback itself appeared to run into problems, as many of its sites went down. It was unclear who was behind the counterattack.

MasterCard is the latest in a string of U.S.-based Internet companies — including Visa, Amazon.com, PayPal Inc. and EveryDNS — to cut ties to WikiLeaks in recent days amid intense U.S. government pressure. Visa or PayPal were not having problems Wednesday but PayPal said it faced "a dedicated denial-of-service attack" on Monday.

WikiLeaks' extensive releases of secret U.S. diplomatic cables have embarrassed U.S. allies, angered rivals, and reopened old wounds across the world. U.S. officials in Washington say other countries have curtailed their dealings with the U.S. government because of WikiLeaks' actions.

PayPal Vice President Osama Bedier said the company froze WikiLeaks' account after seeing a letter from the U.S. State Department to WikiLeaks saying that the group's activities "were deemed illegal in the United States."

Offline, WikiLeaks was under pressure on many fronts. Assange is in a British prison fighting extradition to Sweden over a sex crimes case. Recent moves by Swiss Postfinance, MasterCard, PayPal and others that cut the flow of donations to the group have impaired its ability to raise money.

Neither WikiLeaks nor Assange has been charged with any offense in the U.S., but the U.S. government is investigating whether Assange can be prosecuted for espionage or other offenses. Assange has not been charged with any offenses in Sweden either, but authorities there want to question him about the allegations of sex crimes.

Undeterred, WikiLeaks released more confidential U.S. cables Wednesday. The latest batch showed the British government feared a furious Libyan reaction if the convicted Lockerbie bomber wasn't set free and expressed relief when they learned he would be released in 2009 on compassionate grounds.

Another U.S. memo described German leader Angela Merkel as the "Teflon" chancellor, but she brushed it off as mere chatter at a party. American officials were also shown to be lobbying the Russian government to amend a financial bill they felt would disadvantage U.S. companies Visa and MasterCard.

The most surprising cable of the day came from a U.S. diplomat in Saudi Arabia after a night on the town.

"The underground nightlife of Jiddah's elite youth is thriving and throbbing," the memo said. "The full range of worldly temptations and vices are available — alcohol, drugs, sex — but all behind closed doors."

The pro-WikiLeaks vengeance campaign on Wednesday appeared to be taking the form of denial-of-service attacks in which computers are harnessed — sometimes surreptitiously — to jam target sites with mountains of requests for data, knocking them out of commission.

Per Hellqvist, a security specialist with the firm Symantec, said a network of web activists called Anonymous — to which Operation Payback is affiliated — appeared to be behind many of the attacks. The group, which has previously focused on the Church of Scientology and the music industry, is knocking offline websites seen as hostile to WikiLeaks.

"While we don't have much of an affiliation with WikiLeaks, we fight for the same reasons," the group said in a statement. "We want transparency and we counter censorship ... we intend to utilize our resources to raise awareness, attack those against and support those who are helping lead our world to freedom and democracy."

The website for Swedish lawyer Claes Borgstrom, who represents the two women at the center of Assange's sex crimes case, was unreachable Wednesday.

The Swiss postal system's financial arm, Postfinance, which shut down Assange's bank account on Monday, was also having trouble. Spokesman Alex Josty said the website buckled under a barrage of traffic Tuesday.

"Yesterday it was very, very difficult, then things improved overnight," he told the AP. "But it's still not entirely back to normal."

Ironically, the microblogging site Twitter — home of much WikiLeaks support — could become the next target. Operation Payback posted a statement claiming "Twitter you're next for censoring Wikileaks discussion."

Some WikiLeaks supporters accuse Twitter of preventing the term "WikiLeaks" from appearing as one of its popular "trending topics." Twitter denies censorship, saying the topics are determined by an algorithm.

Twitter's top trending topics are not the ones people are discussing the most overall, but those they are talking about more right now than they did previously, Twitter explained in an e-mail Wednesday. If tweets were ranked by volume alone, the weather or other mundane topics would dominate the trends.

WikiLeaks angered the U.S. government earlier this year when it posted a video showing U.S. troops on a helicopter gunning down two Reuters journalists in Iraq. Since then, the organization has leaked some 400,000 classified U.S. war files from Iraq and 76,000 from Afghanistan, which U.S. military officials say could put people's lives at risk. In the last few weeks, the group has begun leaking a massive trove of secret U.S. diplomatic cables.

U.S. officials have directed their anger at Assange, but others have begun to ask whether Washington shares the blame for the diplomatic uproar.

"The core of all this lies with the failure of the government of the United States to properly protect its own diplomatic communications," Australian Foreign Minister Kevin Rudd said Wednesday, criticizing the fact that tens of thousands of U.S. government employees had access to the cables.

Assange, meanwhile, faces a new extradition hearing in London next week where his lawyers plan to reapply for bail. The 39-year-old Australian denies two women's allegations in Sweden of rape, molestation and unlawful coercion, and is fighting his extradition to Sweden.

In a Twitter message Wednesday, WikiLeaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson shrugged off the challenges.

"We will not be gagged, either by judicial action or corporate censorship ... WikiLeaks is still online," Hrafnsson said.

___

Malin Rising in Stockholm, Frank Jordans in Geneva, Jamey Keaten in Paris, Cassandra Vinograd in London, Rod McGuirk in Canberra, Brian Murphy in Dubai, Tia Goldenberg in Jerusalem, Michelle Chapman, Peter Svensson and Barbara Ortutay in New York and Anne Flaherty in Washington contributed to this report.

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Hi.

 

So, I am going topost a couple of things here all at once.  

 

I noted that"Dirty Day" was played as the intercom music at the head of the showin Brisbanelast night.  I can't know the motivation behind that decision, but I canspeculate that it might be an embedded commentary on this Assange affair. So, I want to say a few things, in case this is so.  

 

First, I want toestablish what my thoughts are on internet journalism and the related freedomof speech issues.  I believe in and support both.  And I accept and support the arguments regardingpress freedom and the public's right to know.

 

However, Ithink Assange did terrible damage, not just to the US, but to efforts around the worldfor governments and people to navigate the terrible complexity and danger ofthe modern global environment.   When he released lists of sensitivesites--including factories that produce vaccines to counter biological weaponsattacks by terrorists-- I cannot see that this brings anything of value toanyone other than those who might want to launch such an attack.   Andwhen he threatened to release even more dangerous material if arrested, hecrossed, I feel, the line of constructive journalism and became an agent ofintentional destruction.  I must stop on this side of that line he hasdrawn.

 

Now there is aglobal campaign of cybercrime, in the form of hacking, going on.  This wasstarted by his supporters and  is being countered by others.  We arenow fully engaged in a cyberwar.  Great.  War is war.

 

When AmnestyInternational first awarded Assange, I could understand their case andposition.  But I do not see how they can, in good faith and integrity,continue to support him now.  I know U2 is a life-long partner withAmnesty, a partnership which, for the most part, I support.  I also know thatBono has been repeatedly nominated for a Noble Prize.  So, I understandwhere his/their loyalties lie. 

 

I have often hadto engage with myself in philosophical and political acrobatics to findcompromise and consensus with some of Bono/U2's positions.  For the mostpart, these have been very fruitful and valuable mental and spiritualexercises. But, I have to admit that if Dirty Day was in any way an oppositioncommentary against US efforts to reign in an individual who is abusing thebrilliance and promise of the internet to do incredible harm, and if U2'sposition will be to come down on the side of  Assange in this affair, then I thinkthis might be the irrevocable breach between me and these metaphorical loves-of-my-life, that I will not be able to overcome.

 

I would also liketo add two articles below.  Russia had opined that Assangeshould be awarded the noble prize for being a martyr to the "loss of pressfreedom."  I would like to post again the news of the journalistsbeaten terribly in Russiathat I placed in another thread about the Khimiki forest and Bono's meetingwith Medvedev, because I cannot believe Russia's hypocracy.

 

I also would liketo post a Guardian article that discusses the conflation of the sex-assaultallegations in Swedenwith the furor around Wikileaks.

 

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Hi.

 

So, I am going topost a couple of things here all at once.  

 

I noted that"Dirty Day" was played as the intercom music at the head of the showin Brisbanelast night.  I can't know the motivation behind that decision, but I canspeculate that it might be an embedded commentary on this Assange affair. So, I want to say a few things, in case this is so.  

 

First, I want toestablish what my thoughts are on internet journalism and the related freedomof speech issues.  I believe in and support both.  And I accept and support the arguments regardingpress freedom and the public's right to know.

 

However, Ithink Assange did terrible damage, not just to the US, but to efforts around the worldfor governments and people to navigate the terrible complexity and danger ofthe modern global environment.   When he released lists of sensitivesites--including factories that produce vaccines to counter biological weaponsattacks by terrorists-- I cannot see that this brings anything of value toanyone other than those who might want to launch such an attack.   Andwhen he threatened to release even more dangerous material if arrested, hecrossed, I feel, the line of constructive journalism and became an agent ofintentional destruction.  I must stop on this side of that line he hasdrawn.

 

Now there is aglobal campaign of cybercrime, in the form of hacking, going on.  This wasstarted by his supporters and  is being countered by others.  We arenow fully engaged in a cyberwar.  Great.  War is war.

 

When AmnestyInternational first awarded Assange, I could understand their case andposition.  But I do not see how they can, in good faith and integrity,continue to support him now.  I know U2 is a life-long partner withAmnesty, a partnership which, for the most part, I support.  I also know thatBono has been repeatedly nominated for a Noble Prize.  So, I understandwhere his/their loyalties lie. 

 

I have often hadto engage with myself in philosophical and political acrobatics to findcompromise and consensus with some of Bono/U2's positions.  For the mostpart, these have been very fruitful and valuable mental and spiritualexercises. But, I have to admit that if Dirty Day was in any way an oppositioncommentary against US efforts to reign in an individual who is abusing thebrilliance and promise of the internet to do incredible harm, and if U2'sposition will be to come down on the side of  Assange in this affair, then I thinkthis might be the irrevocable breach between me and these metaphorical loves-of-my-life, that I will not be able to overcome.

 

I would also liketo add two articles below.  Russia had opined that Assangeshould be awarded the noble prize for being a martyr to the "loss of pressfreedom."  I would like to post again the news of the journalistsbeaten terribly in Russiathat I placed in another thread about the Khimiki forest and Bono's meetingwith Medvedev, because I cannot believe Russia's hypocracy.

 

I also would liketo post a Guardian article that discusses the conflation of the sex-assaultallegations in Swedenwith the furor around Wikileaks.

 

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Hi.

 

So, I am going topost a couple of things here all at once.  

 

I noted that"Dirty Day" was played as the intercom music at the head of the showin Brisbanelast night.  I can't know the motivation behind that decision, but I canspeculate that it might be an embedded commentary on this Assange affair. So, I want to say a few things, in case this is so.  

 

First, I want toestablish what my thoughts are on internet journalism and the related freedomof speech issues.  I believe in and support both.  And I accept and support the arguments regardingpress freedom and the public's right to know.

 

However, Ithink Assange did terrible damage, not just to the US, but to efforts around the worldfor governments and people to navigate the terrible complexity and danger ofthe modern global environment.   When he released lists of sensitivesites--including factories that produce vaccines to counter biological weaponsattacks by terrorists-- I cannot see that this brings anything of value toanyone other than those who might want to launch such an attack.   Andwhen he threatened to release even more dangerous material if arrested, hecrossed, I feel, the line of constructive journalism and became an agent ofintentional destruction.  I must stop on this side of that line he hasdrawn.

 

Now there is aglobal campaign of cybercrime, in the form of hacking, going on.  This wasstarted by his supporters and  is being countered by others.  We arenow fully engaged in a cyberwar.  Great.  War is war.

 

When AmnestyInternational first awarded Assange, I could understand their case andposition.  But I do not see how they can, in good faith and integrity,continue to support him now.  I know U2 is a life-long partner withAmnesty, a partnership which, for the most part, I support.  I also know thatBono has been repeatedly nominated for a Noble Prize.  So, I understandwhere his/their loyalties lie. 

 

I have often hadto engage with myself in philosophical and political acrobatics to findcompromise and consensus with some of Bono/U2's positions.  For the mostpart, these have been very fruitful and valuable mental and spiritualexercises. But, I have to admit that if Dirty Day was in any way an oppositioncommentary against US efforts to reign in an individual who is abusing thebrilliance and promise of the internet to do incredible harm, and if U2'sposition will be to come down on the side of  Assange in this affair, then I thinkthis might be the irrevocable breach between me and these metaphorical loves-of-my-life, that I will not be able to overcome.

 

I would also liketo add two articles below.  Russia had opined that Assangeshould be awarded the noble prize for being a martyr to the "loss of pressfreedom."  I would like to post again the news of the journalistsbeaten terribly in Russiathat I placed in another thread about the Khimiki forest and Bono's meetingwith Medvedev, because I cannot believe Russia's hypocracy.

 

I also would liketo post a Guardian article that discusses the conflation of the sex-assaultallegations in Swedenwith the furor around Wikileaks.

 

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