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Shuttle Challenger


wahine
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My town is pretty somber here tonight. Tomorrow is the 25th anniversary of the explosion and catastrophic failure of Challenger. I watched it with my own eyes that morning, I was very very very pregnant and it was freezing here I went out front with my mom and watched it explode what seemed like right over my head. The beach and the ocean out here was covered in debri. It was horrific. The whole Space Coast just seems almost numb, there are all kinds of memorials set for tomorrow but for some reason, tonight seems so depressing. It still seems like just yesterday, I can remember every single detail of that whole day.

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 I remember when the tragedy happened, I was in the my homeroom class (9th grade) when the home economics teacher, school principle with a television came into the room with an announcement.

 After our teacher stepped aside, The principal said "We have an announcement, something very bad has happened" and he turned on the tv which showed footage of the explosion.

  ((HUGS))

 

 

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In the maybe 10 minutes it took me to leave my house and walk to my friend Jennifer's house to pick her up to walk to school together it happened. They were all sitting gawking at the TV when I got to the front door. I remember it being a snowy cool and sunny day. It was heartbreaking. It had never occurred to me that the shuttle could explode.

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I remember it very clearly as well . . . a shocking and sad day. One of the astronauts was from the Hermosa Beach/Manhattan Beach area where I grew up and there is a memorial there near the pier along the bike path.

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25years aleady?? wow, it doesn't feel that long ago.  I was watching it when it happened, can't remember if it was a newsflash on the telly or a special news programme, it was so weird watching it, you didn't really know what had happened, you just felt shocked because your gut feeling knew it was catastrophic, it was awful, so much hope turned to such tragedy and horror of realisation in a matter of seconds, it left me cold.

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Thanks for this, Wahine.

I remember it too.  And, yes, a lot of time has gone by very quickly.  Nearly a 1/3 of a lifetime for most people.

I was in school on the Southwest coast of Florida--90 miles from the launch site, which is still close enough to see the flame trails.  So, the entire school was out on the football field to watch the launch when the explosion occurred.  We could see that too.

This past summer, I went to the Kennedy Space Center and watched the final night launch of a shuttle from a pier built way out into the water across from the center.  The launch was beautiful....somber, many people present, and everyone sad to witness the shuttle era passing, even if the new private space initiatives are something to be very excited about.  And I am excited about them.  But, they really are not a replacement.

There is a launch of Discovery on Monday, and then two more.  The very last shuttle flight is scheduled for June.  After this, the era will be over and we will have no way to get our astronauts to space.  We are going to pay the Russians fares to take our people up.  The Russians tripled the price as soon as our shuttle missions were cancelled.  The new private space entrepreneurs promise they will have private space taxis to take our astronauts to the International Space Station within three years.  Let us hope they pull this off.  I am hopeful and optimistic.  But, they will be held to their promises and held accountable if they fall short.  I just wish we could have maintained the shuttles UNTIL the private fleet was up and flying.

Nasa.gov is a very cool website.
SpaceX is a very good company to keep your eye on if this sort of stuff interests you.
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Thanks for this, Wahine.

I remember it too.  And, yes, a lot of time has gone by very quickly.  Nearly a 1/3 of a lifetime for most people.

I was in school on the Southwest coast of Florida--90 miles from the launch site, which is still close enough to see the flame trails.  So, the entire school was out on the football field to watch the launch when the explosion occurred.  We could see that too.

This past summer, I went to the Kennedy Space Center and watched the final night launch of a shuttle from a pier built way out into the water across from the center.  The launch was beautiful....somber, many people present, and everyone sad to witness the shuttle era passing, even if the new private space initiatives are something to be very excited about.  And I am excited about them.  But, they really are not a replacement.

There is a launch of Discovery on Monday, and then two more.  The very last shuttle flight is scheduled for June.  After this, the era will be over and we will have no way to get our astronauts to space.  We are going to pay the Russians fares to take our people up.  The Russians tripled the price as soon as our shuttle missions were cancelled.  The new private space entrepreneurs promise they will have private space taxis to take our astronauts to the International Space Station within three years.  Let us hope they pull this off.  I am hopeful and optimistic.  But, they will be held to their promises and held accountable if they fall short.  I just wish we could have maintained the shuttles UNTIL the private fleet was up and flying.

Nasa.gov is a very cool website.
SpaceX is a very good company to keep your eye on if this sort of stuff interests you.
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Thanks for this, Wahine.

I remember it too.  And, yes, a lot of time has gone by very quickly.  Nearly a 1/3 of a lifetime for most people.

I was in school on the Southwest coast of Florida--90 miles from the launch site, which is still close enough to see the flame trails.  So, the entire school was out on the football field to watch the launch when the explosion occurred.  We could see that too.

This past summer, I went to the Kennedy Space Center and watched the final night launch of a shuttle from a pier built way out into the water across from the center.  The launch was beautiful....somber, many people present, and everyone sad to witness the shuttle era passing, even if the new private space initiatives are something to be very excited about.  And I am excited about them.  But, they really are not a replacement.

There is a launch of Discovery on Monday, and then two more.  The very last shuttle flight is scheduled for June.  After this, the era will be over and we will have no way to get our astronauts to space.  We are going to pay the Russians fares to take our people up.  The Russians tripled the price as soon as our shuttle missions were cancelled.  The new private space entrepreneurs promise they will have private space taxis to take our astronauts to the International Space Station within three years.  Let us hope they pull this off.  I am hopeful and optimistic.  But, they will be held to their promises and held accountable if they fall short.  I just wish we could have maintained the shuttles UNTIL the private fleet was up and flying.

Nasa.gov is a very cool website.
SpaceX is a very good company to keep your eye on if this sort of stuff interests you.
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