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Toughest job you ever had


illumination70
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All of my jobs have been tough, but I love/loved them all:

 

Environmental Security Analyst-- providing future forecasting of international environmental security threats and developing recommendations to off-set them.

 

Foreign Media Analyst-- identifying and countering international media threats by terrorists and other hostile groups.

 

16mm Independent filmmaker--EVERYTHING about this is hard, but only because the craft is SO expensive and it is hard to do much easily without funds. (I am a fan of Spiderman, but how could they not pull off a show for 70 million???)

 

Owner of a small services consulting firm--hard only because one has to spend so much time looking for clients rather than just working productively! I decided this was not an efficient use of my time or energy.

 

I have had lots of minimum-wage temp jobs on and off at different points in my life, but the only thing hard about these is doing mindless work for no money. Blech. I really can't stand that.

so smart and savvy to sell yourself on this thread.
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Plucking turkeys - needed extra cash to go travelling, lasted half a day, it was disgusting. Still determined to make some extra money, the next day I arrived at a meat factory in Burton on Trent, they made meat pies and sausages, never went back after lunch break.

 

Became a veggie!!!!!!!!!

oh. my. god. do you have nightmaares???

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[quote name='illumination70 wrote:


kerttuli']I might have been lucky 'cause I know people have very terrible job experiences. Mine is not that bad.... but it felt terrible that time. I was about 20 when I worked three days as a telemarketer. I called people and tried to sell them lousy magazines.... no one wanted to buy anything from me and some people just hung up the phone.

 Ugh you have my condolences because I also did telemarketing (selling home security systems) and had the same responses from potential customers!!  I stuck it out for two weeks and left when I was accepted into a tech school in Western, Washington.

 

 

see! thats why i'm always nice and friendly to whoever i get on the phone. i always remind myself these people got to do their jobs too. no need in being rude! 

altho i do get angry at crappy cunstomer-service employers. but only when they start giving uninterested replies or talk down at me. kids think i'm quite notorious in some companieswink.gif 
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 During the summer of 1996, I was working a through a temp service at a plastic packaging factory during the day (8 hour shift) and then I would work at the Paramount theater in Downtown Seattle for another 4-5 hours.

  Then on the weekends, I would work double-shifts (if they were available) on both Saturday and Sunday  and both jobs were for minimum wage.

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I guess that the toughest job I have ever had is the one I have now - being a teacher. It is not a physically hard job but emotionally it is very hard. I have worked in different schools and with different types of kids but every teen and trying to teach them is a challenge to say the least.

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Like Zhivvy, my toughest job has been teaching middle school (12 -13 yr. olds) who didn't particulary want to be taught! Many of them were in gangs, had parents in prison, or had no parents at all (foster care), were or became pregnant, were on drugs, violent, etc. . . . . . did this for many, many years with a two hour commute and (eventually) kids of my own at home who needed me. I have to say, I became pretty burned out trying to do too much and once my own kids reached middle school, I was able to come home and be here for them.

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I've done a lot of office-temp work in my life, so I've had a lot of tough/bad/OMFG work experiences. But a special prize has to go to Bank of America, where I was sent to toil on a data-entry project. The pay wasn't great, but it was long-term, even open-ended, and this after the dot-com crash, when jobs were vaporizing faster by the hour, so a cheap but steady gig was better than no gig at all. But what a horrible set up:  they wouldn't give us temps entry cards, so we were basically forced to stay on site all day (if we had to go outside, a manager had to escort us in and out; if they weren't quick to let us back in, guess who would be penalized for being 'late'?) The work room was overcrowded, too many desks, computers and bodies crammed in like steerage.  The room had a very low ceiling--one manager remarked that it was originally a storage room/fixit center for the computer department, and wasn't designed as work space for more than a few people.  Add to this:  poor ventilation.  After all, how much fresh air does a storage room really need?  Even if it now has several dozen humans squeezed into it?  Oh, and bad lighting--flickering flourescent bulbs.  Bad setups for desks, computers, copy stands--other temps who'd been there for a while told me the job have given them pain in their arms, backs, necks.   Bad design of the computer interface itself.  As I worked through my first day, as best I could considering how BofA had set it up, I noticed I was getting headaches.  Eye strain (that fluorescent flicker!)  Muscle aches.  Spots in front of my eyes.  But of course:  there was no air in the room!  On lunch, other temps told me they had headaches every day, and a lot of the women were going in to the bathrooms to vomit  (and I did notice, in the afternoon, quite a few women heading to the bathroom with some urgency). 

 

When I left, I had to go sit outside on Market Street, gasping for fresh air, trying to gather my strength to go home.  All the symptoms I had--dizzyness, fatigue, headache, nausea--were classic symptoms of oxygen deprivation.  BofA had decided that their workers didn't need...air

 

Of course, I called the agency the next day, told them exactly what the problem was, that I wouldn't be returning, that I would not work a job that I could not do properly, and if they wanted to blacklist me for doing so (of course, they did!) that was their problem, not mine.  

 

On the other hand, there is one amusingly posh temp gig I got, right around that same time. I had just finished a lengthier assignment, when the agency called me and asked if I could go pinch hit a one-day job, today, for another temp who had either flaked or gotten sick (they weren't clear).  Pay wasn't great, but it was just some chimp work:  preppping a big fund-raising mailing for the San Francisco Symphony.  Sure, I had nothing else on my plate, so off I went to Davies Symphony Hall, and was ushered to the basement to work on the project. Turns out, the Symphony had a special series of programs scheduled that day, for busloads of local schoolkids.  The performance was piped, live, throughout the workspace under the hall, so I got to stuff envelopes, accompanied by a full live symphony! Twice, in fact; the Symphony did the same program twice, for two shifts of schoolkids.   Swank!

 

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