Jump to content

No Rattle and Hum remaster? Doesn't look like it here....


MacFoley
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Subscriber

[quote name='Zhivvy wrote:


MacFoley']god knows!!! hahaha about the best of!

 

best of 2000-2010 i would say it could be?

But not as many singles only 14. And four of those are on U218 or another greatest.

So a 10 track greatest hits is not that many tracks in all!

 

But they included stuff from the other two'Best Of' CDs on the U218 disc. In fact, it was made up ENTIRELY of material from previous 'Best Of' CDs (apart from Elevation, Walk On, the Bomb material and the Rubin tracks). Given that the material in brackets was included, I imagine, and also given the material on U218 is some of the same stuff from previous 'Best Of' CDs, I imagine Elevation, Walk On, Vertigo, Sometimes, Saints and Window In The Skies will appear on 'The Best Of 2000-2012', along with some other material from H=Bomb, and also No Line songs, and hopefully Winter, too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Subscriber

[quote name='peterferris8 wrote:


Zhivvy wrote:

MacFoley']god knows!!! hahaha about the best of!

 

best of 2000-2010 i would say it could be?

But not as many singles only 14. And four of those are on U218 or another greatest.
So a 10 track greatest hits is not that many tracks in all!

 

But they included stuff from the other two'Best Of' CDs on the U218 disc. In fact, it was made up ENTIRELY of material from previous 'Best Of' CDs (apart from Elevation, Walk On, the Bomb material and the Rubin tracks). Given that the material in brackets was included, I imagine, and also given the material on U218 is some of the same stuff from previous 'Best Of' CDs, I imagine Elevation, Walk On, Vertigo, Sometimes, Saints and Window In The Skies will appear on 'The Best Of 2000-2012', along with some other material from H=Bomb, and also No Line songs, and hopefully Winter, too.

Winter would be good - love that song. And would like to see Mercy realeased in some form - apart from on WAIE. But I doubt that would give a wide base for people to buy it. 

I think you are right Peter that some songs from 18 will be on a greatest hits - there has to be or it will be a very short album. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Subscriber

What was the R&H backlash mentioned? I could look it up in one of my books, but you guys will answer quicker. I hope! ;-)

After the success of The Joshua Tree, the album received a generally mixed reception. Writing in Rolling StoneAnthony DeCurtis said, "The album ably demonstrates U2's force but devotes too little attention to the band's vision." The album received an 8/10 marking in the NMEreview from Stuart Baillie, but was controversial as Mark Sinker originally gave it a much poorer review, which was pulled in favour of Baillie's more positive one. Sinker left NME shortly after.[22]

Roger Ebert slammed the film, saying that the concert footage was poorly lit and monotonous, with little use made of the crowds. However, review partner Gene Siskel was more sympathetic, praising the music and finding the footage of the Harlem gospel choir particularly moving.[23]

"Rattle and Hum was conceived as a scrapbook, a memento of that time spent in America on the Joshua Tree tour. It changed when the movie, which was initially conceived of as a low-budget film, suddenly became a big Hollywood affair. That put a different emphasis on the album, which suffered from the huge promotion and publicity, and people reacted against it."[24]
—The Edge

U2's 1987 album The Joshua Tree brought the band critical acclaim, great commercial success, and high exposure, but it was the beginning of a backlash against them.[25] They were accused of being grandiose, over-earnest, and self-righteous.[25] The criticism increased the following year with their continued exploration of American music on Rattle and Hum motion picture and companion album. The film's director Phil Joanou called the picture "pretentious", while critics called the record "misguided and bombastic".[26] Many of them interpreted the band's intended homage to American music legends as an attempt to place themselves as peers with rock's all-time great artists.[27][28][29]

Despite the criticism, the album was a strong seller, continuing U2's burgeoning commercial success. It hit No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart, remaining at the top spot for 6 weeks, and also reached No. 1 in the UK and Australian charts. In the UK, it achieved the highest first-week sales of any album to that date (and held the record until the release of Oasis's Be Here Now in 1997). However, the album's sales were a far cry from the massive sales of The Joshua Tree.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...