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glatonbury keyboards


fchris17
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this is me being a bit of a geek here and asking about this..

bono said in an interview that they lost their keyboard computers during the set but as far as i can hear its only the beginning of 'where the streets have no name' that the backing keyboards are missing (it sounds like someone is playing that live instead), they're definitely back on for beautiful day i think.
i reckon there was supposed to be keyboards in Jerusalem as well (simular to when they do amazing grace) 

did anyone notice any of the backing sounds missing???
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I thought it was a bit strange that when Bono sang Jerusalem, the backing faded out, and only returned on the word 'land'. Guess that's why the repeats had the Jerusalem intro to Where The Streets Have No Name cut.

or because Bono heard that back and though, that sounded crap, get rid of it, never show it again!

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[quote name='MacFoley wrote:


peterferris8']I thought it was a bit strange that when Bono sang Jerusalem, the backing faded out, and only returned on the word 'land'. Guess that's why the repeats had the Jerusalem intro to Where The Streets Have No Name cut.

or because Bono heard that back and though, that sounded crap, get rid of it, never show it again!

He did go off-key in the last two lines, so I can kinda see why he'd want it out.

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It was just a bit random for me.

 

And also in streets, bono started singing "can't take my eyes off of you" which ruined it.

 

Streets would have been amazing if bono sung it properly.

If U2 ever play a festival again, I'd rather they did it without snippeting other artists' songs. They should let their own songs stand on their own two feet.

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yeh i totally agree about the 'cant take my eyes off of you bit'. i think that was just a spur of the moment thing which sounded a bit rubbish

 

the other bits where brilliant though because it was a nice touch to the other artists playing at glastonbury....it made feel like they wanted to do a set that involved them self with the festival and not just turning up to play it.

 

in the moment i think everyone loved the Jerusalem bit but when i got home i saw the problem with it, as i said, it was just a shame it didnt finish the same way as amazing grace did linking into streets

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yeh i totally agree about the 'cant take my eyes off of you bit'. i think that was just a spur of the moment thing which sounded a bit rubbish

 

the other bits where brilliant though because it was a nice touch to the other artists playing at glastonbury....it made feel like they wanted to do a set that involved them self with the festival and not just turning up to play it.

 

in the moment i think everyone loved the Jerusalem bit but when i got home i saw the problem with it, as i said, it was just a shame it didnt finish the same way as amazing grace did linking into streets

The thing is, though, with snippets not just at Glastonbury but at any U2 gig, it gives the impression that U2 are trying to place themselves among the ranks of these artists (all the constant snippeting of The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Lennon, etc.), which is exactly what got Rattle & Hum so much flack. Most other artists that I like don't do snippets, because they choose instead to stand on their own two feet. Which, if you ask me, is the right thing to do.

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The keyboard and computers are what Terry Lawless operates during the show. Apart from the keyboard parts, there's also click tracks that only the band can hear, so that they're on time. It also cues them when to come in. The reason why U2 has a full sound is because of some backing tracks. Yes, they play and sing live, but there's always the 2nd and 3rd guitar tracks. There's the drum tracks to Get On Your Boots for instance. It may not stand out over the P.A., but it could be one of the main sounds in each of their mixes. When those go away, artists feel uncomfortable. Their main fear is that something bigger will go wrong.

 

Here's an example of what Bono is listening, during One Tree Hill:

 

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