Jump to content

SOPA/PIPA Internet Protest now in effect


Sigma957
 Share

Recommended Posts


Can you guys spread the SOPA video I posted to anywhere and everywhere you can? PIPA is due for a vote on 01-24. It's part of a greater murdering of the bill of rights.

 

I am frankly shocked onbly 4 or 5 people are responding here but over 45 have viewed it. What are you guys afraid of? Guaranteed you're already on some list somewhere anyway.

 

I wonder if Paul McGuinness realized this would happen.

sigma, in answer to your question, I came across this article in the next box from the UK's Telegraph...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 33
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

http://musicmanagersforum.ie/tag/paul-mcguinness/

 

Business Matters: World Coming Around to U2 Manager Paul McGuinness’ Piracy, ISP Views

16JUL

Business Matters: World Coming Around to U2 Manager Paul McGuinness’ Piracy, ISP Views

July 12, 2011
By Glenn Peoples (@billboardglenn), Nashville

Visionary or Apostate? U2 Manager Paul McGuinness
– Paul McGuinness has a guest column in The Telegraph titled “The Age of ‘Free’ is Coming to an End.†It’s a well-timed article. Last week, U.S. entertainment companies and ISPs announced they had created a “copyright alert†system intended to educate and deter copyright infringers.

He may be lambasted – again – by tech bloggers and media pundits, but the fact is the vision McGuiness has publicly outlined for over three years is actually taking shape all over the world. McGuinness has long argued that ISPs need to be a part of a piracy solution. A few years ago it was hard to imagine ISPs either coming to the negotiating table or being forced to act by governments.

But both have happened and will happen even more in the future. Piracy is no longer a music industry problem. It’s just about everybody’s problem. And it’s no longer a moral issue. It’s an economic issue. A country that relies on and values the cultural and economic impact of their intellectual property sees the fight against piracy as a mater of national importance.

In January 2008, McGuinness attracted worldwide attention – and a fair amount of ridicule in some circles – for his speech at Midem that called on ISPs to take an active role in helping content owners fight piracy on their networks. “For ISPs in general, the days of prevaricating over their responsibilities for helping protect music must end,†he said.

He has continued to speak out on the issue ever since that Midem speech. In a guest article at The Guardian over two years ago, McGuinness called the debate over ISP involvement “a critical debate that I believe will shape the lives and the working conditions of creative professionals for years, even decades, to come.â€

And in a GQ article last year, McGuinness noted that the momentum had already begun to change. “Today we take a far more sober view as we see what damage ‘free’ has done to the creative industries, above all to music.â€

As I noted last week, the U.S. agreement could inspire similar actions elsewhere. Some countries will let the government take the lead. Other countries will see market-driven solutions preempt the less favorable option of legislative interaction.

McGuinness also recognizes the impact of the recent developments in the US. “The ISP agreement in the US is good news for music and the creative industries,†he wrote in the Telegraph article over the weekend. He called on parties to “stop the thumb-twiddling and the soul-searching†and encourage ISPs to become partners in shaping the Internet. “In the US they have made a welcome voluntary step in that direction. Elsewhere, it will need the pressure of government and legislation to make it happen.â€

Call it what you want – a level playing field, a fair shake for the creative industries – but the truth is countries’ responses to digital piracy are following the advice laid out by that speech at Midem three and a half years ago. Free was once considered to be the ultimate weapon in fighting piracy and was seen by some as the foundation for new business models (give away the music, sell the T-shirt and ticket). But free has lost its luster. Instead of giving away music, companies increasingly want to get paid and have a fair chance at operating a sustainable business.
(The Telegraph)


Link to comment
Share on other sites


spicy, Paul McGuinness considers anyone who downloads a song a pirate, even if they buy it from Amazon. He's unhappy U2's show are freely available for download. He's not the Paul I grew up reading about in Touch the Flame, the fanzines (remember those?), Three Chords and the Truth, U2 the Early Years and so forth.

 

How different is he from Rupert Murdoch, Walmart, Procter & Gamble, Time Warner, CBS/Viacom now?

 

CBS/Viacom created and distributed file sharing software for 10 years and then called it piracy. They created piracy. Total hypocrites now seeking to control what you and I see or hear. Youtube is a threat to any group that wants complete control of your life. It scares them because as Anonymous said, WORDS have POWER. Facebook, Tumblr, Twitter, Reddit, Wikipedia, Google all threaten total control. They want to chip you, stamp you, index you and sell you their products. It's the MATRIX, it's the future in the films Blade Runner, V for Vendetta, Minority Report and the series Babylon 5.

 

January 24th PIPA is up for vote. I suggest everyone, not just US citizens start policing their government's doings and read up on these bills. The United States forefathers are crying in the afterlife.

 

And there are much worse things ahead.

 

This is how Nazi Germany started, one thing at a time.

http://musicmanagersforum.ie/tag/paul-mcguinness/

 

Business Matters: World Coming Around to U2 Manager Paul McGuinness’ Piracy, ISP Views

16JUL

Business Matters: World Coming Around to U2 Manager Paul McGuinness’ Piracy, ISP Views

July 12, 2011
By Glenn Peoples (@billboardglenn), Nashville

Visionary or Apostate? U2 Manager Paul McGuinness
– Paul McGuinness has a guest column in The Telegraph titled “The Age of ‘Free’ is Coming to an End.†It’s a well-timed article. Last week, U.S. entertainment companies and ISPs announced they had created a “copyright alert†system intended to educate and deter copyright infringers.

He may be lambasted – again – by tech bloggers and media pundits, but the fact is the vision McGuiness has publicly outlined for over three years is actually taking shape all over the world. McGuinness has long argued that ISPs need to be a part of a piracy solution. A few years ago it was hard to imagine ISPs either coming to the negotiating table or being forced to act by governments.

But both have happened and will happen even more in the future. Piracy is no longer a music industry problem. It’s just about everybody’s problem. And it’s no longer a moral issue. It’s an economic issue. A country that relies on and values the cultural and economic impact of their intellectual property sees the fight against piracy as a mater of national importance.

In January 2008, McGuinness attracted worldwide attention – and a fair amount of ridicule in some circles – for his speech at Midem that called on ISPs to take an active role in helping content owners fight piracy on their networks. “For ISPs in general, the days of prevaricating over their responsibilities for helping protect music must end,†he said.

He has continued to speak out on the issue ever since that Midem speech. In a guest article at The Guardian over two years ago, McGuinness called the debate over ISP involvement “a critical debate that I believe will shape the lives and the working conditions of creative professionals for years, even decades, to come.â€

And in a GQ article last year, McGuinness noted that the momentum had already begun to change. “Today we take a far more sober view as we see what damage ‘free’ has done to the creative industries, above all to music.â€

As I noted last week, the U.S. agreement could inspire similar actions elsewhere. Some countries will let the government take the lead. Other countries will see market-driven solutions preempt the less favorable option of legislative interaction.

McGuinness also recognizes the impact of the recent developments in the US. “The ISP agreement in the US is good news for music and the creative industries,†he wrote in the Telegraph article over the weekend. He called on parties to “stop the thumb-twiddling and the soul-searching†and encourage ISPs to become partners in shaping the Internet. “In the US they have made a welcome voluntary step in that direction. Elsewhere, it will need the pressure of government and legislation to make it happen.â€

Call it what you want – a level playing field, a fair shake for the creative industries – but the truth is countries’ responses to digital piracy are following the advice laid out by that speech at Midem three and a half years ago. Free was once considered to be the ultimate weapon in fighting piracy and was seen by some as the foundation for new business models (give away the music, sell the T-shirt and ticket). But free has lost its luster. Instead of giving away music, companies increasingly want to get paid and have a fair chance at operating a sustainable business.
(The Telegraph)


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...