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Spider-Man: Bono And Edge Will Attend Trial


febottini
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U2's Bono and the Edge, director Julie Taymor and the other producers of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark will meet in court on May 28th to settle a legal battle over the infamous show. 

Taymor, who co-wrote the script and was the musical's first director, initially filed suit against the show's producers, plus composers Bono and the Edge, in November 2011 after they fired her from the disastrous, injury-prone show in March, the New York Times reports. Taymor filed a copyright suit claiming the producers were making money off her ideas and script and that she was owed $1 million. The producers countersued, claiming she had been fired for breach of contract.

 

Judge Katherine B. Forrest set the New York court date after four days of closed-door sessions that failed to produce any sort of settlement over copyright control and profits, despite coming to terms in principle in August. What's more, last February, both parties reportedly settled their dispute over Taymor's firing, with the producers withdrawing their breach of contract claim and allotting Taymor full royalty fees for her work.

According to a source, however, both sides are now at an impasse regarding creative rights and control of Spider-Man, as the producers are now considering future runs of the show and overseas tours. The anonymous source did add that the sides are still talking and that a settlement is possible.

Despite receiving mostly negative reviews and costing a whopping $75 million, Spider-Man has become a Broadway fan favorite, grossing more than $1 million a week. That number, however, is about the same as its weekly running costs, and the show has seen a dip in ticket sales recently.

 


From Rolling Stone
 

Edited by febottini
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More from the New York Times:

 

A federal judge has set a May 28 trial date for the director Julie Taymor, Bono and the Edge of U2, and the producers of the Broadway musical “Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark” to battle in court over a lawsuit stemming from the spectacular implosion of their years-long collaboration on the show.

 

Judge Katherine B. Forrest of Federal District Court in Manhattan ordered on Friday that the parties may conduct discovery through May 1 and that “trial is and will be on May 28, 2013,” adding that no further meetings with the judge were necessary. The order came four days after the judge, during a closed-door session with the various sides, expressed frustration that they had not been able to settle disputes over copyright control and profits from the show in spite of coming to terms in principle in August.

 

One person familiar with the settlement negotiations said on Tuesday that the sides were at an impasse, and that the holdup had less to do with compensating Ms. Taymor than with creative rights and control of “Spider-Man,” whose producers are now considering future overseas tours and other runs. The person, who spoke on condition of anonymity to avoid antagonizing the parties involved in the lawsuit, said that the sides were still talking and that a settlement was still possible.

 

A lawyer for Ms. Taymor declined to comment on Tuesday; lawyers for the producers did not return phone messages seeking comment.

The lawsuit is primarily between Ms. Taymor, the musical’s former director and one of its script writers, and the producers and “Spider-Man” composers, Bono and the Edge; the producers, with the composers’ blessing, fired Ms. Taymor in March 2011. She sued that November on copyright grounds, saying the producers were making money off her ideas and script and owed her more than $1 million. The producers countersued, saying that they had ousted her for breach of contract.

 

“Spider-Man,” by far the most expensive musical in the history of Broadway with a $75 million budget, opened in June 2011 to largely negative reviews but has gone on to be a fan favorite, grossing more than $1 million a week. Its weekly running costs are quite high on Broadway, however, at roughly $1 million, and ticket sales have dipped slightly in recent months.

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