Jump to content

What's Your Slang? Irish & Otherwise... (Regionalisms, Sayings, Accents, Etc.)


Recommended Posts

  • Subscriber

No a lot of people would say that so you're grand (It's ok). :)

 

I learned that expression here at U2.com - I think from either a Scottish person or an Irish person. I was told "you'll be grand."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Subscriber

Southern "Ya reckon?"  

Meaning - Do you think?

 

I had a friend from Venezuela who worked in a tiny Illinois town and couldn't understand this saying.

 

Also : Up the creek without a paddle

Meaning:  Almost hopelessly hard

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber

Southern "Ya reckon?"  

Meaning - Do you think?

 

I had a friend from Venezuela who worked in a tiny Illinois town and couldn't understand this saying.

 

Also : Up the creek without a paddle

Meaning:  Almost hopelessly hard

 

Ooo. I didn't realize they'd say "Ya reckon" as far north as Illinois! Interesting.

 

That one reminds me of this kind of speech: in some areas in the south & southwest (in America), they say "fixing to" or "fixin' to" to mean someone's going to do something / getting ready to do something / about to do something.  For ex: "I'm fixin' to go to the store."

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber

The apple doesn't fall far from the tree...  bull in the china shop again..

 

Good ones, bragi. :)

 

I think "like a bull in a china shop" or the version u mentioned is 'a saying.' The one about an apple is a saying but it's also an aphorism. (Merriam Webster says an aphorism is "a short phrase that expresses a true or wise idea...a concise statement of a principle.")

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber

Alma-it was southern Illinois, tiny town.

 

Of course in the 80s, gag me with a spoon = do not like

 

Thanks Terri.

 

If I remember right, "gag me w/ a spoon" was part of what was called "Valley speak" & it was from the way that girls in some Valley in California spoke. They were called "Valley girls." I have the impression that that's also where "like" made its way into our language so prevalently (if you, like, know what I mean).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...