Jump to content
  • Bono Book Zoo Header.jpg

What's Your Slang? Irish & Otherwise... (Regionalisms, Sayings, Accents, Etc.)


Alma1
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Subscriber

I just saw where someone over at the 'say something' thread said "hinky" (posted in 2009). Marty, I saw your recent comment there about the 1st thing you thought of posting over here. Did you mean that term?

 

Funny stuff! Here's the 1st & last place I ever heard that term until seeing it in that thread now - from the movie 'The Fugitive' (love that movie, btw) :

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • Subscriber

Btw, we all prefer some slang terms over other ones & I hafta say - personally, I'm not crazy about 'hinky' - I don't use it myself. I've never heard it used in real life either so I wasn't sure if the writer(s) of the movie made it up for the movie or not.

 

Marty or anyone - have u heard it used in real life & if so did it mean 'weird' or 'strange' like the guys in the movie clip say? The way someone used it over at the 'say something' thread, another interpretation might be that it can mean 'messed up,' too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Subscriber

Lol

I always thought it was just made up for the movie or the actor just ad-libbed

 

 

Remember the scene where the main character escapes into a St. Patrick's Day parade? A little touch o' Ireland. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Subscriber

In Ireland they say 'mad' when we in America would say 'crazy.' In America, we do use 'mad' to mean crazy but only relatively rarely. Pretty much we just have the terms 'mad scientist' & 'madly in love.' For just about everything else we say 'crazy.' When we say 'mad' we almost always mean 'angry.'

 

Of course I knew that 'mad' can mean crazy, but I had thought that people no longer really used that term anywhere - until I heard Bono say it in concert. It was the 1st time I really realized that people in Ireland use the term 'mad' instead of 'crazy.' (It was the part of the concert where he talked about efforts to end extreme poverty in our world - just b4 the song 'One'. He compared it to when he was a kid & he heard that America wanted to land on the moon. He said he thought "these Americans are mad." His point of course was about what people are capable of achieving when there's enough support for it, & they get together & put their mind to it.) I just love the differences in language usage around the world! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Subscriber

 

 

Alma-it was southern Illinois, tiny town.

 

Of course in the 80s, gag me with a spoon = do not like

Thanks Terri.

 

If I remember right, "gag me w/ a spoon" was part of what was called "Valley speak" & it was from the way that girls in some Valley in California spoke. They were called "Valley girls." I have the impression that that's also where "like" made its way into our language so prevalently (if you, like, know what I mean).

 

And didn't Frank Zappa's daughter write a song about it!?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...