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The Action Thread Part Two


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EDUCATION

THIS is what epic activism for 130M+ girls looks like

12 July 2017 3:13PM UTC | By: ZAINAB ALI KHAN

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A few months ago, we told you over 130 million girls are missing out on getting an education. We asked you to raise your voice so world leaders would hear our call for action and you delivered!

Just last weekend leaders met in Hamburg for the G20 Summit where they agreed on a list of commitments to help shape a better world. Thanks to your campaigning, not only was education in there, but it included a call for better and more innovative financing. While we still have a long way to go to, this was a great step forward.

We started this campaign giving G20 leaders an “F” grade, but having seen and heard you, they managed to bring it up to a C. It’s a pass, but they’ll need to work much harder to get to the top of the class. We’re going to need your help to keep this campaign going and make sure they deliver to get those 130 million + girls the education they deserve.

Across the globe, you shared 34,000 tweets and over 21,000 retweets using #GirlsCount. On Facebook, you shared posts about girls education nearly 9000 times and gave over 49,000 reactions! 16,190 of you from 169 different countries (and counting) showed off your creativity and commitment to girls’ education by helping us count to an insanely high number and 122,191 of you signed a postcard asking world leaders to show us they think #GirlsCount too!

Our tireless volunteers and Youth Ambassadors also made sure they helped us spread the message offline! Ahead of the G20 Partnership with Africa conference and G20 Hamburg we covered Berlin and Hamburg with thousands of posters and stencils to target 20 world leaders in the fight for the over 130 million girls missing out on an education around the world.

Take a look at some of this amazing activity below:

BELGIUM

Over in Brussels, our Youth Ambassadors did a virtual hand-in of the petition outside the European Commission and European Council offices.

.@JunckerEU: 106,500+ ONE members call on you to show that #GirlsCount by putting girls’ education at the top of the #G20agenda

 
 

 

They also took action by taking photos of themselves with hand-drawn signs declaring why education was important to them.

 

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Busy evening with @ONEinEU asking #OneYouth17 what education can give to the 130 million girls worldwide denied access ? #girlscount #G20

 
 

 

FRANCE

In France, over 16,000 people took our postcard action! Our French YAs and volunteers attended festivals across France to mobilise the public and collect signatures encouraging the government to take action for all girls missing out on an education.

130 millions de filles ne vont pas à l’école. La France doit agir lors du #G20 contre cette injustice #GirlsCount https://act.one.org/sign/g20-chaque-fille-compte/ 

 
 

 

GERMANY

Our G20 hosts handed in the petition with 2,000 postcards to Merkel’s Chief of Staff – one of the highest level staff in the German government!

Vielen Dank @peteraltmaier für das Gespräch & Ihren Einsatz für Bildung für Mädchen - Wir zählen auf Sie! #ONEYouth17#GirlsCount #G20

 
 

 

IRELAND

We received over 700 signatures from supporters in Ireland and our Irish Youth Ambassadors took to Twitter using hand-written signs to share what education means to them.

School taught me this, but 130m girls are missing out. Join me & demand change at the G20: http://ow.ly/YEXT30cK1mc  #GirlsCount#ONEYouth17

 
 

 

 

ITALY

Two Italian Youth Ambassador’s did a virtual hand-in of our postcard action to Palazzo Chigi (the Prime Minister’s office) and asked Italy to continue showing leadership on the topic of girls’ education!

Our YAs also tweeted #GirlsCount videos to the Prime Minister asking him to encourage other G20 leaders to step up their commitment to girls’ education.

#ONEYouth17 consegna il suo messaggio a @PaoloGentiloni: #Italia continui a mostrare leadership al #G20 sul tema dell'istruzione femminile!

 
 

 

NETHERLANDS

Dutch Youth Ambassadors targeted tweets towards Prime Minister Rutte with pictures that explained how important education has been to them and requests for him and the other G20 leaders to do more for girls’ education around the world.

Onze Jeugdambassadeurs over #onderwijs. 130 mln meisjes kunnen niet naar school. Roep #G20 & @MinPres tot actie http://ow.ly/X0Qj30dogcX 

 
 

 

Our Youth Ambassadors also visited The Hague to complete a virtual hand-in of our #GirlsCount petition.

130 mln meisjes kunnen niet naar school. Dat kan niet! TEKEN: http://ow.ly/Ofwv30dja8E  en vraag #G20 leiders voor meer en beter #onderwijs

 
 

 

UNITED KINGDOM

In the UK over 24,000 people signed our postcard!

 

A team of UK Youth Ambassadors made visits to No. 10 Downing Street to hand in our postcards and the ONE team attended meetings at the Argentinian, Canadian, and German embassies in London where they spoke with representatives about why all #GirlsCount.

Great to meet the team at @ARGinUK to discuss our #GirlsCountcampaign & why the G20 must invest in girl's education ??‍?

 
 

 

Fantastic meeting with @CanadianUK discussing our shared passion for girls' education & why the #G20 must invest because #GirlsCount ??‍? ?

 
 

 

Great meeting with the #G20 hosts @GermanEmbassy to discuss why #G20 leaders must invest in girls' education, because ALL #girlscount ???‍?

 
 

 

And this is just the beginning. We’re going to keep holding world leaders to account to push for more and better funds to get those girls back where they belong: in school.

 

Via ONE

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1058 EDUCATION How soccer is changing the lives of girls in Kenya February 23 2017 | By: MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO GIRLS COUNT Every gi

238 WATER AND SANITATION How the Ebola outbreak spurred improved access to running water in Liberia 16 November 2018 1:35PM UTC | By: WOMEN'S ADVANCEMENT DEEPLY

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AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Awesome! This is how Kenyans are beating poverty through yoga

14 June 2017 7:06PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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By Melissa Catelli. A version of this post was originally published by Take Part.  

For most travellers, a Kenyan safari involves days of patiently waiting for a glimpse of lions, elephants, or an elusive leopard hiding in the bush. For native New Yorker Paige Elenson, a 2006 family safari yielded a far less conventional sighting: a group of young Kenyan acrobats doing handstands in the middle of the bush.

“As a yoga teacher, my first reaction was to jump out of the vehicle and do handstands with [them],” Elenson says—so she did, leaving the safari group behind.

It was a brief encounter, but Elenson’s skills—honed over 15 years—impressed them. Shortly after returning home, she got an email from the acrobats, members of the Sarakasi Trust, asking her to come back and teach them yoga. At first, Elenson, a full-time yoga teacher, declined their requests, sending them yoga books and DVDs instead. But their persistence paid off.

A Seva Safari participant practicing yoga with members of the Maasai tribe in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. (Photo credit: Africa Yoga Project)

A Seva Safari participant practising yoga with members of the Maasai tribe in Amboseli National Park, Kenya. (Photo credit: Africa Yoga Project)

Elenson returned and started volunteering in some informal settlement communities and was asked to teach a class at a private gym. At the time, the city was home to just five yoga teachers and the health and wellness industry in Kenya was only accessible to a small number of wealthy individuals. On average, a single yoga class cost each participant 500 Kenyan shillings, or approximately $5.50.

So Elenson came up with an idea: Why not create a way to train unemployed youths from marginalised communities and help them earn money teaching yoga?

Photo Credit: Miranda Adler

Photo Credit: Miranda Adler

That year, she founded the Africa Yoga Project (AYP). The program provides a scholarship-based, 200-hour teacher training course to residents ages 18 to 35 from slums and informal settlements across Kenya; the goal is to help the teachers spread health and well-being throughout their communities while also providing them with a stable income. To qualify for the program, Elenson requires that applicants be African nationals, demonstrate financial need, and be “committed to becoming a yoga teacher and serving communities.”

Participants who have completed all of their requirements are provided health benefits and a stipend of roughly $100 per month over the course of three years to teach five weekly outreach classes free of charge in their communities. Teachers are required to open a bank account in order to receive their monthly stipend, encouraging long-term financial responsibility as well.

The weekly community outreach classes take place in various locations, including schools and acrobat training camps, but also areas of need such as orphanages, HIV centres, and prisons. More than 200 local AYP-trained instructors teach approximately 300 classes and reach 6,000 people each week in Kenya.

Eason says most of the current teachers were unemployed prior to working with Africa Yoga Project and were living in some of Kenya’s poorest slums. “For many of them, their way of making a living [was] through pickpocketing or theft,” she says.

Screen Shot 2015-06-03 at 3.53.46 PMNairobi local Eliam Wanji, 27, had never heard of yoga until her sisters started practising with AYP. Prior to AYP, she held a variety of different casual jobs, from beading to garbage collection, but her income was never consistent.

Nairobi local Eliam Wanji, in half moon pose, has been teaching yoga through AYP for the past five years. (Photo credit: Africa Yoga Project)

Nairobi local Eliam Wanji, in half moon pose, has been teaching yoga through AYP for the past five years. (Photo credit: Africa Yoga Project)

“The most I made one time was 7,500 shillings [equivalent to $82], and I felt like I was the richest person on earth,” she says. “There is no way I can compare AYP and former jobs. It’s like comparing death and sleep.” Today, four members of Wanji’s family are teaching yoga, and she’s been with the organisation for five years.

For Wanji, the most challenging and rewarding part of her training with AYP was learning about forgiveness and building trust. “It’s hard to go back and teach the same communities we may have stolen from. We were asked to call people that we needed to forgive and also ask for forgiveness,” she says. “I am the better for it, as it helped set me free [so] I could move on with my life.”

 

Eight years in, Elenson says she’s most proud of how the program has helped participants enter Kenya’s middle class while serving their communities and doing something they enjoy. “Some AYP teachers have moved from living in what they referred to as slums to new homes, starting families, supporting family members with school fees, and working on new income generating projects,” she says.

This post was originally published in June 2015. Click here to learn more the Africa Yoga Project. 

 

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**Attention Everyone** A little birdie told us to keep an eye out for Music Generation Clare this evening on Nuacht RTÉ at 5.45pm and Nuacht TG4 at 7pm 1f642.png:-)

11/07/2017

Three iconic landmarks in Clare will come alive to the sound of music this Wednesday!

Three iconic landmarks in Clare will come alive to the sound of music this Wednesday!

Music Generation Clare and Music Generation Limerick City will join forces on Wednesday 12 July to stage a series of pop-up gigs at three iconic locations on the Clare coast – the Cliffs of Moher and the beaches of Lahinch and Kilkee. More than one hundred musicians of different genres and styles will perform the three shows in just over three hours, all with the support of Clare County Council.

Timings for the rolling roadshow are as follows:

  • 11.00am, The Cliffs of Moher
  • 1.00pm, Seafront Lahinch  
  • 3.30pm, Seafront Kilkee (parking lot by the steps)

All performances are free to attend and open to the public.

Leading the performances will be the newly formed Clare Youth Trad Orchestra which already comprises one hundred young musicians, 60+ of whom will perform on Wednesday. An initiative of Clare Arts Office and Music Generation Clare, the Orchestra is directed by Padraic O’Reilly, a well-known traditional piano player from Corofin.

The ensemble will use this exciting pop-up performance opportunity to warm up for their upcoming slot at the Shannon Aerodrome at Fleadh Ennis 2017. The group will have the honour of being the first to perform in the Aerodrome, opening the inaugural concert at the venue on Tuesday 15 August. Tickets for this event will go on sale shortly online at www.fleadhcheoil.ie and www.glor.ie

Joining the Trad Orchestra on Wednesday will be a whole host of rappers, songwriters, producers and bands from Music Generation Limerick City’s celebrated Limerick Voices programme.

The combined result will be three short public concerts featuring a fantastic mix of musical styles. The event will also create a valuable opportunity for these young people to perform together and share their music in a non-competitive setting.

Wednesday’s tour will also mark the first ever public appearance of the Music Generation Limerick City ‘Creativity Pod’ – a mobile performance, recording and workshop space with a pop-up outdoor stage and PA.

For further information about the roadshow or about the Clare Youth Trad Orchestra, contact:

Jean Wallace, Music Development Officer
Music Generation Clare, Limerick and Clare Education and Training Board, Station Road, Ennis, County Clare

t: +353 65 686 5470
e: jean.wallace@lcetb.ie
facebook.com/musicgenerationclare

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1512
REFUGEES

This teacher’s experience as a refugee helps him make a big impact on his students

April 14 2017 | By: MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO

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This is part two of a three-part series on Sud Academy in Nairobi, Kenya. Don’t miss part one and part three.

Growing up in a remote village in Bar el-Ghazal region—present-day South Sudan—Ayuel never gave much thought to education, and never imagined that one day he would become a teacher.

But an attack on his village in 1999 set off a series of events that led him to dedicate his life to teaching, and to instill the love of education in countless young students, many of them refugees with stories much like his own.

Mr-Ayuel1-1024x683.png

“Living as a refugee child and surviving in a refugee camp taught me that the only thing that can change the world is education,” says Ayuel. “That is what pushed me to become a teacher.”

He was only 12 when the Khartoum government’s forces attacked his village. In the confusion, Ayuel and his 5-year-old brother, who had been severely injured in the attack, were separated from their parents. Ayuel would not talk to them again for more than 15 years.

“My brother and I were taken by the Red Cross to Lokichogio in Northern Kenya, but he did not survive the wound. I ended up in the Kakuma refugee camp with other unaccompanied children and went to school there until 2005.” In the camp, Ayuel learned how to speak English and Swahili, and excelled in his primary school exams.

In the meantime, a cousin of Ayuel’s had moved to Nairobi, Kenya, and was teaching at Sud Academy, a community school opened by South Sudanese refugees in 2002 to help children from disadvantaged backgrounds—both refugees and Kenyans—pursue a quality education. Upon hearing about Ayuel’s situation and his good exam results, Trisa Haak, a Canadian sponsor of Sud Academy, offered to pay for him to attend high school there.

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The buildings of Sud Academy in Nairobi.

After that, Ayuel volunteered as a teacher at Sud Academy for two years before becoming full-time staff in 2011. While he’s continued teaching in the years since, he’s also been pursuing degrees in law and international relations.

“I felt that not only did I have the academic knowledge to teach, but because of my experience as a refugee, I had something more to offer these children,” he says.

Ayuel sees his role as a teacher as far more than simply going over what is in the curriculum. Many of his students have escaped violence in South Sudan or have grown up in a refugee camp, and adapting to their new environment can be difficult.

“It takes a lot of support to integrate the new children into the school,” says Ayuel, who often takes on a parental role, especially with younger children who have arrived without parents. “I see myself in their shoes and I understand what they are going through because I went through the same. It is my duty to help them, the way someone helped me.”

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A Swahili class at Sud Academy.

Out of the 180 children who currently study at Sud, about 80 percent are refugees, mostly from South Sudan. “One of the biggest impacts of this school has been to teach children that they can happily interact with people from different communities – whether other South Sudanese communities that are not their own, or with refugees from Rwanda and Congo, or with Kenyan children,” says Ayuel.

And this spirit of tolerance and inclusion, as well as the quality education that Sud Academy provides, is helping children build bright futures not only for themselves, but for their countries.

Many of Ayuel’s former students have returned to South Sudan. “Only through education they can recover from the pain and trauma they have been through,” says Ayuel of his students. “And only if there is education, our country can progress, once there is peace. Education must be a foundation for people and the country.”

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MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO
April 14 2017

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398
EDUCATION

Zipora started a coffee co-op that’s transforming her community

February 14 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

GIRLS COUNT

Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

Story and photos by Gaius Kowene

Zipora Nyituriki stands in the library of Akilah Institute, an East African college with a mission of empowering young women in leadership roles. As the only women’s college in Burundi and Rwanda, Akilah offers a rare chance for students like Zipora to change their lives. Of the girls enrolled, 97 percent are the first in their family to receive higher education.

IMG_6090.jpg

Information System students at the Akilah Institute, in Kigali, Rwanda.

Sitting in a wooden chair with her elbows on the table, Zipora smiles as her eyes scan the library’s shelves. She’s trying to find a book on agribusiness. She has no class today and plans to spend the time taking care of her business.

At just 24 years old, Zipora has founded her own coffee co-operative, COOBAKAMU, which now has more than 400 coffee farmers working in the district of Muhanga in southern Rwanda.

IMG_0050-1024x683.jpg

The coffee farm of a COBAKAMU member in Muhanga District, Southern Rwanda.

It’s an amazing achievement. Zipora’s from a rural area, and the youngest in a large family. She didn’t do well in high school, and her low grades meant she wasn’t offered a place at university. Studying at a private university was never an option as it was just too expensive. “I felt stuck,” she remembers.

But then she heard about Akilah Institute, and how its students have 70 percent of their fees covered via sponsorships. It seemed like her second chance. Zipora immediately filled out and sent off her application.

“I was very excited at the idea of finally going to university,” she says. But all of the available spots were already taken and Zipora’s application was rejected.

This wasn’t enough to deter her from her goal of higher education. Once Zipora discovered that Akilah had a second campus in neighboring Burundi, she left her home country of Rwanda to travel over the border to apply.

Her perseverance paid off: Zipora was accepted at the Burundi campus and spent the first year of her degree there before reapplying for the Kigali campus, where she was accepted into the entrepreneurship department.

IMG_6078.jpg

Zipora Nyituriki in front of Akilah Institute for Women in December 2016.

As she got further into her coursework, Zipora’s ideas for her future began to evolve.

“When studying market research and product design, my mind was always in my village, in Muhanga,” she says. In this part of Rwanda, farmers were producing tons of coffee beans they couldn’t sell due to long distances to processing plants.

“I really wanted to help them but was afraid they wouldn’t take me seriously as I’m very young,” she admits. “So I asked local leaders’ mediation.”

IMG_0048-1024x683.jpg

Coffee in the field of a COBAKAMU member in Muhanga District, Southern Rwanda.

It turned out that the farmers were impressed with her knowledge of market conditions, and in February 2016, Zipora and Muhanga coffee farmers created a cooperative to support farmers in producing high-quality coffee.

“We produce between five to ten tons of coffee every month, have eight direct permanent employees, and several more during harvest,” she says.

Aline Kabanga is the director at Akilah Institute. For her, Zipora is just one example of what young women can do when they are educated and inspired.

IMG_6107.jpg

Aline Kabanga, Akilah Institute’s director, in her office in Kigali, Rwanda.

“We work on mindset and attitude so the girls can better shape their own lives,” she says. “Practical education based on the market’s skills gap is the most powerful weapon we can give to our girls.”

It’s certainly worked for Zipora, who’s planning on doubling the number of farmers benefiting from her business, and expanding into more sectors. Inspired by her school, she dreams of helping other girls overcome barriers in order to help their own communities, just like she has been able to do.

Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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What water can do for economic growth in Cabo Verde
113
WATER AND SANITATION

What water can do for economic growth in Cabo Verde

June 28 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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This post by Naomi Cassirer, MCC Gender and Social Inclusion Director, and Lona Stoll, MCC Deputy Vice President for Sector Operations, originally appeared on MCC.gov.

Women, the poor and other vulnerable groups are particularly impacted by the shortcomings of the water and sanitation sector in developing countries like Cabo Verde. Yet, women and the poor are seldom represented in national policy conversations and decision-making. At the local level, utilities rarely design services that address the challenges that these groups face in accessing and paying for water and sanitation. But in Cabo Verde, an island nation off the coast of West Africa, this is changing.

In partnership with the Government of Cabo Verde, MCC is supporting reforms to the country’s major water and sanitation institutions and the development of a financially sound basis for the delivery of water and sanitation services — from clean tap water to safe wastewater removal. By considering women, the poor and other disadvantaged populations in making these reforms, along with improving accountability, the Government of Cabo Verde is expanding access to and affordability of these vital services to help people lift themselves out of poverty.

Worldwide challenges

Globally, 748 million people live without access to piped water or other drinking water sources that protect against contamination, and 2.5 billion people lack access to a flushing toilet or similar sanitation facilities.

When access is lacking, women and girls are most likely to shoulder the burden, as they are most often responsible for the daily tasks and costs of managing household water resources. According to the United Nations Children’s Fund, women and girls around the world spend 200 million hours daily collecting water to provide for their families, sometimes traveling long distances. And every day, women and girls face risks of sexual harassment and violence because they don’t have a private, safe sanitation facility or water close by.

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Girls in Tanzania on the long route to fetch fresh water for their school and families. (Photo credit: ONE)

This time lost means women and girls are more likely than men and boys to disrupt their education and less likely to pursue paid employment and other activities that help increase family incomes and foster economic growth in their communities. Global gross domestic product would increase by as much as $28 trillion if women had the opportunity to participate in the global economy at equal rates to men.

The United States is a leader in promoting women’s rights around the world. By supporting our partner countries in undertaking difficult reforms, as in Cabo Verde, MCC’s investments address barriers to women’s participation in the workforce and empower them to contribute to their countries’ economic growth.

Wide-ranging investments in Cabo Verde’s water and sanitation sector

Despite significant improvements in the water and sanitation sector over the last two decades, Cabo Verde still faces major challenges. As an island nation, Cabo Verde relies on the energy-intensive process of desalinization for clean water, which is made even more costly by the high price of imported fuel to power the national grid. Only 59 percent of people have access to piped water in their home or on their property, just 20 percent of the population is connected to a sewer, and 27 percent of the population is forced to resort to open defecation.

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Thanks to an MCC-funded project in Cabo Verde that provided low-cost household connections to water and sanitation networks, Celestina has clean water coming directly to her home. She now spends less time collecting water and has a private, indoor toilet. (Photo credit: MCA-Cabo Verde II)

In 2012, under the MCC-Cabo Verde Compact, the Government of Cabo Verde embarked on ambitious reforms to its water and sanitation sector. Addressing challenges faced by women and other vulnerable groups in accessing water and sanitation shaped each MCC-supported project:

  • An innovative grant facility was established to fund infrastructure and capital investments to utilities on a competitive and transparent basis.
  • A dedicated Social Access Fund was created to improve access to water and sanitation for poor and women-led households — and the fund has already provided more than 3,000 new connections to the water network and more than 2,000 new sanitation facilities, including septic tanks, household plumbing and connections to the public sanitation network.
  • And perhaps most critically, MCC helped the Government of Cabo Verde create new institutions and strengthen existing ones to improve governance, function, and inclusivity in the delivery of water and sanitation services.

Nearly 600,000 people are expected to benefit from MCC’s investments in the sector over the next 20 years.

Creating more inclusive policies and institutions

The creation of entirely new institutions in Cabo Verde offered a unique opportunity to integrate the needs and voices of women and low-income populations at both national and local utility levels.

At the national level, the government launched a National Agency for Water and Sanitation (ANAS) with an Office of Environment and Gender and Social Integration. The Office works with departments to support data-driven social and gender analyses that inform master planning, investments, policy discussions, and monitoring and reporting — all to improve access and affordability. It also engages stakeholders, including civil society, and undertakes national information, education and communication campaigns on water, sanitation, and hygiene.

photo-060817-CPV_ads-inclusion-team-800x

Members of a new special office within Aguas de Santiago (AdS), a utility on the island of Santiago, work on making the utility more responsive to the needs of women, low-income families, and other vulnerable populations. To deliver more affordable water and sanitation services to the people of Cabo Verde, independently operating municipal and utility water services were consolidated to form AdS as part of the MCC-Cabo Verde Compact. (Photo credit: MCA/Cabo Verde II)

Historically absent from national water and sanitation policy and strategy discussions, women and civil society organizations in Cabo Verde today now have permanent seats on the National Council on Water and Sanitation, a consultative body. MCC’s compact also inspired the creation of a national network on social inclusion and gender in the water and sanitation sector that brings together national ministries, municipal governments, non-governmental organizations, academia and donors to better coordinate resources and ensure the concerns of women and the poor are included in policies and programs.

Cabo Verde’s policies today also now include key provisions that advance physical and economic access to water and sanitation. The country’s national strategic plan for water and sanitation sets minimum consumption goals for water and aims to make water available within a reasonable distance from homes at a cost compatible with incomes. A new tariff policy is already benefitting vulnerable residents by reducing the price of water at community stand-posts to the same price that households connected to the public water network pay. And for customers on the public network, the new tariff policy includes provisions to reduce water bills for low-income households.

A woman pauses before continuing her journey for water in the arid plains of southern Chad.

A woman pauses before continuing her journey for water in the arid plains of southern Chad. Here, as in Cabo Verde, access to water is vital for growth. (Photo credit: Joe Mason/ONE)

At the local level, independently operating municipal and utility water services were consolidated on the island of Santiago into a single corporatized utility called Aguas de Santiago (AdS). The island is home to approximately half of the country’s population. Within this new utility, the Office of Information, Education and Communication, and Social, Gender and Integrated Management helps other units throughout AdS understand the value of improving utility efficiency and revenue by expanding and improving services to women, low-income, and other vulnerable populations. By examining the diversity of users’ needs with regard to access, payment schedules, billing, connections and technologies, this unit is helping AdS adopt practices that meet those needs. And by better serving vulnerable groups, the utility is expanding its customer base to ensure not only its own but also the sector’s long-term sustainability.

Inclusivity is key to economic growth

These groundbreaking institutional reforms undertaken by the Government of Cabo Verde, with MCC’s support, can have a transformative impact for its people. As women and other vulnerable groups gain a greater voice in decision-making and their access to water and sanitation services expands, they will be better positioned to pursue education and employment opportunities that help them lift themselves out of poverty and contribute to the growth of Cabo Verde’s economy for years to come.

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315
FOOD AND NUTRITION

The world needs a gender-focused approach to tackle hunger

26 May 2017 5:59PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

GIRLS COUNT

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

By Minna Nurminen, Youth Ambassador, Belgium

Hunger is perhaps the clearest manifestation of poverty and inequality. There are around 795 million hungry (chronically undernourished) people in the world – much of this group is made up of women and girls. Women remain disproportionately affected by poverty, discrimination and exploitation and face much higher social, economic, and political barriers compared to their male counterparts. These difficulties for women are only multiplied in the world’s poorest countries.  

If we want to end extreme poverty and hunger, we must face facts: girls and women are getting a bad deal.

Growing_Sweet_Potatoes_in_Tanzania.221-1

The president and CEO of the World Hunger Project, Åsa Skogström Feldt, describes how the cycle of malnutrition in a girl’s life may start.

As a child, a girl is likely to be fed last and least after her brothers and father. She may be married at a young age and drop out of school because of pregnancy. She might miss school for other reasons, such as lack of decent sanitation facilities or domestic work responsibilities. In fact, only a little over 20 % of girls in poor rural African communities will complete primary education. Later in life, she may not have access to the same job opportunities as her male counterparts and is more likely to be in vulnerable employment with lower pay. If she becomes pregnant while she’s undernourished, she is likely to give birth to an undernourished baby – and so the cycle continues.

16Kenya_Fistula_ONE_Campaign_Modola_ApriThis is the reality for too many girls and is why ONE is working to remind the world that “Poverty is Sexist”. The campaign calls for refocusing the development agenda so that girls and women are center stage. What does it mean in practice?Here are some examples:

Guarantee equal access to educationStudies show that breaking the barriers to quality education and training for girls could significantly reduce overall poverty levels and boost girls’ future income, reduce rates of child malnutrition, and save the lives of mothers and children. Education is key to breaking the cycle of poverty — but 130 million girls still do not have access to this opportunity.

Empower women through employment and agriculture. Gender norms downplay women’s work opportunities, while women and girls continue to bear the lion’s share of unpaid domestic and care work. Land rights, safe energy, technology and financial services are still out of reach for many women. Ensuring access to quality jobs for women is a powerful way to combat hunger.

Tanzania_Farming.14-1024x683.jpg

Invest in inclusive social protection systems. Social security schemes are an essential part of inclusive growth, and critical for eradicating poverty, hunger and malnutrition. Guaranteeing a minimum level of resources mitigates risks but also facilitates better access to social services, health care, better nutrition, education and jobs for the most vulnerable – who often are women.

Growing_Sweet_Potatoes_in_Tanzania.275-1Poverty and gender inequality go hand in hand. Empowering women and girls is not just a question of equality and rights, but a precondition for ending world hunger and extreme poverty. The good news is that ending hunger is possible – and you can play a role. Here are a few easy ways you can mark World Hunger Day this year:

  • Sign ONE’s Poverty is Sexist letter to leaders to help girls get education
  • Join Malala Yousafzai, Sheryl Sandberg and others by claiming your number because all #GirlsCount  
  • Challenge your friends, family and neighbours to sign up, too!

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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315
FOOD AND NUTRITION

The world needs a gender-focused approach to tackle hunger

26 May 2017 5:59PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

GIRLS COUNT

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

By Minna Nurminen, Youth Ambassador, Belgium

Hunger is perhaps the clearest manifestation of poverty and inequality. There are around 795 million hungry (chronically undernourished) people in the world – much of this group is made up of women and girls. Women remain disproportionately affected by poverty, discrimination and exploitation and face much higher social, economic, and political barriers compared to their male counterparts. These difficulties for women are only multiplied in the world’s poorest countries.  

If we want to end extreme poverty and hunger, we must face facts: girls and women are getting a bad deal.

Growing_Sweet_Potatoes_in_Tanzania.221-1

The president and CEO of the World Hunger Project, Åsa Skogström Feldt, describes how the cycle of malnutrition in a girl’s life may start.

As a child, a girl is likely to be fed last and least after her brothers and father. She may be married at a young age and drop out of school because of pregnancy. She might miss school for other reasons, such as lack of decent sanitation facilities or domestic work responsibilities. In fact, only a little over 20 % of girls in poor rural African communities will complete primary education. Later in life, she may not have access to the same job opportunities as her male counterparts and is more likely to be in vulnerable employment with lower pay. If she becomes pregnant while she’s undernourished, she is likely to give birth to an undernourished baby – and so the cycle continues.

16Kenya_Fistula_ONE_Campaign_Modola_ApriThis is the reality for too many girls and is why ONE is working to remind the world that “Poverty is Sexist”. The campaign calls for refocusing the development agenda so that girls and women are center stage. What does it mean in practice?Here are some examples:

Guarantee equal access to educationStudies show that breaking the barriers to quality education and training for girls could significantly reduce overall poverty levels and boost girls’ future income, reduce rates of child malnutrition, and save the lives of mothers and children. Education is key to breaking the cycle of poverty — but 130 million girls still do not have access to this opportunity.

Empower women through employment and agriculture. Gender norms downplay women’s work opportunities, while women and girls continue to bear the lion’s share of unpaid domestic and care work. Land rights, safe energy, technology and financial services are still out of reach for many women. Ensuring access to quality jobs for women is a powerful way to combat hunger.

Tanzania_Farming.14-1024x683.jpg

Invest in inclusive social protection systems. Social security schemes are an essential part of inclusive growth, and critical for eradicating poverty, hunger and malnutrition. Guaranteeing a minimum level of resources mitigates risks but also facilitates better access to social services, health care, better nutrition, education and jobs for the most vulnerable – who often are women.

Growing_Sweet_Potatoes_in_Tanzania.275-1Poverty and gender inequality go hand in hand. Empowering women and girls is not just a question of equality and rights, but a precondition for ending world hunger and extreme poverty. The good news is that ending hunger is possible – and you can play a role. Here are a few easy ways you can mark World Hunger Day this year:

  • Sign ONE’s Poverty is Sexist letter to leaders to help girls get education
  • Join Malala Yousafzai, Sheryl Sandberg and others by claiming your number because all #GirlsCount  
  • Challenge your friends, family and neighbours to sign up, too!

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

Share

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 SAVE FOR LATER
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JULY 13, 2017

Burqa Bans Are Legal, European Court Rules

"If we want to live together in a free society, we need to recognize each other."

By Madison Feser

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

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The burqa ban is legal.

That was the ruling handed down by the European Court of Human Rights on Tuesday as it upheld a ban in Belgium on full-face veils, burqas, and niqabs in the country.

The case was brought by two Muslim women who said the law, passed in 2011, violated their right to freedom of religion and expression, according to NPR. Wearing the veil in public could result not only in fines, but also jail time.

The court said the ban was justified, and called it  “necessary in a democratic society”.

Belgian politician Daniel Bacquelaine argued in 2010, during the passage of the bill, that the ban actually supports Muslim women, saying “to forbid the veil as a covering is to give them more freedom.”

Read More: Why the Burkini Ban Is Really a Symptom of France's Identity Crisis

Bacquelaine’s notion that “if we want to live together in a free society, we need to recognize each other” has been echoed by Belgian law-enforcement who agree the veil should be banned for security reason, as it prevent police from identifying people.

Samia Belcacemi and Yamina Oussar, who initiated the court case, say the ban has forced one of them to stay indoors, fearing heavy fines for wearing the veil in public, and the other being forced to remove the veil in public despite religious preferences, reports BBC.

Other European nations, such as France, Austria, Bulgaria and the Netherlands, have similar bans on veils that cover the face.

Leading the charge on burqa and niqab bans in 2011, then-French President Nicolas Sarkozy said the veils were oppressive and women who wear them would face heavy fines. In 2016, France passed another controversial law, eventually overturned, that prohibited women from wearing full-body swimsuits.

Read More: The Year of the Burqa Ban: Where, How, & Why It Was Banned

Austria’s ban came in May of this year amid pressure from Austria’s right-wing Freedom Party, according to NPR. Supporters of the legislation, which also forbids distribution of the Quran, say it will make integration into the country easier.

In 2016, both Bulgaria and the Netherlands passed laws banning face veils, although the Dutch legislation also bans ski-masks and helmets that cover the face.

Although it has not yet been passed, a ban on full-face veils at Norwegian universities was also proposed last month.  

Madison is an Editorial Intern at Global Citizen. She attends Seton Hall University where she studies Diplomacy and International Relations and writes for The Diplomatic Envoy. With a passion for writing, politics, and justice, Madison aspires to continue working for organizations that use journalism as a force for positive change.

 

Via Global Citizen

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