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CULTURE

This is how Nelson Mandela’s legacy continues to inspire the world

18 July 2017 2:18PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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By Megan Gieske 

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.” – Nelson Mandela

Every year on July 18th, people across the globe celebrate Nelson Mandela’s birthday and contributions to the world by spending 67 minutes — representing the 67 years he fought for human rights during his lifetime — making a difference in the lives of others.

Mandela began campaigning for the rights of all South Africans in 1942 and continued the fight as a human rights lawyer and, later, as a prisoner for freedom on Robben Island. He went on to become an international peacemaker and the first democratically elected president of South Africa.

DSC_0582.jpgHis life has been an inspiration to the world. The Nelson Mandela Foundation asks that we “Take action. Inspire change.” — and people are taking the call to heart. Here’s how communities are celebrating Mandela Day this year:

South Africa
Family and friends gather together and look back on what has been done and forward to what will be done, making every day a Nelson Mandela Day.

Gugulethu, South Africa
Ntombi brings the spirit of Nelson Mandela to her community by starting gardens in people’s homes, educating students on proper nutrition, and sharing with visitors to her country the abundance of Africa. She says, “If you ever [need] joy in your life, give without expecting any returns. The joy of other people is fulfilling to the heart.”

DSC_0099.jpgLanga, South Africa
Siviwe says, “When you think you have nothing to give that is when you should give.” He is celebrating his birthday, July 18th, along with Nelson Mandela by bringing volunteers to paint colourful murals on the dark grey walls of local townships and bringing educational “iThuba” or opportunities in Xhosa to the underprivileged schools.

Accra, Ghana
Students put on a drama performance on the fight for freedom in South Africa.

Senegal_Graffiti_30042015_RicciShryock-2Yaounde, Cameroon
Secondary school students watch an education film on becoming “Mandela’s friends” by inspiring change in their community.

Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Donation ceremonies were held for orphanages to have food, medicine, and school supplies.
1103122-wingard-malawi-0231-1024x683.jpg
Jakarta, Indonesia

Female leaders gather to host a summit on gender equality.

Windhoek, Namibia
Girls at a Muay Thai club studied self-defense and encouraged themselves to help the world find solutions to end violence against women and girls and protect human rights.

Here are a few ways you can give back this Nelson Mandela Day:

  • Learn more about Nelson Mandela and his mission by watching Nelson Mandela’s Life Story with friends
  • Inspire understanding and community by getting to know someone from another culture or background
  • Join us and support girls’ education

Via ONE

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12141

10 films from Africa that will change the way you think about poverty

15 January 2016 3:45PM UTC | By: JOY ELLIOTT

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Did you know that each year, more movies come out of Nigeria’s ‘Nollywood’ than Hollywood? We’ve picked our top 10 films and documentaries from across Africa that you simply have to see. Special shout-out to our @ONEinAfrica followers for their suggestions!

We’ve linked each film on our list to one of the #GlobalGoals – click on the Goal for more information about each issue!

1. Moolaadé (2004) | Senegal

Directed by ‘the father of African film,’ Senegalese Ousmane Sembène, Moolaadé addresses the subject of female genital mutilation. The plot focuses on Collé, the second wife in a polygamous family, who refuses to allow her daughter to be cut. She also protects three young girls from her village from the practice using ‘Mooladé’ – magical protection. The film won the Prize Un Certain Regard at Cannes in 2004.

Global Goal #3 – Good Health and Wellbeing 

2. The First Grader (2010) | UK / Kenya

Based on the true story of Kimani Maruge, a Kenyan farmer who enrolled in elementary school at the age of 84 following the government’s announcement of free universal primary education in 2003. National Geographic describe it as “a triumphant testimony to the transforming force of education.”

Global Goal # 4 – Quality Education

3. Neria (1993) | Zimbabwe

The 90s is seen as the golden age of ‘Zollywood’ and Neria is the most critically-acclaimed film of this decade and highest-grossing film of all time from the country. It portrays the issues faced by a rural woman when she is widowed, including the loss of her farm and thus her livelihood. The soundtrack is by Zimbabwe’s biggest cultural icon Oliver Mtukudzi.

Global Goal # 5 – Gender Equality

4. Big Men (2014) | USA / Ghana

This documentary is about the 2007 discovery of oil off the coast of Ghana is noted for its impressive insider access to the workings of big corporate oil firms. The New York Times describe it as a “cool and incisive snapshot of global capitalism at work”. Director Rachel Boynton has praised the country for its adoption of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and the fact that the Ghanaian Ministry of Finance has committed to publish a detailed analysis of petroleum receipts and their allocation every six months. Transparency is high on the agenda here at one, so that is very good to hear.

Global Goal # 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

5. Stealing Africa (2012) | Zambia / Denmark

In the last ten years, foreign corporations have extracted copper worth over $29 billion from Zambia’s copper mines, but it is still ranked one of the poorest countries in the world. This documentary, which alleges that ten times more is lost due to dodgy tax practices than is given to the country in international aid, looks at the impact of such practices on the country’s development. 

Global Goal 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

6. Stories of Our Lives (2014) | Kenya

Stories of Our Lives is a Kenyan film, released in 2014. Created by the members of The Nest Collective, a Nairobi-based arts group, the film is an anthology of five short films dramatising true stories of LGBT+ life in Kenya.

Global Goal # 10 – Reduced Inequalities 

7. Tsotsi (2005) | South Africa / UK

One of South Africa’s most successful films, Tsotsi (which translates to ‘thug’) is set in a city slum in Johannesburg. It follows a young street criminal who steals a car and discovers baby. The movie is a moving portrait of the redemption of a forgotten boy from a neglected community. Tsotsi won the 2005 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film in 2006.

Global Goal 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

8. Pirate Fishing (2014) | Sierra Leone / UK

The precious marine resources of some of the world’s poorest people are being targeted by industrial scale illegal fishing operations to feed the seafood hungry markets of Europe and Asia. Working with the Environmental Justice Foundation, this investigation for Al Jazeera’s People & Power series takes to the seas off Sierra Leone to expose the multi-million dollar illegal fishing trade. Al Jazeera has recently produced an exceptional interactive game based on the documentary that we highly recommend taking a look at.

 Global Goal # 14 – Life Below Water

9. Virunga (2014) | UK / Democratic Republic of Congo

Virunga focuses on the conservation work of rangers within Virunga National Park and damaging oil exploration activity within the UNESCO World Heritage site. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Global Goal # 15 – Life on Land

10. Beats of the Antonov (2014) | Sudan / South Africa

This documentary deals with the Sudan–SRF conflict in the Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains regions, focusing in particular on the role of music, heritage and creative traditions in helping the affected communities to sustain themselves culturally and spiritually in the face of the ongoing dispute.

Global Goal # 16 – Peace and Justice

Support all 17 of the #GlobalGoals by standing with ONE today!

 

Via ONE

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10 films from Africa that will change the way you think about poverty
12141

10 films from Africa that will change the way you think about poverty

15 January 2016 3:45PM UTC | By: JOY ELLIOTT

 
   

Did you know that each year, more movies come out of Nigeria’s ‘Nollywood’ than Hollywood? We’ve picked our top 10 films and documentaries from across Africa that you simply have to see. Special shout-out to our @ONEinAfrica followers for their suggestions!

We’ve linked each film on our list to one of the #GlobalGoals – click on the Goal for more information about each issue!

1. Moolaadé (2004) | Senegal

Directed by ‘the father of African film,’ Senegalese Ousmane Sembène, Moolaadé addresses the subject of female genital mutilation. The plot focuses on Collé, the second wife in a polygamous family, who refuses to allow her daughter to be cut. She also protects three young girls from her village from the practice using ‘Mooladé’ – magical protection. The film won the Prize Un Certain Regard at Cannes in 2004.

Global Goal #3 – Good Health and Wellbeing 

2. The First Grader (2010) | UK / Kenya

Based on the true story of Kimani Maruge, a Kenyan farmer who enrolled in elementary school at the age of 84 following the government’s announcement of free universal primary education in 2003. National Geographic describe it as “a triumphant testimony to the transforming force of education.”

Global Goal # 4 – Quality Education

3. Neria (1993) | Zimbabwe

The 90s is seen as the golden age of ‘Zollywood’ and Neria is the most critically-acclaimed film of this decade and highest-grossing film of all time from the country. It portrays the issues faced by a rural woman when she is widowed, including the loss of her farm and thus her livelihood. The soundtrack is by Zimbabwe’s biggest cultural icon Oliver Mtukudzi.

Global Goal # 5 – Gender Equality

4. Big Men (2014) | USA / Ghana

This documentary is about the 2007 discovery of oil off the coast of Ghana is noted for its impressive insider access to the workings of big corporate oil firms. The New York Times describe it as a “cool and incisive snapshot of global capitalism at work”. Director Rachel Boynton has praised the country for its adoption of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and the fact that the Ghanaian Ministry of Finance has committed to publish a detailed analysis of petroleum receipts and their allocation every six months. Transparency is high on the agenda here at one, so that is very good to hear.

Global Goal # 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

5. Stealing Africa (2012) | Zambia / Denmark

In the last ten years, foreign corporations have extracted copper worth over $29 billion from Zambia’s copper mines, but it is still ranked one of the poorest countries in the world. This documentary, which alleges that ten times more is lost due to dodgy tax practices than is given to the country in international aid, looks at the impact of such practices on the country’s development. 

Global Goal 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

6. Stories of Our Lives (2014) | Kenya

Stories of Our Lives is a Kenyan film, released in 2014. Created by the members of The Nest Collective, a Nairobi-based arts group, the film is an anthology of five short films dramatising true stories of LGBT+ life in Kenya.

Global Goal # 10 – Reduced Inequalities 

7. Tsotsi (2005) | South Africa / UK

One of South Africa’s most successful films, Tsotsi (which translates to ‘thug’) is set in a city slum in Johannesburg. It follows a young street criminal who steals a car and discovers baby. The movie is a moving portrait of the redemption of a forgotten boy from a neglected community. Tsotsi won the 2005 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film in 2006.

Global Goal 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

8. Pirate Fishing (2014) | Sierra Leone / UK

The precious marine resources of some of the world’s poorest people are being targeted by industrial scale illegal fishing operations to feed the seafood hungry markets of Europe and Asia. Working with the Environmental Justice Foundation, this investigation for Al Jazeera’s People & Power series takes to the seas off Sierra Leone to expose the multi-million dollar illegal fishing trade. Al Jazeera has recently produced an exceptional interactive game based on the documentary that we highly recommend taking a look at.

 Global Goal # 14 – Life Below Water

9. Virunga (2014) | UK / Democratic Republic of Congo

Virunga focuses on the conservation work of rangers within Virunga National Park and damaging oil exploration activity within the UNESCO World Heritage site. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Global Goal # 15 – Life on Land

10. Beats of the Antonov (2014) | Sudan / South Africa

This documentary deals with the Sudan–SRF conflict in the Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains regions, focusing in particular on the role of music, heritage and creative traditions in helping the affected communities to sustain themselves culturally and spiritually in the face of the ongoing dispute.

Global Goal # 16 – Peace and Justice

Support all 17 of the #GlobalGoals by standing with ONE today!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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AUTHOR

JOY ELLIOTT
15 January 2016 3:45PM UTC

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CULTURE

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EDUCATION

Malala just asked the acting president of Nigeria to declare a state of emergency for education

20 July 2017 2:56PM UTC | By: ALICE JOWETT

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Malala Yousafzai has called for a state of emergency for education to be declared in Nigeria.

On Monday, the 20-year-old Nobel Prize winner met with the acting president of Nigeria, Prof. Yemi Osinbajo, to discuss the importance of investing in children’s education in the region.

The human rights activist is visiting the West African country as part of her #GirlPowerTrip, where she plans to visit Africa, North America, the Middle East, Latin America and Europe in order to meet girls and learn about their fight to go to school.

Screen-Shot-2017-07-20-at-16.00.56.png

Malala returned to Nigeria this week to meet with girls in Nigeria. (Photo Credit: Tess Thomas / Malala Fund)

According to UNICEF, more than 8 million primary school aged children are out of school in Nigeria. In north-east Nigeria alone, 2.9 million people are in need of education due to the ongoing humanitarian crisis. That’s a population almost the same size as Abuja. Around one in three girls of primary school age are out of school.

This is a massive emergency, the impact of which can only be measured in loss of potential.  Of potential economic gains.  Of potential health gains.  Of potential innovators and world leaders.

webimage-9B24E3EA-72D3-4E43-8DBE3A26DB3E

An additional year of schooling for girls is estimated to result in almost a 12% increase in wages.  This impact is not as visible or immediate as other emergencies, like a war or a flood.  But no less urgent. This is what makes the emergency even more alarming: it’s quietly stealing the enormous potential of each and every one of us – of Nigeria.

 

Malala_State-of-Emergency_4_Facebook_120

ONE wholeheartedly supports this call and hope it will prompt a nationwide response commensurate with the size and scope of this crisis.

To start, the Nigerian government must take concrete steps to make education work for every girl, and every child, by breaking every barrier, monitoring every outcome, connecting every classroom and investing in every teacher. In practice, that means Nigeria must update its education sector plan to include the following reforms:

Monitor every outcome – The Nigerian Federal Ministry of Education (FME) and the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) should invest in collecting and publishing disaggregated education data from the state and local government on a regular basis. Good quality data is imperative if we are to address this crisis.

Break every barrier – The Minister of Education should lead a thorough multi-stakeholder investigation to assess the greatest barriers that keep girls out of school, and learning once they are in school – focusing on the poorest, most marginalised and those in conflict affected areas.

Invest in every teacher – Teachers must have the training, qualifications and support they need to ensure engaging content is accessible to all students.

Connect every classroom – Innovative technology should be adopted to address the scope of the educational challenges in Nigeria and provide additional opportunities for learning.

We #StandwithMalala and support her request to make education a state of emergency in Nigeria.

If YOU believe in the power of girls’ education – take action today!

 

Via ONE

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380

From Uganda to your doorstep: The journey of a Krochet Kids hat

11 April 2017 4:27PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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This story was originally published in full at Krochet Kids Intl. on February 3, 2016.

Every Krochet Kids product has a very unique and special journey before it arrives packaged neatly on your doorstep. One of our most-loved products, “the Becks”has been a favorite among supporters since we first introduced it in Spring 2013. From raw materials to finished product, we want to show you how this beanie is created and how these products positively impact those in our program.

Photo credit: Krochet Kids International

Photo credit: Krochet Kids International

Meet Lamwaka Harriet: Before joining KK Uganda, she struggled to make ends meet by knitting sweaters for local schools and businesses. She loved the work she was doing, but was unable to provide a consistent and liveable income for herself and her family. Now she has plans to buy a knitting machine of her own to pursue her own business creating and selling clothing. She hones her skills creating products like “the Becks” while continuing her education through specialised training sessions and developing via one-on-one mentorship. She is just one example of the capable women in our program.

Photo credit: Krochet Kids International

Photo credit: Krochet Kids International

Because great products begin with great materials, we start with high-quality yarn that is carefully threaded through a hand-powered knitting machine. Each woman is specially trained and approach these machines with a high level of expertise and skill to ensure a quality product.

From start to finish, “the Becks” is entirely and solely created by one individual woman, the woman who signs the label. This approach to ethical fashion allows you to connect with the person who made your product.

Photo credit: Krochet Kids International

Photo credit: Krochet Kids International

No product is complete without the signature of the woman who made it. This signature is a symbol of pride for her and an indicator of the job, mentorship, and education she is receiving while in our program. She is on a path to empowerment, and you can wear “the Becks” or any KK International item knowing that your purchase facilitates this. Take pride in what you wear.

Purchase beautiful Krochet Kids Intl. merchandise of your own—now in the ONE store!

 

Via ONE

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1691

How this village in Kenya is planning to survive the hunger season

10 August 2016 10:43AM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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In partnership with One Acre Fund, ONE will follow a small community called Luucho in Western Kenya through the agricultural season.

About 250 miles northwest of Nairobi, Kenya, the sun rises over Luucho, a quiet village nestled between large granite boulders. At the centre of the village, there is an outdoor market where three orange, dusty roads intersect, bordered by thick and thorny vegetation.

In the morning, the market begins to stir as the first of the vendors arrive to unlock their booths and restock their shelves. Later in the day, the vendors will be busy counting change and wrapping items in recycled newspapers. Until then, they work quickly to prepare for their customers and try to stay out of the sun’s increasingly punishing heat.

Resident of Luucho gather at a water pump to collect water to take to their homes, most of which do not have running water.

Residents of Luucho gather at a water pump to collect water to take to their homes, most of which do not have running water.

On the outskirts of the market lives 66-year-old David Wanangeiye, one of the village elders responsible for solving minor disputes in the community. Also trying to escape the sun’s wrath, David takes refuge under a lone tree outside his mud-walled home.

“This has been an extraordinary year. I’ve never experienced a year as hot as this in my whole life,” David says, his eyes gazing up toward the sky. “But I can see signs of the coming rain everywhere now.”

A woman farms her rocky field in Luucho, Kenya.

A woman farms her rocky field in Luucho, Kenya.

Like many smallholder farmers in Luucho, David depends solely on the rain to water his crops. In an ordinary season, the rains start somewhere between late February and early March with most farmers planting seeds by mid-March. This year, the fields sit empty, waiting, while farmers anxiously await the return of the rains. It’s now late March.

“My grandfather taught me that if the rain pours heavily at night, then it’s time to start planting. Every night before bed I walk outside and look to the sky searching for dark clouds,” David says. “I pray the rains start soon because if not, then this whole village will lack food in a few months.”

Signs around Luucho village.

Signs around Luucho village.

Ironically, lack of food is a common struggle for farmers in western Kenya. The majority of farmers run out of food three to four months after harvesting, leading to a period of food insecurity that lasts until the next year’s harvest is mature. This period is commonly referred to as wanjala in Bukusu, the local dialect; it means “hunger season.” During this time, farmers and their families will rely on a cup of tea or porridge in place of a meal.

Wanjala is still vivid in Shalene Simiyu’s mind. Shalene lives about 300 feet east of David’s home and could never grow enough food to make it through the entire year. Usually, Shalene managed to harvest just one bag of maize from her half-acre farm, and this single sack of food would only last her family of six for two months. For the rest of the year, her family would be limited to one meal a day.

“When we had no food in the evening, I would give my children a cup of water and then ask them to go to sleep. But they could not sleep because their stomachs were hungry, so I had to stay awake the whole night trying to calm them down,” Shalene says.

One Acre Fund field officer Salate Oteba hands out planting trainings to Shalene (far left) and her neighbors as part of a One Acre Fund crop training.

One Acre Fund field officer Salate Oteba hands out planting trainings to Shalene (far left) and her neighbors as part of a One Acre Fund crop training.

In 2009, Shalene bought seed and fertiliser from One Acre Fund, a nonprofit social enterprise that delivers farm inputs on credit to farmers in remote areas of East Africa and trains them on how to increase farm productivity and income.

Armed with new agricultural knowledge and supplies, Shalene increased her harvest that season to an astounding eight bags of maize. With this food, she was able to defeat the hunger season and feed her family for the full year. Since then, she has continued to improve her crop yields, and says she even has a surplus that she can share with her neighbours.

Shalene Simiyu and her daughter Lenise Nafulasit together in their house in Luucho.

Shalene Simiyu and her daughter Lenise Nafulasit together in their house in Luucho.

“All I wanted was to give my children a good life. I’m now happy when I see them smiling and happy because I’m able to provide them with at least three meals in a day,” Shalene says. “I pray for rains so that I’m able to continue producing enough food for my family.”

At half past noon, a distant gong signals lunchtime at Luucho primary school. As her children arrive home, Shalene quickly moves to the kitchen and starts serving a meal of rice and beans. She is soon joined by Christine Nanjala, her immediate neighbour and friend. The two friends chat happily as they arrange the plates on the table.

Residents of Luucho travel primarily by foot or bicycle.

Residents of Luucho travel primarily by foot or bicycle.

According to Christine, a meal of rice and beans is common for this time of year in many Luucho households. Since onset of the dry season three months ago, green vegetables have become scarce and expensive. Villagers now depend on other foods that can be dried and stored, and beans fit the bill.

“During the dry season, all the farms in this village are empty, so our options become limited. I’m looking forward to the start of the rains because then there will be plenty of fresh vegetables in the farm for us to choose from,” Christine says, Shalene nodding in agreement.

Shalene’s children (from left) Laban Wanyonyi, Mark Wekesa, and Getrine Nasimiyu eat a lunch of rice and beans at home in Luucho.

Shalene’s children (from left) Laban Wanyonyi, Mark Wekesa, and Getrine Nasimiyu eat a lunch of rice and beans at home in Luucho.

Shalene and Christine clear the table after the children finish lunch, and the two women prepare to head out in the heat to the market where Shalene sells clothes, fish, and mangoes.

Unlike the morning, the market is now abuzz with activity. Sellers and their customers bargain to get the best price. Music booms from several shops, and a growing line forms at the cereals mill, where parents wait their turn to grind grains into flour for porridge. Unexpectedly, a cool breeze sweeps through and the whole market pauses for a moment. Everyone looks to the sky, hoping—perhaps today will be the day when the rain finally returns.

Want to know if the rain finally falls over Luucho? Check back next month for part two of this year’s harvest series.


One Acre Fund supplies smallholder farmers with the financing and training they need to grow their way out of hunger and poverty. Instead of giving handouts, they invest in farmers to generate a permanent gain in farm income. One Acre Fund provides a complete service bundle of seeds and fertiliser, financing, training, and market facilitation—and delivers these services within walking distance of the 400,000 rural farmers they serve. They measure success in their ability to make farmers more prosperous and they always put Farmers First.

 

Via ONE

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TECHNOLOGY

8 ways African countries are using data to change lives

30 June 2017 4:51PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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By Jennifer Oldfield, Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data

What data is and how data could and should be used to change the world is a debate that’s been going since the beginning of data collection.

In its simplest form, data is numbers. These numbers then get collected and analysed (for trends, patterns, anomalies, outliers etc.) and turned into information. It’s this information which then informs us how best to proceed.

When people within the international development talk about the “data revolution”, and get excited by its potential to change the world, it can sometimes feel slightly beyond reach.

Here, we’ve decided to explore 8 real life examples of why #datamatters, and how it is being used across Africa to change lives:

1NASA is helping Kenya build a secure future for farmers and the younger generation.

nasaGIF.gif
Working with Kenya’s Ministry of Agriculture, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will provide real-time information on crop types, agricultural insurance, and weather. The Kenya government is leading this effort to boost the productivity of small farmers.

2.  Rebuilding post-conflict countries using data.

ebola2-1024x682.jpg

Student sprayers keeping medics safe from Ebola in Makeni, Sierra Leone. (Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Sierra Leone has weathered the Ebola crises and the collapse of its main mining industry (iron ore), but has doubled down on efforts to develop and implement data-led national development plans to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals. Projects include an initiative to open up fiscal and economic data. Despite after-effects of conflict, data can help these nations accelerate recovery and contribute to Africa’s collective future. 

3. Securing farmers’ futures while building food resilience and security.

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(Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons)

Good data can secure a farmer’s future. In collaboration with NASA and the Initiative Prospective Agricole et Rurale (IPAR) the Government of Senegal will learn about farming trends through producer’s associations and then feed back information to them on changing seasons, weather and optimal crops to strengthen food security. 

4. ID cards can help improve access to education and health care to millions.

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The ID card system will help the government plan for and enrol more children in school at age 6. (Photo credit: World Bank).

Ghana will introduce a national ID card to address the country’s problem with unregistered births. Using ID cards to gather data will improve health services throughout a child’s early years, and will significantly improve a child’s chances in adult life. Better lives start with better childhoods.

 5. Registering new births to provide access to healthcare.

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Globally, an estimated 230 million children under five are not registered. (Photo credit: Plan International).

It is estimated that millions of births are unregistered, severely limiting life chances. Kenya is partnering with private sector partners such as Unilever, Royal Philips, and Safaricom to improve data collection and connectivity in rural counties. Together they will improve primary health care, and share their learnings with African nations to better the lives of Africa’s young.

6. African nations are building sophisticated data systems to improve public policy.

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Taking the Global Goals to Dodoma. (Photo credit: UN).

In Tanzania, the government is using international standards established at global forums such as the PARIS21 consortium, to improve availability, quality, and accessibility of data to the country. This collaborative effort will apply global and regional indicators helping national policy to address the most serious challenges, including population growth and climate change. 

7. Setting up data labs to provide home-grown talent.

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Data science can be used for development and humanitarian action. (Photo credit: UN Global Pulse).

There is a worldwide shortage of data scientists while data-wrangling capacity is in short supply. A network of data labs is emerging where global institutions, national experts, and researchers are collaborating to support African countries. Kenya’s Strathmore University, the University of Rwanda, UNECA plus the UK’s Office of National Statistics and Department for International Development (DFID) are working together to improve the quality, strengthen leadership and share the benefits of data led development.    

8. Using telco data to track internal migration.

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Anonymised data from users mobiles’ pinging local towers can be used to see how people flow through a country. Ghana is exploring use of this technique to map and plan for internal economic migration and access to social services.

The hard work starts NOW.

With political commitments secured across Africa, the UN Foundation’s “Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data,” which co-ordinates initiatives for African progress, is gathering in Nairobi to host “Data for Development in Africa” on June 29 and 30. Key partners from national governments to the private sector will present their first steps to achieving tangible date-led development projects. The Partnership’s Executive Director, Dr. Claire Melamed, believes “African countries are leading by example, mainstreaming innovations that will benefit millions of people across the continent.”

Information on the conference and its outcomes can be found at data4sdgs.org.

 

Via ONE

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18/07/2017

Music Generation to complete its second phase thanks to further investment by U2 & The Ireland Funds

Music Generation to complete its second phase thanks to further investment by U2 & The Ireland Funds

Dublin, 18 July 2017: Music Generation today announced that it will expand into nine new areas of Ireland within five years, thanks to the ongoing support of U2 and The Ireland Funds who together will have raised a total of €6.3m for the programme’s second phase. This combined investment in ‘Phase 2’ of Music Generation will include donations from the proceeds of U2’s The Joshua Tree Tour 2017, as well as donations previously raised for Music Generation through the band’s iNNOCENCE + eXPERIENCE Tour in 2015, alongside further philanthropic investment by The Ireland Funds. A grant from Bank of America, through the Bank of America Charitable Foundation, forms part of The Ireland Funds’ investment in this second phase of Music Generation.

Moreover, this next phase of Music Generation has been assured of long-term sustainability through a commitment by the Department of Education and Skills to co-fund the new areas into the future, together with Local Music Education Partnerships.

Currently Music Generation creates access to high-quality, subsidised music tuition for more than 41,000 children and young people annually in 12 areas of Ireland (Carlow, Clare, Cork City, Laois, Limerick City, Louth, Mayo, Offaly/Westmeath, Sligo, South Dublin and Wicklow). This ‘first phase’ of the programme was seed-funded through a €7m philanthropic donation by U2 and The Ireland Funds in 2009.

In January 2017, just over a year after confirming plans for further expansion, Music Generation launched an open national call for applications from new Music Education Partnerships to participate in ‘Phase 2’. As a result of U2 and The Ireland Funds’ combined donations, a total of 9 new areas will soon be selected for participation and rolled out on a phased basis between 2017 and 2021.

Speaking of this milestone achievement for music education in Ireland, U2’s The Edge said: ‘This is a really important moment for Music Generation. Our ambition is for every child and young person in Ireland to have access to tuition and this next phase of expansion brings us ever closer. Huge thanks to both the Government and The Ireland Funds for their ongoing commitment to a programme of which we, as a band, are immensely proud.’

Kieran McLoughlin, Worldwide President and CEO, The Ireland Funds, said: ‘Music Generation is a wonderful Public Philanthropic Partnership making a huge difference to hundreds of communities. We are most grateful to Bank of America for joining U2, ourselves and Government in bringing this great project to thousands more children across Ireland. We look forward to working with Government to build upon the remarkable success of the programme to date.’

Minister for Education and Skills, Richard Bruton, TD, commented: ‘My Department whole-heartedly supports access to performance music education for Ireland’s children and young people and currently invests €2.5m annually in Music Generation. We are delighted to work in partnership with U2, The Ireland Funds and Local Music Education Partnerships to extend this access into new areas of the country. By co-funding the new phase into the future, Government is demonstrating its commitment to ensuring the future of non-mainstream music education in Ireland. Developing musical education is a great way to help children and young people to learn a new skill, gain confidence in themselves, and have a lot of fun while doing it.’

Brian Moynihan, Chief Executive Officer of Bank of America said: ‘We are pleased to once again work with U2 and The Ireland Funds to support Music Generation, which helps enrich education and contribute to the culture of Ireland. Our purpose is to help the communities where we live and work succeed, through the power of connections we can help them make.’
 
Responding to the announcement, Rosaleen Molloy, National Director of Music Generation, remarked: ‘We are immensely grateful for the extraordinary generosity of U2, The Ireland Funds and Bank of America whose commitment to invest a further €6.3m in the programme’s next phase will enable us to work towards our shared vision for universal access to music tuition for all children and young people in Ireland. It is through their ongoing, visionary leadership that we have already achieved such incredibly powerful outcomes for the children, young people, families, communities and many other partners with whom we work. We would also like to sincerely thank the Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships, without whose commitment to partnership-working and sustainable future co-funding none of this would be possible.’

Initiated by Music Network, Music Generation is co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds, the Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships.

//ENDS 

Media Contact
Aoife Lucey (Communications Manager, Music Generation)
aoife@musicgeneration.ie / 085 741 5171 / 01 475 8454

 

Via Music Generation

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As part of our Community Care Programme we have designed ‘Family Support Fun Days’ for the families in our programme to meet with other families in the programme to talk, exchange ideas and to have the children enjoy some summer sunshine. Many of the children in this programme, as well as their families, have little contact with other families who have similar needs and the children rarely leave their homes due to their high level of care needs so these days are of great support by simply bringng a little joy to these most precious children’s lives.

Below are some of the pictures of the days the families enjoyed that CCI donors have helped to make happen in recent weeks.

CCI’s Community Care and Hospice programme helps treat and deliver therapeutic services to terminally and chronically ill children across Belarus. CCI’s multi-disciplinary teams conduct home based services specifically designed for each family. The programme helps a total of 30 families between Minsk and Gomel in Belarus.

The programme allows children to be cared for in their own homes, by their own families keeping these at risk children out of state run institutions. Each family is assigned a palliative care team comprised of a doctor, nurse, social worker and psychologist. The team makes home visits to supervise the child’s care, provides medication and supplies at no cost to the families and evaluates the social and emotional needs of all family members.

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sonriendo, exterior

 

 

Via Chernobyl Chlidren International

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