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10 films from Africa that will change the way you think about poverty
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10 films from Africa that will change the way you think about poverty

15 January 2016 3:45PM UTC | By: JOY ELLIOTT

 
   

Did you know that each year, more movies come out of Nigeria’s ‘Nollywood’ than Hollywood? We’ve picked our top 10 films and documentaries from across Africa that you simply have to see. Special shout-out to our @ONEinAfrica followers for their suggestions!

We’ve linked each film on our list to one of the #GlobalGoals – click on the Goal for more information about each issue!

1. Moolaadé (2004) | Senegal

Directed by ‘the father of African film,’ Senegalese Ousmane Sembène, Moolaadé addresses the subject of female genital mutilation. The plot focuses on Collé, the second wife in a polygamous family, who refuses to allow her daughter to be cut. She also protects three young girls from her village from the practice using ‘Mooladé’ – magical protection. The film won the Prize Un Certain Regard at Cannes in 2004.

Global Goal #3 – Good Health and Wellbeing 

2. The First Grader (2010) | UK / Kenya

Based on the true story of Kimani Maruge, a Kenyan farmer who enrolled in elementary school at the age of 84 following the government’s announcement of free universal primary education in 2003. National Geographic describe it as “a triumphant testimony to the transforming force of education.”

Global Goal # 4 – Quality Education

3. Neria (1993) | Zimbabwe

The 90s is seen as the golden age of ‘Zollywood’ and Neria is the most critically-acclaimed film of this decade and highest-grossing film of all time from the country. It portrays the issues faced by a rural woman when she is widowed, including the loss of her farm and thus her livelihood. The soundtrack is by Zimbabwe’s biggest cultural icon Oliver Mtukudzi.

Global Goal # 5 – Gender Equality

4. Big Men (2014) | USA / Ghana

This documentary is about the 2007 discovery of oil off the coast of Ghana is noted for its impressive insider access to the workings of big corporate oil firms. The New York Times describe it as a “cool and incisive snapshot of global capitalism at work”. Director Rachel Boynton has praised the country for its adoption of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative and the fact that the Ghanaian Ministry of Finance has committed to publish a detailed analysis of petroleum receipts and their allocation every six months. Transparency is high on the agenda here at one, so that is very good to hear.

Global Goal # 7 – Affordable and Clean Energy

5. Stealing Africa (2012) | Zambia / Denmark

In the last ten years, foreign corporations have extracted copper worth over $29 billion from Zambia’s copper mines, but it is still ranked one of the poorest countries in the world. This documentary, which alleges that ten times more is lost due to dodgy tax practices than is given to the country in international aid, looks at the impact of such practices on the country’s development. 

Global Goal 9 – Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

6. Stories of Our Lives (2014) | Kenya

Stories of Our Lives is a Kenyan film, released in 2014. Created by the members of The Nest Collective, a Nairobi-based arts group, the film is an anthology of five short films dramatising true stories of LGBT+ life in Kenya.

Global Goal # 10 – Reduced Inequalities 

7. Tsotsi (2005) | South Africa / UK

One of South Africa’s most successful films, Tsotsi (which translates to ‘thug’) is set in a city slum in Johannesburg. It follows a young street criminal who steals a car and discovers baby. The movie is a moving portrait of the redemption of a forgotten boy from a neglected community. Tsotsi won the 2005 Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and was nominated for the Golden Globe for Best Foreign Language Film in 2006.

Global Goal 11 – Sustainable Cities and Communities

8. Pirate Fishing (2014) | Sierra Leone / UK

The precious marine resources of some of the world’s poorest people are being targeted by industrial scale illegal fishing operations to feed the seafood hungry markets of Europe and Asia. Working with the Environmental Justice Foundation, this investigation for Al Jazeera’s People & Power series takes to the seas off Sierra Leone to expose the multi-million dollar illegal fishing trade. Al Jazeera has recently produced an exceptional interactive game based on the documentary that we highly recommend taking a look at.

 Global Goal # 14 – Life Below Water

9. Virunga (2014) | UK / Democratic Republic of Congo

Virunga focuses on the conservation work of rangers within Virunga National Park and damaging oil exploration activity within the UNESCO World Heritage site. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Global Goal # 15 – Life on Land

10. Beats of the Antonov (2014) | Sudan / South Africa

This documentary deals with the Sudan–SRF conflict in the Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains regions, focusing in particular on the role of music, heritage and creative traditions in helping the affected communities to sustain themselves culturally and spiritually in the face of the ongoing dispute.

Global Goal # 16 – Peace and Justice

Support all 17 of the #GlobalGoals by standing with ONE today!

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JOY ELLIOTT
15 January 2016 3:45PM UTC

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On 7/24/2017 at 0:52 PM, tan_lejos_tan_cerca said:

AIDS isn't over, but it can be. AIDS-related deaths have declined by nearly half globally since 2005. #Progress #MoreToDo #endAIDShttp://bit.ly/2uRBDeZ

 

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I totally agree, in fact this is one of the reasons why I ditched a guy I was seeing.  IN other words, I couldn't take anymore of his ignorant and narrow-minded views about AIDS, poverty, etc.

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50 minutes ago, illumination70 said:

I totally agree, in fact this is one of the reasons why I ditched a guy I was seeing.  IN other words, I couldn't take anymore of his ignorant and narrow-minded views about AIDS, poverty, etc.

So bye bye!;)

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According to the United Nations 13.7% of the World's population cannot read or write.

Through CCI's pioneering commitment to de-institutionalisation , an education programme is now providing residents of Vesnova Children's Mental Asylum with the skills and capacity to hopefully regain access to their rights and live a fullfilling independent life.

As part of this, through CCI funded teachers and tutors, some residents are now learning to read and write for the very first time...and they are doing a great job too!

At a recent visit to Cork City Hall, on invitation by Lord Mayor Cllr. Tony Fitzgerald, a group of Vesnova residents were welcomed to sign the visitor book in a poignant moment which reflected the hope in their future thanks to the power of education.

 

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The countdown is on to this year's Rose of Tralee International Festival.

CCI has had a very close connection with The Rose of Tralee International Festival for many years. The Roses and Escorts travel to Vesnova twice a year and their time volunteering there is a very important part of the Rose and escort experience.

Among the groups travelling to Vesnova Children’s Institution are teachers, nurses, speech therapists, mental health social workers and disability support workers. They will use their skills to help the CCI staff to stimulate the children and to support them with the rehabilitative work they are undertaking to improve the quality of the life of the children.

In a bid to raise awareness about the reality faced by many 31 years after the Chernobyl accident, Escorts John Slowey and Barry McGuire penned 'Hope Don't Get Wasted' for the inaugural United Nations Chernobyl Disaster Remembrance Day on April 26th.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0TWQTVPk_Q

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JULY 25, 2017

Hijab Goes Mainstream as Advertisers Target Muslim Money

"Every little girl deserves to see a role model that's dressed like her."

 

Brought to you by: Thomson Reuters Foundation

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By Heba Kanso

BEIRUT, July 24 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The hijab — one of the most visible signs of Islamic culture — is going mainstream with advertisers, media giants and fashion firms promoting images of the traditional headscarf in ever more ways.

Last week, Apple previewed 12 new emoji characters to be launched later this year, one of a woman wearing a hijab.

Major fashion brands from American Eagle to Nike are creating hijabs, while hijab-wearing models have started gracing Western catwalks and the covers of top fashion magazines.

 

 

 

Many Muslim women cover their heads in public with the hijab as a sign of modesty, although some critics see it as a sign of female oppression. But there is one thing most can agree on: when it comes to the hijab, there is money to be made.

"In terms of the bottom line — absolutely they're (young Muslims) good for business ... it's a huge market and they are incredibly brand savvy, so they want to spend their money," said Shelina Janmohamed, vice-president of Ogilvy Noor, a consultancy offering advice on how to build brands that appeal to Muslim audiences.

Read More:  American Eagle’s Denim Hijab Sold Out in Just One Week

Nike announced it is using its prowess in the sports and leisure market to launch a breathable mesh hijab in spring 2018, becoming the first major sports apparel maker to offer a traditional Islamic head scarf designed for competition.

In June, Vogue Arabia featured on its cover the first hijabi model to walk the international runway, Somali-American Halima Aden, who gained international attention last year when she wore a hijab and burkini during the Miss Minnesota USA pageant.

"Every little girl deserves to see a role model that's dressed like her, resembles her, or even has the same characteristics as her," Aden said in a video on her Instagram account.

Read More:  This School in Maine Is the First to Offer Athletic Hijabs to Muslim Athletes

WESTERN ADVERTISING

Hijabs have also become more visible in Western advertising campaigns for popular retailers like H&M and Gap.

"Brands especially are in a very strategic and potent position to propel that social good, to change the attitudes of society and really push us forward and take us to that next step," Amani al-Khatahtbeh, founder of online publication MuslimGirl.com, said by phone from New York.

Read More:  Meet Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, a Global Citizen of America Who Is Giving Muslim Girls a Voice

In Nigeria, a medical student has become an Instagram sensation for posting images of a hijab-wearing Barbie, describing hers as a "modest doll" - unlike the traditional version. And mothers in Pittsburgh have started making and selling hijabs for Barbies in a bid to make play more inclusive.

However, al-Khatahtbeh warned of the potential for the young Muslim market to be exploited just for profit without any effort to promote acceptance and integration.

"It can easily become exploitative by profiting off of communities that are being targeted right now, or it could be a moment that we turn into a very, very empowering one," she told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

Read More:  These Iranian Men Are Wearing Hijabs to Fight for Gender Equality

EMOJIS AND FASHION

Frustrated she could not find an image to represent her and her friends on her iPhone keypad, Saudi teenager, Rayouf Alhumedhi, started an online campaign, the Hijab Emoji Project.

She proposed the idea of the emoji last year to coding consortium Unicode that manages the development of new emojis, Alhumedhi said on her campaign's website, helping to prompt Apple to create its hijab-wearing emoji.

"It's only really in the last 18 to 24 months - perhaps three years - that bigger mainstream brands have started to realise that young Muslim consumers are really an exciting opportunity," said Janmohamed of Ogilvy Noor.

Read More:  Two Muslim Students Were Sent Home From School for Wearing Hijabs Without Permission Slips

A global Islamic economy report conducted by Thomson Reuters showed that in 2015, revenues from "modest fashion" bought by Muslim women was were estimated at $44 billion, with designers Dolce & Gabbana, Uniqlo and Burberry entering the industry.

Janmohamed, author of the memoir "Love in a Headscarf", sees young hijabi representation in the digital communications and fashion space a step forward for tolerance.

"It feels particularly empowering for young people to see themselves represented. So today I think it is the least that consumers expect and anyone that doesn't do it is actually falling behind."

(Reporting by Heba Kanso @hebakanso, Editing by Lyndsay Griffiths and Ros Russell; Please credit Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, and climate change. Visit www.trust.org)

 
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Thomson Reuters Foundation is the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org.

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JULY 25, 2017

16 of the Most Inspiring Quotes from the Global Citizen Festival Stage

“We have to reach beyond ourselves, we have to be a light to the world.”

By Colleen Curry

 

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The stage at a Global Citizen Festival is a powerful place — a platform from which world leaders, incredible musical artists, and extraordinary humans share their visions for a world without poverty.

Over the past five years that Global Citizen has been combing pop music with policy all over the world, from New York to Mumbai, there have been dozens of incredibly inspirational moments on that stage.

Now, with just weeks to go before the Global Citizen Festival 2017 in New York City, we’re looking back at 11 of the most inspirational quotes from luminaries, leaders, and global citizens just like you.

Read More: 18 Stunning Photos From Global Citizen Festival Hamburg


 

 

“We're going to end extreme poverty by 2030. Fact.”
 
Jay Z, on the Global Citizen Festival India stage in 2016.

 

Jay_Z_GCF_NYC.jpg

 

 

“I know many of you have been raising awareness about an issue I care deeply about, the fact that right now nearly 62 million girls worldwide are not in school…. This year I’m asking you to take the next step and actually take action to help these girls learn… These girls are counting on us to be their champions, and I intend to keep using my voice to speak out on their behalf, not just for the rest of my time in the White House, but for the rest of my life. I hope you all will join me.”
 
First lady Michelle Obama, on the Global Citizen Festival stage in New York City, 2015.

 

 

Michelle_Obama_GCF_NYC.jpg

 

 

“Our efforts here will be in vain if we do not also address the forces that are threatening to destroy our very planet. The first people to suffer the effects of these calamities will be the world’s poor and most marginalized.”
 
Leonardo DiCaprio, on the Global Citizen Festival stage in New York City, 2015.

 

Leo_DiCaprio_GCF_NYC.jpgImage: Theo Wargo/Getty Images for Global Citizen

 

 

“Every year at this time, the world comes to New York City at this time and this concert is all about giving back to this world. Whether you’re here in Central Park or watching from somewhere else, you are now part of the global fight to end extreme poverty.”
 
President Barack Obama, during a video broadcast on the Global Citizen Festival stage in New York City, 2014.

 

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“It’s not natural for people to live in extreme poverty and I feel proud to be part of a movement that isn’t just building, it’s huge already.” 
 
Hugh Jackman, at the Global Citizen Festival New York Red Carpet, 2014

 

Time Travel Hugh Jackman.jpgImage: Gage Skidmore

 

 

“We have to reach beyond ourselves, we have to be a light to the world.”
 
Joe Biden, on stage at the Global Citizen Festival New York, 2015

 

Joe_Biden_2015_GCF (1).jpg

 

 

“Given the opportunity, women and girls can change the world.”
 
Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada and Mrs. Sophie Grégoire-Trudeau, Global Citizen Festival Hamburg stage, 2017.

 

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“That is the sound of change in 2017.”  
 
Pharrell Williams, Global Citizen Festival Hamburg stage, 2017.

 

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“This is the type of event that allows people to feel they’re part of a movement and to participate in activism, people who maybe have felt excluded from the world of activism and philanthropy before. It’s a reminder that we’re all responsible for making the world a better place.” 
 
 Olivia Wilde, at the Global Citizen Festival New York Red Carpet, 2014.

 

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“I believe we can speak with one voice.” 
 
Narendra Modi on stage at the Global Citizen Festival New York, 2014.
 
Prime Minister Narendra Modi Hugh Jackman GCF 2014 Kevin Mazur.jpgImage: Kevin Mazur/Getty Images for Global Citizen

 

 

"You are the generation that can end extreme poverty by 2030." 
 
Ban Ki-moon on stage at the Global Citizen Festival New York, 2014

 

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“I’m here standing with four other girls for a cause, for a basic human right — the right to go to school.”
 
Malala Yousafzai, on stage at the Global Citizen Festival New York, 2015.

 

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“My call to action for you tonight is to know your power, to know your power to drive change, to know your power to advance the vision of a more just and sustainable world, to know the power to spread your dreams, to know the power of your dreams and then to spread them to others to stand with us in these shared goals.”
 
Nancy Pelosi, on stage at the Global Citizen Festival New York, 2016.

 

nancy_pelosi_gcfestival_2016.jpgImage: Global Citizen / Getty Images

 

 

“That’s why it’s important for all governments to investigate and record all killings, suicides, and disappearances of women that are taking place, and to ensure that there are laws to punish these killers.”
 
Sharmeen Obaid Chinoy on stage at the Global Citizen Festival New York, 2016.

 

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“Mental health support can help enable refugees, like Nadia, and many others who have been victims of conflict to seek justice, provide closure, and heal.”
 
Demi Lovato, on stage at the Global Citizen Festival Hamburg, 2017.

 

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“Every woman, and every girl, should be able to decide, for herself: how many kids she wants to have, when she wants to have them, and with whom she wants to have them.”
 
Alexander de Croo, Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium, on stage at the Global Citizen Festival Hamburg, 2017.

 

Hamburg_AlexanderDeCroo_GreyHuttonForGlobalCitizen.jpgImage: Grey Hutton/Global Citizen

 

Colleen Curry is a senior editor at Global Citizen. She has covered domestic and international news for outlets including ABC News, VICE News, and The New York Times, with a particular focus on women's issues, criminal justice, and LGBT rights. She is also pursuing her Master's in Creative Writing, and has had nonfiction published by Sports Illustrated and Marie Claire.

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Eradicating HIV stigma & humiliation: How Lydiah is changing lives in Kenya
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Eradicating HIV stigma & humiliation: How Lydiah is changing lives in Kenya

29 August 2016 11:00AM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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By Abby Higgins

Lydiah Litunya raced through the dusty, narrow alleyways of Kayole, a low-income neighbourhood on the outskirts of Nairobi, Kenya’s capital city, towards her friend Sabina Atieno’s house.

“My mother, she’s dead!” cried Sabina’s daughter from a crowd of about 20 family members and neighbours who had gathered around the small corrugated iron house.

DSC04475

Lydiah in Kayole, her home and the neighbourhood where she is a community health volunteer, traveling house to house to ensure TB and HIV positive patients are receiving the care they need.

But Lydiah knew she wasn’t dead. She saw both Sabina’s tuberculosis medication and her anti-retrovirals used to treat HIV scattered across the floor—a lethal combination if not taken correctly. Sabina’s family was about to contact the mortuary before Lydiah intervened and explained the problem.

“She saved my life,” Sabina says from the same home in which Lydiah saved her, “She’s helped me so much.”

And Lydiah has continued to do so: she helped Sabina swap her HIV medication out for one that would be compatible with her TB treatment, and she’s continued visiting to ensure that she is taking her medication properly and regularly. She also introduced her to a support group for HIV positive women, which has made a world of difference for Sabina.

“Together, we’re able to become strong,” she said of her group. Sabina used to hide her HIV status, but now she’s not afraid of people knowing.

DSC04484

Lydiah visiting Sabina at home to see how her health is and if she’s still taking her medication properly.

Lydiah does all this because she’s a community health volunteer, trained by Malteser International to support HIV positive women, pregnant mothers, and tuberculosis patients.

Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease that usually affects the lungs and that can be lethal if left untreated. More than 95 percent of deaths occurred in developing countries. In Kenya, it is the fifth leading cause of death nationwide. 

People who are HIV positive are significantly more at risk of developing TB, and it is a leading cause of death for HIV positive patients. In 2015, one in three HIV deaths was due to TB.

Part of why Lydiah is so good at this job is because she’s from the community where she works—and because she is also HIV positive.

“People have this spirit of fear about people knowing their HIV status,” says Lydiah. “I’ve opened up and I can show people how much you can benefit from discussing it openly.”

Lydiah didn’t always feel like that. She found out she was HIV positive when she was eight months pregnant with her fourth child. Paralysed by the deep stigma of HIV, she avoided telling her doctor, risking transmitting HIV to her child.

With the support of her best friend and with treatment from Malteser International, Lydiah got help for herself and her child just in time. Now her daughter is 4 years old and HIV negative. Last weekend, she donned a frilly white dress to be the flower girl in Lydiah’s wedding.

Lydiah in the hallway of St. George's where she has worked for four years with two nurses in the background.

Lydiah in the hallway of St. George’s where she has worked for four years with two nurses in the background.

The heavy stigma attached to HIV also affects TB treatment. Because the two are sometimes related, people often avoid getting tested for TB for fear they’ll also find out they’re HIV positive.

Lydiah’s message to her community continues to be one of openness and disclosure, one that she hopes will eradicate the humiliation association with HIV and TB.

When Lydiah was first diagnosed, she would throw her medication away, terrified someone would find out. Now, she takes it openly and in front of other women.

“I have this passion for encouraging people, for supporting people,” said Lydiah “Telling that them they can still work, they can still live [if they have HIV].”

Knowing that she is high-risk because she’s HIV positive and because she works with TB patients, Lydiah takes a preventative drug called isoniazid, which helps to keep her tuberculosis-free.

Because of the work of organisations like Malteser International and women like Lydiah, the fight being waged against TB is showing a great deal of success: Between 1990 and 2015, the TB death rate dropped by almost 50 percent around the world. The Millennium Development Goal target of halting and reversing the TB epidemic by 2015 was met globally.

But Lydiah’s work isn’t done.

“My life has changed a lot, I’ve come from so far and I want to see other people reach the place where I’ve reached,” she says. “God has given me this work.”

TAKE ACTION: Tell world leaders to support the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB, and Malaria!

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29 August 2016 11:00AM UTC

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