Jump to content

The Action Thread Part Two


Recommended Posts

  • Subscriber

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 27, 2017

Leo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet Just Low-Key Raised $30M for the Environment

Also in attendance at the fundraiser: Cate Blanchett, Kate Hudson and Billy Zane.

  •  
  •  
  •  

Yesterday, unbeknownst to many, actor Leonardo DiCaprio was in France doing what he does best: raising money for the environment. 

At his fourth annual fundraising gala in St. Tropez, DiCaprio raised $30 million for his foundation, People Magazine reports

Take Action: Stand With Climate Change Refugees Around the World

The Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation was founded in 1998 “with the mission of protecting the world’s last wild places,” according to its website. It has a following of over 50 million people, and has given over $80 million to environmental causes

DiCaprio wasn’t the only big name at the auction. Also in attendance were Kate Winslet, Billy Zane, and Tom Hanks, among others. Singer Madonna dropped in for a surprise performance. 

Read More: Leonardo DiCaprio Just Got Mexico to Save the Endangered Vaquita Porpoise

But perhaps the night’s biggest prize? A dinner with DiCaprio and Winslet to raise funds for a UK mother suffering from cancer

We’d go all in for that. 

Phineas Rueckert is a writer at Global Citizen. He graduated from Macalester College with a degree in Political Science and International Studies, and spent the past year teaching English in Toulouse, France. He is originally from Brooklyn, New York.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Environment

May 18, 2017

And 10 facts about the bottled water industry. Read More

July 26, 2017

They're beating their own records. Read More

July 26, 2017

Britain follows France in move to tackle air pollution and fight climate change. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 7.9k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

1058 EDUCATION How soccer is changing the lives of girls in Kenya February 23 2017 | By: MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO GIRLS COUNT Every gi

238 WATER AND SANITATION How the Ebola outbreak spurred improved access to running water in Liberia 16 November 2018 1:35PM UTC | By: WOMEN'S ADVANCEMENT DEEPLY

Posted Images

  • Subscriber
Skip to content
 
571
HEALTH

Meet 4 women who are fighting Malaria on the frontline

25 April 2017 2:23PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

This blog was originally posted on the Frontline Health Workers Coalition Blog. To view the original, please go to their blog, here.

Filumba, Judy, Bertha and Sule are protecting their communities from the world’s deadliest animal – the mosquito.  

They work for a US-funded project called Africa Indoor Residual Spraying (AIRS) that helps prevent malaria by spraying the walls of homes with insecticide.  And thanks in part to their efforts, this program has protected over 54 million people from malaria.

Here is more about the work they do and why they do it.

Meet Filumba, pictured here with her son Richard. As a Team Leader, Filumba manages a team of seven spray operators in the Samfya District in Zambia.

 

Screen-Shot-2017-04-24-at-10.53.24.png

In an interview with the AIRS team, she explains, “As a woman I have experienced what it is like to care for sick family members because of malaria. When I had my house sprayed, my problem was solved. So as a woman, I understand how to explain the benefits to people. Our strength comes from experience.”

And her perseverance has paid off: The income she’s earned from the project has enabled her son, Richard, to attend university.

Meet Judy, pictured here using her mobile phone that doubles as her bank account. Judy works as a Team Leader in the Mansa District, a neighbouring district to Filumba’s.

Screen-Shot-2017-04-24-at-10.53.40.png

A single mother of three children, she tells AIRS staff “the project has changed my life. I’ve built a house and sent my children to school with the money I’ve earned.”

In the future, we don’t want children to be denied access to their rights like women were in the past. The world is recognising that a woman has a role to play and there is nothing she can’t do.”

Meet Sule, a 20-year-old spray operator working in the Bunkpurugu District in Ghana, far from Ghana’s capital city of Accra.

WMD-Social-.jpg

Like Filumba, Sule says that being a spray operator is a hard job. She works for hours in the hot sun, wearing layers of protective clothing and gloves. Knowing that she is protecting people from getting sick keeps her motivated.

Meet Bertha, AIRS’ information, education and communications manager in Bunkpurugu District in Ghana.

Screen-Shot-2017-04-24-at-10.54.141.png

She grew up in the district’s capital and speaks the local language, Moar, which is important because many people where she works cannot read.

Communicating in a language familiar with the community, she uses community meetings, radio talk shows and pictures to educate the community about indoor residual spraying.

Through strong treatment and prevention efforts – like what Filumba, Judy, Bertha and Sule do – the world has cut malaria deaths in half since 2000. Still, this preventable and curable disease takes the lives of nearly 50 people every hour, most of whom are young children living in Africa.

To find out more about what you can do to get involved, check all the social activity for World Malaria Day!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
25 April 2017 2:23PM UTC

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
Music Generation
 

WHAT'S HAPPENING

Music Generation is a splendid example of what can be achieved by Government and philanthropists working in tandem
- Kieran McLoughlin, President & CEO - The Worldwide Ireland Funds

← return to blog

27/07/2017

Corda Connections 2017: a creative music camp for young string players

Corda Connections 2017: a creative music camp for young string players

For a second successive year, Music Generation Louth presents Corda Connections – a creative music camp designed to give young string players of all ages and abilities the chance to learn and collaborate with musicians from Music Generation Louth and the Irish Chamber Orchestra.

The camp takes place from 14 to 16 August 2017, 10am to 3pm daily, at the PJ Carroll Building, DkIT (Dundalk IT).

Together, participants will enjoy an opportunity to arrange, create, and improvise their own music, develop skills in small group and full ensemble performance, and connect with other young string players from the county.

For a flavour of what to expect at this year's camp, look back on the video captured during Corda Connections 2016: 



Corda Connections caters for young classical strings and fiddle players aged 8 to 18 years – from those just starting out on their journey or instrumental learning to the very experienced looking to develop new skills. All participants will be grouped according to their age, ability and interests.

Participation costs €25 per musician, and enrolment is now open online at the Music Generation Louth website.

Please note that places are limited and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis. Early booking is advised.

For more information about Corda Connections and to apply, contact:

Eamonn Quinn, Music Generation Louth
e: equinn@lmetb.ie
t: +353 42 93 64635
musicgenerationlouth.ie

Bookmark and Share

Ireland's National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© Music Generation DAC. All Rights Reserved. Registered in Ireland No. 491331. Charity Reg. No. CHY 19679.
NCH Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2. Telephone: +353 1 4758454

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber
Skip to content
6 facts that will make you think differently about girls’ education
558
EDUCATION

6 facts that will make you think differently about girls’ education

24 April 2017 12:44PM UTC | By: MEGAN COWLEY

 
   

With the German-led G20 just around the corner (7- 8 July), we have a unique opportunity to promote the benefits of girls education, particularly in Africa–  because its population is predicted to double by 2050. If the G20 and African leaders invest in a partnership with Africa with ambition, urgency and efficiency over the next three years, the continent’s youth can drive a surge in inclusive growth that would benefit the globe. This all starts with early education.

Here are 6 facts from our report that will make you think differently about girls’ education:

1. 130 million girls are out of school. If this were the population of a country, it would be the 10th largest nation in the world.

big-bang-theory-penny-WHAT-gif.gif

Nowhere in the world do women have as many opportunities as men — and this starts with girls and their access to education. In the poorest countries, girls are less likely to go to school, are less likely to have the same opportunities for work, and are less likely to have a say in the direction of their own lives than their brothers.

The main way to fight such unacceptable inequalities is to educate more girls. Education is one of the most powerful weapons in the fight against extreme poverty. Evidence shows that countries that educate their girls are wealthier, healthier, and more stable — and that universal access to quality education is one of the best antidotes to poverty. We cannot end extreme poverty without prioritising education, especially for girls.

2. An additional year of schooling for girls is estimated to result in almost a 12% increase in wages.

kelly.gif

When girls are educated, they have more options for employment opportunities, and their earning potential rises. Not getting these girls an education, however, could be even more dramatic– ONE has calculated that failing to educate girls to the same standard as boys costs developing countries between $112 and $152 billion a year. Failing to make such an important and cost-effective investment in girls could be — and is — damaging , and it can no longer be a side issue.

3. If every girl completed a primary education in sub-Saharan Africa, maternal mortality could fall by a dramatic 70%.

a27e5c7b6808fbac6aa0009f6fd24ea8.gif

Educating a girl doesn’t just benefit her — it benefits everyone. Maternal mortality–  the death of a woman due to pregnancy or childbirth-related complications– is still prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Educated women and girls are more able to make informed decisions about their lives: they tend to have smaller families and have more access to information surrounding prenatal care, hygiene, immunisation and nutrition– all of which play a serious role in reducing the causes of maternal mortality and the deaths of children under five. Educating all women in sub-Saharan Africa through secondary school, for example, could save 1.2 million lives.

Additionally, the chances of girls marrying below the age of 18 decline significantly with each stage of education, as those in school are more likely to marry later in life after they finish their education. This also contributes to lowering the risk of maternal and child deaths in lower-income countries.

4. Only 34% of girls in sub-Saharan Africa are able to complete lower secondary school, while 42% of their male classmates do.

2zH3CZ4.gif

Why do girls drop out before they can complete lower secondary school in sub-Saharan Africa? The inequalities between boys and girls in school start early, particularly in the poorest countries– for instance, many girls are forced to stay home because they need to work to make enough money to eat their next meal; as another example, once girls hit puberty, they might not attend school due to a lack of access to sanitation facilities. Not only are these girls missing out on opportunities to fulfil their highest potential, but they are more vulnerable as a result. Girls out of school are more likely to become child brides, are more vulnerable to diseases like HIV and are more likely to die young.

5. Girls’ schools are targeted three times more often than boys’ schools and attacks on girls’ schools increased 17-fold between 2000 and 2014.

peggyolsen.gif

Things are even worse for girls in conflict situations. For example, there are currently 2.9 million children in need of emergency education in Nigeria’s north-east. Boko Haram (which literally translates as ‘western education is forbidden’) has targeted schools and education: 276 schoolgirls were kidnapped from their school in Chibok in 2014, more than 1,000 schools have been destroyed in the conflict and 1,500 schools have been forced to close. As of November 2016, 645 teachers have been murdered and 19,000 have been displaced. Education has literally turned into a life-threatening situation for the children and teachers of north-east Nigeria, with girls’ schools being targeted the most.

6. The cost of a 12-year education in the poorest countries ($1.17 per day) costs less than a loaf of bread or a newspaper.

giphy-1-11.gif

Breaking down the cost of educating girls shows us how little it actually costs to give a girl an education. It helps to demonstrate that the benefits of educating girls far outweigh the costs – which are less than the cost of a loaf of bread for one day! This is a small investment that could literally change the world we live in. Do you agree? 

Join the campaign for girls’ education today!

ALL GIRLS COUNT

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

MEGAN COWLEY
24 April 2017 12:44PM UTC

TOPICS

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 27, 2017

Stephen Colbert Has Feelings For Donald Trump About the Transgender Ban

Late night comedians had strong words — and a song and dance — for Trump's trans ban.

colbert-transgender-reaction.jpg
  •  
  •  
  •  

It’s often the job of the stand-up comedian and the late night talk show host to put into words feelings of disbelief, dismay, confusion, sometimes even anger. 

On Wednesday, after US President Donald Trump announced a ban on transgender individuals serving in the US Military, Stephen Colbert had just two words, and they were, shall we say, a bit untoward to the president. 

In last night’s episode of “The Late Show” with Stephen Colbert, the comedian recalled the moment he found out about the transgender military ban. 

“I began my day today, as I often begin my days, by checking Donald Trump’s Twitter feed to see how far the crazy has spread,” Colbert said, “and today I really think he’s off his meds because today he went from crazy to cruel.” 

Read More: 9 Battles the LGBT Community in the US Is Still Fighting, Even in 2017

Colbert went on to read out the series of tweets the president fired off yesterday morning, in which he announced transgender individuals would not be allowed to serve in the US Military “in any capacity,” on account of the “tremendous medical costs and disruption” that they would cause. 

After reading the final of three tweets, in which Trump signed off with a curt, “Thank you,” Colbert stared directly into the camera, a look of incredulity on his face. 

“Thank you?” Colbert asked, before delivering the punchline. 

“F--k you,” he said.  

Read More: Trump Announces Ban on Transgender People in Military

Colbert wasn’t the only late night host to address the transgender ban. 

Jimmy Fallon took a different approach, inviting transgender comedian Patti Harrison to address the announcement on “The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon.” 

“Trump says transgender people in the military would be a tremendous disruption,” Harrison quipped, “and I get it: if you constantly draw attention to yourself, spend all day distracting everyone, and cost taxpayers millions of dollars, the perfect job for you isn’t the military, it’s the President of the United States.”

James Corden, for his part, chose to express himself in song. On the “Late Late Show,” Corden donned a tuxedo and belted out a trans-inclusive rendition of Nat King Cole’s “L-O-V-E.”

 

“POTUS thinks it’s unsavory, patriots who know real bravery, Trump’s got hate for me and you,” Corden sang. 

Read More: These 6 TV Comedians Aren’t Laughing at Trump’s Election

As for the transgender ban itself, the Department of Defense yesterday referred all questions to the White House, in doing so distancing itself from the announcement. 

“We will continue to work closely with the White House to address the new guidance provided by the Commander-in-Chief on transgender individuals serving in the military,” Capt. Jeff Davis, a spokesman, said in a statement.

Phineas Rueckert is a writer at Global Citizen. He graduated from Macalester College with a degree in Political Science and International Studies, and spent the past year teaching English in Toulouse, France. He is originally from Brooklyn, New York.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Citizenship

July 28, 2017

They're feminists, activists, and are making positive change. Read More

May 16, 2017

Best advice ever. Read More

July 27, 2017

There are a lot of talking points from the past 24 hours. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MAY 16, 2017

Bill Gates Just Dropped This Life-Changing Advice: ‘Start Fighting Inequality’

Best advice ever.

Meghan Werft

By Meghan Werft

 

ap_17128846109365_bill_gates_ap_photo_nati_harnik.jpgAP Photo/Nati Harnik
  •  
  •  
  •  

Want to be the next Bill Gates? Good news — Gates does, too. And earlier this week, he tweeted 14 lessons he wish he had learned earlier in life to help you — and college grads — get there.

His advice was not focused on wealth, or how to become more intelligent. Instead, Gates’ message centered on how to make a positive impact in the world. 

An understanding of inequality and a belief in peace were central to his message, which was aimed at recent graduates. He said it took him decades to appreciate both. 

Take Action: Tell France’s New President To Support Education For All

“I also have one big regret: When I left school, I knew little about the world’s worst inequities. Took me decades to learn,” he tweeted. “You know more than I did when I was your age. You can start fighting inequity, whether down the street or around the world, sooner.” 

Sprinkled with humor, Gates’ asks readers not to associate his advice with the likes of  stuffy adults from the film “the Graduate.” 

He reveals the “promising fields” he’d pick as young person today: artificial intelligence (AI), biosciences, and presumably renewable energy, where people can make the biggest impact. 

Read More: Bill Gates Thanks Polio Advocates in Heartfelt Letter

He also shared his belief that the world is more peaceful than ever. And if you don’t believe him, he recommends picking up a copy of “The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined,” by Canadian-American psychologist Steven Pinker. 

Gate’s endorsement of the book has caused Amazon orders to spike since his tweet on Monday. The book is 650,000% more popular than before Gates’ tweet, Washington Post reports. It rose to number two on Amazon’s “Movers and Shakers” list overnight. 

He also included shoutouts to Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett. 

Read More: Bill Gates Is Making a $1 Billion Bet on Clean Energy

“Surround yourself with people who challenge you, teach you, and push you to be your best self.” he shared “As Melinda Gates does for me.” 

“Like Warren Buffett I measure my happiness by whether people close to me are happy and love me, and by the difference I make for others,” he said. 

Gates’ advice is being taken to heart not just by recent grads, but by global citizens everywhere. 

Read More: Melinda Gates Is Fighting Trump’s Proposed Foreign Aid Cuts

And if you already believe the world is more peaceful today than ever in the course of history, and that the world is getting better — you’re basically smarter than a young Bill Gates.

Take Action: Pledge Now

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 
In partnership with: CHIME FOR CHANGE

Meghan is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She studied International Political Economy at the University of Puget Sound before moving to New York. She is a firm believer that education and awareness on interconnected global issues has the power to create a more sustainable, equal world where poverty does not exist.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Citizenship

July 28, 2017

They're feminists, activists, and are making positive change. Read More

July 27, 2017

Late night comedians had strong words — and a song and dance — for Trump's trans ban. Read More

July 27, 2017

There are a lot of talking points from the past 24 hours. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/26/2017 at 10:13 AM, tan_lejos_tan_cerca said:

So bye bye!;)

Yep and I also voted in for a local primary election  to boot!!.  By the way, I just came across this video by the late, Leslie, Gore which encourages us women to vote no matter what.

 

Edited by illumination70
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Subscriber

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

JULY 26, 2017

UK Will Ban All New Petrol and Diesel Cars by 2040

Britain follows France in move to tackle air pollution and fight climate change.

  •  
  •  
  •  

The UK has announced new measures to ban all new petrol and diesel cars from 2040, as part of a £3 billion plan to tackle air pollution.

The announcement follows a pledge from French President Emmanuel Macron earlier this month that France will also ban the sale of cars dependent on fossil fuels by 2040 to transition to a carbon-neutral society by 2050.

But is Britain really moving towards a more eco-friendly future? The reaction on social media was mixed.

Previously, the move had just been an “ambition” for the Conservative government.

The new approach will involve £255 million in local council funding to “come up with an imaginative solution” to illegal levels of the pollutant nitrogen oxide. This could mean anything from cleaning up public transport services to reprogramming traffic lights.

Outdoor air pollution has been linked to 40,000 premature deaths in the UK every year, according to the Royal College of Physicians. The economic cost is estimated at over £20 billion a year — in one recent year, this included £2.7 billion is lost productivity . The carbon emissions also contribute to the greenhouse effect, which surges the process of climate change into fast forward.

“We have to get rid of petrol and diesel cars off our roads if we’re going to make sure not only we deal with the health problems that air pollution causes, but also that we meet our climate change targets,” said Michael Gove, the Environment Secretary , “and the good news is that the car industry is already moving in this direction.”

Gove refers to Swedish car company Volvo, who have pledged to prioritise the production of electric cars. Volvo will only build electric cars from 2019 onwards , whilst BMW plan to build all models of its fully electric Mini within the UK.

However, some activists have protested that the announcement is just a “smokescreen” to distract from the absence of quicker, more comprehensive solutions. Notable omissions from the plan includes a vehicle scrappage scheme to actively reduce diesel powered engines on the road and a mandate for councils to charge the worst polluting vehicles before entering cities.

“We cannot wait nearly a quarter of a century for real action to tackle the public health emergency caused by air pollution,” said Areeba Hamid from Greenpeace UK. “It means that children across the UK will continue to be exposed to harmful air pollution for years to come, with potentially irreversible impacts.”

The UK government's flagship announcement follows a draft strategy set out in May that was criticised by environmental lawyers for being “weak” and “woefully inadequate”.  The High Court sent it back, and ordered the government to produce better plans by July 31.

The end of the road might be in sight for petrol and diesel cars in the UK. But Gove’s responsibility to protect the future of the environment must stretch further. He has so far remained quiet on the Global Citizen campaign to halve the 88 million tonnes of food wasted within EU members states before 2030. Until Britain negotiates its exit from the EU, it still has influence — and it’s vital that Gove supports the 70,000 people who have backed the food waste campaign to make these targets law. 

Sign our petition now, and send Gove an email asking for his support.

 

Take Action: Email Now

 
 
 
 
 

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 
In partnership with: This is Rubbish

 

James is a Digital/Communications Assistant at Global Citizen. A devout Welshman based in East London, he adores new music, adventures abroad, and Liverpool Football Club. When he's not studiously tinkering with his Fantasy Football team, he's busy either quoting Kanye West or planning his next ambitious trip away. His favourite things in the world are his labradoodle (called Pandora), Huw Stephens, and everything David Bowie did in the 70's.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Environment

July 27, 2017

Also in attendance at the fundraiser: Cate Blanchett, Kate Hudson and Billy Zane. Read More

May 18, 2017

And 10 facts about the bottled water industry. Read More

July 24, 2017

And that’s just the start of the plastic problem. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...