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The Action Thread Part Two

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We saw last Saturday amazing dodging skills and a good bunch of fancy dresses - thanks everyone for taking part in this years #Dodgeballdayer. See you all again next year!

 

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Thanks to Music Generation Clare's Leath/Leath Go See! Scheme there will be half price tickets available for Under 18s to the much anticipated 'Legacy Concert' as part of Fleadh Cheoil Ennis 2017 at the Shannon Aerodome on August 18th.

Tickets are on sale now from glór.ie or fleadhcheoil.ie

 

 

Edited by tan_lejos_tan_cerca

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Music Generation
 

WHAT'S HAPPENING

Music Generation truly is an innovative and pioneering partnership model, located in 12 counties, which has significantly progressed the development of infrastructure for increased access to performance music education for children and young people.
- The Minister for Education and Skills, 2016

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08/08/2017

110+ young musicians from Music Generation partners in 8 counties to perform at Fleadh Ennis

110+ young musicians from Music Generation partners in 8 counties to perform at Fleadh Ennis

On Thursday, 17 August more than 110 young traditional Irish musicians from 8 different counties will perform live as part of a special Music Generation session on the Gig Rig at Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann 2017.

This will be the second year that Music Generation has hosted its own slot on the Gig Rig in Ennis, following the inaugural session hosted by Music Generation Sligo in 2015. Take a look back on the action from last year’s gathering in this excellent video captured by Music Generation Clare:



The 2017 Fleadh will be the largest yet, with a record number of gigs taking place across a huge range of venues, in addition to on-street performances taking place throughout Ennis town. The Gig Rig in the Abbey Street Car Park will provide the heartbeat of the festival – a place where visitors, audiences and musicians can enjoy some of the very best music-making free of charge on an outdoor stage.

Hosted by Music Generation Clare, Music Generation’s Gig Rig line up will include young musicians from two Carlow groups (Reelig and Reelóg); participants in Music Generation Cork City’s Creative Tradition programme, who have been rehearsing at weekly ‘Tunes for Teens’ workshops for several months; The Donegal Highlanders from Donegal Music Education Partnership; the Music Generation Laois Trad Orchestra; Rolling Waves from Music Generation Mayo; Ceoltóirí Ógra Coleman from Music Generation Sligo; and young trad players from Music Generation Wicklow.

The session, which takes place from 3pm to 6pm, will also feature special guest performances from members of Grupaí Cheoil Clare who enjoyed recent success at Fleadh Cheoil na Mumhan 2017.

Each accomplished young trad group has been working hard throughout the summer in preparation for this much-anticipated performance opportunity. Under the direction of their inspiring musician-mentors they will showcase their skills before an audience of hundreds of lively Fleadh-goers, their families and friends. They will also have an opportunity to immerse themselves in this extraordinary festival of music-making, and to share and develop their skills with peers and professional musicians from different Music Generation partnership programmes.

The full Gig Rig schedule for the week can now be viewed online. Keep up to date with Music Generation’s activities at the Fleadh on the Music Generation Clare Facebook page, or find full details about Fleadh Ennis online at fleadhcheoil.ie

The Music Generation session on the Gig Rig is funded as a Music Generation National Partnership Project.

For more information about Music Generation Clare programmes and events contact:

Jean Wallace, Music Development Officer, Music Generation Clare
Limerick & Clare Education & Training Board, Station Road, Ennis, County Clare

t: +353 87 9843403
e: jean.wallace@lcetb.ie
Facebook.com/MusicGenerationClare

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Ireland's National Music Education Programme.
A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,
The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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© Music Generation DAC. All Rights Reserved. Registered in Ireland No. 491331. Charity Reg. No. CHY 19679.
NCH Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2. Telephone: +353 1 4758454

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Why Malian women will do more agric: A success story in promoting women’s land rights
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AGRICULTURE

Why Malian women will do more agric: A success story in promoting women’s land rights

7 August 2017 2:05PM UTC | By: OULIE KEITA

 
   

Mali is one of the poorest countries in the world, with more than half of its 17 million people living on less than $1.25 USD a day. For the past five years, Mali has experienced a multi-dimensional political and humanitarian crisis, driven in part by internal conflict and terrorism. Mali’s food security has been rocked in recent years by recurring disasters, including erratic rainfall, drought, and a military coup that triggered a political and security crisis. Although peace negotiations were concluded in 2015, the situation remains volatile, preventing the return of those who have fled to neighbouring countries. Considerable effort has been made to combat terrorism in the northern regions of the country. However, vital issues like economic growth, agriculture — particularly for women — and the fundamental matter of lasting peace and stability are left on the margins.

Mali has another major problem: Women produce 80% of the country’s agricultural produce and make up 65% of the agricultural labour force, but they do not receive proportional recognition or benefits from this industry.

A farmer in Mali. (Photo credit: IICD/Wikimedia Commons)

A farmer in Mali. (Photo credit: IICD/Wikimedia Commons)

They have limited access and control of the resources needed to increase productivity. Less than 5% of the current agriculture budget serves women in farming, and women’s rights to own land in Mali have, until now, been severely limited — they were only able to access land for use via their husbands and sons. Past attempts to give women land rights have been opposed on cultural and religious grounds. When the Land Tenure Law was first initiated almost five years ago, it received no political support from government, parliament or religious leaders. Traditional and religious beliefs in Mali made it impossible for women to dare dream of having their land to cultivate.

mali2.jpg

ONE joined forces with a group of Civil Society Organisations to tackle the lack of gender parity in agriculture and campaigned for the Land Tenure Bill to be passed into law. The campaign included lobbying the Malian government to maintain their position as a leader in respecting the Malabo commitments made by the African Union heads of state meetings in 2014. The government has surpassed the 10% Malabo target and has allocated 15.1% of its national budget to agriculture. ONE and its partners in Mali called on the government to:

  • Pass and enact the Land Tenure Law, which would ensure that a minimum of 10% of irrigated lands are allocated to women and youth in agriculture
  • Allocate at least 10% of the national agriculture budget to women in agriculture

During these meetings, the Malian government pledged to fund and transform agriculture adequately and to empower women in agriculture, thereby also contributing to ending extreme poverty through sustainable development goals two and five, which are ending hunger and achieving gender equality respectively.

mali3.jpg

In 2016, the Malian parliament finally agreed to pass the Land Tenure Law, surpassing the initial ask by legislating that 15% of irrigated land in Mali would be allocated to women and youth, an increase of 50% on the original ask. The law was officially passed in April 2017 and is a significant success toward enabling women in Mali to legally own land and enjoy the economic benefits of the agricultural sector, to which they make a major contribution.

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OULIE KEITA
7 August 2017 2:05PM UTC

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How Internet access could help lift women and girls out of poverty
4372
TECHNOLOGY

How Internet access could help lift women and girls out of poverty

7 November 2016 5:11PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

This is a guest post from Benjamin Jourdan, ONE’s Policy Officer for Development Finance in our Johannesburg office.

I followed my normal routine this morning:

8:40AM woke up after hitting snooze three times

8:41AM browsed Facebook for about 5 minutes

8:46AM sent an email to my boss

8:47AM mozied to the shower and gave an extraordinary lipsync performance of my favourite jam

8:53AM dried off and Snap-chatted some rainbow-pukey face pics to my mates

8:56AM checked the weather

8:57AM downloaded the next Game of Thrones episode (it’s going to be a wild Friday night!)

8:58AM realised it was 8:58AM, threw on clothes and raced to work

Maize farmer Zaugia Nyiransengimana of the Impabaruta Co-operative, trials 'Agro-fiba APP' during a visit from Lilian Uwintwari of software development firm M-AHWII. Southern Province, Rwanda.

As I sped down the streets of Johannesburg on my trusty scooter, I reflected on how reliant I am on technology and the Internet – and how much easier it has made my life. Yes, it brings its vices, but without the Internet I wouldn’t be able to video chat with family in the U.S., I wouldn’t have been able to apply to my current job, I wouldn’t be able to post this blog!

Where the Internet has truly been most revolutionary, however, is within the world’s poorest and most vulnerable populations.

These groups now have access to information and networks that help them communicate, set up businesses, and access services, allowing them and their families to lead healthier, safer and more prosperous lives.

But more than half of the world is still unconnected to the internet and where someone lives makes a huge difference. Almost 75% of Africa’s population is offline compared with 19% of people in developed countries. To put it in perspective, the amount of data I use in my normal daily routine (checking apps, streaming music, posting photos, downloading video) is more data than the average citizen living in the poorest regions of the world uses in one month.

A Maasai woman checks her phone as she sells jewelry at the market in the town of Susua, Kenya, Wednesday, August 12, 2015. Many people in Africa don't have access to power in their homes and will walk many miles to charge their cell phones. In Kenya people almost can't live without their mobiles, they use it to pay for most things and connect with the world -- they use their mobiles instead of physical money, which is a lot safer and more practical. In nearly every location globally, at every demographic level, people possess some form of cell phone in todayÕs hyper connected world. Be it an iPhone or the simplest Nokia, the anxiety born of a fading battery has emerged as a common human experience. In villages, slums and any poorer area of Africa, charging stations have become the central social circles. The consequences of lost connections are palatable in Kenya, and the opportunities and growth that come with access to reliable power is transformative. (Photo credit/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

Hit harder by this lack of connectivity are women and girls. Women living in the poorest countries are a third less likely than their male counterparts to be connected and the gap is increasing; if trends continue, in 2020 over 75% will be unconnected.

Without connecting these women and girls to the internet, barriers for women to access education, lifesaving health information, and job opportunities will continue to perpetuate dire gender inequalities in these regions.

In the Making the Connection report, ONE calls for an action plan to connect 350 million women and girls in the poorest countries by 2020, resulting in spin off benefits for everyone.

So Snap, Instagram, Facebook, Tweet, Youtube, and Pinterest your support to #PovertyIsSexist and sign our petition today! 

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AUG. 10, 2017

Deadly Protests Erupt in Kenya After Claims of Rigged Election

Memories of past unrest have loomed over this election.

Joe McCarthy

By Joe McCarthy

 

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ap_17221407818701.jpgAP Photo/Brian Inganga
 

With 98% of the votes counted in Kenya’s presidential election, it seems that the incumbent Uhuru Kenyatta will be returning to power.

Both the African Union and Commonwealth have said that Tuesday’s vote appears credible.

"We believe that the election has been conducted in a transparent and credible manner and that Kenyans must be commended for that election," Commonwealth observer mission head and Ghana's ex-President John Mahama said at a press conference in Kenya's capital, Nairobi.

Take Action: Tell Congress Not to Slash Foreign Aid

But protests over the election’s results have erupted across the country, leading to violent clashes between civilians and security forces, leaving at least five people dead so far.

 

Protesters throughout the country have created blockades in streets with trash fires and boulders and demanded that the election be reviewed.

In Nairobi, two people were shot and killed amid protests that devolved into looting, according to the regional police chief Larry Kieng. Further south, police shot at demonstrators and used tear gas, according to one protester. Five men armed with knives in Tana River region stabbed people at a vote tallying station, killing one person, Al Jazeera reported.

Kenya has a bloody history of election unrest. In 2007, more than 1,300 people were killed and 600,000 displaced following an uprising disputing that year’s election results. In 2013, voting machines throughout the country malfunctioned, inviting accusations of fraud.  

"There is tension after every election,” Hussein Ibrahim, a resident of the capital Nairobi, told Al Jazeera. “That's why all these shops are closed and why no one is coming out of their homes.”

"No one is going out because they don't know what could happen next,” he said

 

Fully aware of this grim history, voting officials took precautions such as standardizing machines, enhancing digital security, improving voter registration and verification protocols, and training more people to carry out and monitor the election.

They also deployed security forces to areas where unrest was expected.

Read More: The World Is Watching With Bated Breath as Kenya Takes to the Polls

But that wasn’t enough to deter suspicions that the will of the people was being undermined.

Long before the vote began on Tuesday, the opposition leader Raila Odinga seeded fears that the election would be rigged. Odinga has ran for president and lost four times, and his doubts about the country’s ability to oversee an election has grown with each bid.  

He renewed his accusations as the votes came rolling in and his defeat seemed imminent by claiming that Kenyatta’s Jubilee party had hacked the election and tampered with voter rolls.

"The fraud Jubilee has perpetuated on Kenyans surpasses any level of voter theft in our country's history. This time we caught them," Odinga tweeted.

These accusations gained a lurid dimension when it was learned that a top election official was tortured and killed days before the election. Odinga said that Kenyatta’s supporters used the victim’s identity to hack the election.

Read More: This Is How Many People US Foreign Aid Helps Around the World

The Jubilee party, meanwhile, has said that the vote was carried out fairly and is seeking to placate the unrest.

"We assure Kenyans and all residents, the country is safe and I urge everyone to go on freely with their daily chores," Kenya's interior minister, Fred Matiangi, said in a statement.

More than 50% of Kenyans receive their news through social media, where “fake news” and conspiracy theories are rampant, according to the Christian Science Monitor. Matiangi said that the country may temporarily shut down social media platforms to limit the spread of misinformation, hate speech, and incitement.

 

Across the country, Kenyans are worried that the unrest could spiral into something far bloodier than it has.

"I hope this ends quickly because we need to go back to work and feed our families," Nancy Odongo, another resident of Nairobi, told Al Jazeera.

"Elections are always bad news for us poor people,” she added. “I have to pay bills and feed my children. I don't care who wins."

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.

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AUG. 4, 2017

Mobile Health Messages Are Helping Parents and Saving Lives

Health organizations are sending health messages to parents around the world through their phones.

 

Brought to you by: Johnson & Johnson

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197433_lead11_abby_jackqueline_009_r1_cmyk_300_small.jpgJackqueline and Pretty
Photo provided courtesy of Facebook.
 

Author: Colleen Hancock

First-time parents Jackqueline and Fred have a lot of questions about how to care for their daughter, Pretty. For example, Pretty cried a lot when she was a baby, and Fred and Jackqueline didn't know what to do. They live in Nairobi, Kenya, more than 12 hours from Jackqueline’s mother, and can’t afford to call home for advice.

Fortunately, Fred’s mobile phone provides another type of lifeline: Through the Free Basics program, the couple can access a range of mobile websites covering topics that include parenting, jobs, and health – without data charges.

Take Action: Tweet at Ugandan Leaders and Urge Them to Prioritize Maternal and Child Health

In the evenings when Fred comes home from work, they sit and read advice on the BabyCenter® Free Basics site, which features information for pregnant women and new parents. The articles are written in Kiswahili by health journalists and reviewed by medical experts. The advice is customized for parents in Kenya and formatted to be read easily on basic phones.

Jackqueline and Fred especially enjoy reading about Pretty's upcoming developmental milestones and how best to engage and play with her as she grows. Fred has also learned that it's best to smoke outside the home to protect his family from second-hand smoke.

At least 4 billion people own mobile phones around the world, and more than 6 billion have access to one (because many people share phones). However, less than half the world uses the internet, mostly because of the expense or a lack of access. This is why programs like Free Basics are so critical.

BabyCenter, a member of the Johnson & Johnson family of companies, works on many mobile health programs across the globe.  Alongside the J&J Global Community Impact team and local organizations, they send free text and audio messages to parents in areas where access to healthcare is limited. Pregnant women, new mothers, and their family members receive helpful messages two or three times a week based on their due date or their child’s birth date.  

Read More: The World Is Failing to Invest in Breastfeeding, UN Reports

Any nonprofit can apply to use these messages, which have been translated into 24 languages and localized for 29 countries, reaching more than 4 million families. In India, BabyCenter partnered with the nonprofit organization ARMMAN  to develop mMitra®, a program that sends audio versions of the messages to pregnant women and new mothers in urban slum communities. More than 900,000 women have enrolled since 2014.

197433_LEAD11_ABBY_JACKQUELINE_021_cmyk_300_small.jpgFred and Pretty
Image: Photo courtesy of Facebook.

Learning about Pretty’s development and looking up questions has brought Jackqueline and Fred closer together. Jackqueline misses her mother deeply, but she feels that BabyCenter offers her the guidance her mother might have provided and much more based on current medical research.  This support and reassurance has boosted their confidence as parents. Mobile phones delivering quality information are empowering parents like them around the world every day. Please enjoy some of their heartfelt stories below.

197433_TZ_Shaibu _1_cmyk_300_small.jpgImage: Photo provided courtesy of Facebook.

Shaibu is a community health worker in Tanzania. “I use Free Basics to expand my knowledge on health topics, and it doesn’t cost me any data. My responsibility is to educate people about malaria, AIDS, and family planning. I use BabyCenter on Free Basics to talk to women about prenatal health and how to care for newborns. Connecting with people is my passion. When you give someone knowledge, you give them strength.”

Renu Large.jpgRenu
Image: Photo provided courtesy of ARMMAN.

After her son was born prematurely in India, Renu signed up for calls through the mMitra program. “Had it not been for mMitra, my premature baby would not have lived,” she says. After her son’s birth, her doctors simply sent the tiny baby home and told Renu and her husband to ‘take care of him’. “mMitra helped us through one of the most difficult times of our lives. The calls educated me about taking care of the baby. For instance, I wasn’t aware that I should be breastfeeding my baby for as long as he wants. Though breastfeeding wasn’t an easy task since the baby was very tiny, I did not give up,” she explains.

Read More: This Ugandan Midwife Believes Every Baby Can Be Someone Important

Screen Shot 2017-08-07 at 11.47.36 AM.pngSwati
Image: Photo provided courtesy of ARMMAN.

Swati calls the mMitra calls “a true friend and counselor.” “My husband Mahesh and I live by ourselves. When I got pregnant with Asmita there was no older person to turn to for an advice,” says Swati, who lives in Dharavi, a neighborhood in Mumbai, India, that is often called the largest slum in Asia. She nearly skipped important vaccinations for her daughter but credits mMitra with relieving her fears that her daughter was not healthy enough for her shots.

2016-11-29 18.25.09.jpgPregnant women in Mexico.
Image: Photo provided courtesy of UNICEF

In Mexico, Lola registered for a new program called Prospera Digital while she was pregnant and is still receiving text messages six months after her daughter’s birth. She is grateful that the messages helped her remember to go to her prenatal check-ups, resolve her breastfeeding challenges, and let her know when she could start feeding Julia solid foods. Lola says, “It’s a treasure to count on someone to guide you as a mom, that someone is telling you, ‘Look, this goes like this and that.’ One feels protected, like there is a person concerned about us and our children."

You can take action to urge Ugandan leaders to prioritize matnernal and child health. Download the Global Citizen app now and start taking action. 


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AUG. 10, 2017

This Syrian Refugee Became a Doctor After Studying in Four Countries

"War can take everything from you except your passions and your love."

 

Brought to you by: Thomson Reuters Foundation

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syrian-refugee-doctor.pngSt. George's University of London
 

By Adela Suliman

LONDON, Aug 4 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Ten years, four countries, four medical schools and 21 houses later Tirej Brimo, a refugee who fled the Syrian war, is finally a doctor.

Having been just 10 months away from graduating with a medical degree at a university in Aleppo, Brimo was forced to flee his homeland in 2012 due to the war, crisscrossing the Middle East before arriving in Britain in 2013.

Last week, he graduated from St George's University of London - after having been turned away by several medical schools - and is now embarking on his career as a junior doctor in the National Health Service in the north of England.

Brimo expressed his joy with a Facebook post that he said went viral, being shared over a thousand times.

"I always describe it as the world was smiling at me again. You feel like a flower of hope is growing back into your life." After 10 years, four countries and 21 homes, Syrian refugee Tirej Brimo, who now lives in England, has graduated as a doctor.

"War can take everything from you except your passions and your love and for me to not give up on my dream and on who I am - I simply rejected the unfairness of life," Brimo, 27, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

As a refugee he said he knows what it is like to lose everything and understands the value of compassion - a key attribute of a doctor.

Brimo hopes to "serve humanity" wherever that may be.

"I feel attached to both Syria and the UK. Syria is the sorrow that breaks my heart every single day, the UK is the place that loved me, welcomed me and believed in me - I can't wait to start contributing to the community," he said.

Working as a phlebotomist to support his studies, Brimo said language was the biggest hurdle initially, as he had to shift from studying in Arabic to English.

"When my friends did an hour of work I used to do two, to make up for the language challenge," he said. "I love the English language!" Brimo won praise from London Mayor Sadiq Khan.

"Congratulations to Syrian refugee Dr Tirej Brimo. Londoners are proud you've graduated as a doctor here in our city," Khan tweeted.

Brimo hopes other refugees can be afforded similar opportunities and support.

"Someone once told me, life is not about waiting for the storm to pass, life is about learning how to dance in the rain. I know how difficult it is to go through wars. My message would be, don't give up on yourself don't give up on your dream ... one day you will get there."

(Reporting by Adela Suliman; editing by Astrid Zweynert @azweynert. Please credit the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, property rights, climate change and resilience. Visit http://news.trust.org)

 
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About Our Partner

Thomson Reuters Foundation is the charitable arm of Thomson Reuters, that covers humanitarian news, women's rights, trafficking, corruption and climate change. Visit news.trust.org.

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“My son Lloyd, has serious learning disabilities and I receive a personal budget from my Local Authority to pay for his specialist care. An essential part of that care involves staying over-night. 

Lloyd and our families’ life has been transformed by ‘sleep-in’ support. He gets to live in his own house, making his own choices and be as independent as possible. 

I was alarmed and frightened when I learned back in January that this support could be taken away from him – and even worse that Lloyd and myself could receive a personal demand for £45,000 in back-pay.

Innocent people like Lloyd and our family should not be a target of such severe financial demands.”

Read Shirley’s story to hear how families could be personally liable for devastating back pay demands and sign our petition to #StopSleepInCrisis https://www.mencap.org.uk/blog/stopsleepincrisis-mothers-story

More on Lloyd's story in the Guardian: https://www.theguardian.com/social-care-network/2017/aug/10/disabled-people-back-pay-sleep-in-carers-mencap?CMP=share_btn_tw

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Music Generation Wicklow's final brilliant music summer camp for children will kick off next week - A Samba Drumming Camp, which runs in the Community Centre in Charlesland, Greystones in the Community Centre. 

Classes will take place from Mon 14 to Fri 18 August, from 11.00am to 12.30pm or from 1.30pm to 3.00pm. 

Find out more and book a place by email: chlyouthctr@gmail.com

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