Jump to content
tan_lejos_tan_cerca

The Action Thread Part Two

Recommended Posts

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUG. 14, 2017

7 Things That Happened After Charlottesville That Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity

From solidarity marches to unequivocal denunciations of hate.

Joe McCarthy

By Joe McCarthy

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
ap_17225861692631.jpgBrittney Cain-Conley, lead organizer for Congregate Charlottesville, with hat, gets a hug from a supporter after she addressed the crowd during a vigil on Sunday, Aug. 13, 2017, held at the site where a car plowed into a crowd of people protesting a white nationalist rally on Saturday in Charlottesville, Va.
AP Photo/Steve Helber
 

"They get out of bed every day to hate people and divide our country," Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said in response to the violent white supremacist and neo-nazi rallies over the weekend in Charlottesville that left three people dead and 34 injured.

The governor, like many other politicians and leaders throughout the country, did not hesitate to unequivocally condemn the racist and hateful gathering, reminding everyone that the rallies were made up of people who actively chose to participate and display their bigotry.

That clarity and resolve, along with countless examples of heroism, generosity, and solidarity, have helped the country begin to heal in the aftermath of such a traumatizing event.  

Here are seven other heroic moments following the rally.


1/ Marcus Martin Saved His Fiancee From Oncoming Car

 

When a neo-nazi plowed his car into a group of peaceful protesters, Marcus Martin realized that his fiancée, Marissa Blair, was in the path of destruction and he acted quickly. As he pushed her out of harm’s way, his body was hit by the car. Fortunately, he survived with a broken leg. His selfless act likely saved his Blair’s life.  

Read More: This Is What You Should Do If You See a Muslim Person Being Harassed

“We couldn't have hate groups walking around our city with no peaceful opposition,” Blair told the Daily Mail. “We knew the risk we were taking. But we said they aren't going to do this anymore.”


2/ Heather Heyer Becomes Symbol of Peace and Tolerance

Screen Shot 2017-08-14 at 11.42.43 AM.pngGo Fund Me / Heather Heyer

Heather Heyer, 32, was at the same peaceful protest to promote tolerance and denounce hate when the rampaging car ran her over and killed her.

Heyer was known for her commitment to equality and her generous approach to life.

Her mother was grateful that Heyer will be remembered for her bravery.

“Somehow I almost feel that this is what she was born to be, is a focal point for change. I'm proud that what she was doing was peaceful, she wasn't there fighting with people,” she told Huffington Post. "I'm proud of her. I'm proud of what she did."


3/ Louisville, Kentucky, Announces All Confederate Statues Will Be Removed

 

 


4/ At Least 682 “Solidarity With Charlottesville” Rallies Are Happening

Screen Shot 2017-08-14 at 11.46.31 AM.pngVia Google Maps

The hateful events of the weekend spurred a much larger demonstration of tolerance and commitment to equality.

The social justice group Indivisible shared a map to help people find solidarity events to join put together by more than 60 progressive organizations. So far, at least 682 rallies have been planned.

“This is a moment when we need to demonstrate that we as a nation have the capacity to stand together in the face of hate,” Ben Wikler, the Washington director of MoveOn, a group involved in the protests, told Vox.

Read More: How Two Anti-Muslim Hate Crimes Revealed Incredible Stories of Love

“Just as Trump’s election led to the women’s march, this white supremacist terror is sparking a nationwide outpouring based on the idea that we can build a democracy of shared religions and shared races. This attack is a reminder of the nation’s darkest heritage; the outpouring of solidarity following is a reminder of its best.”


5/ Political Leaders Surrounding Trump Denounce the Terrorism

 

US President Donald Trump was widely excoriated for “whiffing” on his chance to denounce the terrorism of white supremacy, as the Charlottesville mayor said.

But members of Trump’s cabinet unequivocally condemned the acts.

US Attorney General Jeff Sessions said: “You can be sure we will charge and advance the investigation toward the most serious charges that can be brought because this is unequivocally an unacceptable evil attack.”

National Security Advisor H.R. McMaster said: “I think what terrorism is, is the use of violence to incite terror and fear. And, of course, it was terrorism.”

 

Vice President Mike Pence said: “We have no tolerance for hate and violence, white supremacists or neo-Nazis or the KKK.”


6/ Commercial Pressure on White Supremacists and Neo Nazis

 

As footage of the violence in Charlottesville was circulated around social media over the weekend, a vast crowdsourcing campaign began to identify and bring to justice the white supremacists who perpetrated the violence.

AirBnB, meanwhile, has banned people affiliated with Unite the Right, the rally organized by hate groups dedicated to white supremacy because it violates their codes of conduct.


7/ Global Leaders Condemn the White Supremacists and Neo Nazis

 

German Chancellor Angela Merkel called the rally organizers “absolutely repulsive.”

 

 

 

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Citizenship

Aug. 10, 2017

Africa’s migrant crisis is reaching new lows. Read More

Aug. 10, 2017

“Trans people are extraordinary, strong, intelligent, persistent and resilient.” Read More

Aug. 2, 2017

How to de-escalate a hateful situation. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Skip to content
How Jake’s meme is raising thousands for his school in Ghana
7023
CULTURE

How Jake’s meme is raising thousands for his school in Ghana

February 7 2017 | By: GLOBAL CITIZEN

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

This story by Yosola Olorunshola was originally posted on Global Citizen.

jake1.png

Photo credit: Carlos Cortes / Solomon Adufah

Jake, a 5-year-old boy from a small village in Ghana, has inadvertently raised thousands of dollars for his school by becoming an internet sensation — entirely by accident.

With cheeks you’ll never forget and an expression that means business, Jake’s face spawned a meme that has been shared countless times. The image went viral, particularly across Africa, with people sharing hilarious captions imagining what Jake was thinking as he concentrated hard on his page.

jake2.png

Photo credit: NairobiWire

jake2.jpg

Photo credit: NairobiWire

Both Jake and the photographer who took the original image were initially oblivious to the boy’s growing fan base.

Carlos Cortes took the photo while filming a documentary about Ghanaian-born artist Solomon Adufah’s creative project Homeland Ghana.

Adufah now lives in the US, but returned to Ghana to teach art and creative studies in 2015. He posted the photo to his Instagram, and somehow, the internet just could not resist Jake’s face.

Adufah was surprised to hear about the picture’s spread, and was concerned they were making fun of Jake.

“I thought, I’m not going to respond,” he said, in an interview with the BBC. “But then I remember a moment when I thought, what if all these ‘likes’ turned into actual funds to help?”

So he set up a Go Fund Me page to raise funds for Jake’s education and to support other children in the village of Asempanaye. The campaign has raised almost half of its $20,000 (USD) target in less than a week.

“My goal is to secure funds to help support Jake’s tuition from primary school through Secondary school and beyond,” Adufah writes. “Much like Jake, my goal is to support many of the students who are in Jake’s position.”

jake3.jpg

Photo credit: Solomon Adufah

“Those children are in need of proper school uniforms, shoes and sports attire. Due to the lack of consistent electricity in Ghana, it is sometimes difficult for the children to do their homework at night as seen in the picture above. I will provide an alternative generator during power outages.”

The school is also in need of clean sanitary water for the children during school hours, sports equipment, sustainable toilets, and new desks, tables and chairs.

 

The story of Jake’s photo is reminiscent of the “Skeptical Third World Kid” meme that sparked a complex debate on attitudes toward Africa. The image of a Western-looking woman and a young African boy with a look of suspicion on his face, initially triggered ironic lines on perceptions of Africa. But many questioned whether the image was exploitative — using an anonymous child’s face to hash out stereotypes without any concern for his real identity.

But this time, it looks like funny memes can be a force for good — giving Jake 15 minutes of fame and an education that will last a lifetime.

“This money could make a huge difference to the kids,” Adufah told the BBC. “This could be something really positive going forward.”

And if you were wondering what Jake was working so hard on, this might be the answer:

 

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         United States Canada Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER
globalcitizen

AUTHOR

GLOBAL CITIZEN
February 7 2017

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUG. 15, 2017

Zimbabwe Nurse Wins International Award For Her Tuberculosis Research

Her work will save the lives of countless HIV patients diagnosed with TB.

Madison Feser

By Madison Feser

 

  •  
  •  
  •  

“Nursing is often looked down upon and people just think you are there to be the maid of the doctor or do the dirty work,” says Chenai Mathabire. “But teachers made me realize that nurses have a big role to play.”

And she did more than just play her role.

The 35-year-old from Zimbabwe won the 2017 International AIDS Society prize for her research in protecting the lives of HIV patients from tuberculosis.

Read More: Meet Dr. Master, a Tuberculosis Physician With One the Toughest Jobs in the World

After becoming the first nurse in her family, Mathabire began working for Doctors Without Borders in the care and diagnosis of HIV, tuberculosis (TB), pneumonia, and malaria patients throughout Zimbabwe. She also treated gunshot victims in South Sudan.

But her award-winning research would not begin until 2015 when Doctors Without Borders recruited her for a research assignment regarding rapid TB tests.

Global Citizen is dedicated to achieving the Global Goals for Sustainability. You can take action for Global Goal 3, which calls for universal ensuring good health and well-being. You can take action on this issue here.

TB is one of the leading causes of death among HIV patients even though tests can detect TB early.

 

Take Action: Sign A Petition

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 

 

Mathabire and her team conducted research on how easily and efficiently clinics in Malawi and Mozambique could implement rapid TB tests, which were at the time not authorized in the country.

Rapid tests analyze a patient’s urine and provide results within the hour — meaning patients can be diagnosed and begin treatment the same day. This means that low-income people from remote villages are more likely to get treatment because they don’t have to travel back and forth, which is often too expensive.

Mathabire told NPR how one man left the clinic untreated despite his rapid test confirming him for TB, because the detection method was not yet approved by the Ministry of Health, and another type of test showed a negative result.

Read More: 1 Million People With AIDS in Africa Will Die if Trump's Budget Is Enacted, Experts Say

But after Doctors Without Borders published the findings of Mathabire and her team, many clinics and health aid organizations have begun using the rapid TB testing in a way that may convince larger health care systems, like Malawi’s Ministry of Health, to do the same.

The standard coughing test commonly used to detect TB can take days or even months to render results, according to Mathabire’s research. Tragically, the man of Mathabire’s story died before he was able to receive treatment due to inaccurate coughing test results.

Mathabire’s team also found that it only took a few hours to train doctors and nurses to administer the test, and patients were ready to try the new method of TB detection after experiencing so much loss due to late detections.

"Everybody basically knew somebody that had died of HIV [and opportunistic infections] in a terrible way," she told NPR.

With a killer like TB threatening HIV positive people, rapid TB tests are necessary, life-saving medical procedures to which everyone should have access.

And everyone should have access to nurses like Mathabire, whose dedication and insight often mean the difference between life and death.

Madison is an Editorial Intern at Global Citizen. She attends Seton Hall University where she studies Diplomacy and International Relations and writes for The Diplomatic Envoy. With a passion for writing, politics, and justice, Madison aspires to continue working for organizations that use journalism as a force for positive change.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Health

Aug. 14, 2017

The humanitarian crisis is just beginning. Read More

April 19, 2016

A doctor in Gaza is experimenting with bee stings to treat a wide range of ailments. Read More

Aug. 1, 2017

"I always imagine that the babies might become someone important in life, or do something great." Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUG. 15, 2017

11 Quotes That Show How Melinda Gates Is Tackling Extreme Poverty

“Limiting women’s power keeps everyone poor.”

melinda_gates_ap.jpg(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
  •  
  •  
  •  

Today, Melinda Gates celebrates her 53rd birthday. 

Much has changed in her 53 years on earth, especially when it comes to poverty alleviation. Since 1960, the number of people living in extreme poverty has been cut by more than half: from nearly 2 billion to just under 700 million. 

Gates, for her part, has played an outsized role in making that happen. 

 

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, which was founded in 2000, has given more than $40 billion toward the alleviation of extreme poverty, supporting work in all 50 US states and more than 100 countries around the world. 

Take Action: Commonwealth Leaders: Commit to Leveling the Law and Ending Polio and Malaria for Good

Among its numerous projects around the world, the charity has worked with the GAVI alliance to bring life-saving vaccines to millions of children in developing countries, aimed to overhaul the US public education system, and for more than a decade has endeavored to increase access to water and sanitation facilities across the African continent. 

Gates, an outspoken advocate for women and girls around the world, has served not only as a philanthropic donor, but as a role model for young women everywhere. 

Her philanthropic work is surpassed only, perhaps, by her wisdom and eloquence, her ability to distill complex development issues into comprehensible nuggets of wisdom. 

 

In honor of her birthday, here are 10 quotes from Melinda Gates that show how she’s truly a Global Citizen: 

On women & girls:  

1/ “Women truly only get empowered when there’s a collective of them. You get one woman down in a village trying to break the system. She can’t do it at the village level unless she’s got women around her.” — Interview with Wired

2/ “Limiting women’s power keeps everyone poor. Fortunately, as a society becomes better off, a woman’s position in that society improves.” — 2017 Annual Letter

3/ "I’m optimistic about what the next 18 years will bring all of us as these young men grow up to become equal partners in their households, champions for women in workplace and architects of a better, more equitable future for their own sons and daughters.” — “How I Raised a Feminist Son,” Op-Ed in Time Magazine

4/ “You can create all kinds of new tools, but if you’re not moving toward equality, you’re not really changing the world. You’re just rearranging it.” — 2017 Annual Letter

On foreign aid cuts: 

5/ “Far from locking countries in cycles of dependency, smart aid investments actually help countries unlock virtuous cycles of growth.” — CNN Op-Ed

 

6/ “Enabling women to time and space their pregnancies and providing access to treatment and prevention of infectious diseases is lifesaving work. It saves moms’ lives and it saves babies’ lives, and that has long had wide support in the United States..” — Interview with the Guardian

On health: 

7/ “When women are able to time and space their pregnancies, they are more likely to advance their education and earn an income — and they’re more likely to have healthy children.” — 2017 Annual Letter

On education: 

8/ “Kids are falling through the cracks and nobody notices it. That to me is what’s wrong with the school system.” — Interview in Oprah magazine

 

On development: 

9/ “Public advocates are important, which is why I’ve taken on that role. But nothing can take the place of a trusted voice in the community.” — 2017 Annual Letter

10/ “It’s important to remember that behind each data point is a daughter, a mother, a sister — a person with hopes and dreams.” — Interview with Marie Claire

11/ “Optimism is a huge asset. We can always use more of it. But optimism isn’t a belief that things will automatically get better; it’s a conviction that we can make things better. — 2017 Annual Letter

Phineas Rueckert is a writer at Global Citizen. He graduated from Macalester College with a degree in Political Science and International Studies, and spent the past year teaching English in Toulouse, France. He is originally from Brooklyn, New York.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Citizenship

Aug. 14, 2017

From solidarity marches to unequivocal denunciations of hate. Read More

Aug. 10, 2017

Africa’s migrant crisis is reaching new lows. Read More

Aug. 10, 2017

“Trans people are extraordinary, strong, intelligent, persistent and resilient.” Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 
Skip to content
“Strong women cannot be shaken”: South Sudan’s refugee sisterhood
1532
REFUGEES

“Strong women cannot be shaken”: South Sudan’s refugee sisterhood

March 14 2017 | By: REFUGEES DEEPLY

 
   

This piece, written by Angela Wells with photos by Rachel Reed, is part of a reporting partnership between ONE and Refugees Deeply.

BOROLI SETTLEMENT, UGANDA – Opia Joyce is raising 14 children, both her own and those of her dead brother. She is also the leader of a community group of three dozen women, all South Sudanese refugees in Uganda like herself.

She counsels them when they are in distress, advocates on their behalf to humanitarian groups working with refugees in Uganda and finds foster parents for abandoned children.

Joyce is a women’s affairs leader in Boroli, one of 18 refugee settlements in Uganda’s Adjumani district. She was born in South Sudan, but her father brought the family to Uganda shortly after she was born to prevent her from having a childhood overshadowed by war. She stayed in Uganda for 21 years before going home to South Sudan in 2011. But after two years, when peace did not last, Joyce returned to Uganda.

In January last year, Joyce was appointed by women in the camp to lead the community group. “They chose me because they’ve seen that I have so many children in the house and I’m able to take care of them,” Joyce said. “When I speak to them, it makes a lot of sense because of the responsibility I have at home.”

Politically motivated conflict that erupted in December 2013 caused the bulk of refugees to flee South Sudan in recent years. Such reports have been confirmed by the United Nations, with warnings of a Rwanda-type genocide in the making.

Nearly 700,000 South Sudanese have fled to neighboring Uganda in the past three years. The majority are women and children.

Most of them lost the men in their lives to war – the husbands, fathers or brothers who traditionally provide for families. The women are now joining together to build a different kind of support system, fighting for peace instead of power or resources.

Throughout Uganda’s refugee settlements, women leaders volunteer in makeshift schools, teaching children the alphabet under trees for free. They share food with their neighbors, care for each other’s children and lead focus groups to hear grievances and then bring them to NGOs.

1.-Opia-Joyce-14-kids-Munuki-1024x683.jp

In addition to raising 14 children, Opia Joyce is the women’s affairs leader in Boroli.

“Women bring peace among themselves. If you have a sick neighbor you take [her] to the hospital, or even if she is not sick, you go greet [her] and ask how [she] slept. If a group meeting is planned, then we all go together. If there’s a problem at your neighbor’s place, you must go and help resolve it. This is what brings peace among women,” said Susan Agull, a South Sudanese refugee who fled to northern Uganda.

Uganda is one of the most welcoming countries in the world for refugees, allowing refugees to settle on donated land and enjoy employment rights and freedom of movement.

“We see the human worth of refugees,” said a Ugandan official from the Office of the Prime Minister in Adjumani district. “Many of us were refugees ourselves [during Uganda’s civil war] so we will do whatever is humanly possible to help.”

But the large numbers arriving from South Sudan are testing the limits of what is possible. Uganda’s refugee policy is designed to help refugees become self-reliant, but in reality many are hungry and so are their children. Drought during the last growing season led to failed harvests, and food rations last year were cut in half for many refugees. More people keep arriving in Uganda while calls for funding from the international community go unanswered.

“Hunger is our biggest problem,” Fatuma Nasu, a South Sudanese refugee in her 50s, told a meeting of Joyce’s community group in Boroli last November. “If your family has 10 people, you will receive enough food for six. We received rations just three days ago and [mine] are already gone. Women are in the worst situation. We do not have any power.”

Women often now rely on each other more than they can on foreign aid or humanitarian support.

  • 14. Susan Agull, 6 kids, Juba
Alice Yangi from Eastern Equatoria has 12 children. "Women can bring peace in this world by educating those who are ignorant about peace. If you know what peace is, you go and tell others how peace can change someone’s life.". Susan Agull from Juba has six children. “Women bring peace among themselves.”.Current SlideCurrent Slide Zaria Zubair is from South Kordofan. “Women can change the world through respect. If you have personal respect, the community respects you and it proceeds to the whole world. Then it’s also how we conduct ourselves in the community. Because once the community is positive about you, everything will be positive.”.Current Slide Mary Akwer from Jonglei has ten children. “If there’s no peace in your heart, it means you won’t stay in peace. There must be peace in your heart.”.Current Slide Akway from Jonglei has six children. “When women are seated together and you have something in your hand, you must divide it among yourselves. And then later when a sister of yours gets something she will also share with you like you shared with her. That is how peace comes among people who are staying in one place.”.Current Slide Dak Nyabol from Malakal has nine children. “If women want to become good in this world, just like we are seated as neighbors, let us love each other. Even for example, a Ugandan woman is my neighbor, I would love her like my sister. And we respect each other. That is what brings peace.”.Current Slide Atior Sham from Jonglei has seven children. “What brings peace amongst women – when the children of your neighbor are hungry, you give them something to eat just as you give to your children. You take care of your neighbors’ children just like your own children, don’t differentiate … Good deeds are the ones that bring peace.”.Current Slide Rose Poni from Lowa has three children. "Women, they bring a lot of change in this world. Give back to your grandchildren so they also can bring peace to the family and the community. Take care of the sick, whether it’s a relative or not, and take her to the nearby health center to get treatment.”.Current Slide Awadia Julu from Jonglei has nine children. “A woman, if she is determined to bring peace, she will start it in the house, and once she goes outside she will spread peace to other people. If a woman lives with love, peace will come. You love your neighbor as yourself. You will love your other sister like you love yourself. If your sister does not have something and you have it, you take it and give it to your sister. This is how love and peace starts.”.Current Slide Previous Slide◀︎Next Slide▶︎

“These women have energy. They’re the ones who take all responsibility of the house,” Joyce said. “They work together, which is good because it increases their knowledge. Even if you do not have experience in something, when you gather together [you learn] something that you didn’t know.”

Joyce is called on to support women coping with the harrowing fallout of the war and their subsequent displacement. She says one woman committed suicide in Boroli and another two women attempted to hang themselves in recent months. Some widows give in to pressure to marry again, but, according to Joyce, their new husbands do not treat them well and refuse to take care of their children.

“Sometimes women feel their only option is to go home to the war and die there because of the hardships here,” she added.

In late February, the U.N. declared a famine in parts of South Sudan, and refugee women and their families continue to travel to Uganda in an effort to survive.

Joyce’s work is to band the women together and help them persevere, despite food ration cuts and limited aid. “Women who are strong, cannot be shaken,” Joyce said. “The good thing is that God created me as a woman.”

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         United States Canada Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER
refugeesdeeply

AUTHOR

REFUGEES DEEPLY
March 14 2017

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Susan Agull from Juba has six children. “Women bring peace among themselves.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUG. 15, 2017

The Haunting Reason Why Statues of Women Are Sitting on Buses in South Korea

The statues commemorate the suffering of Korea’s “comfort women” in WWII.

Daniele Selby

By Daniele Selby

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

south_korea_comfort_women_statue.jpg
  •  
  •  
  •  

On five buses running through South Korea, statues of young girls occupy seats. They are dressed in traditional clothing and birds sit on their shoulders. 

The statues are a powerful reminder of a painful part of South Korea’s past: “comfort women” were forced into sex slavery by Japanese soldiers during World War II. They were installed Monday, on the eve of South Korea’s anniversary of its liberation from Japanese occupation. 

 

 

An estimated 200,000 women were used as sex slaves by Japanese forces, including women in Korea, China, and the Philippines. 

Only 37 “comfort women” survive in South Korea today and the last of the 24 Chinese womenwho sued the Japanese government for their enslavement died at age 90 yesterday; however, the pain of the war crimes committed persists and the path forward continues to be a point of contention in South Korean and Japanese political relations.

The statues were created by a private bus company and will ride the buses until late September. Though the installation is not affiliated with the government, the mayor of Seoul rode with one of the statues yesterday morning calling it an “opportunity to pay tribute to the victims.”

 

 

On Monday, 500 statues of “comfort women” were also erected in central Seoul to commemorate Kim Hak-soon’s 1991 testimony against the abuses of comfort women, the first public testimony by a former “comfort woman” in South Korea.

Read more: One-Third of Trafficked Humans Are Kids, UN Says

Lim has clarified that his goal is not to make Japanese people feel uncomfortable, but rather to ensure that this piece of history and suffering is not forgotten. The buses carrying the statues pass the Japanese embassy in Seoul and will play the traditional folk song “Arirang” as they pass by.

These statues are not the first of their kind. A similar statue, created by artists Kim Seo-Kyung and Kim Eung-Sung, appeared outside the Japanese embassy in Seoul in 2011, prompting outrage from the Japanese government.

 

 

In 2015, the neighboring countries reached an agreement over the painful “comfort women” issue in which Japan pledged to give 1 billion yen ($8.3 million) to a fund for survivors. However, many felt the arrangement did not hold the Japanese government to a high enough standard of accountability. 

Read more: Why the Comfort Women Issue Isn’t Completely Resolved

In January, a replica of this statue was installed outside the Japanese embassy in Busan, South Korea, in protest of the inadequate agreement. In response, Japan recalled two diplomats and hit pause on its economic talks with South Korea. The countries have since resumed talks over common concerns such as North Korea, agreeing to discuss the “comfort women” conflict separately.

 

 

"The reality is the majority of our people cannot emotionally accept the comfort women agreement," South Korean President Moon Jae-in has told Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

The bus statues are supported by Lim Jin Wook, the president of the transportation company on whose buses they appear, but are not affiliated with the government. However, the mayor of Seoul rode with one of the statues in the morning calling it an “opportunity to pay tribute to the victims.”

On Monday, 500 statues of “comfort women” were also erected in central Seoul to commemorate Kim Hak-soon’s 1991 testimony against the abuses of comfort women, the first public testimony by a former “comfort woman” in South Korea.

Read more: One-Third of Trafficked Humans Are Kids, UN Says

Lim has clarified that his goal is not to make Japanese people feel uncomfortable, but rather to ensure that this piece of history and suffering is not forgotten. The buses carrying the statues pass the Japanese embassy in Seoul and will play the traditional folk song “Arirang” as they pass by.

 

The song has an emotional history and is sometimes called the unofficial anthem of Korea. It represents “all the joys and sorrows in the history and lives of Koreans,” according to the National Folk Museum of Korea, much like the “comfort women” statues—their fists clenched in pain and resilience, birds symbolizing peace and freedom on their shoulders.

Global Citizen campaigns to achieve the Global Goals, including Global Goal No. 5, toward gender equality. You can take action here to help end gender inequality and see justice for girls forced into sex slavery by ISIS.

Daniele is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She believes that education and the equal provision of human rights will empower change. She studied music and psychology at Vassar before earning her Masters of International Affairs at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Daniele brings with her an unhealthy love of chili and chocolate, and a small, fluffy dog from the Little Red Dot (Singapore) to the Big Apple.

  •  
  •  
  •  
chime-logo_container.jpg
About Our Partner

CHIME FOR CHANGE is a global campaign founded by Gucci in 2013 to convene, unite and strengthen the voices speaking out for girls and women around the world. The campaign uses innovative approaches to promote gender equality. Co-founded by Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Salma Hayek Pinault, CHIME FOR CHANGE works with a coalition of partner organizations, including the Kering Foundation, Facebook, and Hearst Magazines.

Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Girls & Women

Dec. 19, 2016

When I was a little girl in my native Belgium, I was put to work as a sex slave. Read More

Aug. 14, 2017

Why would a child need to be modest? Read More

Aug. 9, 2016

Faced with a starving family, her father gave away his 6-year-old daughter in exchange for food. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUG. 15, 2017

Bill Gates Just Donated Roughly $4,600,000,000 to Charity

That brings his grand total to over $35 billion since 1994.

ap_17128846109365_bill_gates_ap_photo_nati_harnik.jpgAP Photo/Nati Harnik
  •  
  •  
  •  

Bill Gates is at it again. The richest man in the world is giving back to the poorest among us.

On Tuesday, Gates donated 64 million Microsoft Corp. stock shares worth an estimated $4.6 billion, Bloomberg reported. The donation’s recipient was not specified in Bloomberg’s report, which was based off a Securities & Exchange Commission filing, but the expectation is that the donation will go to the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. 

Gates’s donation was the largest charitable donation of 2017, and the philanthropist’s largest since 2000, when he donated over $5 billion to his foundation. Overall, Bill and his wife Melinda Gates have donated more than $35 billion to charity since 1994, according to Bloomberg. 

 

via GIPHY

Take Action: Take Action to #StopTheCuts to the US Foreign Aid Budget

The Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, which employs more than 1,400 people worldwide, has given more than $40 million in grants to developing countries and within the United States, according to the Foundation’s website

The foundation has joined the fight against preventable diseases, donating more than $2 million to organizations that work to reduce malaria and $1.6 billion to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. It supports women around the world through family planning and aims to distribute contraceptive information, services, and supplies to 120 million women by 2020

Global Citizen campaigns to suppor thte Global Fund's efforts as well as the She Decides campaign, which is helping to close the funding gap for women's health around the world after US Presidnet Trump pulled his funding with the Global Gag Rule.  

 

Read More: After Big Budget Cuts, Bill Gates Meets With Donald Trump to Discuss Foreign Aid

Domestically, the foundation has been active in creating pathways for students to achieve a K-12 education.  

Both Bill and Melinda have also been on the front lines of the fight against foreign aid budget cuts proposed by the Trump administration. In March, Gates spoke with Trump to advocate against foreign aid cuts, with a Gates Foundation spokesperson saying beforehand that the organization was “deeply troubled” with the proposed cuts. 

For now, Gates, who still remains the richest person in the world, is holding up his end of the bargain as one of the world’s 170 Giving Pledge members, who promise to donate more than half of their money to charity. 

Keep up the good work, Bill! 

 

Take Action: Tweet Now

 
 
 
2 points

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 

 

Phineas Rueckert is a writer at Global Citizen. He graduated from Macalester College with a degree in Political Science and International Studies, and spent the past year teaching English in Toulouse, France. He is originally from Brooklyn, New York.

  •  
  •  
  •  
Sign up to receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.
 
Sign up

What's Trending In Finance & Innovation

April 29, 2015

Plus one extra one that outranks them all. Read More

Aug. 9, 2017

Artists, entrepreneurs and free tickets. Read More

 

June 12, 2013

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
This site uses cookies to provide you with the best experience. Read more.
×

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AUG. 15, 2017

4 Dutch Airports to Become 100% Renewable By Next Year, in Big Win for the Planet

The Netherlands’ four airports consume the amount of energy equivalent to that of 60,000 households.

Phineas Rueckert
  •  
  •  
  •  
1200px-amsterdam_schiphol_airport_entrance.jpgWikimedia Commons/Cjh1452000
 

It’s well-documented that airplanes contribute heftily to global carbon dioxide emissions. But what about airports? 

From their fluorescent lighting to their perpetually-moving walkways, airports themselves also use large amounts of energy. 

Amsterdam’s Schiphol Airport, the world’s 12th busiest airport, which receives more than 60 million people each year, is no exception. In a given year, the airport uses about about 175 million Kilowatt hours of energy, or the equivalent of 50,000 households. 

Take Action: Educating Girls Strengthens the Global Fight Against Climate Change

But now, Schiphol, along with three other Dutch airports, is launching a ~ pilot ~ program to reduce its environmental footprint. 

 

These four airports — Schiphol, Rotterdam The Hague Airport, Eindhoven Airport and Lelystad Airport — will run exclusively on renewable energy produced in the Netherlands beginning Jan. 1, 2018, the Royal Schiphol Group announced in a statement Tuesday

“For our new energy contract, we wanted nothing but sustainable power generated in the Netherlands,” Jos Nijhuis, President and CEO of Royal Schiphol Group, said in the statements. “After all, one thing is certain: aviation can and must be made more sustainable.” 

The renewable energy will be delivered through Eneco Group, a sustainable energy company, who signed off on a 15-year contract with Royal Schiphol Group. 

By 2020, all of the energy will come from newly-build Dutch wind farms. Until then, the energy will come through a combination of newly-built wind farms, such as one in the municipality of Vianen, and already-existing sources of renewable energy within the country, the group said.

 

“We feel that the most important elements of this collaboration with Eneco are that all the Schiphol Group airports are involved and that additional sustainable energy sources will be developed in the Netherlands,” Nijhuis said. “This will allow our airports to increase their sustainability and offer economic benefits.”

Read More: These Hybrid-Electric Planes Are Revolutionizing the Future of Air Travel

When it comes to renewable energy, the Netherlands is charting a bold path. The country plans to completely eliminate greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 and to have 16% of its energy produced through sustainable sources by 2023, according to CNBC

In June, the Netherlands announced that 100% of its trains now run on renewable energy, a full year earlier than government officials had previously announced it would. 

The Global Goals for Sustainable Development enshrine affordable and clean energy as one of 17 goals for eliminating extreme poverty. 

Since 1990, the world’s output of carbon dioxide has been cut by nearly half thanks to advances in clean energy, but the proportion of carbon emissions from air travel is expected to rise “significantly” as “the volume of air travel is increasing much faster than gains in flight fuel efficiency,” according to the New York Times

Read More: South Africa Plans to Have Six Solar-Powered Airports by End of Year

Making airports more energy efficient is a good way to start addressing air travel’s immense, and growing, carbon footprint. 

The Netherlands is not the first country to embrace sustainability in airports. 

At George Airport in South Africa, 41% of the airport’s energy consumption comes from solar energy, according to NACO, an airport planning and design firm. Worldwide, more than 100 airports produce at least some of their energy from solar power. 

Industry leaders are increasingly recognizing not only the environmental, but also the economic benefits of transitioning to clean energy. 

 

“For the energy transition, it is crucial for the business sector – which is by far the largest energy consumer – to embrace sustainability,” Jeroen de Haas, CEO of Eneco Group said. 

As for airports’ primary export — planes? They too are slowly moving in the direction of sustainability. 

Hybrid-electric and solar-powered planes could provide an even greater lift for sustainability. 

Phineas Rueckert is a writer at Global Citizen. He graduated from Macalester College with a degree in Political Science and International Studies, and spent the past year teaching English in Toulouse, France. He is originally from Brooklyn, New York.

 

Via Global Citizen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...