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AUG. 17, 2017

These 10 Iconic Designs Show How Creativity Will Save the World

They sum up 2017 so far.

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From “PussyHats” to the Refugee Flag, 2017 has shown that images and objects have serious horsepower in activism and protest across the world. 

Now, the Design Museum in London has released a 60-strong list of nominations for this year’sBeazley Design Awards and, in its 10th year, it’s proving to be more politically charged than ever. 

In an age of unrest and resistance, designers have been looking to the news for inspiration, producing innovative products to help make the world a better place. 

READ MORE: 9 Innovations That Show Clean Energy Can Look Good and Save the Environment, Too

“There’s a lot of very tough stuff in there. It feels like there’s a particular weight on this year’s exhibition,” Glenn Adamson, curator of the Design Museum’s award nominee exhibition, told CNN

“But it’s great to show how design can make a difference.”

Global Citizen campaigns to achieve the Global Goals, including Global Goal No.9 for Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure. You can take action here 

Here are 10 of the nominees from across the design categories — products, transport, graphics, fashion, digital, and architecture — that sum up the best and the worst of 2017 so far.

 

1. The PussyHat

 

From an innocent knitting pattern to a global phenomenon, the PussyHat hit off in a big way. Designers Krista Suh and Jayna Zweiman posted their knitting pattern for a hat with cat ears, following President Trump’s remarks about grabbing women "by the pussy."

By the day after the president’s inauguration , women across the world were sporting one, and it quickly became “a symbol of support and solidarity for women’s rights and political resistance,” according to the Design Museum. 

 

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2. Upcycling the Oceans

The Upcycling the Oceans project, by Ecoalf, aims to remove the marine waste from the bottom of the Mediterranean Sea, and use it to create a new 100% recycled material. 

Recycling rubbish from the oceans is proving to be a popular theme of this year, with Adidas also jumping on the bandwagon to create an “ ocean shoe ,” among other items 

Another great product on the list making use of environmental problem is AIR-INK, by Graviky Labs — the first commercially available ink made from air pollution. 

 

3. Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture 

 

This museum in Washington D.C., by Adjaye Associates, is the culmination of a decades-long struggle to recognise the importance of the black community in the social fabric of American life.

Inaugurated by President Obama in September 2016, it houses galleries and theatre space, and resonates deeply with America’s “longstanding African heritage.” 

READ MORE: How This 4-Ingredient Protein Could End Global Hunger Once and For All

 

4. ‘Finding Her’

This poster campaign, by Japanese agency IC4 Design, was used by the UN to highlight the lack of women in the workplace in Egypt — where just 23% of the workforce is female. It focusses particularly on male-dominated industries: politics, science, and technology.

The “Where’s Wally” style poster challenges its viewers to find a woman, with a caption: “Finding women in technology shouldn’t be this hard.” 

While we’re on the subject, Emojis of professional women, has also been nominated for an award. Bearing in mind women under 30 are the most frequent users of emojis, it’s about time we saw the arrival of the cartoon female doctors, teachers and builders 

 

5. Campaign for Remain

Well, it wouldn’t be 2017 without some mention of Brexit, would it? Wolfgang Tillmans’ series of posters, T-shirt designs, and campaign images urged Britons to vote to remain in the EU. The designs were distributed by Tillmans, but were also available to download for free on his website. 

It targeted young voters in particular, with slogans such as “Say you’re in if you’re in.” 

 

6. Refugee Nation Flag 

Featuring a thin, black stripe across an orange background, the flag for the first-ever Olympic Refugee Team was, heartbreakingly, inspired by a lifejacket.

The flag’s Syrian designer, Yara Said, was herself displaced and had to come to Europe on a boat — a journey that killed 3,500 people last year alone. 

READ MORE: India’s New Roads Are Made With Recycled Plastic

 

7. Nike’s Sporting Hijab 

Nike Pro Hijab

The Nike Pro Hijab , which is set for release in spring 2018, will finally give Muslim female athletes the chance to pursue their ambitions with compromising their religious beliefs. 

According to Nike, the impetus of the sporting hijab can be traced “to an ongoing cultural shift that has seen more women than ever embracing sport.” 

 

8. Saydnaya: Inside a Syrian Torture Prison 

A harrowing interactive 3D installation, this recreates Saydnaya, a Syrian torture prison near Damascus. It was created, by Forensic Architecture and Amnesty International, through the memories and descriptions of people who survived the prison, as part of a campaign to allow independent monitoring of detention centres. 

READ MORE: This High-Tech Bangle Alerts Pregnant Women in South Asia to Toxic Fumes

 

9. Avy Search and Rescue Drone 

The overall winner of the Beazley Design Award for 2016, was Ikea’s flat-pack refugee shelter. And this year the push to create innovations that will save the lives of, or relieve conditions for, refugees struggling to reach Europe is just as strong. 

The Avy Search and Rescue Drone is designed to help refugee boats crossing the Mediterranean. It’s capable of flying long distances, of detecting vessels, and of dropping life jackets, buoys, food supplies, medication, and communication devices. 

Along the same lines, Refugee Text is also nominated. It’s an SMS service that provides refugees with practical information and live updates on policy changes. 

 

10. Lending Library of Protest Banners 

Artist Aram Han Sifuentes began making protest banners for social justice in her Chicago apartment, following the 2016 presidential elections. Now, she has created a space to teach people how to make their own banners. 

“Banners are a way for me to resist what is happening in the United States and in the world. It is a way to put my voice out there and not stay silent,” said Sifuentes .

 

Nominations for the Beazley Designs of the Year will be on display at the Design Museum in London from October 18. A winner will be selected in each category and the overall winner will be announced on January 25 2018. 

Imogen is content writer & editor at Global Citizen UK. A former global news journalist, Imogen has been flitting from Australia to Spain to India since graduating from the University of Warwick. She's also trying to read all the Booker Prize winners, so wish her luck because there are loads.

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Tonight our founder and Voluntary CEO, Adi Roche, will attend the very special 'Rose Ball' as part of the Rose of Tralee International Festival. Tomorrow night, a fun-filled parade will line the streets of beautiful Tralee, which Adi will attend and welcomes all past and future Roses to walk with CCI and our Tralee Outeach Group.

A special message of 'Good Luck' to the Kentucky Rose of Tralee, Martha Mortell, whose parents were stalwart volunteer before their move to the USA.

The Rose of Tralee has been a powerful force of change and good and we would like to wish everyone at the festival the best of luck.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0TWQTVPk_Q

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Music Generation
 

WHAT'S HAPPENING

My Department would like to thank U2 and The Ireland Funds for their philanthropic donation which has seed funded this remarkable initiative, and to also thank the Local Music Education Partnerships who have provided, and will continue to provide, 50% funding to ensure its success into the future.
- Jan O’Sullivan TD, Minister for Education and Skills

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17/08/2017

Opportunities for Brass Musicians at Music Generation Cork City

Opportunities for Brass Musicians at Music Generation Cork City

In partnership with Barrack Street Band, Music Generation Cork City runs a dynamic brass, wind and percussion programme in schools and youth settings throughout Cork City, offering group instrumental learning, musicianship, and ensemble participation from beginner to advanced, in school and community concert bands. In addition, this holistic community music education programme offers exciting annual opportunities for musical learning including Summer Band Camps, large-scale improvisatory projects such as Bold as Brass 2015, and the collaborative residential intensive Brass Off, as part of the national Music Generation network.

Music Generation Cork City is currently seeking brass musicians who are interested in becoming part of this youth music phenomenon, to support the next generation of brass musicians in Cork City and beyond.

Tutors are required in Trumpet, Cornet, Tenor Horn, Baritone, Euphonium, Trombone, Tuba and French Horn. Suitably qualified candidates are invited to submit a CV to musicgencorkcity@corketb.ie.

Ideal candidates will have appropriate qualifications in music and/or music teaching, and should demonstrate a high degree of relevant skills and experience in musical performance and teaching. Experience in group teaching and working within community concert band settings would be desirable, in particular working with training, junior and youth bands.

A high degree of motivation, flexibility and commitment to facilitating high quality, innovative music learning within community settings is essential.  

For further details please email: aida.whooley@corketb.ie

The closing date for receipt of applications for is 5pm, August 30th 2017. A selection process and interviews will be held in early September.

For more information about Music Generation Cork City programmes and events contact:

Mags O’Sullivan, Coordinator, Music Generation Cork City
Music Generation Cork City, Cork Education and Training Board, 21 Lavitt's Quay, Cork City

T: +353 021 4907186
E: musicgencorkcity@corketb.ie
musicgenerationcorkcity.com

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Ireland's National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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© Music Generation DAC. All Rights Reserved. Registered in Ireland No. 491331. Charity Reg. No. CHY 19679.
NCH Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2. Telephone: +353 1 4758454

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356
CULTURE

This is how Nelson Mandela’s legacy continues to inspire the world

18 July 2017 2:18PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

By Megan Gieske 

“What counts in life is not the mere fact that we have lived. It is what difference we have made to the lives of others that will determine the significance of the life we lead.” – Nelson Mandela

Every year on July 18th, people across the globe celebrate Nelson Mandela’s birthday and contributions to the world by spending 67 minutes — representing the 67 years he fought for human rights during his lifetime — making a difference in the lives of others.

Mandela began campaigning for the rights of all South Africans in 1942 and continued the fight as a human rights lawyer and, later, as a prisoner for freedom on Robben Island. He went on to become an international peacemaker and the first democratically elected president of South Africa.

DSC_0582.jpgHis life has been an inspiration to the world. The Nelson Mandela Foundation asks that we “Take action. Inspire change.” — and people are taking the call to heart. Here’s how communities are celebrating Mandela Day this year:

South Africa
Family and friends gather together and look back on what has been done and forward to what will be done, making every day a Nelson Mandela Day.

Gugulethu, South Africa
Ntombi brings the spirit of Nelson Mandela to her community by starting gardens in people’s homes, educating students on proper nutrition, and sharing with visitors to her country the abundance of Africa. She says, “If you ever [need] joy in your life, give without expecting any returns. The joy of other people is fulfilling to the heart.”

DSC_0099.jpgLanga, South Africa
Siviwe says, “When you think you have nothing to give that is when you should give.” He is celebrating his birthday, July 18th, along with Nelson Mandela by bringing volunteers to paint colourful murals on the dark grey walls of local townships and bringing educational “iThuba” or opportunities in Xhosa to the underprivileged schools.

Accra, Ghana
Students put on a drama performance on the fight for freedom in South Africa.

Senegal_Graffiti_30042015_RicciShryock-2Yaounde, Cameroon
Secondary school students watch an education film on becoming “Mandela’s friends” by inspiring change in their community.

Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Donation ceremonies were held for orphanages to have food, medicine, and school supplies.
1103122-wingard-malawi-0231-1024x683.jpg
Jakarta, Indonesia

Female leaders gather to host a summit on gender equality.

Windhoek, Namibia
Girls at a Muay Thai club studied self-defense and encouraged themselves to help the world find solutions to end violence against women and girls and protect human rights.

Here are a few ways you can give back this Nelson Mandela Day:

  • Learn more about Nelson Mandela and his mission by watching Nelson Mandela’s Life Story with friends
  • Inspire understanding and community by getting to know someone from another culture or background
  • Join us and support girls’ education

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GUEST BLOGGER
18 July 2017 2:18PM UTC

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What we don’t know about refugees and humanitarian aid
224
REFUGEES

What we don’t know about refugees and humanitarian aid

26 June 2017 3:31PM UTC | By: GALEN ENGLUND

 
   

According to the UNHCR, at least 65 million people around the world have been forced to flee their homes and become refugees or internally displaced.

But like many of the numbers about migration and displacement, that headline stat comes with some caveats. For starters, 65 million is probably a serious understatement of how many refugees and internally displaced persons live around the world.

dadaab4.png

A group of refugees perform a traditional dance in the Dadaab camp in Kenya. (Photo credit: ONE)

Here at ONE, we rely on data to make the case for getting more resources to those in need. To do our best work, we have to understand just how many people have fled from violence and disasters, what they most need, and what money is being sent to help. Backing up advocacy with strong data that proves the impact of assistance on human security is a necessity—especially these days.

Sadly, the state of humanitarian data today is lacklustre at best. Critical sets of data to answer basic questions are in bad shape. Numbers of how many people are displaced can be found at a macro (country) level, but are often inaccessible at a micro (province or smaller) level. Even those estimates likely miss likely entire displaced groups: Think of women who flee domestic abuse to live with their families, the thousands in Central America forced away by drug violence, and longstanding internally displaced groups that governments don’t want to acknowledge.

Different organisations collect information in different ways, and often don’t share it with each other. A lack of transparency and detailed reporting by donor agencies makes tracing the “last mile” of funding at the local level nearly impossible. Last year, donors and humanitarian agencies pledged at the World Humanitarian Summit to improve transparency. But there’s a long way to go.

Movement_Refugee_Sudan-1024x512.jpg

A screenshot of our new tool, MOVEMENT.

That’s why we created a new platform – MOVEMENT – which helps bring together available data in one place, while at the same time shining a light on the major gaps and discrepancies in refugee data. For example, when we tried to get data to display in MOVEMENT on what assistance that refugees and displaced people most need, we had to manually take numbers from 67 different reports across 30 humanitarian appeals and make a whole new database. From those, we found 356 differently worded metrics to describe people’s needs—sometimes a number would be for shelters, another time for building camps, and another time for building camps and providing other material support. We then had to distill as many of those as possible into similar sets, so we could show a comparable picture of needs between countries. That’s an awful lot of work for something that could be automated.

Happily, there are a lot of smart people working to address these crucial gaps. UN OCHA and others are improving their data systems — and we’re cheering them on.

A few steps need to happen sooner rather than later:

  • Data on displaced people needs to be collected in a more standardized format across organisations and countries, so it can be comparable.
  • There need to be investments in data collection and reporting systems so that data can be published in as real time as possible.
  • There need to be platforms for displaced people to directly express what they need and whether those needs are being met.
  • Donors should report in detail where aid money goes, all the way to the final destination, and do so through open data standards like UN OCHA’s Financial Tracking Service, the , and, when sensible, the International Aid Transparency Initiative (IATI).
Kakuma-1024x683.jpg

Kakuma Refugee Camp. (Photo credit: Katie G. Nelson)

In the long term, quality humanitarian and displacement data can actually save lives. Amazing things can be built with better data: early warning systems that predict refugee flight paths from conflicts or disasters; mobile apps for improving assistance programs that allow refugees and displaced persons to review how aid actually meets their needs; and tracking systems with block chain ledger tech that can cut down on corruption and make sure money gets to those who need it most.

Today, people are dying because of what the humanitarian aid sector doesn’t know. We must support and build on data improvements that are already underway, and push for innovation in new initiatives.

Want to learn more? Read our data brief, MOVEMENT: Minding the data gaps around displacement, funding, and humanitarian needs.

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AUTHOR

GALEN ENGLUND
26 June 2017 3:31PM UTC

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We’re like a family"

Sinead O’Halloran, cello (2011)
fun_pics_9-563x215.jpg

In October 2017 our audition panel will travel around the country, hearing the best young musicians in Ireland. Musicians can apply online via the 'Apply' link below. Candidates must download and prepare the audition excerpts which are available below. 2017 audition dates are as follows:

Friday October 13 (evening): Belfast | Saturday October 14: Dublin | Sunday October 15: Dublin | Friday October 20 (evening): Cork | Saturday October 21: Cork | Sunday October 22: Galway

Leadership auditions will take place on the evening of Sunday October 15th in Dublin. Exact locations will be emailed to you in the last week of September, when audition times are allocated. Applicants must have reached their 12th birthday by 1st September 2017 and must not have reached their 19th birthday by 1st August 2018. If you are a first-time applicant, you can sign up to participate in a free audition training workshop. Just tick the relevent box during your application. Closing date for applications is 15/09/17.

NYOI audition excerpts 2017

Apply

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7 barriers to girls’ education you need to know about
5709
EDUCATION

7 barriers to girls’ education you need to know about

5 March 2017 6:02PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

 
 
   

The evidence that educating girls creates healthier, wealthier, fairer, and more stable communities is overwhelming—so why isn’t every girl getting a quality education? The barriers, particularly for girls in the poorest countries, are wide-ranging and complex but these are some of the most challenging:

Cost

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The cost of supplies can limit girls access to education.

Even in areas where school fees are non-existent, there’s still a price to pay. Students are often required to buy uniforms, transportation, and supplies, like textbooks, pens, and notebooks, not to mention the indirect costs such as loss of potential income from missed labour opportunities or contributions around the home.

Violence and Security

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In some regions, parents don’t allow their daughters to attend school, but it isn’t necessarily because they don’t want them to be educated. Sometimes parents keep their children home because the commute to and from school is unsafe and the risk of attacks on girls’ schools is a serious concern.

Conflict and Emergency Situations

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Women gather to collect aid at the Dar es Salaam refugee camp in Chad, close to the border to Niger. (Photo credit: Ashley Hamer)

In conflict-affected countries, education is not always accessible. As a result, girls in these countries are almost 2.5 times more likely to be out of school than girls living in countries not affected by conflict.

Teaching and School Climate

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Boys participating in a school science experiment.

The perpetuation of traditional gender norms can result in girls being excluded from learning important subjects like science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Teaching must be inclusive and enable girls to learn the same lessons as their male counterparts.

Access to Resources

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A girl learning how to code at Ghana Code Club. (Photo source: Facebook.)

Where resources don’t address girls’ needs, it can limit their learning. Providing a wide range of resources that do address girls’ needs—such as textbooks, teaching guides, and the internet—all help ensure girls are both in school and learning.

Cultural Norms and Expectations

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Constance Amusugut faced obstacles to thriving at school after she had a child at 15.

Household duties, the care of family members, early marriage, and early childbirth are all factors that contribute to girls missing out on an education. In cultures where these expectations are the norm, girls’ education may be lower on a family’s list of priorities.

Poor Infrastructure

valentine.jpgOvercrowded classrooms and rundown schools provide students with a less-than-quality learning environment. Schools that don’t provide students with access to separate toilets, washing areas, and sanitary products can discourage girls who are menstruating from attending classes.

To learn more about what can be done to fight for girls’ education, read our new report ‘Poverty is Sexist: Why educating every girl is good for everyone‘.

Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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