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Music Generation
 

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Music Generation truly is an innovative and pioneering partnership model, located in 12 counties, which has significantly progressed the development of infrastructure for increased access to performance music education for children and young people.
- The Minister for Education and Skills, 2016

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17/08/2017

Opportunities for Brass Musicians at Music Generation Cork City

Opportunities for Brass Musicians at Music Generation Cork City

In partnership with Barrack Street Band, Music Generation Cork City runs a dynamic brass, wind and percussion programme in schools and youth settings throughout Cork City, offering group instrumental learning, musicianship, and ensemble participation from beginner to advanced, in school and community concert bands. In addition, this holistic community music education programme offers exciting annual opportunities for musical learning including Summer Band Camps, large-scale improvisatory projects such as Bold as Brass 2015, and the collaborative residential intensive Brass Off, as part of the national Music Generation network.

Music Generation Cork City is currently seeking brass musicians who are interested in becoming part of this youth music phenomenon, to support the next generation of brass musicians in Cork City and beyond.

Tutors are required in Trumpet, Cornet, Tenor Horn, Baritone, Euphonium, Trombone, Tuba and French Horn. Suitably qualified candidates are invited to submit a CV to musicgencorkcity@corketb.ie.

Ideal candidates will have appropriate qualifications in music and/or music teaching, and should demonstrate a high degree of relevant skills and experience in musical performance and teaching. Experience in group teaching and working within community concert band settings would be desirable, in particular working with training, junior and youth bands.

A high degree of motivation, flexibility and commitment to facilitating high quality, innovative music learning within community settings is essential.  

For further details please email: aida.whooley@corketb.ie

The closing date for receipt of applications for is 5pm, August 30th 2017. A selection process and interviews will be held in early September.

For more information about Music Generation Cork City programmes and events contact:

Mags O’Sullivan, Coordinator, Music Generation Cork City
Music Generation Cork City, Cork Education and Training Board, 21 Lavitt's Quay, Cork City

T: +353 021 4907186
E: musicgencorkcity@corketb.ie
musicgenerationcorkcity.com

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Ireland's National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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564
AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Why ONE isn’t just bipartisan — we’re NONpartisan

June 19 2017 | By: SAMANTHA URBAN

 
   

When you think of the ONE Campaign, a lot of our causes probably come to mind: global poverty, preventable disease, HIV/AIDS, gender inequality.

But at our core, our main goal is almost always the same: We pressure governments around the world to do more for the world’s poorest. We want them to use their influence and resources to help fight AIDS and other preventable, treatable diseases in the poorest places on the planet; to help girls everywhere get access to education; to empower small-holder farmers; to expand access to energy and connectivity; and more. ONE and its members are dedicated to educating and petitioning governments so that they will enact policy solutions that can save and improve millions of lives.

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Assistant Secretary Anne Richard at the U.S. State Department with ONE members and partners for a petition delivery. (Photo credit: Esther Chan)

And that’s why we’re not just bipartisan… we’re nonpartisan. There are no sides in the fight against extreme poverty — and to work with only one party or the other would do a disservice to the people we are trying to help. Though there might be disagreements over how best to fight it, we know there are politicians on both sides of the aisle who are committed to the fight, period.

So what does that look like? Well, here in the United States, ONE pushes for a fully funded International Affairs budget, which is currently just 1% of the entire U.S. budget. That funding — also known as foreign assistance or foreign aid — saves innocent lives, makes America safer, helps creates jobs here in America, and is just the right thing for the strongest and most successful country on earth to do.

And there are both Democrats and Republicans who are strongly in favor of foreign aid. But every year, budgets and policies that would help the fight against poverty come under threat from cuts and other priorities. That’s when we organize, mobilize, educate, and advocate — regardless of party affiliation — so people living in extreme poverty will have the chance not just to survive, but to thrive.

A family makes the daily trek to the village market, where they hope to sell vegetables they've grown.

A family in Chad makes the daily trek to the village market, where they hope to sell vegetables they’ve grown. (Photo credit: Joe Mason)

We’ve been doing this work for about 13 years — through now two Republican presidential administrations and a Democratic one; through Republican-led Congresses and Democrat-led Congresses. And together, we’ve made huge strides in eliminating poverty and preventable disease. (In fact, thanks to a bipartisan commitment to PEPFAR and the Global Fund, we are close to turning the tide against the HIV/AIDS epidemic!)

This year, we have our work cut out for us: President Trump has proposed cutting the budget for State and USAID by 32 percent next year. That proposal becoming law would really hurt people living in extreme poverty and weaken America’s leadership in the world. But we’ve been putting pressure on Congress since getting word of these cuts, and a wide array of senators and representatives from both parties have already voiced their opposition to cutting the foreign aid budget.

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ONE members mobilizing in support of the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis. (Photo credit: ONE)

But not everyone’s on board yet. That’s why we need you — regardless of your party affiliation — to stand with us and urge your elected official to do the same. Your voice matters: Join the fight and sign the petition today. 

Stop President Trump’s proposed cuts to foreign aid

Dear Congress, Please oppose President Trump’s proposed cuts - nearly ⅓ - to life-saving programs in the International Affairs Budget.

STOP THESE CUTS

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When you submit your details, you accept ONE’s privacy policy and will receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

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18
AGRICULTURE

Buzzworthy: Why some Kenyan women have started beekeeping

23 August 2017 10:46AM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

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Residents of Kailer village normally live to the rhythm of mooing cows and bleating goats. But over the past year, silence has reigned over these swathes of dry land dotted with cacti and mathenge, a dense shrub.

Faced with severe drought, herders and their animals have had to travel further than normal to find water or grazing – and to escape worsening raids on their livestock at home, say the village’s women.

“We don’t know when they’ll return, as cattle raiders may attack them on the way,” said a worried Christine Lewatachum of Kailer, a village in the Rift Valley county of Baringo.

 

With worsening drought and more erratic rainfall, competition for water and grazing is growing, stoking rivalry and theft between livestock herders.

Women and their children, who are left to mind some of the animals at home, also find themselves vulnerable to livestock raids – and left without an income when they happen.

But an unusual kind of livestock is helping: bees.

Wild honey bees. (Photo credit: Bob Peterson/Wikimedia Commons)

Wild honey bees. (Photo credit: Bob Peterson/Wikimedia Commons)

Since 2009, women in the village – and others like it in the region – have managed beehives as a new way of earning a living.

They use the hives to produce honey, soap, beauty creams, candles, and cough syrup, among other products, and sell them to residents from neighbouring villages.

While the business has been going on for some time, it is proving particularly valuable as droughts grow more frequent and severe.

Even as conditions grow more uncertain, “we want to break free from poverty,” said Josephine Lemangi, one resident.

Solomon Kerieny, an animal production officer at the Ministry of Agriculture, said that a longer dry season and erratic rainfall have severely affected earnings from livestock, making families more vulnerable.

“When houses lose livestock, they lose their livelihood,” he said. “Women need to embrace alternative sources of income like beekeeping so they can withstand weather shocks like these.”

 

FOILING CATTLE RAIDERS

For women in Baringo county, cattle raids and violence are a fact of life. In 2009, Faith Lekimosong, a member of the women’s group, was forced to leave her village of Kiserian without her livestock – 80 goats and 18 cows – after eight raiders attacked her home.

“After that, I would hear gunshots ringing in my head for a long time,” she recalled, having found refuge in a nearby village.

“It is a nightmare to live in a place where you have no idea if your animals will be there tomorrow,” she added.

The women’s group, which Lewatachum co-founded in 2000, initially specialized in buying and raising dairy goats “to stop depending on our husbands’ income”.

In 2005, however, cattle raiders stole most of the women’s herd. “It was too much,” said Lewatachum. “We sold the few remaining goats and had to find a new solution.”

INCOME AND JOBS

Every three months, the group harvests and sells about 22kg of unprocessed honey for 4,000 Kenyan shillings (about $38). Processed honey sells for three times that price.

A 100g pot of body cream goes for 200 shillings ($2), while a piece of honey soap fetches between 20 and 30 shillings ($0.20-0.30).

Other products made from honey or honeycomb are more unusual.

“The arthritis and asthma syrup, as well as the snake venom antidote, are particularly popular,” said Lewachtum. “Residents often get bitten by snakes lurking in shrubs when fetching water or searching for grazing spots.”

The women display their products at weddings or farm fairs, she said. When they aren’t able to meet demand, they buy honey from other beekeepers.

 

“In times of drought there is no nectar for bees to feed on, so we can only harvest once a year instead of three times,” said Lemangi, another group member.

The women put the profit they make into a fund from which members can take out loans with a 1 percent interest rate.

This has allowed them to expand their operation to 14 beehives and to buy a 2.25-acre piece of land in the village, where they plan to set up a honey processing plant.

“We will use it (the plant) to increase our production so we can sell products in the rest of the country and offer jobs to women and girls,” said Lewatachum, as she straightened a crumpled bee suit in a makeshift shed.

She said the initiative has provided women with not only a better income but better prospects for the future.

“When the members take out loans, they know they have to pay them back and that prompts them to think about potentially setting up their own businesses or renting a portion of land to farm it,” she said.

Group members now earn an average of 26,000 shillings (about $250) per month from their various businesses, compared to next to nothing previously, as everything was stolen by raiders, she added.

SECURITY STILL AN ISSUE

While the women are becoming more secure economically, continuing insecurity threatens their progress, experts say.

“Without physical security, the women cannot establish long-term investments, as cattle raids or counter-attacks routinely burn houses and injure residents,” said Tom Nyamache, a professor of economics at Kenya’s Turkana University College.

In February, the government deployed over 100 police reservists to the area to reinforce local authorities – but even they were attacked by the bandits, Nyamache said.

But while cattle raids continue, the beehives have so far remained intact.

This story was originally published at Thomson Reuters Foundation News. Reporting by Moraa Obiria; Editing by Zoe Tabary and Laurie Goering.

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THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION
23 August 2017 10:46AM UTC

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929
GIRLS AND WOMEN

Here are the 12 African game changers you need to know

20 April 2017 4:50PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

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Who is changing the game in Africa? That’s the question NewAfricanWoman magazine put to the public as they prepared to host the New African Woman Awards 2017 – an annual ceremony that honors and celebrates Africa’s most influential and impactful women. After weeks of nominations a special panel of judges took on the tough task of narrowing the candidates down to just twelve winners. Here are this year’s winners:

New African Woman of the Year: Fatoumata Jallow-Tambajan, Gambia
Vice-President of the Gambia, Minister of Women Affairs and a fierce human rights activist she’s rightfully claimed this award for her key contributions to the ouster of Gambia’s former long-term leader, Yahya Jammeh.

New African Woman in Civil Society: Chief Theresa Kachindamoto, Malawi
With over 300 child marriage annulments under her belt, you can bet Chief Kachindamoto is a force to be reckoned with. A strong advocate against the practice, she played a major role in influencing the Malawian government to outlaw child marriage altogether earlier this year.

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic1.jpgNew African Women in Health, Science and Technology: Dr. Helena Ndume, Namibia
We can’t think of a doctor more deserving of a win. Dr. Helena Ndume is a game changing ophthalmologist and cataract surgeon who’s provided vision restoring surgery to over 35,000 Namibians for free.

New African Woman on the Rise (The Next Generation): Vivian Onano, Kenya
This avid youth activist (and ONE Member!) has called for improved girls rights and strongly encourages men to get involved in the fight for equal rights. As a UN Women Youth Advisor, it’s clear that she’s on the path to achieve her goals.

New African Woman in Politics and Public Office: Amina J. Mohammed, Nigeria
Years of experience have earned Amina a key position with the United Nations as its Deputy Secretary-General. The former Nigerian Minister of Environment played a big role in assessing how the Sustainable Development Goals and Millennium Development Goals would impact African women across the continent.

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic2.jpgNew African Woman in Arts and Culture: Joan Okorodudu, Nigeria
Joan Okorodudu is the brains and force behind one of Africa’s fastest growing modeling agencies and is credited with raising the profile of Nigerian fashion to a global level.

New African Woman Award in Education: Tsitsi Masiyiwa, Zimbabwe
We know educating young girls and boys is one of the best ways to equip them for success in life. As the founder of the Higherlife Foundation, a non-profit organisation that provides vulnerable and orphaned children with scholarships which has already benefitted over 250,000 children, it’s clear Tsitsi Masiyiwa knows this too!

AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic4.jpgNew African Woman in Finance: Binta Touré Ndoye, Mali
Competition for this award was high, but Binta’s game changing work with Oragroup – a Malian banking enterprise – earned her the top spot.

New African Woman in Media: Amira Yahyaoui, Tunisia
This blogger and political activist is a brazen advocate for human rights, transparency and public accountability. Amira’s goal is to empower citizens to participate in civil society and to encourage governments to establish good governance and political ethics.

New African Woman in Agriculture: Tumusiime Rhoda Peace, Uganda
The former African Union Commissioner of Agriculture and Rural Development played a key role in promoting the importance of food security across the continent. Throughout her career she has championed women’s empowerment and poverty eradication.AF-Women-Award-Individual-Graphic3.jpgNew African woman Award in Business: Salwa Idrissi Akhannouch, Morocco
She’s one of Africa’s most successful businesswomen. Heading up the Akwa Group franchise group Askal landed her 68th place on Forbes Middle East’s 100 Most Powerful Arab Businesswomen.

New African Woman in Sport: Fatma Samoura, Senegal
Fatma’s not only the first female Secretary General of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), she is also the first non-European to hold the role!

Congratulations to all of the well-deserving winners and nominees!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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ROBYN DETORO
20 April 2017 4:50PM UTC

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  3. Culture Night 2017

News

Culture Night 2017

31 Aug 2017
Culture Night 2017

On Friday 22nd September, venues across Ireland will come alive with the sights and sounds of music, art and culture for Culture Night 2017.

Music Generation South Dublin is delighted to be joining Tallaght Community Arts and the OPW/Pearse Museum in presenting a night celebrating music and spoken word at the Pearse Museum, St Enda’s Park Rathfarnham.

This free event will include:

  • Ukulele Workshop led by Bryan Fleming
  • Hip Hop Workshop and Performance by Street Arts Academy
  • Outdoor traditional performance Music Generation South Dublin
  • Indoor traditional music by Club Cheoil na Lochanna Blessington
  • Rehearsed reading by performers from Tallaght Community Arts Performance Ensemble and Freshly Ground Theatre.

Find the event on Facebook:  https://goo.gl/86eVRi

Culture Night at the Pearse Museum aims to reflect the spirit of Patrick Pearse’s school which was progressive in it's inclusion of performance, music and spoken word as part of a bilingual curriculum of Irish and English. 
Visitors on the night will be able to discover their mojo in a 60 minute hip hop workshop followed by a performance.
Explore your hidden talent with a 45 minute ukulele workshop to be followed by a public concert where workshop participants will have the chance to play alongside the young traditional musicians
Then later treat yourself to an outdoor traditional music concert in the Courtyard by members of Music Generation South Dublin’s Trad Group with a cup of coffee and a treat.
To end the night, Tallaght Community Arts Performance Ensemble,Freshly Ground Theatre and Club Cheoil na Lochanna will perform a rehearsed reading of the Gaza Monologues in the historic rooms of the house.


All activities in this setting unique to South Dublin County are family-friendly and completely free.


Please note numbers are limited for workshops and will be issued on a first come, first served basis. 
BOOKING ESSENTIAL FOR UKULELE WORKSHOP: info@musicgenerationsouthdublin.ie

 


Culture Night is brought to you by the Department of Arts, Heritage, Regional, Rural and Gaeltacht Affairs, in collaboration with South Dublin County Council, Music Generation South Dublin,Tallaght Community Arts and OPW/Pearse Museum

Culture Night Facebook Event Page at Pearse Museum: https://goo.gl/86eVRi

Pearse Museum Website

Tallaght Community Arts Facebook Page

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Music Generation is Ireland’s National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds, The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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These 5 Albums Will Fire Up Your Inner Activist to Kick Ass and Change the World

Author:
James Hitchings-Hales

Aug. 31, 2017

 

Can music really change the world?

In 2015 the Dalai Lama rubbished the claim as he celebrated his 85th birthday — whilst atGlastonbury's Stone Circle , of all places. He told a crowd of straw-hatted hippie’s that music alone was not enough to force change — and when asked if music made him happy he replied: “not much.”

Just a few hours later, veteran rocktavist Patti Smith presented him with a birthday cake on stage, before swearing at the government, literally tearing off her guitar strings with her teeth to a revolutionary cover of The Who’s “My Generation”, and screaming “we’re gonna change the f***ing world” to a crowd that roared vociferously in agreement.

Global Citizen believes it can. We’ve hosted music festivals from India to Germany to grapple with the world’s most difficult challenges, and another one is just a few weeks away in New York City with Stevie Wonder, Green Day, and The Killers.

But sometimes it’s not about changing the world — it’s about reflecting it. These five records from four continents do just that and, hardly by accident, happen to be the best things in music this year too.

Prepare to get fired up.

1. Everything Everything— ‘Fever Dream’

 

 

England’s most brilliantly idiosyncratic indie band are back, and Fever Dream immediately picks up from their last record’s finest moment. “No Reptiles" was the bombastically weird electronic masterpiece from 2015’s Get To Heaven, and its euphoric wall of sound marches on with album opener “Night of the Long Knives”. It’s a blueprint for the whole project: brimming with quirk and striking put-downs to the powerful. But the “fat-child in a pushchair” characterised in “No Reptiles” is now all grown up, morphed into the populist “rat king” referenced in “Run The Numbers.”

But this is far from lazy propaganda against any specific individual. It’s a nerd-rock rant against the “machine” that purrs unnoticed in the background. Whether it’s lashing out against white privilege in “Ivory Tower” or figuring out how to resist systematic power while burdened with the “pencil pusher blues” in “Desire”, the record lurches from facing the ludicrous truth of politics in turmoil to wondering if it can even be real to begin with. It’s an epic, eccentric rock opera teaching truth to power. Everything Everything can’t offer an answer that doesn’t exist. But they do ask some damning questions.

“Pin the bunting on the gallows

Dance around it with your blackface on

And we all make a vacuum, we all make a vacuum for this…

… I can think of nothing else but this, but this machine” - “Ivory Tower”

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals, including Goal No.16, pressing for strong institutions. Take action with us here.

2) Kendrick Lamar — ‘DAMN’

 

“This is why I say that hip hop has done more damage to young African Americans than racism in recent years.” - Geraldo Rivera, Fox News, sampled on “BLOOD”

In name and nature, DAMN is Kendrick Lamar’s stunningly measured response to Rivera. “Alright”, from previous studio album To Pimp a Butterfly, was the protest anthem that soundtracked the rise of Black Lives Matter. This new record writhes within that context, breathlessly changing pace between race and politics to depict a home that Kendrick has never felt less familiar with. DAMN is a historic monument to hip hop as omnipresent cultural dogma, as relevant to the future as it is to the past. Kendrick even revealed in an interview with MTV News that it was actually designed to be listened to backwards.

Read More: The Many Ways Kendrick Lamar is Giving Back

In “LOYALTY”, Kendrick recruits Rihanna, fresh and in form from her work with Global Citizen lobbying world leaders like French President Emmanuel Macron to commit funds to global education. They both performed at last year’s Global Citizen Festival, and continue to carry the cause forward. A shock cameo from U2 in the gun control critique “XXX” seems less surprising in these terms — Bono founded the ONE Campaign, a partner of Global Citizen in the fight to end extreme poverty.

“The great American flag is wrapped and dragged with explosives" - “XXX”

DAMN deserves dissertations to unpack it. But in the meantime, there’s probably nothing that can be said that isn’t put better by the greatest storyteller in rap himself.

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals, including Goal No.10, fighting against inequality. Take action with us here.

3) Lorde — ‘Melodrama’

 

Solange. SZA. Laura Marling. The future is female.

And rarely has feminimity been this rich in variety, or so intersectional. In A Seat at the Table, Solange expresses delicate beauty in blackness, while Beyonce, her sister, uses that beauty as a baton. SZA wrenches back control of her own sexuality in Ctrl, whilst Laura Marling questions what womanhood even means in Semper Femina. But for Lorde, the New Zealand pop prodigy who shot to legend status with “Royals” in 2013, feminism is a celebration. And she absolutely revels in it.

Melodrama is a party record. It’s about self-love, temporary romance, and just having the best time ever. From Lorde’s playful whisper of “boom” in “Homemade Dynamite” to the merciless mockery of a former lover in “Writer in the Dark” (written while in bed with them), the whole thing is a total blast. It’s a revelation in optimism.

You can see the whole thing live on her world tour too — just by taking action on gender equality with Global Citizen.

It’s a self-aware pop masterclass, a refreshing reexamination on the female experience as something joyous and beautiful. Lorde even references her late friend David Bowie’s Heroes in the climactic chorus of Green Light — a nod to the icon that reinvented gender roles for a whole generation. Welsh disco artist Bright Light Bright Light told Global Citizen recently that pop was all about “unity.”Lorde gets it — feminism is essentially about bringing people together.

“(Feminism) is totally not about me. It's about all women — women who might not have the privileges that I have — trying to fight for better conditions and better treatment of all women… whether that be trans women, or women of colour, or women in professions that don't typically get a lot of respect" - Lorde, 60 Minutes

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals, including Goal No.5, for gender equality. Take action with us here.

4) Songhoy Blues — ‘Resistance’

 

Songhoy Blues almost never happened.

Initially from Mali, they were forced to flee a civil war when jihadi militants refused to let them perform. Their debut album was called Music In Exile — a fitting title for a band always on the move. Resistance strikes similar themes, especially on “Mali Nord”, a track featuring South London grime MC Elf Kid. It talks about education, poverty, and the refugee crisis.

“Let's return to northern Mali, we who are driven out.

Let's go back to the north of Mali, we who have left our homes.

We are at the end of our strength,

Our children no longer go to school,

Each time the sufferings only increase,

We are reduced to hunger and cold,

Diseases surround us on all sides,

Exhausted from the begging without which we do not eat” - "Mali Nord"

Not that you’d know it. With the exception of Elf Kid’s brief break and a cameo from Iggy Pop on “Sahara”, the album is sung entirely in their native language. As a result, the entire record is jubilant and funky, the marks of a band that have found genuine freedom in creativity. Songhoy Blues first rose to prominence with Blur frontman Damon Albarn’s African Express, and their live shows turned legendary after Albarn refused to leave the stage during a mammoth five hour set in Denmark. Now, they’re bringing African music into the mainstream — and reinventing how many see the continent itself.

“I’ve seen them marketed as an African punk band,” remarked Iggy Pop on his weekly BBC 6 Music radio show. “But they’re much cooler than that.”

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals, including Goal No.16, to foster peace around the world. Take action with us here.

5) IDLES — ‘Brutalism’

 

IDLES are angry. Actually, scratch that. IDLES are blindingly furious.

Economic inequality, tax avoiders, and the Tories all get shoutouts on the aptly titled Brutalism, and it’s pretty… well… brutal. But permeating every flagrant riff and curse is a scathing sense of humour. In “Well Done” they immortalise ex-Great British Bake Off host Mary Berry as a high achieving reggae fan, and go on to burst the anarchist Christmas cracker collection with this opening line in “White Privilege”:

“How many optimists does it take to change a lightbulb?None!Their butler changes the lightbulb” - “White Privilege”

Patti Smith would approve of the English four-piece. Frontman Joe Talbot howls about the storm in his own head like it’s the Book of Revelation, and rips through issues like mental health and the NHS with typically incandescent rage. Though perhaps the most incisive moments of the record come during the moments of relative reflection.

“Sexual violence doesn’t start and end with rape. It starts in our books and behind our school gates” - "Mother"

IDLES can take full advantage of a landscape that’s finally ready to let a band like them breath. Sleaford Mods, a similarly formidable British band that previously seethed on the fringes, are now signed to Rough Trade Records — the independent label that first launched The Smiths. Meanwhile, the rambunctious punk group Cabbage made the BBC Sound of 2017 longlist (previously topped by the likes of Adele) — an impressive achievement for a band who’s EP Terrorist Synthesiser was so-named after the British right-wing press attempted to discredit opposition leader Jeremy Corbyn. Now, IDLES are supporting Foo Fighters at their stadium show at the O2 Arena in London. How big can they get?

If they keep burning this brightly, expect a revolution.

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals, including Goal No.3, to obtain universal health and wellbeing. Take action with us here.

 

 

 
 
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100
EDUCATION

From readers to leaders: Why this program is focused on literacy

August 23 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

This story originally appeared on Room to Read.

Lingering Effects of Apartheid

Ms. Nkosi, a grade one teacher at Baxoxele Primary School, knows the odds stacked against South African students. Having watched children rise from struggles, she’s seen how strong reading habits not only build confidence, but also pave the way for success in and outside the classroom.

Yet, with 80 percent of South African government-run schools lacking libraries, the vast majority of students start behind and stay behind.

Students at Baxoxele Primary School in South Africa. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Students at Baxoxele Primary School in South Africa. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

“Most learners come from poor backgrounds. Going to the public library involves money, so the majority of learners have no access to library facilities,” says Nkosi.

Without access to books, literacy rates fall—which explains why nearly 60 percent of grade four students cannot read for meaning. This not only leads to low graduation rates but also widens the education gap between races. Only 14 percent of black South Africans finish high school as compared to 65 percent of their white peers.

“Black learners are disadvantaged because most of their parents are illiterate. In our community there is a lack of parental involvement in education,” says Nkosi about the conditions she sees in her South African community. “Children of other races, especially whites, are at an advantage as parents are involved in their education, laying a foundation that is encouraging for learners. This plays a vital role in eliminating this imbalance.”

Ayanda, 8, a student at Baxoxele Primary School. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Ayanda, 8, a student at Baxoxele Primary School. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

With Accessibility Comes Possibility

Baxoxele Primary School has seen first-hand how providing quality instruction, a fully-equipped library, and practices for at-home reading help students thrive.

Take 8-year-old Ayanda, for instance. She was fortunate enough to start grade one with a local Literacy Program in place. Raised by her grandmother, Winnie, who makes a living selling perfumes and clothes in town, Ayanda’s family couldn’t afford a uniform. Yet, the program’s comprehensive support eased the strain, allowing Winnie to focus on nurturing Ayanda’s after-school, reading habits.

A class at Baxoxele Primary School taking part in the Room to Read literacy program. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

A class at Baxoxele Primary School taking part in the Room to Read literacy program. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Since starting the program, teachers and family alike notice Ayanda’s beaming enthusiasm for books. With easy access to an array of educational resources, she epitomizes the program’s promise.

“Ayanda has improved very much in reading since she starting making use of the library books provided by Room to Read,” says Winnie. “She hardly watches television and spends much of her time enjoying reading and doing schoolwork.”

Ayanda is just one of the 422,127 South African children supported through Room to Read’s Literacy Program. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Ayanda is just one of the 422,127 South African children supported through Room to Read’s Literacy Program. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Fulfilling Mandela’s Dream

By excelling in school, Ayanda has developed the confidence to dream big and the capacity to act on opportunities.

“Ayanda got assistance at home from an early age. This resulted in her getting an opportunity to be an actor in a local television show,” says Nkosi. “Room to Read helped her build her potential through reading. She is so enthusiastic when it comes to reading.”

While her grandmother and teacher are proud of her ability to thrive in her studies and extracurricular activities, Ayanda has higher hopes for herself.

“When I grow up I would like to be a pediatrician. I like to help children who are sick,” Ayanda says. “I also want to help those who are struggling to read so that they could be leaders in the future.”

Ayanda and other students in the Baxoxele Primary School's reading program. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Ayanda and other students in the Baxoxele Primary School’s reading program. (Photo credit: Room to Read)

Ayanda is just one of the 422,127 South African children supported through Room to Read’s Literacy Program. Her story speaks to Nelson Mandela’s dream of equality: As the anti-apartheid activist said, “Education is the most powerful weapon, which you can use to change the world.”

With supportive teacher trainings, 800,000 local language books and effective instruction, Room to Read is helping South African schools empower its youth and turn today’s readers into tomorrow’s leaders.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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August 23 2017

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EDUCATION

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Meet the man who’s helped save 83,500 children from slavery
12895
AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Meet the man who’s helped save 83,500 children from slavery

12 June 2017 5:45PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

GIRLS COUNT

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

 
  

“There is no greater violence than to deny the dreams of our children.”

This is the warning Kailash Satyarthi had for the world when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Malala Yousafzai in 2014 for his “struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

 

Kailash was only 26 years old when he left his job as a teacher to found Bachpan Bachao Andolan, a grassroots organisation that advocates for children’s rights. Since then, the movement has rescued more than 83,500 individuals from trafficking, slavery, and child labour all while leading the fight for child protectionist laws across India.

More than three decades later, he’s continued to champion the importance of education in building sustainable societies with promising futures, arguing that communities that provide children with safety, education, and good health are more likely to prosper.

Speaking to ONE on a recent visit, Kailash led an inspiring discussion as he spoke passionately about children’s rights and reminded us of the importance of fighting for education.

 

So, what are we waiting for?

Join us and take action today to show world leaders that all #GirlsCount!

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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ROBYN DETORO
12 June 2017 5:45PM UTC

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