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The Action Thread Part Two

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Applications are being sought for Singfest 2018!

Singfest is a choral programme designed by Music Generation Offaly Westmeath in partnership with the Association of Irish Choirs & Irish Youth Choir for children & young people aged 8 - 19.

Closing date for application is 22nd September 2017.

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What a brilliant night we had on the Culture Bus last night with GMCBeats, Ballyphehane Youth Project, Cork Arts and TheJournal.ie ! Including fab tours of The Everyman, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory and St Finbarre's Cathedral.

Well done to all who performed on the bus, including Jamie, Cathal, Danny, Michael, Cian, Shane and Edward.
Come and hear them perform again on Sept 22nd for #CorkCultureNight2017. We can't wait!

#LOVECulture Music Generation

 

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SEPT. 8, 2017

This 13-Year-Old Girl Helped a Record of 8 People to Live by Donating Her Organs

She would be “very proud of her legacy.”

Imogen Calderwood
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It’s a heartbreaking, impossible decision for any parent to make. 

But thanks to the bravery of 13-year-old Jemima Layzell and her family, eight people’s lives have been saved or transformed. 

Although she died in 2012, the teenager from Horton, in Somerset, England, has now been revealed by NHS records to have helped more lives than any other organ donor in the health service’s history.

Among the people Jemima saved after her death were five children, all of whom were given a renewed chance of life. 

Read more:  The Beautiful Moment a British Surgeon Was Reunited with the Syrian Girl Whose Life He Saved

“Everyone wants their child to be special and unique and this among other things makes us very proud,” said Jemima’s mother, Sophy. 

“Shortly after Jemima died, we watched a programme about children awaiting heart transplants… It affirmed for us that saying ‘no’ would have been denying eight other people the change for life, especially over Jemima’s heart, which Harvey [Jemima’s father] had felt uncomfortable about donating at the time.” 

 

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
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In partnership with: Johnson & Johnson

 

It was the sudden death of a family friend in a car crash that prompted Jemima’s parents to first talk to Jemima and her younger sister about organ donation. 

“Jemima had never heard of organ donation before and found it a little bit unsettling but totally understood the importance of it,” Jemima’s mother added.

Just two weeks later, Jemima tragically died after suffering a brain aneurysm while helping to prepare her mother’s 38th birthday party. 

She died at Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, four days after her collapse. 

Although they found it very difficult to donate their daughter’s organs, Jemima’s parents knew it was the right thing to do, and what their daughter wanted. 

Read more: Everything You Need to Know About Donating Blood

The NHS Blood and Transplant has now found, after reviewing records, that Jemima is the only organ donor in Britain who has helped so many people on the NHS.

Her heart, small bowel, and pancreas went to three different people, while two people received her kidneys. Her liver was split and transplanted into a further two people, and both of her lungs were transplanted into one patient. 

An average donation results in 2.6 transplants, so eight is extremely high. 

Read more: Strangers From Israel and Afghanistan Unite to Save Baby’s Life

Jemima’s parents, who said she would have been “very proud of her legacy,” urged parents to discuss organ donation with their children. 

“Every parent’s instinct is to say no, as we are programmed to protect our child. It’s only with prior knowledge of Jemima’s agreement that we were able to say yes,” they said.

Global Citizen believes that everyone must be healthy to end poverty, because healthy people are able to live fuller, happier lives. You can take action with us here .

Following Jemima’s death, her family launched The Jemima Layzell Trust , which helps young people with brain injuries and promotes organ donation. 

According to NHS Blood and Transplant, too many people in the UK are still dying because families are refusing organ donation. 

Last year, 457 people died waiting for a transplant — 14 of those people were children. There are currently 6,414 people on the transplant waiting list, including 176 children. 

Imogen is content writer & editor at Global Citizen UK. A former global news journalist, Imogen has been flitting from Australia to Spain to India since graduating from the University of Warwick. She's also trying to read all the Booker Prize winners, so wish her luck because there are loads.

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AUG. 3, 2017

This Woman Is the World's Youngest Female Boeing 777 Captain

“I want guys, girls, everybody to achieve their dream”

Madison Feser

By Madison Feser

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

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Despite graduating from the Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Uran Akademi flight school at 19-years-old and having over a decade of flight experienceAnny Divya told CNN that people are still shocked when they discover she is the commander of a Boeing 777 aircraft.

“But she's such a young girl to be flying such a big plane!” is something she often hears.

It’s also something that she’s gotten used to, as the  world’s youngest female commander of the large Boeing 777 jetliner.

But the journey to this high ranking position was not easy for Divya, who is now 30.

Read More: This Afghan Refugee Is About to Become the Youngest Female Pilot to Fly Around the World

Although she learned to read and write English in her hometown, her verbal skills were poor. Divya told Hindustan Times that this contributed to the huge culture shock she experienced in Uttar Pradesh, the large city where she attended flight school.

“People used to mock me for my poor English and that hurt me a lot,” she said. “At times, I thought of going back. However, I didn’t. With my parents’ support, I worked hard enough to win a scholarship.”

Before earning her scholarship, Divya’s parents took out a loan for her education, even though they struggled financially. Divya holds that without her parents’ support, both financially and emotionally, she would have never have achieved her childhood dream.

Kids in her hometown were encouraged to pursue medicine or engineering, and aviation was not considered an acceptable career for a woman. Divya was often mocked by other children and looked down on by relatives, but her parents supported her decision every step of the way.

“It’s only with their support that I could do it,” she told CNN.

Read More: Women Soar in India – First Female Fighter Pilots Will Graduate in June

Air India, the airline Divya flies with, offered her a position as captain of the smaller Boeing 737. The ambitious pilot decided to reject the offer, waiting instead for an opportunity to command the jet from her childhood dreams, the larger Boeing 777.

India is leading the world in aerial gender equality, with 15% of their airline pilots being women. But the global statistics are far more bleak with only 5% of pilots being women.  

Divya says she is proud her accomplishments may inspire other hopeful pilots-to-be to follow their dreams despite the barriers they face. She has even posted advice on Facebook on how to becoming a commercial airline pilot.

"I want guys, girls, everybody to achieve their dream and if you want to become a pilot you need to have a passion for this," she says. "Because the sector is such that sometimes the jobs are there, sometimes there are no jobs—you really need to have that passion. You have to have patience."

Madison is an Editorial Intern at Global Citizen. She attends Seton Hall University where she studies Diplomacy and International Relations and writes for The Diplomatic Envoy. With a passion for writing, politics, and justice, Madison aspires to continue working for organizations that use journalism as a force for positive change.

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Tradition Now

The National Concert Hall in partnership with the Arts Council, presents Tradition Now, a week-long festival of forward looking traditional music to take place from 3rd to 8th of October 2017 at the NCH.  
 
With a focus on international collaboration as well as creative and innovative new work the festival features over ten concerts by a range of established and contemporary artists from widely acclaimed Irish band Lankum (formerly Lynched) to Gaelic singer from outer Hebrides Julie Fowlis and Beoga with RTÉ Concert Orchestra to Galician piper Carlos Nuñez, and many more. The festival also comprises of the inaugural Tradition Now Artist in Residence, namely concertina player Cormac Begley and is complimented by a full programme of family events appealing to a wider audience.
 
Comprised of three main stage concerts and a host of smaller more intimate talks, concerts and family concerts Tradition Now explores various themes  including: the sound of traditional music and song in the city of Dublin with independent folk band Lankum and multicultural interchange of Irish/Iranian group Navá; the re-examination of ‘tradition’ with harpist Siobhan Armstrong and Lankum’s exploration of old song in a modern context; innovative new works by singer Julie Fowlis and fiddler Zoë Conway as well as international dialogue and musical exchange with The Rolling Wave exploring Atlantic piping traditions and more.
 
TRADITION NOW 2017
DAY 1: Julie Fowlis, the multi-award winning singer whose voice can be heard on songs from the film Brave, has collaborated with renowned Irish fiddler Zoë Conway and guitarists John McIntyre and Eamon Doorley on a new project aimed at creating new songs from existing and old Scottish Gaelic poems which can be heard on Tues. 3rd October, the Studio at 8.30pm
 
DAY 2: In the first of the main stage events Beoga (meaning ‘Lively’), a traditional band who recently collaborated with famed singer/songwriter Ed Sheeran, will perform an uplifting concert of traditional music with the RTÉ Concert Orchestra, conducted by David Brophy, Wednesday 4th October at 8pm.
 

 

 
DAY 3: Renowned harpist and founder of The Historical Harp Society Siobhán Armstrong, a prolific performer and early Irish harp enthusiast will perform a rare and intimate recital with sean-nós singer of Connemara heritage Roisín Elsafty Thursday 5th October at 7.30pm in the Kevin Barry Recital Room. Daughter of well-known sean-nós singer Treasa Ní Cheannabháin, Roisin’s own musical discovery and output can be heard on her numerous recordings with The Irish Times describing her first solo album as ‘a thing of beauty from beginning to end’.

DAY 4: Comprised of folk/bluegrass musicians Paddy Kiernan and Niall Hughes together with Iranian born brothers Shahab and Shayan Coohe, a new band Navá explore ancient music cultures of Ireland and Persia melding Irish jigs and reels with Persian ‘dastgáh’, original compositions and improvisations in a unique performance on Friday 6th October at 6pm, Kevin Barry Recital Room. The event will also see the band release their new album.
 

 

 

DAY 5: Nominated for ‘Best Group’ and ‘Best Album’ in the 2016 BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards, Lankum (formerly Lynched) have been described as “the most convincing band to come out of Ireland for years” by The Guardian. Although heavily influenced by Irish legends such as Frank Harte, Planxty and The Dubliners, the group add subtle traces of American music hall, ambient techno and psychedelic folk into the mix. The traditional four-piece folk group combine haunting vocal harmonies with Uilleann pipes, concertina, accordion, fiddle and guitar for their hugely anticipated concert on Saturday 7th October at 8pm on the Main Stage.
 

DAY 6: Renowned concertina player from West Kerry Cormac Begley is the inaugural Tradition Now Artist in Residence. Founder of ‘Tunes in the Church’, Begley has performed with a vast range of renowned musicians from fiddler Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh to the well- known concertina player Jack Talty and others. For this special NCH concert on the 8th October 6pm in The Studio, he collaborates with another fine musician, fiddler Liam O’Connor a former TG4 Young Musician of the Year (2002).
 

 
The festival culminates with ‘The Rolling Wave; A Celebration of Atlantic Piping Traditions’ on the main stage on Sunday 8th October at 8pm. Galician piper Carlos Nuñez and band join the St. Laurence O’Toole Pipe Band, young piping sensation Cian Smith from Waterford, the acclaimed Breton duo of Youenn le Bihan and Patrick Molard and the Scottish piper Brighde Chaimbeul for a compelling and intricate musical journey through the musical and cultural conversation between the regions of Ireland, Northern Spain, Brittany and the Western isles of Scotland making this a must attend event for piping enthusiasts.
 

 
Preceding this will be a talk hosted by Na Píobairí Uilleann surveying the 300 year history of the pipes, the music and its players at 6pm in the Kevin Barry Room, Sunday 8th October.
 
Tradition Now is also enhanced by a complimentary programme of family friendly and dementia friendly concerts devised by the NCH Learning and Participation to encourage and enthuse audiences through musical exploration, interaction and dramatic presentation. Traditional Tea Dance Tunes is a dementia friendly concert aimed at those living with dementia, their carers and families in which Luke Cheevers and Fergus Russell perform traditional songs of Dublin. (Friday 6th October at 3pm John Field Room)
 
Ceol Connected’s The Far Field is an irresistibly joyful musical tale for younger audiences (aged 3 - 7) infused with Irish traditional music, puppetry and folklore. (Saturday 7th October at 12.30pm and 2.30pm The Studio)
 
Ceol le Chéile is an interactive concert where young audiences are taken on a wonderful participative journey through the rich and diverse sound of traditional Irish music with fun foyer activity planned in foyer from 12pm/ Concert at 1.30pm. (Foyer at 12pm, The Studio at 1.30pm)
 


 

Events

Beoga
Start Date04-10-2017 20:00
Traditional Tea Dance Tunes
Start Date06-10-2017 15:00
Tradition Now: Nava
Start Date06-10-2017 18:00
The Far Field
Start Date07-10-2017 12:30
The Far Field
Start Date07-10-2017 14:30
Tradition Now: Lankum
Start Date07-10-2017 20:00
Family Day with Ceol Le Cheile
Start Date08-10-2017 13:30

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7367

YES: First ladies vow to fight “barbaric” genital mutilation

7 April 2017 3:41PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

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Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Around the world, there are at least 200 million girls and women who have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM). The reasoning behind FGM varies by culture and community. But the outcomes are the same — short and long-term health risks range from extreme pain to infection and even death.  

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Niger’s first lady Lalla Malika

FGM has been banned in Burkina Faso since 1996 and in Benin and Niger since 2003. But despite the ban, the first ladies of these three countries say this practice – that is “barbaric” in the words of Niger’s first lady, Lalla Malika – still occurs in their countries.

Claudine Talon, the first lady of Benin, warned in a recent interview, cutters have developed new ways to circumvent the laws putting young girls and women at risk again.

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First Lady of Benin Claudine Talon

To avoid discovery, the once commonplace ritual has become riskier as it moves behind closed doors. Families take their daughters across borders into neighbouring countries and infant girls are cut shortly after birth or as toddlers before they’ve learnt to speak. FGM is so deeply embedded into cultural expectations that some young women who were not cut as children purposefully seek out practitioners to perform the procedure to make themselves more desirable for marriage.

If communities want to win this battle, they must be empowered to inspire change.

Education is widely recognised as one of the most effective tools in the fight against FGM, particularly amongst the youth population. Sika Kabore, first lady of Burkina Faso, has specifically called for boosts to girls’ education to aid in the eradication of FGM.

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First lady of Burkina Faso Sika Kabore

Armed with the knowledge about the harmful effects of FGM, future generations can better make educated decisions for their families and independently decide to abandon the practice.

If you believe in the power of girls’ education to help end gender inequality, join the Girls Countcampaign today!

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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ROBYN DETORO
7 April 2017 3:41PM UTC

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We need to end anonymous companies once and for all
151
TRANSPARENCY

We need to end anonymous companies once and for all

30 August 2017 3:19PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

This is a post by Ruba Ishak and Nick Goetschalckx, from ONE’s Transparency and Accountability team.

Exotic fauna and flora, crystalline waters and sandy beaches – while the European Union Institutions are on holiday, we can’t stop thinking about Panama. The Panama Papers to be specific.

panama-1308874_960_720.jpg

Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif was recently removed from office following corruption allegations that began after the Papana Papers revealed a complex web of anonymously owned British Virgin Island companies, and a trail of secret bank accounts and anonymous companies in Cyprus linked President Donald Trump’s former campaign manager to pro-Russian interests.

These are just a few of the most recent scandals involving anonymous companies and trusts (we wrote about some others in March). Anonymous companies and trusts play a central role in money laundering, hiding the identity of corrupt individuals and businesses involved in trafficking of arms, drugs and people, the theft of public funds and tax evasion. Every year a trillion dollars – that’s $1,000,000,000,000 – is syphoned out of developing countries through these types of corrupt activities. If this money had been taxed, the revenues could have been used to build hospitals, schools and help end extreme poverty.

Lifting the veil by publicly disclosing who is behind these mysterious webs of companies and trusts is essential in tackling corruption around the world. For this reason, ONE has been following the revision of the EU’s 4th Anti-Money Laundering Directive (AMLD) – where we’re calling for information about who really owns and controls EU companies and trusts to be made public.

We’ve been loud and visible to end secrecy – our youth ambassadors lobbied, we tweeted, and we proposed solutions, as negotiations took place in Brussels.

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Fionnuala Egan, Youth Ambassador, Brian Hayes, MEP and Dina Dahood, Youth Ambassador

Civil society’s efforts have led to promising developments which could be a huge win for the fight against corruption. However, we need all the pieces to solve the puzzle. Citizens, journalists and governments need to see the full picture in order to be able to follow the money and root out corruption. That means public access to information about company and trust ownership.  

As negotiations continue, the coming months will prove whether the EU has the resolve to close loopholes to make new AMLD rules show the complete picture.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

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GUEST BLOGGER
30 August 2017 3:19PM UTC

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On 26th April 1986 at 1:23 a.m., a series of explosions destroyed the reactor in the building that housed Energy Block No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. The force of the explosions literally stopped time. The rusty clock in the photo below indicates the precise time of the accident. Even now radiation here is still so high that access is limited to very brief time periods.
This year marks the 31st anniversary of the Chernobyl disaster but many continue to suffer. 

To learn more about CCI's humanitarian assistance in the Chernobyl affected regions please visit http://www.chernobyl-international.com/about-us/our-history.

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356
AGRICULTURE

Why this super woman grows super foods for her community

August 21 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

Story and photos by Megan Gieske.

The townships surrounding Cape Town, South Africa, can be described as a “food desert,” where fresh fruit and vegetables are not available. Where lions and elephants used to roam, sustained by the beauty and nature of the Western Cape, concrete has now paved over any gardens or green spaces, except for one in Gugulethu.

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Ntombi Mbinda’s garden outside the local school.

The charming, kid-tended plot is not only producing food — which goes to the school and is sold to the community — but education, as well.

Ntombi Mbinda, the force behind the garden, invites students to learn tending, best practices for nutrition, and empowers them to invest in their community. She encourages the students to start their own container gardens at home, and plants seeds herself at orphanage homes and other high-need areas of the community.

In 2012, Mbinda started her first garden in Khayelitsha teaching others how to garden, and she’s had the school garden in Gugulethu since 2014.

“If you eat healthy, you can make a difference,” she says, “and I really know I’m making a difference. I know what I’m doing helps people.”

Ntombi Mbinda hands produce to a woman passing by the garden.

Ntombi Mbinda hands produce to a woman passing by the garden.

It took Ntombi multiple tries to secure the garden plot. But now that the garden has gained some momentum, things are starting to fall in line. The Urban Agriculture organization helped her with compost, tools, and seeds, and Abalimi, an urban agriculture association, taught her organic farming. Mbinda uses old tires as raised beds, empty soda bottles to add color, and milk jugs as watering cans.

At another garden she helped start, planters are made from suitcases, water containers, and old boots. Even the scarecrow is made from 100% recycled material. Nothing is wasted: Creating her garden is not just about food sustainability.

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Out in the garden, the students mill about, picking carrots, smelling herbs, and digging in the compost for earthworms. Mbinda joins a cluster of children examining a plant, and invites them for smoothies.

Most township schools receive free vegetables from the garden, but they are overcooked, eliminating many of the essential nutrients. The vegetables Mbinda blends into the school’s smoothies are strong, leafy greens — super foods high in vitamins. Every day, the students see the literal fruits of their labor in the smoothies.

That’s why Mbinda started teaching members of her community how to prepare these vegetables so they retain their nutrients. The partnership between SSGC (her non-profit founded in 2016) and the Wow in the Western Cape organization results in recipes that preserve the flavors of Xhosa culture while adding health benefits.

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In 2011, Mbinda lost her brother to AIDS and her mother to diabetes. During Mbinda’s last pregnancy, she developed diabetes, too, and had to deliver two months early because of high blood pressure.

“If you feed your body good, nutritious food, at least it does help you,” Mbinda says.

Mbinda walks around the garden, checking on everything that grows — picking, tasting, and chewing the more than 15 varieties of plants, including wormwood, yarrow, beetroot, spinach, kale, fennel, parsley, and even Zimbabwean cavo.

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Pointing to the wild abundance of growth, Mbinda says, “This is Africa.”

She knows that many people around the world think of her continent when they hear about malnutrition. That’s just one more reason Mbinda wants every block in Gugulethu to have a garden.

“I want to change that, so when you come here, you find garden patches like this.”

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August 21 2017

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Nigeria’s Chibok girls are the inspiration for a new Marvel hero
437
CULTURE

Nigeria’s Chibok girls are the inspiration for a new Marvel hero

September 7 2017 | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

 
   

Move over Captain America and watch out Wonder Woman — here comes Ngozi: a teenage superheroine inspired by Nigeria’s kidnapped Chibok girls who fights evil in Lagos, marking a new chapter in diversity for Marvel Comics.

Ngozi is the star of new title “Blessing in Disguise”, the first Marvel story to be set in a real-life African country – Nigeria’s commercial capital – and feature a Nigerian superhero.

The character stems from the high-profile abduction of about 220 schoolgirls in Chibok in northeast Nigeria in 2014 by the militant group Boko Haram, and the comic’s author hopes the teenage superhero will resonate with girls across the country.

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Women and children affected by Boko Haram in northeast Nigeria. (Photo credit: ONE)

“It was an important decision for me to base Ngozi on the one of the Chibok girls,” Nnedi Okorafor, an award-winning Nigeria-American writer, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The Chibok abduction sparked international outrage and became the most infamous act by the Islamist Boko Haram group which has killed 20,000 people and uprooted at least 2 million in a brutal eight-year campaign that shows no sign of ending.

Two young women who escaped from Boko Haram made an appearance at the United Nations on International Women's Day 2016. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

Two young women who escaped from Boko Haram made an appearance at the United Nations on International Women’s Day 2016. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

“They were normal girls who suddenly had to deal with a huge change in their lives … and their story of perseverance is so powerful,” Okorafor added. “Like many Nigerian girls, Ngozi comes in a small package but is strong-willed and determined.”

The short story is part of Marvel’s “Venomverse” comic, published on Wednesday, which sees Ngozi appear alongside well-established Marvel characters from Venom to the Black Panther.

 

Okorafor said she was buoyed by the global success of the summer box office hit “Wonder Woman” – the first superhero movie to star a woman since 2005 – with the character hailed as a new role model for girls and a break away from sexism in Hollywood.

Yet the U.S.-based science fiction author said that she was desperate to see more diversity in the world of superheroes.

 

“I’m a huge Wonder Woman fan, but we can really push it further when it comes to diversity,” said Okorafor, who is also an English professor at the University at Buffalo in New York.

“I’m not just talking about race and sexual orientation, but about having a range of personalities with different desires, dreams and flaws,” she added. “I don’t only want to see badass female characters, I want to see much less predictable ones.”

A ONE member campaigns for girls' education at the United Nations on International Women's Day 2017. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

A ONE member campaigns for girls’ education at the United Nations on International Women’s Day 2017. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

Several comicbook fans have shared their excitement about the character of Ngozi on social media sites such as Twitter.

“A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian Woman. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive,” Twitter user Beth Lee posted.

Reporting By Kieran Guilbert, Editing by Katy Migiro.

Every girl counts.

130 million girls are out of school. So we’re asking the world to count them, and urge our leaders to act.

JOIN THE COUNT

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