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SEPT. 14, 2017

Philippines Commission on Human Rights Needs $15 Million. Lawmakers Offered It $20

The president has railed against the commission in the past.

Joe McCarthy

By Joe McCarthy

 

philippines-drug-violence.jpgBullit Marquez/AP
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True to its name, the Commission on Human Rights in the Philippines investigates all civil, political, economic, and cultural violations of humans rights.

It was established in 1987 and is made up of a chairperson and four members, who requested a budget of $15,351,356 for 2018.

That money would allow the team to provide legal support and counsel to citizens, educate people on human rights, visit jails and neighborhoods to monitor conditions, provide financial assistance to victims, attend to forensic demands and witness protection as part of investigations, and much more.

Read More: Philippines Police Killed 60 People This Week, and Their President Is Happy About It

If the House of Representatives has its way, however, the commission will see nowhere near that amount.

In fact, the House voted to allocate just $20 to the team for the year, which, if enacted, would essentially abolish the commission, according to The Rappler.

Global Citizen campaigns on the Global Goals, which call for universal human rights. You can take action on these issues here .

The Senate will now undergo a round of additional budget deliberations. If there are disagreements with the House, then a joint session will be held to come to a consensus.

Read More: Why President Trump's Phone Call to Rodrigo Duterte Is More Than Troubling

It’s possible that the $20 allocation will be rejected by the Senate and the commission will ultimately receive adequate funding. But it’s also possible that the enormous budget cut will go through, especially since the move has the tacit support of the president, according to The Rappler.

Since President Rodrigo Duterte took office in 2016, he’s embarked on a violent campaign to eradicate drug use in the country that has left up to 12,000 people dead. Throughout this ongoing war on drugs, backed by martial law in some parts of the country, there have been widespread charges of corruption and humans rights violations, including many instances of extrajudicial killings.  

The Commission on Human Rights, along with the United Nations and international NGOs, has repeatedly raised concerns about potential human rights violations and are currently investigating various cases.

In response, Duterte threatened to abolish the commission and vowed to stop investigations of those carrying out his orders.

Read More: 11 Ongoing Tragedies That the World Has Forgotten But We All Need to Remember

“Remember this, human rights commission, you address your requests through me because the armed forces is under me and the police are under me,” Duterte said during a press conference for his second state of the union.

Duterte has gone after other critics of his agenda. His most outspoken opponent, Senator Leila De Lima, is now in prison over what she claims are false charges.

Recently, the Philippine’s public has turned more forcefully against the president’s war on drugs, after the murder of a teenager was caught on film and contradicted official accounts, and other high-profile cases of corruption.

“Two days after hundreds of people turned out for the teenager’s funeral, the president again told police they would not be punished for killing suspects who resist arrest,” said Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, the head of the UNHCR, in a report.

“This lack of respect for the due process rights of all Filipinos is appalling,” he added.

In such a context, abolishing the one body responsible for upholding human rights could further inflame public sentiment.

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.

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Music Generation
 

WHAT'S HAPPENING

We believe that Music Generation is more than a cultural project - it is a social movement
- Adam Clayton

← return to blog

14/09/2017

Opportunities at Music Generation Laois

Opportunities at Music Generation Laois

Music Generation Laois is currently advertising two employment opportunities. 
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Music Generation Laois Keyboard Tutor: Re-advertisement


Music Generation Laois is seeking a keyboard Tutor for the Music Generation Laois School of Rock and Pop.

Music Generation Laois established a School of Rock and Pop in September 2013, which includes weekly tuition in guitar, keyboard and drums, junior and senior jam times, performance, song writing and recording opportunities, as well as an annual week-long Summer School of Rock and Pop in the Dunamaise Arts Centre. All programmes are delivered in Portlaoise.

Candidates should demonstrate a strong passion for teaching and learning and for nurturing and inspiring the musical development of children and young people of all ages and abilities.

Download the full person specification and details of the required qualifications and experience here. Applicants must complete a Submission Form to be considered for this opportunity. Forms can be downloaded online here.

Completed submission forms must be received by 5pm, Thursday 21 September 2017. Submission Forms can be submitted electronically by email to rflannery@laoiscoco.ie
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Music Generation Laois and Laois School of Music Resource Person

Music Generation Laois and Laois School of Music seeks to contract the services of a Resource Person to work with both organisations for a ten-week period, to assist with the high volume of student enrolments that occurs in October/November each year. This contract will include assisting with day-to-day running and promotion of both organisations, processing enrolments, meeting and greeting students in our local tuition centre in Portlaoise and all aspects of activity that large music education organisations are involved in.

Candidates will be passionate about music education, highly personable and able to engage with the public and with families in the service. They will also be passionate about working with children and young people, and will possess excellent I.T., communication and organisational skills. This opportunity is offered on a contract for services basis.

Applicants must complete a Submission Form to be considered for this opportunity. Forms can be downloaded online here.

Completed submission forms must be received by 5pm, Thursday 21 September 2017. Submission Forms can be submitted electronically by email to rflannery@laoiscoco.ie
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For further information about the posts and for details about Music Generation Laois contact: 

Rosa Flannery, Coordinator, Music Generation Laois 
Music Generation Laois, Arts Office, Laois County Council, Áras an Chontae, Portlaoise, Co. Laois

T: 057 8664078
E: rflannery@laoiscoco.ie
musicgenerationlaois.ie

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Ireland's National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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© Music Generation DAC. All Rights Reserved. Registered in Ireland No. 491331. Charity Reg. No. CHY 19679.
NCH Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2. Telephone: +353 1 4758454

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Music Generation South Dublin are holding registration days in September, in Collinstown Park Community College on Thursday 21st, and Rathcoole Community Centre on Wednesday 27th. It's a great chance to ask questions and get more info on the classes provided.

Get in touch to book your place as spaces are limited!

Check out the attached flyer.

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, texto

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A report released by Ofcom says TV broadcasters are 'failing to represent society'.

Amy, who has a learning disability and works in our communications team, has written a blog about how she feels people with a learning disability are represented in TV and film.

Check out Amy's blog: https://www.mencap.org.uk/b…/learning-disability-seen-screen and read more about the report on BBC's websitehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-41265644

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, anteojos y texto

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From soothing Achille’s tendon to fear of not getting up to go to the airport and a decisive “arghh moment”, Emma, Tony and Jodie are telling their preparative for the trek around the Mont Blanc with other Vanquis Bank employees.
Find Emma's blog: http://bit.ly/2wNKVdm
Tony's: http://bit.ly/2eLJsJL
and Jody's: http://bit.ly/2xV1jqn

La imagen puede contener: una o varias personas, personas de pie, montaña, exterior y naturaleza

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Nastia is standing strong for the very first time!  

17-year-old Nastia   lives in a CCI pioneered Independent Living Facility on the grounds of a Vesnova Children's Mental Asylum in Belarus.  She is well known and dearly loved amongst our volunteers.

Nastia's achievement is a testament to her hard work, determination and the support she has received from CCI's volunteers and donors alike.  Without the vital support and care Nastia has recieved, this achievement may never have happened. 

In this state-of-the-art complex, Nastia has the ability to work with occupational therapists, nurses and teachers to enhance her ability to care for herself in the hopes of one day being freed from an institutionalised life. Each year Nastia travels from Belarus to stay with her loving West Cork family, Sharon and Danny Lynch and their sons from Macroom. 

Nastia was abandoned to an institution in Belarus as a baby.  She has cerebral palsy and until CCI’s intervention, had never been outside the walls of the institution.  She had never experienced simple things like the wind. Since she started visiting Ireland as part of CCI’s Rest and Recuperation Programme she has blossomed. Her visits to Ireland have given her many opportunities, her language skills have improved and she has learnt English, but more importantly it has given her the sense of family that Nastia had been missing.

Well done Nastia! <3 

To support children and young adults like Nastia, visit
www.chernobyl-international.com

 

La imagen puede contener: 1 persona, sonriendo, bicicleta y exterior

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The simple delivery kit that’s saving mothers in Nigeria
2045
HEALTH

The simple delivery kit that’s saving mothers in Nigeria

30 November 2016 3:24PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

By Ayodeji Rotinwa

In June 2011, Adepeju Jaiyeoba heard that a sister of a close friend, Ramatu*, had passed away in hospital after an elective c-section. Ramatu arrived at the hospital on her due date and was informed that her consulting doctor was not available. Her surgery would instead be performed by a matron and house officer.

The baby was safely delivered, but Ramatu bled heavily afterwards. No one could work out why. Even after several blood transfusions, Ramatu eventually bled to death. It was only then it was discovered that the house officer had severed an artery during the birth.

Barely a month after Ramatu’s passing, another friend of Jaiyeoba’s died when heavily pregnant. She had had high blood pressure throughout the pregnancy, which had gone undetected until it killed her.

A woman’s chance of dying from pregnancy and childbirth is 1 in 13 in Nigeria. “It could have happened to anybody. I have four sisters; it could have been any one of them. I had to do something,” she says, so she founded the Brown Button Foundation and the Mothers Delivery Kit company.adepeju-jaiyeoba-photo-credit-path

The Foundation is a non-profit organization that seeks to improve women’s access to quality healthcare, train and improve the skills of those providing healthcare and champion the sexual and reproductive rights of women so they can access care for themselves. The Mother’s Delivery Kit is a product (and social business) designed to ensure safer births, instigate behavioural change in birth delivery procedures and create income-earning power for women selling and distributing the kits across 30 of Nigeria’s 36 states.

Jaiyeoba quickly established that it was mostly rural communities that needed most help. “In most of these communities, primary health centres aren’t headed by trained doctors or nurses because they don’t have enough. They are run by those who have interest in health care and are trained as community extension workers,” she says.

the-mothers-delivery-kitMothers in rural areas typically have to rely on traditional birth attendants, who solve complications with herbs and prayers and who in many instances will tell a bleeding woman post-birth to hold her legs close together to stop the flow instead of transferring her to a medical centre.

To kick off her work, Jaiyeoba contacted a senator in Sagamu, Ogun State to build the first maternity health centre for the community and provide traditional birth attendants with skilled training. Both goals were achieved.

She had begun to expand her work when she encountered a child who died as a result of his umbilical cord being severed with a rusty blade. Jaiyeoba decided to include sterile supplies in the Mother’s Delivery Kit. The kit is sold at a subsidized cost of N1, 700 (US$5.30) which most expectant mothers in fairly low-income communities can afford.

The kit includes basic supplies, like misoprostol – a drug that stops postpartum haemorrhage – and mucus extractors used to prevent newborns from asphyxiating. Incredibly, these basic supplies are often not readily available in even the most modern Nigerian hospitals. Many health centres and hospitals now rely on the kits to care for their patients. Dr. Alalade, a resident at a Kaduna hospital, orders hundreds of the kit at a time and describes it as a must-have in his facility

The supplies and training have proven to be the difference between life and death for mother and child. One community is already seeing the benefits of the training provided by the Brown Button Foundation. “We have saved an estimated 500 women as a result of training from the Foundation,” Shafaatu Abubakar, a community health worker, reports.

ms-jaiyeoba-at-work-talking-about-the-mothers-delivery-kitJaiyeoban has developed a tactic to connect with and lobby influential men who are respected within the communities she works with. Now, 30,000 of the Mothers Delivery Kits have been distributed across 30 different states and her trainings are practiced in 8. “When we mention our work in maternal health, it brings memories of people who have died: mothers, wives, sisters, it is not abstract to them. It would be hard for them to say no to anyone trying to improve maternal health indices in the area.”

She is well aware she is filling a gap in what should be a public health service and looks forward to the day when she can hand the responsibility over to the government. “The government needs to pay more attention to health care at the grassroots level,” Jaiyeoba says, “I hope we run out of business soon.”

*Not her real name

Sign our petition to join these members and many other Nigerians who are demanding more health investment from the Nigerian government.

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30 November 2016 3:24PM UTC

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HEALTH

How these clinics are helping pregnant women in Zimbabwe

September 14 2017 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

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Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Story and photos by Ray Mwareya.

Expensive maternity fees in Zimbabwe are a nightmare for pregnant women. In state or church clinics, where the majority of the poor give birth, charges can rise to $50 USD per month until delivery, according to Chido Gama of the Zimbabwe Health Human Rights Forum, a local lobby network that monitors the rights of disadvantaged expectant mothers.

But organizations like the United Nations Population Fund — with support from foreign assistance provided by countries around the world, including the U.S., U.K., Canada, and more — are working to change that by building and supporting new “maternity waiting homes” in Zimbabwe.

Pregnant women rest in a maternity waiting home in Zimbabwe's Mashonaland province.

Pregnant women rest in a maternity waiting home in Zimbabwe’s Mashonaland province.

The need for affordable maternity waiting homes in Zimbabwe is huge – but supply and cost are beyond the means of many women. The country has seen a worrying amount of incidences of mothers suffering from complications like obstetric fistula or dying in childbirth, as well as babies dying from malnutrition. According to the UN Population Fund’s Country Representative, Cheikh Tidiane Cisse, Zimbabwe’s mortality rate is 614 per 100,000 live births.

The UN Population Fund wants to stop this: “We are implementing work to build cheap maternity waiting homes for Zimbabwe’s poorest women,” says Cheikh Tidiane. “These homes give women a safe place before labor to ensure access to skilled birth attendants.”

He praises the multilateral donor funding because it prevents critical delays that cause maternity deaths. In these maternity homes, pregnant women receive antenatal care, nutrition support, and fetus screening services.

A nurse examines a pregnant woman in a maternity home.

A nurse examines a pregnant woman in a maternity home.

“Our program seeks to increase the number of pregnant women visiting a proper health institution by 80% by 2020. Young women shouldn’t give birth in villages under the care of untrained midwives.”

The program has already installed three maternity waiting homes in Zimbabwe’s Mashonaland province, home to the country’s capital city, Harare.

The program is having an impact, especially among young, new mothers.

“I feel safe in this maternity waiting home,” says Roselyn Chitema, 20. “It is my first time to fall pregnant. I could not afford the $80 that a state clinic charged to manage my delivery, so I came to this UN facility.”

She had to travel 300 kilometers from her village to check herself into the UN facility.

An employee at the maternity home discusses infant care with a pregnant woman.

An employee at the maternity home discusses infant care with a pregnant woman.

“Some rural clinics in Zimbabwe are notorious for turning away first-time pregnant women,” adds Chido Gama. “If you’re pregnant for the first time, rural clinics can wave you away and tell you to approach city hospitals because they say they don’t want to take chances with complicated first-time births. But in city clinics, you land into even more expensive hospitals.”

She adds: “Cost and lack of medical facilities is causing some rural young women to give birth at home under the risky supervision of untrained midwives — usually 60-year-old grandmothers.”

Roselyn feels well-cared for at the UN-supported maternity waiting home. “We feel safe giving birth in these safe-house maternity waiting homes,” she says. “This feels so secure. I need peace during childbirth.”

Her friend, Neria*, who is 26 and also pregnant, agrees. Neria says this is her second attempt at child birth. Her first pregnancy was when she was 17. But the baby was stillborn and Neria developed obstetric fistula, a debilitating condition that rendered her incontinent.

An expectant mother sits at the maternity waiting home in Mashonaland province.

An expectant mother sits at the maternity waiting home in Mashonaland province.

Neria is happy with the services at the maternity home. “I look forward to a healthy baby delivery,” she says. She is also receiving surgical treatment to reverse the effects of her obstetric fistula.

All mothers should be able to give birth in safe, clean environments — and organizations supported by generous development assistance from the U.S, U.K., and countries around the world can help make that happen.

* Name has been changed.
ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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