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SEPT. 20, 2017

These Indian Women Are Correcting Wikipedia’s Gender Bias One Page at a Time

Just 9% of Wikipedia editors around the world are women.

Daniele Selby

By Daniele Selby

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

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Wikipedia pages are the first to come up in most internet searches — but what if what you’re looking for is nowhere to be found on the online encyclopedia’s expansive database?

If you’re looking for information about Indian women in contemporary art, science, or politics, that might be true. That’s exactly why media publication Feminism in India has been organizing monthly “Edit-a-Thons,” to correct the gender imbalance in Wikipedia’s coverage.

Part of Wikipedia’s appeal is that it’s crowd-sourced. Anybody can create and edit pages. The problem is, not everybody does.

In a 2011 survey, Wikipedia found that only 9% of its editors globally were women. That number jumps to 15% in the US, but plummets to just 3% in India, according to Quartz.

Another study found that women reported a lower level of confidence in their expertise and a greater discomfort with editing the work of others on Wikipedia, which may explain the site’s small number of female editors.

According to Alexa Internet, Wikipedia is the fifth most popular website in the world. Millions of people rely on it to provide information, and without female editors the site’s offerings may be skewed, academics say.

 

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“From a pure content perspective, men and women may bring different interests and preferences, and they may focus on different issues,” Stony Brook University professor Julia Bear told the Harvard Business Review. “If we have such a small percentage of women contributing, then there are a lot of issues that will potentially be skewed or get less attention than they should.”

Because Wikipedia is crowd-sourced, it is “a representation of knowledge,” Joseph Reagle, a professor at Northeastern University, said. This means that the knowledge and information accessible on Wikipedia is a reflection of the knowledge and interests of its contributors and editors.

“If you go there, and you don’t see any female representation or role models, it shows an implicit bias in the way things are ordered and prioritized. That can have a significant effect on people,” Reagle added.

Read more: There’s a New Book Series for Young Girls, and It Wants to Close the Gender Gap in Tech

You know, every time I end up on Wikipedia and see another woman referenced w/o a page, I remember what a fight women have to get listed...

 
 

Feminism in India’s agenda is to increase the representation of Indian women on the Internet, which “very closely ties in with Wikipedia,” its founder and editor-in-chief, Japleen Pasricha, told Quartz.

September’s Edit-A-Thon focused on increasing the representation of women who are contemporary Indian artists on Wikipedia’s pages and had 17 participants, most of whom were women, according to Quartz.

But even getting women to attend the Edit-A-Thons can be a challenge — one that has a lot to do with gender-biased social norms in the country. Pasrich told Quartz that even in modern-day India, women are expected to balance work and family, and that might not leave much free time for Edit-A-Thons.

Similar initiatives to correct Wikipedia’s gender imbalance issue have taken place in the US and Mexico. But with more than 40 million pages in close to 300 languages on Wikipedia, there’s still a long way to go.

Global Citizen campaigns to ensure equal rights and opportunities for women and girls. You can take action here.

Daniele is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She believes that education and the equal provision of human rights will empower change. She studied music and psychology at Vassar before earning her Masters of International Affairs at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Daniele brings with her an unhealthy love of chili and chocolate, and a small, fluffy dog from the Little Red Dot (Singapore) to the Big Apple.

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People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

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SEPT. 20, 2017

7 Times Music Sparked Change in Central Park

And it’s all culminating Sept. 23.

Joe McCarthy

By Joe McCarthy

 

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Rolling and wild, flat and tamed, stretching for miles in the heart of Manhattan, Central Park has often served as a site for global activism.

Protesters filled the park in the 1960s to promote peace. Two decades later, protesters marched in the park to challenge nuclear proliferation. Another two decades later, protesters courses through the park to call for global climate action.

Oftentimes, there’s a soundtrack to these movements — musicians play benefit concerts to highlight the cause and boost the call for action.  

Read More: Literally Everything You Need to Know About Attending the 2017 Global Citizen Festival

And it’s through this merging of art and advocacy that protests seem to have the biggest impact.

At the same time, the park inspires people with music on a daily basis. Whether it’s through summer stage acts or seasonal orchestral arrangements, people are everyday inspired by the park’s musical flourishes.

Since 2012, Global Citizen has brought hundreds of thousands of people to Central Park to call for an end to extreme poverty and for a more just, sustainable world.

The promise of globally renowned acts spurs citizens to take action, and then the music itself elevates the overall impact.

Here are seven of the biggest musical advocacy moments in Central Park History:


1/ The March Against Nukes

 

At the peak of the Cold War, when tensions between the world’s two nuclear powers — Russia and the US — were strong, hundreds of thousands of US citizens gathered in Central Park to call for global disarmament.

According to the New York Times, these were some of the signs on display: ''Choose Life''; ''Bread Not Bombs''; ''No Nukes''; ''Reagan Is A Bomb - Both Should Be Banned''; ''U.S. Out of El Salvador''; ''Freeze or Burn''; ''Build Houses Not Bomb Shelters''; ''A Feminist World Is a Nuclear-Free Zone,'' ''Arms Are for Embracing.''

Read More: Here's How to Have the Best Trip to NYC — Just in Time for the Global Citizen Festival

This was a culmination of years-long dissent over nuclear weapons. A few years earlier, musicians including Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty, and Neil Young came together for the “No Nukes” concert. The backing of so many mainstream artists helped to turn a somewhat fringe movement into the one that has national and global support.


2/ Climate Action March

nyc_climate_march_092114.jpgImage: Earth Guardians

The world has seen 16 of the 17 hottest years in recorded history since 2000. For many people around that world that’s more than enough reason to take action on climate change.

Yet there’s often a disconnect at the governmental level, with climate change being perceived with urgency.  

Read More: How Pharrell Williams Is Fighting for the Future and Making the World a Better Place

So in 2014, more than 400,000 people marched through and along Central park to demand action leading up to the United Nations General Assembly.

Throughout the event, musicians played on impromptu stages and people from all backgrounds joined on politically-charged chants and sing-a-longs.


3/ New York Public Schools

 

Rock music has often viewed education warily, but in 2003, Dave Matthews threw his support behind a call for funding for New York’s public schools.

Matthews and his band played for three hours in Central Park to tens of thousand of people. At least $2 million was raised for the city’s 1.1 million students.


4/ John Lennon — Strawberry Fields

 

 

“All we are saying is give peace a chance,” John Lennon sings in his iconic song “Give Peace a Chance.” As tourists around the world know, that message is enshrined in Central Park, in a 2.5 acre section called Strawberry Fields and known colloquially as a Garden of Peace.

The spirit of Lennon is captured in a mosaic celebrating the song “Imagine,” which includes these lines:

“Imagine no possessions
I wonder if you can
No need for greed or hunger
A brotherhood of man
Imagine all the people sharing all the world, you”


5/ Simon & Garfunkel

 

Simon & Garfunkel have lent their voices to numerous causes over their multi-decade career. Last year, for example, Paul Simon joined Global Citizen to present the inaugural George Harrison award, which honors musicians who dedicate their life to activism.

Simon has supported causes including conservation, education, and HIV/AIDS relief.

In 1981, the iconic rock duo played a free show in Central Park in front of what was, up to the that point, the largest concert crowd in the park’s history to support the park’s horticultural program.


6/ James Taylor

James Taylor also has a long career of activism and advocacy. The rock legend has supported causes such as disaster relief, animal rights, rainforest restoration, and many more throughout his life.

In 1979, he played to a massive crowd in Central Park to raise awareness of the park’s need for repairs.


7/ The Global Citizen Festival

Rihanna GCF 2016 Pete Keeling.jpgImage: Global Citizen

Arguably the pinnacle of Central Park’s embrace of music and activism, the Global Citizen Festival has brought 60,000 people to the Great Lawn for five straight years to call for an end to extreme poverty.

Read More: Andra Day Is Rising Up as a Voice for the Voiceless

Over the years, artists like Beyonce, Jay-Z, Rihanna, Kendrick Lamar, Neil Young, Carrie Underwood, Metallica, Major Lazer, and many more have performed alongside heads of state and other world leaders.

Billions of dollars have been committed by governments, NGOs, and private corporations to improve global education, access to water and sanitation, food security, energy independence, women’s rights, and much more.

On Sept. 23, the Global Citizen Festival is returning to Central Park with Stevie Wonder, Greenday, the Killers, Pharrell, and many more musicians to once again call for an end to extreme poverty.

You can find out more about this year’s festival here.

Joe McCarthy is a Content Creator at Global Citizen. He believes apathy is the biggest threat to creating a more just world and tries his hardest to stay open-minded and curious. Living in New York keeps him aware of how interconnected our world is, how every action has ripples.

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SEPT. 7, 2017

How Crowdfunding Can Democratize Fundraising for Everyday Movement Makers

You don't have to be Bill Gates to change lives.

 

Brought to you by: Johnson & Johnson

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The last decade has seen incredible progress in the fields of global health and global development. While philanthropists like Bill Gates often grab the headlines, the power of everyday movement makers has been vital to changing the lives of those most in need. 

It has never been easier for Global Citizens like you to tap into crowds of like-minded individuals to raise attention and mobilize resources by through new, readily available technologies. Crowdfunding is one of these technologies, which democratizes fundraising and allows advocates to raise funds in a faster, more agile way than traditional grantmaking or philanthropy.  

Patricia Silis saw children being abandoned every day in the streets, churches, hallways, and doorsteps throughout the state of Chihuahua in Mexico because of the disabilities they faced. She founded Los Ojos de Dios (meaning “the eyes of God”) and runs a facility that houses disabled children and provides much needed therapy to special needs children in the community for free.  

Though Los Ojos de Dios had accomplished a lot, they still needed $10,000 to provide hundreds of therapy sessions for these children, who had no other access to healthcare and were affected by multiple sclerosis, spina bifida, cerebral palsy, and other conditions. But one of Patricia's colleagues posted about this need on CaringCrowd® — a free crowdfunding platform for non-profits with health-related projects — and rallied 38 supporters from his and the organization’s social networks to raise the funds.  

While Patricia founded her own organization, one of the great features of crowdfunding is being able to advocate for a campaign, even if you don’t work for a non-profit.

Watch the video to hear more about Patricia and other likeminded individuals’ experiences with crowdfunding and get started making a difference today! 

To learn more, visit www.CaringCrowd.org or contact help@caringcrowd.org

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SEPT. 20, 2017

This Is the Best Way to Lift Women Out of Poverty, According to Melinda Gates

“If you believe in women, you fund things for women.”

Tess Sohngen

By Tess Sohngen

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

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In the fight to end extreme poverty, one thing has been proven time and time again: women must be lifted up. Melinda Gates, whose Gates foundation has committed millions of dollars to closing the gender gap, knows this better than anyone.

And last night, Gates called on Congress to do just this by increasing funding to women and girls through family planning and women’s health initiatives — funding that has been threatened by the Trump administration’s proposed foreign aid cuts.

 

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In partnership with: CHIME FOR CHANGE

 

“If you believe in women, you fund things for women, you fund family planning, you fund women’s health,” Gates told CNN.

Take Action: Speak Up for The Millions of Girls and Women Who Are Without Access to Basic Health Services

Gates is the co-chair of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the world’s largest private charity that focuses on eradicating extreme poverty worldwide and addressing global health crises.

 

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has said that family planning is a vital part of global health and development — leading to better educational and economic opportunities for women and promoting healthier families and communities

Under President Trump these services have been threatened.

In one of his first actions as president, Trump signed an executive order — called the “Global Gag Rule” — that effectively ended all US aid to global organizations that provide or educate people on abortion services. He has also slashed approximately $8.8 billion US funding for family planning around the world.

Some of those services included reproductive health, maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS relief, prevention, and treatment for diseases and support for sanitation programs, according to Human Rights Watch.

 

Global Citizen campaigns on providing equal opportunity and rights for women and girls around the world, knowing that they play a critical role in ending extreme poverty. You can take action here.

Read More: UK to Host Family Planning Summit, Amid Fears of Void Left by Global Gag Rule

Gates said she was “deeply troubled” by the president’s decision to slash family funding worldwide, and she and her husband condemned the executive order at the time.

Since, she has traveled to Washington D.C. several times to speak with members of Congress about the importance of funding foreign aid and programs that empower women.

Gates has also spoken out about US foreign aid, urging Congress not to cut funding or else the progress made toward eradicating poverty “will start to slide backwards.”

“The power is in the money,” Gates told CNN.

 

She pointed to countries around the world that have risen from a low-income to middle-income country, such as Bangladesh, where the US funded family planning and reproductive health. However, President Trump’s current budget of over $600 million includes $0 for family planning, Gates said.

“It says that women aren’t important, that family planning isn’t important, that we don’t believe in this,” Gates told CNN. “Yet we know that is the thing that will lift women out of poverty.”

Gates is more optimistic that Congress sees the value in funding family planning and will include it in the budget.

Read More: Ending Gender Discrimination Will Be Centre Stage at 2018 Commonwealth Summit, Pledges UK Minister

Gates spoke several times with First Daughter Ivanka Trump, who has advocated for paid family medical leave for men and women. Gates believes paid family medical leave should be available to workers across the board through employers, as well as at state and federal levels.

 

“There’s no reason in this day and age not to have [paid family leave],” Gates said. “We need to right this wrong in society and make business and family equally important. We value our families, so let’s economically value that as a country.”

As a co-chair of her foundation, Gates did not formally endorse the FAMILY Act, legislation introduced by senator Kirsten Gillibrand (NY) earlier this year that requires up to 12 weeks of paid leave for a worker of any gender that has an infant or family member suffering from an illness.

However, Gates said the legislation is a great starting point to open discussion in Congress on paid family medical leave, and that bipartisan support will be essential for passing a bill into law.

Tess is an Editorial Intern at Global Citizen. Taking chances on unique opportunities has led her to write for a start-up in London, report for grass root organization in Cincinnati, and volunteer in Zanzibar. Helping create a world in which everyone can achieve wellness, food security, and happiness is her mission.

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If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be?
7920
YOUTH AMBASSADORS

If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be?

10 August 2017 1:18PM UTC | By: INE TOLLENAERS

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Today is International Youth Day, which this year celebrates young people’s contributions to inclusion, social justice and sustainable peace. At ONE, we’re lucky to have some inspiring young campaigners in our movement and today’s the perfect day to put their voices in the spotlight.

So, to celebrate International Youth Day, we asked our Youth Ambassadors in Europe, our Champions in Nigeria and Campus Leadersfrom the US: ‘If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be?’ – watch the videos below to find out their thoughts:

Khalid Ahmad, Youth Ambassador from the UK – “I’d make the world a fairer and peaceful place to live.”

Lina, Youth Ambassador from France – “If I could change one thing in the world it would be gender inequalities in girls’ education.”

Ajay, Campus Leader from the US – “If I could change one thing about the world I would make more people empathetic.”

Federica, Youth Ambassador from Italy – “Give more importance to women’s rights – because we know there is no difference between men and women.”

Bryant, Youth Ambassador from the Netherlands – “I would create more education and training opportunities for vulnerable youth.”

Christian, Champion from Nigeria – “If I could change one thing in the world it would be the process that leads to the refugee crisis.”

Bénédicte, Youth Ambassador from Belgium – “I would make sure that everybody — all the children — have the same opportunities…the opportunity to become who they want to be.”

Lena, Youth Ambassador from Germany – “If I could change one thing thing in the world it would be more empathy.” or “See developing countries not as victims but as equal partners who have great potential.”

Jacki, Campus Leader from the US – “I would make it so that people realise their voice matters.”

Claragh, Youth Ambassador from Ireland – “If I could change one thing about the world I would have full and proper gender equality.”

What would YOU change in the world? Leave a comment below or tweet your answer using the hashtag #ONEyouth17!

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174
EDUCATION

The brilliant way these Nigerian schools are helping students overcome illiteracy

24 July 2017 10:00PM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

By Anne Smiley and Nurudeen Lawal, FHI 360

In Northern Nigeria, the vast majority of third-grade pupils cannot read a single word in any language. Teaching materials are few and far between, and most teachers receive little training or support. But in Katsina and Zamfara states, communities are excited to see kids starting to learn how to read in Hausa, a language that almost everyone can speak and understand. Learning to read is the first step to learning across all subjects, setting kids up for success in school.

The Reading and Numeracy Activity, also known as RANA, which means “sun” in Hausa, is working with primary schools, integrated Qur’anic schools, and local government institutions to deliver an evidence-based approach to early grade literacy and numeracy. The program is working: learning assessments show consistent gains across fundamental reading and numeracy skills for both girls and boys.

RANA-Girl-learner-reading-in-class-1024x

RANA came to Salahudeen’s school in 2016, and since then, this bright ten-year-old has become a self-proclaimed reading champion.

“I have always admired people when I see them reading,” he says. “When our teacher started teaching us RANA lessons, I paid attention so that I can also read.”

According to Salahudeen’s father, “The RANA lessons have made him more hardworking and love school. I will support his education to any level within my means. I am very grateful to RANA for giving school a new meaning.”

RANA-Boy-learner-reading-in-class.jpg

Here’s how RANA works:

  • Aims to break every barrier to education access and quality: By directly engaging communities and schools in the process of improving the quality of teaching and learning, and by teaching in Hausa, families are increasingly motivated to participate for the long term.
  • Invests in every teacher: Not only through ongoing training and coaching in the use of high-quality teaching and learning materials in Hausa, but also by equipping teachers with continuous assessment techniques and tools, so that they can directly see the impact on student learning.
  • Measures every outcome: Coaches routinely conduct classroom observations on teachers’ methods of instruction and fidelity to the program design, and learning data is collected as well: three times a year, coaches test a panel of pupils from each class in reading and numeracy fundamentals, allowing the program to study student learning gains over time. Finally,
  • Connects every classroom: Coaches use tablets for observations and monitoring of school and community activities, which rely on GPS time stamps for accountability; and a vibrant online Community of Practice has been created amongst teachers and trainers via Whatsapp, reducing isolation and increasing opportunities for peer learning and review.

RANA represents a holistic, clearly defined, locally-based and locally-owned approach to education reform, with children and their families at the centre. Scale-ups are already being planned, and in some cases implemented, in neighbouring areas. More readers, more books, more learning: sustainable, locally relevant education for all, in action.

RANA is funded by the U.K. Department of International Development (DFID) through the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), and implemented by FHI 360 and its local partners. For more information about RANA, please contact Anne Smiley at globallearning@fhi360.org. To learn more about FHI 360’s work in global education, visit their website.

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AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
24 July 2017 10:00PM UTC

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EDUCATION

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Meet the man who’s helped save 83,500 children from slavery
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AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Meet the man who’s helped save 83,500 children from slavery

12 June 2017 5:45PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

 
   

“There is no greater violence than to deny the dreams of our children.”

This is the warning Kailash Satyarthi had for the world when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Malala Yousafzai in 2014 for his “struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

 

Kailash was only 26 years old when he left his job as a teacher to found Bachpan Bachao Andolan, a grassroots organisation that advocates for children’s rights. Since then, the movement has rescued more than 83,500 individuals from trafficking, slavery, and child labour all while leading the fight for child protectionist laws across India.

More than three decades later, he’s continued to champion the importance of education in building sustainable societies with promising futures, arguing that communities that provide children with safety, education, and good health are more likely to prosper.

Speaking to ONE on a recent visit, Kailash led an inspiring discussion as he spoke passionately about children’s rights and reminded us of the importance of fighting for education.

 

So, what are we waiting for?

Join us and take action today to show world leaders that all #GirlsCount!

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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ROBYN DETORO
12 June 2017 5:45PM UTC

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751
CULTURE

Nigeria’s Chibok girls are the inspiration for a new Marvel hero

September 7 2017 | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

GIRLS COUNT

Every girl counts.

130 million girls are out of school. So we’re asking the world to count them, and urge our leaders to act.

 
  

Move over Captain America and watch out Wonder Woman — here comes Ngozi: a teenage superheroine inspired by Nigeria’s kidnapped Chibok girls who fights evil in Lagos, marking a new chapter in diversity for Marvel Comics.

Ngozi is the star of new title “Blessing in Disguise”, the first Marvel story to be set in a real-life African country – Nigeria’s commercial capital – and feature a Nigerian superhero.

The character stems from the high-profile abduction of about 220 schoolgirls in Chibok in northeast Nigeria in 2014 by the militant group Boko Haram, and the comic’s author hopes the teenage superhero will resonate with girls across the country.

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Women and children affected by Boko Haram in northeast Nigeria. (Photo credit: ONE)

“It was an important decision for me to base Ngozi on the one of the Chibok girls,” Nnedi Okorafor, an award-winning Nigeria-American writer, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The Chibok abduction sparked international outrage and became the most infamous act by the Islamist Boko Haram group which has killed 20,000 people and uprooted at least 2 million in a brutal eight-year campaign that shows no sign of ending.

Two young women who escaped from Boko Haram made an appearance at the United Nations on International Women's Day 2016. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

Two young women who escaped from Boko Haram made an appearance at the United Nations on International Women’s Day 2016. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

“They were normal girls who suddenly had to deal with a huge change in their lives … and their story of perseverance is so powerful,” Okorafor added. “Like many Nigerian girls, Ngozi comes in a small package but is strong-willed and determined.”

The short story is part of Marvel’s “Venomverse” comic, published on Wednesday, which sees Ngozi appear alongside well-established Marvel characters from Venom to the Black Panther.

Embed from Getty Images

Okorafor said she was buoyed by the global success of the summer box office hit “Wonder Woman” – the first superhero movie to star a woman since 2005 – with the character hailed as a new role model for girls and a break away from sexism in Hollywood.

Yet the U.S.-based science fiction author said that she was desperate to see more diversity in the world of superheroes.

 
 

 

“I’m a huge Wonder Woman fan, but we can really push it further when it comes to diversity,” said Okorafor, who is also an English professor at the University at Buffalo in New York.

“I’m not just talking about race and sexual orientation, but about having a range of personalities with different desires, dreams and flaws,” she added. “I don’t only want to see badass female characters, I want to see much less predictable ones.”

A ONE member campaigns for girls' education at the United Nations on International Women's Day 2017. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

A ONE member campaigns for girls’ education at the United Nations on International Women’s Day 2017. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

Several comicbook fans have shared their excitement about the character of Ngozi on social media sites such as Twitter.

“A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian Woman. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive,” Twitter user Beth Lee posted.

Reporting By Kieran Guilbert, Editing by Katy Migiro.

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SEPT. 15, 2017

More than 200,000 Kids Are Trying to Escape ‘Ethnic Cleansing’ in Myanmar, UN Says

Many have been separated from their families and are making the dangerous journey alone.

Daniele Selby

By Daniele Selby

 

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Approximately 400,000 Rohingya Muslims have fled violence in Rakhine, Myanmar, over the last three weeks — and more than half of them are children — according to UN estimates.

Many of the children are unaccompanied and separated from their families. And the refugee camps in which the Rohingya are being held in Bangladesh are chaotic and well over capacity, the New York Times reports.

Read more: Myanmar’s Rohingya Crisis: Everything You Need to Know

"The first thing you see here in the different Rohingya camps is the large number of children. You see children who have not slept for days, they are weak and hungry,” UNICEF Chief of Child Protection in Bangladesh Jean Lieby said. “

After such a long and challenging journey many children are sick and they need health care right away. Children are traumatized. They need protection and psychological support,” he said.

 

And because children are particularly vulnerable to the dangers of living in such conditions, the crisis is also a health emergency. 

“There are acute shortages of everything, most critically shelter, food and clean water,” another UNICEF representative said. “Conditions on the ground place children at risk of high risk of water-borne disease. We have a monumental task ahead of us to protect these extremely vulnerable children.”

Read more: Half of All Migrants Are Children, And Other Startling Facts About Refugees

In situations like these, children are particularly vulnerable to being trafficked, abused, and forced into labor or marriage.

Global Citizen campaigns for the childrens’ rights and the protection of refugees globally. You can take action here.

Read more: Refugee and Migrant Children Are Being Trafficked at Record Rates, UN Says

 

The Rohingya have been fleeing ethnic and religious violence in Myanmar, which the UN High Commissioner for Refugees has denounced as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.”

UNICEF has appealed for $7.3 million to provide emergency support and humanitarian aid to hundreds of thousands of Rohingya children affected by the violence over the next four months, as the violence shows no signs of letting up.

Daniele is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She believes that education and the equal provision of human rights will empower change. She studied music and psychology at Vassar before earning her Masters of International Affairs at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Daniele brings with her an unhealthy love of chili and chocolate, and a small, fluffy dog from the Little Red Dot (Singapore) to the Big Apple.

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15/08/2017

Music Generation activities and events are announced as part of Culture Night 2017

Music Generation activities and events are announced as part of Culture Night 2017

This year Culture Night will take place on Friday 22nd September 2017 – an all-island public event celebrating creativity, culture and the arts. We’re delighted that this year’s programme once again incorporates several partnerships with Music Generation, including activities, concerts and opportunities to get musical in Wicklow, Laois, Offaly/Westmeath and Cork City…

Music Generation South Dublin is teaming up with Tallaght Community Arts and the OPW/Pearse Museum to present a night celebrating music and spoken word. This free, family event will include a Ukulele Workshop led by Bryan Fleming, a Hip Hop Workshop and Performance by Street Art Academy and an outdoor traditional music performance Music Generation South Dublin. Places on the workshops are limited and will be allocated on a first-come, first-served basis.

Address: The Pearse Museum, St Enda’s Park Rathfarnham
Time: 5pm - 9pm
Find out more
___

Music Generation Laois invites you to witness an electric Samba Drum Spectacle under the direction of drumming specialist Peter Crann. The event will include a performance by a visiting professional Samba Band who will be joined by members of the Music Generation Laois Samba programme, as well as children from local primary schools who have participated in workshops in preparation for the event. (Outdoor event, weather permitting)

Address: The Plaza, Áras an Chontae, Portlaoise, Co Laois
Time: 5pm - 6pm
Find out more
___

Music Generation Cork City in partnership with the Cork Academy of Musicpresents a free jazz improvisation workshop with Tom Mulcahy, open to musicians of all ages and instruments from intermediate to advanced playing ability.

Address: Griffin Burke Building, North Monastery Campus, North Monastery Rd, Cork
Time: 4.30pm - 6pm
Find out more
___

All are welcome to enjoy a lunch-time inclusive music and brass band performance at City Hall’s Millennium Hall, with demonstrations of assistive music-making technologies, presented by SoundOUT, the School of the Divine Child, Music Mash-Up and Mahon Community Concert Band (Cork Academy of Music) in partnership with Music Generation Cork City.
Time: 12pm - 1.30pm

The City Hall Plaza will host an evening of musical entertainment with performances from the Barrack Street Youth Band, in partnership with Music Generation Cork City, (5.30pm - 6.10pm), the Polyonics Barbershop Choir (7.30pm - 8pm) and the City of Cork Male Voice Choir (8pm - 9pm).

Address: New Civic Offices, Anglesea Street
Time: 5.30pm - 9pm
Find out more
___

The Millennium Hall will come alive once more on Friday evening with another unique live music experience, featuring rock and pop bands, rappers, traditional Irish music groups and brass bands, presented by Youth Work Ireland Cork, SoundOUT, Music in Community, GMC Beats, Club Ceoil Knocknaheeny (Creative Tradition), the Barrack Street Youth Band and Ballyphehane Youth Project in partnership with Music Generation Cork City.

Time: 6.30pm - 8.30pm

Address: Millennium Hall, City Hall, Eglinton Street, Cork
Find out more: https://culturenight.ie/event/city-hall-millenium-hall/
___

Music Generation Offaly/ Westmeath in partnership with Youth Work Ireland (Midlands) and the Edenderry Youth Café present ‘Edenderry Rocks On’, an open mic night showcasing the work of the Edenderry Rockers. Now in its third year, this event will bring together young people involved in Music Generation Offaly/Westmeath’s programmes for an evening of music and song.

Address: Edenderry Youth Cafe, School Lane, Edenderry
Time: 7.30pm - 9pm
Find out more
___

Music Generation Wicklow will present a Bodhrán Buzz Workshop at Arklow Library suitable for families and music enthusiasts ages 7+. Guided by The Bodhrán Buzz’s Robbie Walsh, participants will learn how to hold a bodhrán, the stick and the basics of finding your rhythm and beat! (Places are limited, advance booking required)

Address: Arklow Library, Main Street, Arklow
Time: 6pm - 6.45pm
Find our more: https://culturenight.ie/event/bodhran-buzz-arklow-library/
___

Music Generation Cork City
Public rap & bets workshop with performances from local artists and open-mic at the Kabin Studio (supported by Music Generation Cork City & GMC Beats Workshops). Record in the vocal booth, try out some beatmaking technology or just sit back and enjoy the tunes.

Address: Across from Credit Union, Harbour View Road, Knocknaheeny, Cork.
Time: 6pm - 8pm
Website: www.gmcbeats.com
___

Music Generation Mayo
Ballina Arts Centre has participated in Culture Night since it became a county wide event and celebrates with a programme of activities for all ages. There are six events planned in the arts centre this year.

Mapping Music with The Core is a Musical showcase by members of Music generation Mayo’s The Core youth music project. Musicians from the project will present original music based on music from around the world.

Address: Ballina Arts Centre, Barrett Street
Time: 4pm - 9.30pm
Website
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Music Generation Limerick
Dance Limerick brings together youth and professional artists for an evening of dance, music, poetry and colour in Limerick’s Cultural Quarter!

Address: Dance Limerick, 1-2 John’s Square, Limerick
Time: 6pm - 9pm
Website: www.dancelimerick.ie
___

Music Generation Limerick City
Music Generation Limerick City will throw open the doors of their Creative Centre, the only one of its kind in the country. Activities include a Silent Disco & green-screen song recording and pop-up gigs though-out the 12 studios. This is a chance to get involved with hands on music making.

Address: Music Generation Creative Centre, Athenaeum Building, 30 Cecil Street, Limerick
Time: 5pm - 7pm
Website
___

Music Generation Cork City
From 5pm: Free music workshops on the Cork Community Gamelan, presented by Music Generation Cork City in partnership with UCC. No musical experience necessary. Booking recommended, see www.musicgencc.eventbrite.com.

Address: The Lido, 71 Watercourse Road, Blackpool, Cork
Time: 5pm - 9pm
Website: www.corkcommunityartlink.com
___

For more information about Culture Night and to view the full programme of events visit culturenight.ie

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