Jump to content
tan_lejos_tan_cerca

The Action Thread Part Two

Recommended Posts

 
BACK IN THE DAY

These vintage photos capture the lives of young Ethiopians in Addis Ababa 50 years ago

Cinema Addis Ababa 1935
Young people studying posters advertising a cinema in Addis Ababa in 1935. (AP Photo/Alfred Eisenstaedt)
SHARE
WRITTEN BY
Khanya Mtshali
OBSESSION
Lifestyle
September 21, 2017 Quartz Africa

Three years ago, Philipp Schütz, a Swiss publisher and photographer based in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, bought two books about Uganda by Dutch photographer, Andrea Stultiens.

The photography, a selection of curated images taken by Ugandan photographers, shows people going about their lives under colonization, regime changes, and dictatorships. The project was meant to digitize and preserve Ugandan photography, which Schütz drew inspiration from. Along with photographer Wongel Abebe, who documented students at Addis Ababa University last year, and documentary photographer Nafkot Gebeyehu, they started Vintage Addis Ababa in July 2017.

The site allows Ethiopians to submit old photographs of ordinary people in Addis Ababa to a Tumblr page. At first, Schütz and Abebe wanted to sell and market the book to an international audience, but decided to target locals instead.

Chemistry students 1966 Vintage Addis Ababa Science and Engineering college students at an open day in Addis Ababa in 1966. (Tumblr/Vintage Addis Ababa)

“For Ethiopians, the project is a lot more about identity rather than just art,” said Schütz. “We knew their participation in the archiving process and development of the project [was] crucial. Everything that grows out of this project in the future will be influenced by this crowd sourcing approach.”

For Wongel Abebe, the decision to make Addis Ababa the centerpiece of the project was a matter of practicality and historical significance. “Much of Ethiopia’s documented history tells of stories of a select few, and of what are categorized as ‘major’ events,” Abebe said. “Although this documentation speaks of truth, it can’t represent the whole picture of how things were at the time. Vintage Addis Ababa focuses on the happenings of just this one city.”

tumblr_ott1rbPMGN1vgydeio1_1280 Young Ethiopian women pictured in the 1970s. (Tumblr/Vintage Addis Ababa)

The period in which many of the photos were taken was an active time in Ethiopian history. Addis Ababa, the nation’s capital, was the location of important political events. From the first conference for the Organization of African Unity in 1963, to the 1974 coup which overthrew monarch Haile Selassie, three years shy of the war between Ethiopia and Somalia in 1977.

Students rowing in 1975. Two men row papyrus boats on Tana Lake in 1975.(Tumblr/Vintage Addis Ababa)

Vintage Addis Ababa aims to show that people still had lives to live in spite of the monumental incidents happening in the country. “It never occurred to me that even in tough seasons, everyday people still lived moments worth remembering. People got married, went to photo studies, developed a sense for fashion, celebrated, studied, traveled, and started businesses,” Abebe said.

And it appears the site is tapping into a desire to see the capital’s history told through the lens of everyday people. In the almost two months Vintage Addis Ababa has been active, their posts reach on Facebook was over 400,000, and post engagement listed at almost 123,000.

Nafkot Gebeyehu credits the site’s growing popularity to “people-friendly” content that allows the “opportunity for [users] to be involved in preserving history as well.”

The site’s photos are all scanned professionally so they can be used in different formats. Schütz, Abebe, and Gebeyehu said their submissions and audience are mostly based in the country, but they’re already receiving interest from Ethiopian communities in the US, Australia, and the United Arab Emirates. One of the likely reasons this is focusing on the diaspora is that internet penetration is quite low in Ethiopia despite the uptick in mobile subscribers in the country.

Wedding in 1984 The wedding of Martha Taffesse and Milkias Shamebo in 1984.(Tumblr/Vintage Addis Ababa)

“One of the reasons the project is successful is also the intimacy of the photos,” Schütz said. “Foreign photographers have been documenting Ethiopia for over a century, but their photos often lack intimacy.” For the co-founders of Vintage Addis Ababa, the hope is to collect photographs for a year before publishing a photography book Ethiopia can call its own.

Food and drink Enjoying a meta beer and good food. (Tumblr/Vintage Addis Ababa)

Sign up for the Quartz Africa Weekly Brief — the most important and interesting news from across the continent, in your inbox.

 
 
 
 
THE PEOPLE'S ART

Africa’s largest museum for modern art opens this month in a former grains silo

SHARE
OBSESSION
Design
September 24, 2017Quartz Africa

The largest contemporary art museum in Africa is set to open its doors to the public.

Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa (MOCAA) will become the first African museum to showcase art strictly from the continent and the diaspora. Located near a harbor in Cape Town, South Africa, the building used to be Cape Town’s grain silos, a factory part of an industrial area. Built in 1921, it was once the tallest building in sub-Saharan Africa and a source for agricultural advancement in the country before it closed in 2001.

Partly funded by the mall complex, the V&A Waterfront, Zeitz MOCAA plans to provide a platform for artists on the continent to display their work.

776_4_hr_zeitzmocaa_heatherwickstudio_credit_iwan-baan_atrium.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&w=50 Zeitz MOCAA atrium. (Iwan Baan)

The building was designed by British architect, Thomas Heatherwick, who first came to Cape Town around two decades ago, and was transfixed by the factory’s grain silos and lofty heights. When building the museum, which is 100,000 square feet, the silos were sliced and shaped into a concave structure with rock-shaped holes. Zeitz MOCAA will house more than 100 galleries, six research centers, a rooftop garden, and a hotel on the top floor. The museum overlooks Robben Island where former president Nelson Mandela, was imprisoned. Its grand opening is slated to take place on Sept, 22.

776_4__hr_zeitzmocaa_heatherwickstudio_credit_iwan-baan_exterior-at-dusk.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&w=50 Outside Zeitz MOCAA. (Iwan Baan)

The museum is named after Jochen Zeitz, former CEO of Puma and an African art enthusiast. Many of the museum’s items will come from his private collections. “It’s a public museum with a private collection,” Zeitz told the Financial Times, adding that MOCAA is “not [his] museum or the Waterfront’s — it’s for Africa.”

776_1_hr_zeitzmocaa_heatherwickstudio_credit_iwan-baan_harbour-view.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&w=50 Overlooking Cape Town’s harbor.(Iwan Baan)

But some have questioned whether the museum will become a creative hub for African artists and people keen to see their work. The museum, despite being a landmark African institution, is named after a German man who once operated global sportswear brand. There are also doubts about Cape Town’s suitability as a host for this pan-Africanist project. Often criticized for its hostility to black South Africans, the city has gained a reputation for being beautiful but bigoted, with South Africans and foreigners often remarking how colonial and Eurocentric it feels.

776_5_hr_zeitzmocaa_heatherwickstudio_credit_iwan-baan_atrium-vault.jpg?quality=80&strip=all&w=50 The view above. (Iwan Baan)

Sign up for the Quartz Africa Weekly Brief — the most important and interesting news from across the continent, in your inbox.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Marketing and Communications Officer

BY IAYO · SEPTEMBER 8, 2017

 

The Irish Association of Youth Orchestras is recruiting for a Marketing and Communications Officer to work at their office in Cork City. This is an opportunity for the successful candidate to contribute to the development of youth orchestras and youth music throughout Ireland with a wide, but manageable, portfolio of activity to a variety of stakeholders and the general public.

IAYOfest-40-600x360.jpg

Role Title: Marketing and Communications Officer

Location: Civic Trust House, 50 Pope’s Quay, Cork.

Contract: Permanent full-time (37.5 hours per week). There is a 6-month probationary period. Annual leave of 25 days per annum. Some weekend work may be required for which time-off-in-lieu will be given as per the IAYO Employee Handbook. There is currently no pension scheme operated by IAYO – employees will be facilitated in a PRSA.

Salary: €28k-€30k depending on skills and experience.

Application Deadline: Monday, 16 October 2017 at 5pm.

Interviews: Interviews will take place on Friday 10 November 2017 at the IAYO Offices in Cork (subject to confirmation). Online interviews may be offered to candidates resident outside of the Republic of Ireland.

How to Apply: Application for the post is by application form and cover letter.

Downloads

IAYO Marketing and Communications Officer Application Pack (.pdf)

IAYO Application Form.docx (Microsoft Word)

IAYO Application Form.odt (OpenDocument Text or OpenOffice / LibreOffice)

cropped-PopesQuay-600x334.jpg

 

 
 
 
IAYO Logo    Arts Council Logo    Cork City Logo    TourismCultureSport.png    MusicNetwork.png    The Ireland Funds Logo 

IYWELogo.png    ConCordaLogo.png    

NYCILogo.png    NCFAweb.jpg    WheelLogo.png    BusinesstoArts.png    VolunteerIreland.png ABOweb.png    European-Orchestra-Federation.png

 

The Irish Association of Youth Orchestras Ltd (IAYO) is the all-Ireland resource organisation for youth orchestras.

IAYO is a company limited by guarantee, registered in Ireland, No: 296500, and a registered charity, No: 20045623.

IAYO is grant aided by The Arts Council and supported by Cork City Council.

IAYO acknowledges the support of The Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht and Music Network through the Music Capital Scheme 2010-2015.

Directors: Paolo Cordone (Chairperson), Niall Catney, Michael Core, Clare Daly, Amy Gillen, Dervilla Hynes, Brian Murray, Ed Phelan, Marianne White.

Staff: Allin Gray (Director), Bertie Buckley (Administrator), Yvonne Owens (Marketing and Communications Officer), Emmett O'Shaughnessy (Marketing and Communications Assistant).

Registered Address: Civic Trust House, 50 Pope's Quay, Cork, Ireland. T23 R6XC

T: +353 21 421 5185      M: +353 86 057 0062 (Vodafone)      E: info@iayo.ie

 

Irish Association of Youth Orchestras, Civic Trust House, Pope's Quay, Cork. T23 R6XC
T: +353 21 421 5185 E:info@iayo.ie W:www.iayo.ie

 
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. We hope you're okay with that?Ok

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We believe everyone should be able to live an independent life with the ability to choose where and who they live with, and make decisions about their own future. 

Take a look at our Golden Lane Housing and see if it is right for you or a family member. 
https://www.mencap.org.uk/advice-and-support/services-you-can-count/golden-lane-housing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPT. 25, 2017

Andra Day Performed a Chilling Rendition of 'Strange Fruit' at the 2017 Global Citizen Festival

Originally by Billie Holiday, the song was a protest against lynching and racism in America.

Daniele Selby

By Daniele Selby

 

  •  
  •  
  •  
 

Andra Day stunned the crowd at the 2017 Global Citizen Festival on Saturday evening with her incredible rendition of “Strange Fruit” when she took to the stage after the Equal Justice Initiative’s video about the history of slavery and lynching, and the enduring legacy of racism in America.

“Southern trees bear strange fruit,” she began, unaccompanied.

The “strange fruit” to which the song refers are the bodies of lynched black Americans and became a protest song against violent racism when it was first recorded in 1939 by Billie Holiday.

Day wore a broken pair of handcuffs as she gave a chilling performance of the song before a video backdrop, which listed the names of people who were lynched, as well as where and when they were killed. According to the NAACP, 3,446 black people were lynched between 1882 and 1968, accounting for more than 70% of all people lynched during that time period.

Day’s moving performance was both a powerful statement about race, violence, and mass incarceration in America today, and a tribute to Holiday, one of Day’s inspirations.

“The artists that I admired when I was young and who I was exposed to at school—artists like Nina Simone and Billie Holiday... They use[d] their platforms to talk about race,” Day told Jezebel

“Being inspired by artists like that, it’s not just a decision,” she continued. “I think it’s a driving force inside me, to do not do music just for myself, but to do it because you have a platform and a you have a responsibility.”

Throughout the performance, her backup singers sat slumped over, as if lifeless, recalling lives lost as a result of racial violence.

“That was a song that was written over 80 years ago and unfortunately the message in the song is still just as relevant today as it was then,” Day told the crowd at the festival.

She explained that Billie Holiday sang “Strange Fruit” to “stand up for something” even if it meant her life would be threatened, and encouraged audience members to stand up for something too.

Day was one of several artists who commanded the Global Citizen Festival stage on Saturday to stand up for freedom, for justice, for all.

"People are absolutely worth the fight and sacrifice. They just need to know that and know that other people feel that way about them," she told Global Citizen.

Her performance of “Strange Fruit” in Central Park certainly let people know that she’s ready to fight for them.

Daniele is an Editorial Coordinator at Global Citizen. She believes that education and the equal provision of human rights will empower change. She studied music and psychology at Vassar before earning her Masters of International Affairs at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Daniele brings with her an unhealthy love of chili and chocolate, and a small, fluffy dog from the Little Red Dot (Singapore) to the Big Apple.

  •  
  •  
  •  
 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP

What's Trending In Citizenship

Sept. 21, 2017

The world’s most peaceful country has held the title since 2008. Read More

Aug. 1, 2017

This year's lineup is better than ever. Read More

Sept. 25, 2017

Taking a knee in protest of inequality is an act that goes back decades. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global Citizen is a community of people like you

People who want to learn about and take action on the world’s biggest challenges. Extreme poverty ends with you.

Learn more
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SEPT. 25, 2017

This Yazidi Survivor Wants ISIS to Pay for Its Crimes — and the UK Is Leading the Charge for Justice

We’ve just taken a huge step forward.

Imogen Calderwood

By Imogen Calderwood

Brought to you by: CHIME FOR CHANGE

  •  
  •  
  •  
 

 

Today marks a major step forward in the fight for justice for the Yazidi people.

Three years after the Islamic State stormed their home in Iraq, killing many and taking others as slaves and, particularly, as sex slaves, the United Nations finally made progress toward seeking justice thanks to actions from Global Citizens and leadership by the United Kingdom.

One Yazidi activist and survivor, Shireen Ibrahim, bravely told her story to the 60,000-strong crowd assembled in New York’s Central Park for the Global Citizen Festival on Saturday. 

“My people, the Yazidis, suffered genocide at the hands of ISIS,” she said. “ISIS killed our men and children, raped our girls, sold women off as property, and made us watch it all happen. We were separated from our friends and family and put in isolation. There was no escape.” 

Read more: This Yazidi Boy Has Reunited With His Family in Canada 3 Years After Being Captured by ISIS

“I was captured by the ISIS militants, constantly sold and resold as a slave, worth only $1,” Ibrahim continued. “However, unlike thousands of other Yazidis, I was lucky enough to have escaped. But ISIS still holds many Yazidis in captivity.”

Despite their terrible war crimes, no ISIS perpetrator has been prosecuted. 

But now, after an 18-month campaign by Global Citizen, the UK has announced a giant step forward in the global effort to bring justice against the ISIS fighters who unleashed terror on the Yazidi community.

UK Permanent Representative to the UN, Matthew Rycroft, announced that the UK led the UN Security Council to a unanimous vote this week on the decision to set up a UN Investigation Team to pursue justice for the Yazidis. The UN resolution on ISIS accountability was described as a “long overdue first step” by the UN Office for the High Commissioner on Human Rights.

“I'm proud to say that just this week the UK has led the UN Security Council finally to do something. By 15 votes to 0, we decided to set up a UN Investigation Team that will help Iraq collect, preserve, and store evidence of acts that may amount to war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide committed by Daesh,” Rycroft said in a statement.

UN Assistant Secretary-General of Human Rights Andrew Gilmour responded to 80,000 actions by Global Citizens and committed that the UN teams on the ground would gather evidence to secure justice for the Yazidis.

“Like tens of thousands of committed Global Citizens, the UN Human Rights Office has been calling loudly for justice. Tonight I commit that my colleagues on the ground will monitor and report on human rights abuses for the purpose of evidence-gathering." Gilmour said.

 

Take Action: Sign Petition

 
 
 
1 point

 



United StatesUnited KingdomGermanyCanadaAustraliaAfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBruneiBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCabo VerdeCambodiaCameroonCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo (the Democratic Republic of the)Cook IslandsCosta RicaCôte d'IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands  [Malvinas]Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambia (The)GeorgiaGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuamGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and McDonald IslandsHoly See  [Vatican City State]HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIranIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKuwaitKyrgyzstanLaosLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedoniaMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMarshall IslandsMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMicronesia (the Federated States of)MoldoviaMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorth KoreaNorthern Mariana IslandsNorwayOmanPakistanPalauPalestine, State ofPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalPuerto RicoQatarRéunionRomaniaRussiaRwandaSaint BarthélemySaint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth KoreaSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyriaTaiwanTajikistanTanzaniaThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited States Minor Outlying IslandsUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuelaVietnamVirgin Islands (British)Virgin Islands (U.S.)Wallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabwe 
In partnership with: Yazda & It’s On U and CHIME FOR CHANGE

 

“It’s because of the bravery of women and girls like Shireen that the world has learnt the true horrors of groups like Daesh or ISIS,” Rycroft, told the crowd.

The Yazidi people have experienced unimaginable trauma over the past three years, since they faced genocide at the hands of ISIS in 2014.

They have been sold as slaves, and they have been forced to look on as their friends and family were murdered by the terror group members. 

More than 1,600 women and girls are still held as sex slaves and are unaccounted for, while over 1,700 men and boys are still missing, according to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights 

“We have heard their stories of kidnapping, torture, modern slavery. But we’ve heard something else too,” Rycroft said. “Stories of survival, defiance, incredible courage in the face of unspeakable cruelty. We cannot bring back the dead, or erase the memories. But what we can do is bring the terrorists responsible to justice.”

He thanked the 130,000 global citizens who have taken action, calling for justice for Yazidi women like Shireen, and said that the UK government has heard their call loud and clear. 

“Our message to the terrorists is this: you will never win and there is simply no escape from justice,” he finished. “I’m proud that the UK could play our part in making this happen. We did it for Shireen and other survivors like her.” 

Read more: The Clooneys Casually Reveal They Have Taken a Yazidi Refugee Into Their Home

Britain will provide some $1.3 million to help establish the UN’s investigation team, according to a statement from British Minister of State for the Middle East, Alistair Burt. 

The evidence gathered is mainly for use by Iraqi authorities, according to reports , but international courts will also be able to use the evidence in selected cases.

Read more: The UN Responds to Global Citizens and Declares Importance of Achieving Justice for Yazidi Genocide

“Like tens of thousands of outraged and committed Global Citizens, the UN Human Rights Office has been calling loudly for the investigation and justice,” he said. “Justice for the Yazidis and all the other groups that have suffered. Justice for Daesh and all the other perpetrators of horrors. Let us build on this global alliance between us to ensure that we indeed get that justice.” 

But Ibrahim insisted that we cannot afford to get complacent in this struggle, that we cannot forget the continued suffering of her people. 

“We cannot stop fighting for their freedom and justice,” she said. “They tried to take my honour and dignity, yet here I stand, in front of all of you. We are Yazidis, and we will always be Yazidis. We must stand together, strong and united, and not let the atrocities of ISIS define us.”

Imogen is content writer & editor at Global Citizen UK. A former global news journalist, Imogen has been flitting from Australia to Spain to India since graduating from the University of Warwick. She's also trying to read all the Booker Prize winners, so wish her luck because there are loads.

  •  
  •  
  •  
chime-logo_container.jpg
About Our Partner

CHIME FOR CHANGE is a global campaign founded by Gucci in 2013 to convene, unite and strengthen the voices speaking out for girls and women around the world. The campaign uses innovative approaches to promote gender equality. Co-founded by Beyoncé Knowles-Carter and Salma Hayek Pinault, CHIME FOR CHANGE works with a coalition of partner organizations, including the Kering Foundation, Facebook, and Hearst Magazines.

 
Stay up to date

Receive alerts about the world's biggest challenges.

 
SIGN UP

What's Trending In Citizenship

Sept. 21, 2017

The world’s most peaceful country has held the title since 2008. Read More

Aug. 1, 2017

This year's lineup is better than ever. Read More

Sept. 25, 2017

Taking a knee in protest of inequality is an act that goes back decades. Read More

 
 
JOIN THE CONVERSATION
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

© 2012-2017 Global Poverty Project, Inc All Rights Reserved

 
 
×
Global Citizen
Global Citizen
FREE - In Google Play
VIEW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skip to content
Ensuring everyone has the right to read and learn
4025
TECHNOLOGY

Ensuring everyone has the right to read and learn

7 November 2016 3:47PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

JOIN

Join the fight against extreme poverty

 
  

Literacy skills are one of the most powerful tools that enable people to lift themselves out of poverty. But today, nearly 17% of the world’s adult population is still not literate; two thirds of them women, making gender equality even harder to achieve.

margaret1Reading is one of the best ways to help students improve these skills, but for families around the world living on less than $1 a day, books are an unaffordable luxury.

To overcome this barrier, Worldreader devised a mobile app that gives anyone with a phone, tablet, or e-reader access to over 40,000 free book titles in over 43 different languages. With many African schools equipped with few or no books, the availability of digital books has been transformational.

margaret4For women like Margaret in Kenya, attending school was not an option so she missed out on learning even the most basic literacy skills. Unable to read or write, Margaret took a job as a cleaner in a local nursery school and spent days watching the small children learn. This is what inspired her to become a teacher, but first she would have to start her learning too.  

margaret5She began classes at an Adult Learning Centre, quickly adopting the skills she would need to become a qualified teacher and achieving her dream. However, once Margaret was at the front of the classroom, she quickly realised the cost and lack of access to books were a barrier to her student’s education, so she turned to the Worldreader reading app. “Everything you want to learn, you can find it in the phone,” she said.

Margaret now uses her mobile phone to lead lessons and engage students in the classroom. Her students can access thousands of ebooks for free on their mobiles for just a few cents a week of data cost in an in environment where a single physical book can often cost $5 or more.

margaret3“They tell me, ‘Teacher, we want to know more, we want to know more!’,” Margaret says.

To learn more about Worldreader, visit worldreader.org. To read books on your mobile phone using Worldreader’s applications visit read.worldreader.org or download the app on the Google Play Store.

Call on leaders and innovators from all countries, industries and communities to make universal internet access a reality by adding your name now.

Join the fight against extreme poverty

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         Select country Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       
 

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skip to content
How internet access led to success for this Rwandan shop
295
TECHNOLOGY

How internet access led to success for this Rwandan shop

November 23 2016 | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

By Gaius Kowene

As the sun goes down on the town of Kigali in Rwanda, a young woman is negotiating with some of her last customers of the day at Turikumwe Art Center, a social business that reinvests its income to support single mothers.

In this living room-turned-shop, she is surrounded by handmade clothes, as well as bags and jewelry made from Igitenge, a popular Dutch fabric that has been blended with the African identity.

img_0013

Freedah working on her sewing machine in her workshop in Rwanda.

Sylvie Isimbi, a 21-year-old graduate in math and computer science, has been working here as the Shop Manager for almost a year, and considers promoting locally manufactured products her dream job.

But she acknowledges that without access to the internet, finding and landing the job wouldn’t have been so easy for her.

“I would spend most of my time browsing the internet looking for employment opportunities and scholarships” she recalls of her immediate post-university days.

img_9997

Sylvie Isimbi, shop manager at Turikumwe Art Center.

When the saw the job posting, she was able to directly apply online and do research about job interview tactics.

“I learned a lot of tips that boosted my self confidence,” she says. “I’m sure this gave me an advantage over other candidates who didn’t have permanent access to the internet.”

Sylvie is using the same skills that got her to job to keep the job. She helped the shop attract more customers by advertising online—a much less expensive option than traditional media in Rwanda.

“I occasionally act as the model,” she says with a smile. She tries on some of the shop’s clothing items, takes photos of herself with her smartphone, and shares them on the shop’s social media channels.

“Just yesterday, I posted a photo of myself wearing a jacket and hat we made here. My auntie immediately requested it and bought it,” she says, adding that this happens on an almost-daily basis with friends, family, and complete strangers.

img_0021

Sylvie Isimbi (L) and Freda (R) pose with Justin Sunday, Turikumwe Art Center Founder.

Through these ads, Sylvie hopes to bring in more customers for the shop’s clothes and crafts, thereby promoting the work of the talented single mothers employed by the shop. According to Turikumwe Art Center records, more than 70 single mothers are benefiting from the increasing internet-driven sales.

One of them, Freedah Nyirahakiziyaremye, is raising her seven children. Despite nearly 20 years of experience in tailoring and fashion design, she was hardly making ends meet while working on her own.

img_0014

View of Turikumwe Art Center shop.

But since her work started being advertised online, things have changed for the better. Now can she pay school fees for all her children, as well as save money for future investment in real estate.

“I already started building my own house and very soon won’t need to rent anymore,” she says.

Apart from the craft work, Sylvie says their business would close doors without access to the internet.

“Internet is everything for us,” she says.

img_0023

A sign indicating the center location.

Unfortunately, not all Rwandans have the luxury of accessing the internet. According to the International Telecommunications Union, only 18% of people in Rwanda are using the internet.

“Most of my friends don’t even know what the internet is all about and think it’s tricky stuff,” says Sylvie, adding that the low speed also poses an issue. “I tried to show some of them how they could also benefit from the internet, but they were impatient as the speed to show pages was very slow.”

img_0015

A customer buying handmade products at Turikumwe Art Center.

Currently, Sylvie shares her salary with disadvantaged members of her church and focuses on improving the online promotion of her shop’s handmade products. She knows that the more people she can support via her connectivity, the more she can help people become self-sufficient, opening up a world of possibilities for the future.

TAKE ACTION: Call on leaders and innovators from all countries, industries and communities to make universal internet access a reality.

Create an internet for everyone

I believe internet access is essential for achieving humanity’s potential.The internet is critical to sharing new ideas, fighting injustice, and helping create new jobs – with it people can achieve extraordinary things.But, over half the people on this planet don’t have access, especially women and girls.The internet belongs to everyone.It should be accessible by everyone. I call on leaders and innovators from all countries, industries and communities to make universal internet access a reality.

ADD YOUR NAME

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       

When you submit your details, you accept ONE’s privacy policy and will receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

GUEST BLOGGER
November 23 2016

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Skip to content
How one man is connecting Kakuma refugee camp to the rest of the world
46
TECHNOLOGY

How one man is connecting Kakuma refugee camp to the rest of the world

September 26 2017 | By: MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO

ADD YOUR NAME

Create an internet for everyone

 
  

When Innocent fled his native Democratic Republic of the Congo and arrived in the Kakuma refugee camp in 2009, he felt as if he couldn’t have been any further from the rest of the world.

Kakuma is a sprawling settlement in a remote and arid part of northwestern Kenya, and its inhabitants — refugees from DRC, Somalia, Burundi, Ethiopia, and other countries — have little access to higher education, business opportunities, job markets, and healthcare.

Kakuma-4-1024x575.jpg

For a while, like many others in Kakuma, Innocent spent his days idling away time. In Congo, he had been studying electrical engineering at Goma University. But here in the camp, opportunities for study and work were few and far between.

But all of that changed the day he was awarded a scholarship to study through Jesuit Worldwide Learning, which provides higher education to communities on the margins of society. Through a computer screen in the camp’s learning center, Innocent and several other students were able to connect to tutors and professors on the other side of the world at Regis University in Colorado.

“There is no university in Kakuma, but the internet gave us a virtual campus and we were able to further our education,” says Innocent, who was awarded a diploma in liberal arts with a major in business. “Even before I received the diploma, I was able to start my own grocery business thanks to what I had learned through that online course.”

Innocent-computer-1024x794.jpg

Once Innocent made a living off what he’d learned and the impact of his online education became clear, he knew that countless others in the camp would also benefit from being connected to the internet.

Inspired by his love of art, Innocent created a website to connect artists in Kakuma to the outside world: “I know so many talented artists, but they used to be desperate because they couldn’t make a living off their art.” Through Innocent’s website, Kakuma’s refugee artists are able to showcase their creations and sell them online, giving them access to a whole world beyond the camp.

“Kakuma is a remote place, and we are physically disconnected from the rest of the world. But thanks to the internet, we can connect to anyone, anywhere,” says Innocent.

Innocent7-1024x757.jpg

His new project intends to do just that: By connecting would-be business owners to outside investors, Kakuma Ventures aims to build sustainable businesses that provide education, clean water, healthcare, clothing, and more to the 200,000 inhabitants of Kakuma.

“Some refugees who already have established businesses might be able to get loans, but so far it’s been impossible for those who are just starting out,” Innocent says. “By getting them online, we want to train them in basic business skills and eventually connect them to investors from outside the camp.”

Aware that access to the internet will only increase in importance as more aspects of life are conducted online, Innocent is continuing to deepen his knowledge of information technology and is currently studying in Nairobi at Tunapanda, an organization that delivers training in tech and business.

innocent4-1024x867.jpg

“I’m learning about ICT, making websites, design, and coding, and how I can incorporate this with my business skills,” he says. “I want to be connected virtually to the rest of the world. I know that through technology, I can connect all the dots that I want to connect in my life.”

Innocent knows that he can use his new skills to continue helping others, too. “There are so many opportunities through the internet. We could even think of developing new apps that help refugees find the family members they have lost during the war or while they were fleeing,” he says. “Things like this give people hope.”

Create an internet for everyone

I believe internet access is essential for achieving humanity’s potential.The internet is critical to sharing new ideas, fighting injustice, and helping create new jobs – with it people can achieve extraordinary things.But, over half the people on this planet don’t have access, especially women and girls.The internet belongs to everyone.It should be accessible by everyone. I call on leaders and innovators from all countries, industries and communities to make universal internet access a reality.

ADD YOUR NAME

Name
Email
Post/zip code
Country         Afghanistan Åland Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory British Virgin Islands Brunei Bulgaria Burkina FasoBurundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos Islands Colombia Comoros Cook Islands Costa Rica Côte d'Ivoire Country of Sint Maarten Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Democratic Republic of the Congo Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Kosovo Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Laos Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island North Korea Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Republic of the Congo Reunion Romania Russia Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino São Tomé and Príncipe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Korea South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu U.S. Virgin Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vatican City Venezuela Vietnam Wallis and Futuna Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe       

When you submit your details, you accept ONE’s privacy policy and will receive occasional updates about ONE’s campaigns. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Share

 SHARE ON FACEBOOK
 SAVE FOR LATER
 SHARE ON TWITTER

AUTHOR

MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO
September 26 2017

Join the Conversation

Comment Guidelines

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Music Generation Limerick City creative centre schedule is up. Take a look and see what's happening! 

http://musicgenerationlimerickcity.com/creativecentre/schedule/

Contact Music Generation Limerick City to find out more:

Email – stephen.ryan@lcetb.ie
Tel – 061 578 137
Facebook - www.facebook.com/musicgenerationlimerickcity
Twitter - @musgenlimerick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Klaudya and Adam Voranyets stand in a field near their home in Yut village near Dobrush, Belarus. 31 years ago the couple were working as teachers in a village 20km north of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

When reactor number four exploded on 26 April 1986 the couple say they were told nothing about it. They remember that the rainwater they had collected for washing their children had an unusual yellow colour. At an outdoor sports event children began collapsing, many withnosebleeds. In the months afterwards Adam and Klaudya participated in efforts to decontaminate buildings in their village and assist in the evacuation, which finally occurred four months after the accident. Authorities moved the residents to Yut, 150km from Chernobyl, though in the following years it became clear that Yut and the surrounding region were contaminated with radioactive fallout as well.

Both of their children suffer from weak immune systems and their daughter also has high blood pressure, poor memory and underwent surgery for ovarian cancer. Their granddaughter has high blood pressure and arthritis in one leg.

31 years on from the world’s worst nuclear disaster we ask you to take a moment to remember those who continue to be affected by its deadly legacy.

www.chernobyl-international.com

 
La imagen puede contener: 2 personas, personas sonriendo, personas de pie y exterior

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...