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The Action Thread Part Two

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Meet Sherilius, one of our favorite three-year-olds in Ghana. His mother is HIV+ but he was born HIV free. (RED) money helps support programs that ensure Sherilius stays HIV free & healthy. Together we can #endAIDS. 1f4f7.png?: @jonx

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Vroom vroom. (VESPA)RED is coming to India.

We’re proud to partner with Vespa to fight AIDS in some of the world’s hardest hit countries, including India.

Learn more: http://bit.ly/2xVHAZx #iRideRED

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750
GIRLS AND WOMEN

Serafina’s family encouraged her to stay in school. Now she wants other girls to have that chance.

February 14 2017 | By: MEGAN IACOBINI DE FAZIO

 
   

This is part three of a three-part series on Sud Academy in Nairobi, Kenya. Don’t miss part one and part two.

Having lived through violence, discrimination, and subsequent displacement in South Sudan, it is difficult to understand why Serafina might want to go back.

At 20 years old, she should be in her first years of university, but has instead just completed her primary school exams.

“As soon as I get my exam results, I will go to high school and then university”, says Serafina, with a bright smile that rarely leaves her face. Like many of the students at Sud Academy in Nairobi, Kenya, circumstances beyond her control resulted in her falling years behind in her studies.

“Since starting school again last year I’ve tried my best to catch up and I’ve been studying very hard,” she says. “It’s not easy but I’m trying”.

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A classroom at Sud Academy in Nairobi.

Serafina was born in Khartoum, Sudan, where her family had moved to escape violence. She grew up there, the youngest in a family of nine, until the war forced the family to move again and settle in the world’s youngest nation, South Sudan.

“I grew up speaking my mother tongue at home and Arabic (the official language of North Sudan) at school, so I didn’t know English at all,” Serafina says. Not knowing English in a country where it’s the official language was a big obstacle to her education.

But unlike the families of some other girls she knew in South Sudan, Serafina’s family actively encouraged her to keep studying.

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Serafina outside Sud Academy.

“Some girls in South Sudan get married very young. They must grow up very fast because they have no education. They depend on their families and then their husbands, but if something happens they have nothing,” she explains.

“This is why my father wanted me to be educated, and why he always pushed me to continue learning” she says, adding that her family is very proud of what she’s achieved.

So, in an effort to learn English, Serafina travelled to Nairobi to live with one of her sisters. But when Serafina’s father lost his job in Sudan, he was unable to continue paying for her education.

“I stayed at home, not studying, for three years,” she says. “I felt very bad, because all I wanted to do was go to school.”

She tried to make the best of her time, learning English and Swahili by talking to people at church. “But sometimes I felt like giving up,” she recalls. “I would phone my father and ask to go home, but he told me to be patient, and that one day I would go back to school.”

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Her life turned around when some friends told her about Sud Academy, a school not far from where she lived. It had opened specifically to cater to the growing South Sudanese community, and provided education at a fraction of the cost of other schools.

“I started immediately, and I was so happy to be back at school,” Serafina says.

But getting the formal education she always wanted is not the only benefit of attending Sud Academy: “It’s nice be with other South Sudanese from many different parts of the country. We often discuss what we want to do after school, what we can do to build our country. Many of us want to go back,” she says.

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Serafina and her friend Elizabeth in class at Sud Academy.

Despite some of the challenges the school faces – lack of funding has resulted in overcrowded classrooms and inadequate facilities – Serafina is grateful to Sud Academy for giving her the opportunity to gain an education, but also for educating South Sudanese students, who she believes will one day help rebuild the country.

“I don’t want to just learn for myself, but to help others, too. There are not enough teachers in South Sudan, and many children can’t go to school. So, I want to be a teacher and give them a chance.”

Every girl counts.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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Meet the man who’s helped save 83,500 children from slavery
14516
AID AND DEVELOPMENT

Meet the man who’s helped save 83,500 children from slavery

12 June 2017 5:45PM UTC | By: ROBYN DETORO

 
   

“There is no greater violence than to deny the dreams of our children.”

This is the warning Kailash Satyarthi had for the world when he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize alongside Malala Yousafzai in 2014 for his “struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

 

Kailash was only 26 years old when he left his job as a teacher to found Bachpan Bachao Andolan, a grassroots organisation that advocates for children’s rights. Since then, the movement has rescued more than 83,500 individuals from trafficking, slavery, and child labour all while leading the fight for child protectionist laws across India.

More than three decades later, he’s continued to champion the importance of education in building sustainable societies with promising futures, arguing that communities that provide children with safety, education, and good health are more likely to prosper.

Speaking to ONE on a recent visit, Kailash led an inspiring discussion as he spoke passionately about children’s rights and reminded us of the importance of fighting for education.

 

So, what are we waiting for?

Join us and take action today to show world leaders that all #GirlsCount!

All girls count.

130 million girls don’t have access to an education. So we’re asking the world to count them, one by one.

JOIN THE COUNT

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ROBYN DETORO
12 June 2017 5:45PM UTC

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If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be?
8728
YOUTH AMBASSADORS

If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be?

10 August 2017 1:18PM UTC | By: INE TOLLENAERS

 
   

Today is International Youth Day, which this year celebrates young people’s contributions to inclusion, social justice and sustainable peace. At ONE, we’re lucky to have some inspiring young campaigners in our movement and today’s the perfect day to put their voices in the spotlight.

So, to celebrate International Youth Day, we asked our Youth Ambassadors in Europe, our Champions in Nigeria and Campus Leaders from the US: ‘If you could change one thing in the world, what would it be?’ – watch the videos below to find out their thoughts:

Khalid Ahmad, Youth Ambassador from the UK – “I’d make the world a fairer and peaceful place to live.”

Lina, Youth Ambassador from France – “If I could change one thing in the world it would be gender inequalities in girls’ education.”

Ajay, Campus Leader from the US – “If I could change one thing about the world I would make more people empathetic.”

Federica, Youth Ambassador from Italy – “Give more importance to women’s rights – because we know there is no difference between men and women.”

Bryant, Youth Ambassador from the Netherlands – “I would create more education and training opportunities for vulnerable youth.”

Christian, Champion from Nigeria – “If I could change one thing in the world it would be the process that leads to the refugee crisis.”

Bénédicte, Youth Ambassador from Belgium – “I would make sure that everybody — all the children — have the same opportunities…the opportunity to become who they want to be.”

Lena, Youth Ambassador from Germany – “If I could change one thing thing in the world it would be more empathy.” or “See developing countries not as victims but as equal partners who have great potential.”

Jacki, Campus Leader from the US – “I would make it so that people realise their voice matters.”

Claragh, Youth Ambassador from Ireland – “If I could change one thing about the world I would have full and proper gender equality.”

What would YOU change in the world? Leave a comment below or tweet your answer using the hashtag #ONEyouth17!

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Nigeria’s Chibok girls are the inspiration for a new Marvel hero
45
CULTURE

Nigeria’s Chibok girls are the inspiration for a new Marvel hero

8 September 2017 9:28AM UTC | By: THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION

 
   

Move over Captain America and watch out Wonder Woman — here comes Ngozi: a teenage superheroine inspired by Nigeria’s kidnapped Chibok girls who fight evil in Lagos, marking a new chapter in diversity for Marvel Comics.

Ngozi is the star of new title “Blessing in Disguise”, the first Marvel story to be set in a real-life African country – Nigeria’s commercial capital – and feature a Nigerian superhero.

The character stems from the high-profile abduction of about 220 schoolgirls in Chibok in northeast Nigeria in 2014 by the militant group Boko Haram, and the comic’s author hopes the teenage superhero will resonate with girls across the country.

 

“It was an important decision for me to base Ngozi on one of the Chibok girls,” Nnedi Okorafor, an award-winning Nigeria-American writer, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

The Chibok abduction sparked international outrage and became the most infamous act by the Islamist Boko Haram group which has killed 20,000 people and uprooted at least 2 million in a brutal eight-year campaign that shows no sign of ending.

Two young women who escaped from Boko Haram made an appearance at the United Nations on International Women's Day 2016. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

Two young women who escaped from Boko Haram made an appearance at the United Nations on International Women’s Day 2016. (Photo credit: Johnny Wolf/ONE)

“They were normal girls who suddenly had to deal with a huge change in their lives … and their story of perseverance is so powerful,” Okorafor added. “Like many Nigerian girls, Ngozi comes in a small package but is strong-willed and determined.”

The short story is part of Marvel’s “Venomverse” comic, published on Wednesday, which sees Ngozi appear alongside well-established Marvel characters from Venom to the Black Panther.

Okorafor said she was buoyed by the global success of the summer box office hit “Wonder Woman” – the first superhero movie to star a woman since 2005 – with the character hailed as a new role model for girls and a break away from sexism in Hollywood.

Yet the U.S.-based science fiction author said that she was desperate to see more diversity in the world of superheroes.

“I’m a huge Wonder Woman fan, but we can really push it further when it comes to diversity,” said Okorafor, who is also an English professor at the University at Buffalo in New York.

“I’m not just talking about race and sexual orientation, but about having a range of personalities with different desires, dreams and flaws,” she added. “I don’t only want to see badass female characters, I want to see much less predictable ones.”

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Women and children affected by Boko Haram in northeast Nigeria. (Photo credit: ONE)

Several comic book fans have shared their excitement about the character of Ngozi on social media sites such as Twitter.

“A Marvel story. Written by a Nigerian Woman. Set in Lagos. Superhero’s name: NGOZI. What a time to be alive,” Twitter user Beth Lee posted.

This story was originally published at Thomson Reuters Foundation NewsReporting By Kieran Guilbert. Editing by Katy Migiro.

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THOMSON REUTERS FOUNDATION
8 September 2017 9:28AM UTC

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Which human rights are the most important?
123
POLICY

Which human rights are the most important?

22 September 2017 11:54AM UTC | By: GUEST BLOGGER

 
   

This is a guest post by Frank Pichel, CEO of the Cadasta Foundation.

Which human rights are the most important? Ask this question in a developed economy and you will likely hear: the right to freedom of speech, religious freedom, or the right to freedom from discrimination and so on.

Rarely, if ever, will this list include land and property rights — even though this right is the foundation of the Western economic system and so critical that US founding father James Madison once said, “Government is instituted no less for the protection of the property than of the person.”

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Women make up half the agriculture workforce in sub-Saharan Africa but own just 2% of the land. (Photo Credit: Landesa)

Land and property rights often don’t make it into lists of top ten rights or even consciousness in developed economies not because they aren’t valued, but — in part — because they are usually so secure and secured so long ago that they are taken for granted (with the notable exceptions of indigenous groups).

Without secure property rights, you could leave for work in the morning and come home to find that someone had changed the lock on your home and moved in. Or someone could claim your vegetable garden just as you were preparing to harvest your sugar snap peas and lettuce.

For most people in Europe, North America, and some parts of Asia, this is so beyond the realm of possibility that we don’t give secure land and property rights much thought.

But ask any farmer, indigenous community, or resident in a shanty town in an emerging economy — where the World Bank maintains that the vast majority of property rights are undocumented and land governance systems are either non-existent or non-functional — what rights they need to climb out of poverty and you will hear a resounding: secure land and property rights.

Indeed, land rights — particularly the lack of secure land rights — continue to capture headlines across emerging economies. Just last week, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf told the African Green Revolution Forum that the continent would continue to be stalked by poverty, hunger, and famine until governments strengthened smallholder farmers land rights and finally gave them the security and opportunity they need to invest in their land and improve their harvests and their lives.

Research around the world supports this view of land rights as the foundation for development. Secure land rights have been found to increase productivity by as much as 50 percent, double the rate of high-school graduation, and increase conservation.

The impact is even more pronounced when women gain secure rights to land. Study after study shows that economically empowering women starts with land rights. In Tanzania, women with secure rights to land have three times more income. In Nepal, children whose mothers have secure rights to land are one-third less likely to be malnourished.

In India, where 40 percent of people believe wife beating to be sometimes justifiable, women who own land are 8 times less likely to experience domestic violence.

Despite this clear evidence, women’s rights to land and property continue to be undermined by discriminatory laws and practices in more than half the countries on the planet. This not only frustrates women’s ability to climb out of poverty but also leaves their children and community less resilient and poorer.

A new interactive survey is now helping to illustrate the gap between those who have secure property rights and those who do not. Take the 10 question survey developed by Habitat for Humanity’s Solid Ground Campaign and Cadasta Foundation and explore the gap between the haves and the have-nots with regard to land rights.

ONE welcomes the contributions of guest bloggers but does not necessarily endorse the views, programs, or organizations highlighted.

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22 September 2017 11:54AM UTC

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How my daughter taught me to dream
1448
HIV/AIDS

How my daughter taught me to dream

May 1 2017 | By: (RED)

 
   

This is a guest blog post by (RED) Ambassador Constance Mudenda.

It’s a milestone like no other: your child’s first day of school.

It’s a dream most moms and dads around the world have for their children – that one day, they’ll watch their little ones head off to school. But not for me. It’s something I never even dreamed of because my first-born child died one week before her first day of school. I lost all three of my children to AIDS before treatment was available in my home country of Zambia.

Screen-Shot-2017-05-01-at-11.07.55-AM.pn

That was then, and this is now. Today, I’m a proud mom to my daughter Lubona – born HIV-free in 2012. She brings so much joy and happiness into my life. Seeing her going to school in her tiny little uniform every morning makes me want to continue sleeping so that I don’t wake up from this beautiful dream… but it’s not a dream. It is real. She is alive, she is healthy, and she is HIV-free.

Every day she comes home from school and teaches me something new. The other day she came home and said to me, “let’s go outside and play hopscotch!” WHAT? I had no idea what she was talking about, but then she showed me how.

I am the student; she is my teacher. She’s the most important teacher I’ve ever had in my life.

Screen-Shot-2017-05-01-at-11.08.08-AM.pn

Every day she brings new lessons into my life. I’m learning more than ever before, even when I was in school. One thing I love about her is that she is a quick learner. She never forgets what the teacher tells her. She has even learned to write her name (although she only goes halfway with her surname because she claims that it is too long. She writes Mwachi instead of Mwanachilenga. No amount of persuasion will make her go beyond that!) She can also write 1 through to 50 without my help. I want her to reach 100 before the term ends, and I know she can.

She the top student in her class and has not swayed away from her dream: to be a doctor. She’s tired of treating her dolls, she tells me. She wants to treat real people now.

What do I dream for my daughter? That she continues working hard at school so that one day, she will see her dream come true.

Screen-Shot-2017-05-01-at-11.07.40-AM.pn

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(RED)
May 1 2017

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Music Generation
 

WHAT'S HAPPENING

I had a few ‘difficulties’ on my way to being a musician… and a lot of them stemmed from the fact that I did not have music lessons.
- Bono

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27/09/2017

Music Generation Louth and The Oriel Centre partner on an exciting new venture for Louth musicians

Music Generation Louth and The Oriel Centre partner on an exciting new venture for Louth musicians

Music Generation Louth has teamed up with The Oriel Centre, Dundalk Gaol to develop an exciting new venture for young musicians in Louth and surrounding areas, in the formation of the region’s first Youth Folk Orchestra, 'Nós Nua'.

‘Through Nós Nua we are looking to engage with competent young musicians (12 – 18 years) who will work through a series of workshops led by qualified music teachers who come from both traditional and classical backgrounds. It is a tremendously exciting initiative being led by two organisations (Comhaltas and Music Generation) with a track record in practical music education, and offers a new path (nós nua) in bringing young musicians together to lean about and perform local and regional traditional music,’ stated Comhaltas Regional Manager and project director, Kay Webster.

Participation in Nós Nua is not confined exclusively to young traditional musicians, but is open to all young people from varying musical backgrounds interested in exploring the contemporary and traditional repertoire of local Irish music and song.

Project director and Music Generation Louth Coordinator Gemma Murray stated: ‘Nós Nua will serve as a unifying centre of excellence for young traditional players, and support the infrastructure of traditional musical learning, both regionally and nationally. The project is quite unique in that it particularly welcomes instrumentalists of all kinds to apply, not just those playing instruments most associated with traditional music.’

Music Generation Louth and the Oriel Centre have been met with huge support on this initiative and will be preparing for the inaugural performance of Nós Nua to coincide with Comhaltas’ most importance calendar event in 2018 – Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann, which will be held this year in Drogheda.

Those interested in finding out more about the initiative or in registering their interest in participating should email Music Generation Louth at musicgeneration@lmetb.ie

For further information about Nós Nua and other projects and events at Music Generation Louth contact:

Gemma Murray, Coordinator, Music Generation Louth 
Louth and Meath Education and Training Board, Chapel St, Dundalk, Louth

t: 042 9364635
e: musicgeneration@lmetb.ie
www.musicgenerationlouth.ie

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Ireland's National Music Education Programme. A Music Network Initiative, co-funded by U2, The Ireland Funds,The Department of Education and Skills and Local Music Education Partnerships

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© Music Generation DAC. All Rights Reserved. Registered in Ireland No. 491331. Charity Reg. No. CHY 19679.
NCH Building, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2. Telephone: +353 1 4758454

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